Re:[cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-17 Thread Bill Evans
Hello Josh,
Sedge Wren (NY Threatened) should be added if there are fields within FLNF that 
are not managed for cattle and putting greens. I recall being a part of July 
surveys during the early 90s where we found a Sedge Wren with young and lots of 
Henslow’s in late cut hayfields around the periphery of FLNF, but none within. 
I suspect both species may still be irregular breeders in small numbers at FLNF 
& vicinity, especially in fields with no grazing contracts.

Bill Evans



On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:42 PM, Joshua Snodgrass  wrote:
  Hello all, 
  I've been volunteering in the Finger Lakes National Forest checking on the 
condition of bird boxes for the new biologist there. He is currently updating 
the Regional Forester Sensitive Species list for the forest, and asked for my 
input on any birds that should be added to the list that are in trouble. It 
would be irresponsible of me to give advice without asking for input from this 
community, who are far more knowledgeable than I am. 
  What I have done in my efforts to make good recommendations are to crosscheck 
eBird sightings with the NY DEC's list of state Endangered, Threatened, and 
Species of concern, as well as the most recent State of the Birds report for 
species that are in trouble versus those that occur in the forest. I included 
any birds in the SotB report that received a score of "13" or higher. If any of 
you have recommendations for additional species, or other edits, please let me 
know. Thank you all for any input. Below is the list of bird species I came up 
with that have been recorded in eBird as occuring in the Finger Lakes NF, with 
NYDEC sensitive species first.

  Short-eared Owl- NY Endangered
  Golden Eagle- NY Endangered (usually a migrant, one recent record of a 
perched bird)
  Pied-billed Grebe- NY Threatened
  Bald Eagle- NY Threatened
  Northern Harrier- NY Threatened
  Henslow's Sparrow- NY Threatened
  Upland Sandpiper- NY Threatened (flyover record, but habitat seems amenable)
  Northern Goshawk- NY Species of Concern (SoC)
  Cooper's Hawk- NY SoC
  Sharp-shinned Hawk- NY SoC
  Red-shouldered Hawk- NY SoC
  Common Nighthawk- NY Soc
  Horned Lark- NY SoC
  Vesper Sparrow- NY SoC
  Grasshopper Sparrow- NY SoC

  Birds not listed by NY DEC, but in trouble globally according to 2016 State 
of the BIrds report follow.  The State of the Birds Watch List includes any 
species with a score of 14 or higher, as well as those with a score of 13 and a 
rapidly declining population. I have included all species that scored a 13 or 
higher that are known to occur in the Finger Lakes NF below: 

  Bobolink- 14 breeding
  Wood Thrush- 14 breeding
  Canada Warbler- 14 breeding?
  American Woodcock- 13 breeding
  Black-billed Cuckoo- 13 breeding
  Blue-winged Warbler- 13 breeding
  Prairie Warbler- 13 breeding
  Cape May Warbler- 13 migrant
  Connecticut Warble- 13 migrant

  Honorable mentions- birds that score a 12 that breed on Finger Lakes NF lands:
  Yellow-billed Cuckoo
  Chestnut-sided Warbler
  Louisiana Waterthrush
  Mourning Warbler (breeds?)
  Veery
  Field Sparrow
  Rusty Blackbird (migrant?)

  Links to the State of the Birds, and NYDEC species list, and breeding bird 
atlas
  http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/

  http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7494.html

  http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/


  State of the Birds species table: 
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/resources/species-assessments/

  Thank for any input!
  Josh

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-16 Thread Geo Kloppel
Yep, but the BBA's granularity is very coarse. It will tell you if Cooper's 
Hawks were recorded breeding somewhere in a given block 5 kilometers square, 
but it won't tell you if the selective cut you're planning at GPS coordinates 
___  goes through the heart of a traditional Cooper's Hawk nesting territory. 
For that you need more precise location info.

