Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows a nesting

2019-03-18 Thread Geo Kloppel
Speaking of Crows, I was out in my driveway at 10:30 last night, when a distant bunch of Crows began doing something that sounded like mobbing. I couldn’t remember ever hearing them make such a ruckus at night. I thought of Great Horned Owls, and tree climbers like raccoons or fishers. The

Re:[cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-22 Thread Bill Evans
Dozens of crows perched atop sumac branches eating berries near Wal-Mart yesterday. Bill E -- Cayugabirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-21 Thread Geo Kloppel
We offer food year round to a small group of 3-5 Crows in our yard. We’ve actually been missing them recently. The lack of snow following hunting season made for easy access to discarded deer carcasses and parts (common in our neighborhood), as we several times observed. Even though we have a

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-21 Thread Alicia
We haven't had any so far this year, but some years small flocks - usually between 3 and 8 - they swoop in and entertain us when the snow is deep.   At least one figured out how to land on edge of our hopper feeder - s/he had to fly in carefully from the side, ducking under the overhang, just

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-21 Thread anneb . clark
And deep snowy. They can deal with cold if they can reach the ground to forage. Bet the thousands that have been foraging nearer Syracuse and Auburn are finding it VERY challenging. Sent from my iPhone > On Jan 21, 2019, at 9:40 AM, Rachel wrote: > > Crows (4 to 12 at a time, who knows if

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-21 Thread Donna Lee Scott
I always have our local crow families at or below my feeders, since I purposely scatter seeds on ground, too, & especially under sheltering bushes. A lot of birds prefer feeding on ground or deck floor, probably cause it is more natural to them. Of course this means I feed a lot of squirrels

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-21 Thread Jae Sullivan
I have been having the same experience...downtown feeders on the street, usually populated with House Sparrows and not much else the birds are HUGEBlue Jays, Starlings, a Robin, fighting for seed. Delightful to watch. Jae On Monday, January 21, 2019, 9:40:53 AM

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows vs TVs

2015-11-12 Thread AB Clark
Concerted attacks (vs a couple of young crows harrassing vultures) is unusual! But we are now very interested in where roosts are actually occuring! Our studies of roosts and Nitrogen cycling are ongoing. You are right, the “Migrants” did arrive…about 10 days ago. The roost in Auburn went

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows like toad liver

2015-05-07 Thread Lindsay Goodloe
We also have a pond with many (100) breeding American toads, and we've noticed crows lurking about, though we haven't actually observed predation. One possible reason for the crows' preference for the liver is that the parotid glands and skin of the toad produce bufotoxin, which may be poisonous,

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows like toad liver

2015-05-06 Thread Melanie Uhlir
Very interesting. But I'm sad about the toad slaughter. I'm glad I've never noticed this in person! I guess the toad populations are able to survive this seasonal devastation. Great White Sharks take advantage of seal breeding season in the same way. I think the sharks eat the whole seal

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows like toad liver

2015-05-06 Thread Geo Kloppel
I guess it's an element of local Crow culture, maybe even limited to particular families who have toad ponds within their territories and pass the trick down the generations. -Geo Kloppel On May 6, 2015, at 1:31 PM, Melanie Uhlir mela...@mwmu.com wrote: Very interesting. But I'm sad about

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows chasing ravens

2015-04-12 Thread Geo Kloppel
Hi Ben, I just saw the same thing a moment ago, except the Raven was flying _toward_ the L-P preserve (that is, leaving the nest area on a foraging mission), and very tightly harassed by a Crow, all the way down to the WD Fire Station area. Might even have been a member of the Crow family

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows chasing ravens

2015-04-11 Thread Geo Kloppel
Crows are laying eggs now, so vigilance against thieves is in order (I imagine the extended family participates in this). The West Danby Ravens are accomplished egg-thieves, and now have nestlings to feed. Even the Canada Geese are apt to be robbed. I've found their huge empty eggshells on the

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows, Eagle

2015-03-25 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Two times here I have seen what I think are “my” resident Crows flying very close to and harassing an immature Bald Eagle perched in one of my trees on the cliff overlooking the lake. Donna Scott Lansing, From: bounce-118980691-15001...@list.cornell.edu

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows that hunt?