-Geo

> On Mar 16, 2017, at 1:34 PM, Joshua Snodgrass <cedarsh...@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> I was able to use the DEC website for the Breeding Bird Atlas- Maps by 
> Species to look at color coded maps that show breeding occurrence at specific 
> locations to come up with my list for the Finger Lakes NF. It may not be as 
> current as eBird data, and I am not sure how land management entities use 
> that information, but it is accessible 
> http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/  
> 
>> On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 12:51 PM, Wesley M. Hochachka <w...@cornell.edu> 
>> wrote:
>> Hi Geo,
>> 
>>No, breeding-code information is a standard part of the most widely-used 
>> pre-packaged distribution of eBird data, the eBird Basic Dataset (EBD).  You 
>> can't call up this information on the eBird website, if I'm not mistaken, 
>> but then I wouldn't recommend using website output to do anything major in 
>> regard to research or management anyway.  Instead, the most appropriate 
>> thing to do would be to request access (always granted, for free) to the 
>> pre-bundled data in the EBD.  The EBD packages are rather large (i.e. you're 
>> not going to load it into Excel), but with some fairly basic 
>> large-data-management experience, one can pull out all of the breeding code 
>> information that's available without much effort.
>> 
>> Wesley
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -Original Message-
>> From: bounce-121340368-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
>> [mailto:bounce-121340368-3494...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Geo Kloppel
>> Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:24 PM
>> To: Kenneth V. Rosenberg
>> Cc: Joshua Snodgrass; CAYUGABIRDS-L
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help
>> 
>> During the last NYS Breeding Bird Atlas period (2000-2005), field workers 
>> who submitted breeding records for Threatened species or species of Special 
>> Concern were subsequently asked to provide DEC with additional information 
>> (locations).
>> 
>> Is it true that eBird has not yet implemented data output for breeding 
>> records? If so, does this mean that a land management entity like DEC or the 
>> US Forest Service can't just consult eBird for Confirmed or Probable 
>> breeding locations of Threatened or Special Concern species that might be 
>> impacted by management, but instead has to make special requests? Do 
>> management planners routinely make such requests?
>> 
>> I ask this because in my area (Danby/Newfield) I've seen several recent DEC 
>> actions that look like they could easily have been modified if location 
>> information had been available.
>> 
>> -Geo Kloppel
>> 
>> > On Mar 15, 2017, at 11:50 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg <k...@cornell.edu> 
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > Josh,
>> >
>> > Great job compiling conservation status information on these birds!
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
>> 
> 

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-16 Thread Joshua Snodgrass
I was able to use the DEC website for the Breeding Bird Atlas- Maps by
Species to look at color coded maps that show breeding occurrence at
specific locations to come up with my list for the Finger Lakes NF. It may
not be as current as eBird data, and I am not sure how land management
entities use that information, but it is accessible
http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/

On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 12:51 PM, Wesley M. Hochachka <w...@cornell.edu>
wrote:

> Hi Geo,
>
>No, breeding-code information is a standard part of the most
> widely-used pre-packaged distribution of eBird data, the eBird Basic
> Dataset (EBD).  You can't call up this information on the eBird website, if
> I'm not mistaken, but then I wouldn't recommend using website output to do
> anything major in regard to research or management anyway.  Instead, the
> most appropriate thing to do would be to request access (always granted,
> for free) to the pre-bundled data in the EBD.  The EBD packages are rather
> large (i.e. you're not going to load it into Excel), but with some fairly
> basic large-data-management experience, one can pull out all of the
> breeding code information that's available without much effort.
>
> Wesley
>
>
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-121340368-3494...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-121340368-
> 3494...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Geo Kloppel
> Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:24 PM
> To: Kenneth V. Rosenberg
> Cc: Joshua Snodgrass; CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help
>
> During the last NYS Breeding Bird Atlas period (2000-2005), field workers
> who submitted breeding records for Threatened species or species of Special
> Concern were subsequently asked to provide DEC with additional information
> (locations).
>
> Is it true that eBird has not yet implemented data output for breeding
> records? If so, does this mean that a land management entity like DEC or
> the US Forest Service can't just consult eBird for Confirmed or Probable
> breeding locations of Threatened or Special Concern species that might be
> impacted by management, but instead has to make special requests? Do
> management planners routinely make such requests?
>
> I ask this because in my area (Danby/Newfield) I've seen several recent
> DEC actions that look like they could easily have been modified if location
> information had been available.
>
> -Geo Kloppel
>
> > On Mar 15, 2017, at 11:50 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg <k...@cornell.edu>
> wrote:
> >
> > Josh,
> >
> > Great job compiling conservation status information on these birds!
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-16 Thread Wesley M. Hochachka
Hi Geo,