2014-07-22 Thread Anne Clark
Crows will try to catch, kill and eat small vertebrates that they come across. Yes indeed, they are hunting all the time when they are foraging on the ground,in the sense that they are searching for live food like beetles, larvae (beetle or otherwise), earthworms and also, when they encounter

Re: [cayugabirds-l] crows nesting

2014-03-20 Thread Anne Clark
Not too early...Kevin found a crow on Yellow Barn road incubating this past weekend and there are crows building all over Cayuga Heights. The family at the end of Sapsucker Woods Rd and Hanshaw is probably nearing completion of their nest. The peak of many years for starting incubation is

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread Anne Clark
These groups are winter roosts, and they are nothing new in crow life. Despite what urban residents sometimes think, crows didn't start gathering when we set out cities for them to use. Roosting in groups at any time of year may offer safety in numbers from night predators, such as Great

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread Sue Rakow
This is very helpful information! Thank you so much for the complete picture. I am learning so much from being on this list serve. I am very grateful! Sue Rakow On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 8:26 AM, Anne Clark anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote: These groups are winter roosts, and they are nothing new in

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
/. Purchase the webinars herehttp://store.birds.cornell.edu/category_s/55.htm. From: bounce-112890972-3493...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-112890972-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Sue Rakow Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 10:52 AM To: Anne Clark Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L Subject: Re: [cayugabirds

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread Linda Orkin
Sue, thanks for enjoying the list and for being so eager to learn. All of us who admire, respect and enjoy crows are trying to retire the collective noun of murder as it can either imply that crows are evil or that they should be murdered. Another term could be Congress of crows (which in this

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread J. Sullivan
MUSTER . Would that be only used among us locals? Jae On Mar 4, 2014, at 11:02 AM, Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com wrote: Sue, thanks for enjoying the list and for being so eager to learn. All of us who admire, respect and enjoy crows are trying to retire the collective noun of

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread Linda Orkin
No according to ask.com it's an actual alternative. Spread it far and wide. Linda On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 12:03 PM, J. Sullivan blueheron...@yahoo.com wrote: MUSTER . Would that be only used among us locals? Jae On Mar 4, 2014, at 11:02 AM, Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com wrote:

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread jensdreamb
, 2014 11:02 am Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill Sue, thanks for enjoying the list and for being so eager to learn. All of us who admire, respect and enjoy crows are trying to retire the collective noun of murder as it can either imply that crows are evil or that they should

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill

2014-03-04 Thread Ann Mitchell
Rakow sue.ra...@gmail.com Cc: Anne Clark anneb.cl...@gmail.com; cayugabirds Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu Sent: Tue, Mar 4, 2014 11:02 am Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows on South Hill Sue, thanks for enjoying the list and for being so eager to learn. All of us who admire, respect and enjoy

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-19 Thread Anne Clark
HI All, A very quick comment, although I do not in fact know of any data on how effective mobbing of owls is in moving them any substantial distance. Crows are indeed migratory in parts of their range and they do indeed often join roosts in winter. If they have migrated, they won't be present

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-18 Thread nutter.dave
I'm thinking more about crows and owls. It's a substitute for actually knowing, so please chime in, Anne, or anyone else who knows better than I do what really goes on.I've been impressed by how much the Great Horned Owls in Renwick have withstood crows' harassment, and that impression flavored my

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-17 Thread Mona Bearor
Thanks for your note, Anne, and for putting the crows viewpoint out there. I didn't mean to disrespect the crows - I find them fascinating, and often spend an hour or more watching hundreds of them on a discarded produce pile at a pig farm near here. There are ravens as well, and it is a

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-16 Thread Jody W Enck
Don’t know if owls and crows really think like this, but it would be a shame if they didn’t!! Dave, you should write a book. Jody Enck From: nutter.d...@me.com Sent: ‎February‎ ‎16‎, ‎2013 ‎12‎:‎21‎ ‎PM To: CAYUGABIRDS-L Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest I

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-16 Thread Mona Bearor
I'll be thinking of your explaination when I visit the nest again, and I'll be watching for that owl to sigh and plan its nightly menu! Mona Bearor So. Glens Falls, NY On 2/16/2013 12:21 PM, nutter.d...@me.com wrote: I think this is the sort of crap that Great Horned Owls have to put up

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-16 Thread Anne Clark
Right--and come mid-April, some person might just pick up a partly eaten, headless, tagged female crow under her nest and think...it was her first nest--what a short life, only 5 years, her nestlings gone, too! She could have had 6 more years at least, or more. Boredom probably doesn't

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows coming in to roost

2013-01-07 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Thanks for the information. When we were radio-tracking crows to roost we found they could spend the night in lots of different places. Kevin -Original Message- From: bounce-72559731-3493...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72559731-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of W. Larry

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows coming in to roost

2013-01-07 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
From: bounce-72559871-3493...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72559871-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of nutter.d...@me.com Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2013 8:29 PM To: CAYUGABIRDS-L Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows coming in to roost I think there are some crows which stick

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows coming in to roost

2013-01-06 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
Larry, North Campus is hosting many crows, what looks to be 1000+ . Most of them are in the trees by Robert Purcell Community Center, Appel Commons and the Observatory. I was surprised by them on the Christmas Bird Count as I hadn't been up there at dusk. Gary On Jan 6, 2013, at

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows coming in to roost

2013-01-06 Thread nutter.dave
Late this afternoon Laurie and I went on a short walk on the Cayuga Waterfront Trail between NYS-89 and the Flood Control Channel along Cass Park. I brought my scope in hopes of seeing a Turkey Vulture over Cayuga Heights, but no such luck. Instead, while skies over me were empty, I saw a steady

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-16 Thread Dave Nutter
Andrew, Crows are very social animals. They live in family groups during the breeding season, with a multi-year learning period, and young birds raised the previous year often help their parents to raise their younger siblings. In the non-breeding season crows gather into massive roosting

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-16 Thread Marie P Read
I happened to be driving to Rochester through Geneva a week ago at dusk, and there was a huge roost (or pre-roost staging area) of crows gathering in the park at the north end of Seneca Lake too. Thousands of crows silhouetted in the trees at sunset. Very cool to watch. Marie Marie Read

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows? Andrew, Crows are very social animals. They live in family groups during the breeding season, with a multi-year learning period, and young birds raised the previous year often help their parents to raise their younger siblings

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
-7531499-3493...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7531499-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kevin J. McGowan Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2010 9:19 AM To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows? I have little to add and nothing to correct in Dave' nice summary. Crows

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-16 Thread Linda Post Van Buskirk
[mailto:bounce-7530811-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Asher Hockett Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2010 10:36 PM To: Andrew Roe Cc: Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows? Large roosts of crows are famous. A few years ago, Auburn, NY, near the upper reaches of Cayuga

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-16 Thread David Smith
Of *Asher Hockett *Sent:* Wednesday, December 15, 2010 10:36 PM *To:* Andrew Roe *Cc:* Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows? Large roosts of crows are famous. A few years ago, Auburn, NY, near the upper reaches of Cayuga Lake, had to resort to drastic (but non

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows?

2010-12-15 Thread Asher Hockett
Large roosts of crows are famous. A few years ago, Auburn, NY, near the upper reaches of Cayuga Lake, had to resort to drastic (but non-violent) measures to rid the city of tens of thousands of them. Maybe Ithaca has a reputation for being more crow friendly. Here we have our own reverse pied