   No, breeding-code information is a standard part of the most widely-used 
pre-packaged distribution of eBird data, the eBird Basic Dataset (EBD).  You 
can't call up this information on the eBird website, if I'm not mistaken, but 
then I wouldn't recommend using website output to do anything major in regard 
to research or management anyway.  Instead, the most appropriate thing to do 
would be to request access (always granted, for free) to the pre-bundled data 
in the EBD.  The EBD packages are rather large (i.e. you're not going to load 
it into Excel), but with some fairly basic large-data-management experience, 
one can pull out all of the breeding code information that's available without 
much effort.

Wesley



-Original Message-
From: bounce-121340368-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121340368-3494...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Geo Kloppel
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:24 PM
To: Kenneth V. Rosenberg
Cc: Joshua Snodgrass; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

During the last NYS Breeding Bird Atlas period (2000-2005), field workers who 
submitted breeding records for Threatened species or species of Special Concern 
were subsequently asked to provide DEC with additional information (locations).

Is it true that eBird has not yet implemented data output for breeding records? 
If so, does this mean that a land management entity like DEC or the US Forest 
Service can't just consult eBird for Confirmed or Probable breeding locations 
of Threatened or Special Concern species that might be impacted by management, 
but instead has to make special requests? Do management planners routinely make 
such requests? 

I ask this because in my area (Danby/Newfield) I've seen several recent DEC 
actions that look like they could easily have been modified if location 
information had been available.

-Geo Kloppel

> On Mar 15, 2017, at 11:50 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg <k...@cornell.edu> wrote:
> 
> Josh,
> 
> Great job compiling conservation status information on these birds! 

--

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--


--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-16 Thread Geo Kloppel
During the last NYS Breeding Bird Atlas period (2000-2005), field workers who 
submitted breeding records for Threatened species or species of Special Concern 
were subsequently asked to provide DEC with additional information (locations).

Is it true that eBird has not yet implemented data output for breeding records? 
If so, does this mean that a land management entity like DEC or the US Forest 
Service can't just consult eBird for Confirmed or Probable breeding locations 
of Threatened or Special Concern species that might be impacted by management, 
but instead has to make special requests? Do management planners routinely make 
such requests? 

I ask this because in my area (Danby/Newfield) I've seen several recent DEC 
actions that look like they could easily have been modified if location 
information had been available.

-Geo Kloppel

> On Mar 15, 2017, at 11:50 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg  wrote:
> 
> Josh,
> 
> Great job compiling conservation status information on these birds! 

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-16 Thread Joshua Snodgrass
Thank you all for your support!
Ken, Thanks so much for the great Partners in Flight resource and species
list! I'll be sure to include those birds as well. Some of those Common
Birds in Steep Decline are pretty alarming, given just how common they seem
here. I'll give Greg your email as a further contact. I'm not sure of the
process involved in updating the RFSS, or what will come of it. I am
optimistic that the information provided will be taken into consideration
for the management of woodland habitat and grazing practices in the Finger
Lakes NF. Thanks again for all your help!
Best,
Josh

On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 11:50 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
wrote:

> Josh,
>
> Great job compiling conservation status information on these birds!
> Sorting through all the various lists at state, national, and global scales
> can be very challenging. I think you’re approach of combining state-listed
> species, global concern lists, and eBird records is exactly the right
> approach to take.
>
> Another recent source with additional information on these species is the
> Partners in Flight Landbird Conservation Plan, also published in 2016:
> http://www.partnersinflight.org/  The only minor change since the State
> of the Birds report, is that Evening Grosbeak was added to the Watch List
> because of its steep declines — it could be added to your list as a winter
> visitor (now rare) on FLNF. Olive-sided Flycatcher (also on the Watch List)
> also could potentially be added as a migrant.
>
> The Partners in Flight Plan also lists a group of “Common Birds in Steep
> Decline,” which are not yet on the Watch List, but have lost 50% or more of
> their global population since 1970 (according to the BBS), and are often
> representative of degraded habitats. These include the Yellow-billed
> Cuckoo, Field Sparrow, and Rusty Blackbird, which you have already listed
> as “honorable mentions,” as well as some other common local species — Bank
> Swallow (B), Blackpoll Warbler (migrant), Pine Siskin (W), Eastern
> Meadowlark (B), Chimney Swift (B), Wilson’s Warbler (M), Least Flycatcher
> (B), American Tree Sparrow (W), and Common Grackle (!).
>
> If the FLNF has additional questions, or is going through a formal process
> to update their list, I would be happy to provide more input.
>
> KEN
>
>
> Kenneth V. Rosenberg
> Conservation Science Program
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> Office: 607-254-2412 <(607)%20254-2412>
> cell: 607-342-4594 <(607)%20342-4594>
> k...@cornell.edu
>
> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:42 PM, Joshua Snodgrass 
> wrote:
>
> Hello all,
> I've been volunteering in the Finger Lakes National Forest checking on the
> condition of bird boxes for the new biologist there. He is currently
> updating the Regional Forester Sensitive Species list for the forest, and
> asked for my input on any birds that should be added to the list that are
> in trouble. It would be irresponsible of me to give advice without asking
> for input from this community, who are far more knowledgeable than I am.
> What I have done in my efforts to make good recommendations are to
> crosscheck eBird sightings with the NY DEC's list of state Endangered,
> Threatened, and Species of concern, as well as the most recent State of the
> Birds report for species that are in trouble versus those that occur in the
> forest. I included any birds in the SotB report that received a score of
> "13" or higher. If any of you have recommendations for additional species,
> or other edits, please let me know. Thank you all for any input. Below is
> the list of bird species I came up with that have been recorded in eBird as
> occuring in the Finger Lakes NF, with NYDEC sensitive species first.
>
> Short-eared Owl- NY Endangered
> Golden Eagle- NY Endangered (usually a migrant, one recent record of a
> perched bird)
> Pied-billed Grebe- NY Threatened
> Bald Eagle- NY Threatened
> Northern Harrier- NY Threatened
> Henslow's Sparrow- NY Threatened
> Upland Sandpiper- NY Threatened (flyover record, but habitat seems
> amenable)
> Northern Goshawk- NY Species of Concern (SoC)
> Cooper's Hawk- NY SoC
> Sharp-shinned Hawk- NY SoC
> Red-shouldered Hawk- NY SoC
> Common Nighthawk- NY Soc
> Horned Lark- NY SoC
> Vesper Sparrow- NY SoC
> Grasshopper Sparrow- NY SoC
>
> Birds not listed by NY DEC, but in trouble globally according to 2016
> State of the BIrds report follow.  The State of the Birds Watch List
> includes any species with a score of 14 or higher, as well as those with a
> score of 13 and a rapidly declining population. I have included all species
> that scored a 13 or higher that are known to occur in the Finger Lakes NF
> below:
>
> Bobolink- 14 breeding
> Wood Thrush- 14 breeding
> Canada Warbler- 14 breeding?
> American Woodcock- 13 breeding
> Black-billed Cuckoo- 13 breeding
> Blue-winged Warbler- 13 breeding
> Prairie Warbler- 13 breeding
> Cape May Warbler- 13 migrant
> Connecticut Warble- 13 migrant
>
> Honorable mentions- 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-15 Thread Kenneth V. Rosenberg
Josh,

Great job compiling conservation status information on these birds! Sorting 
through all the various lists at state, national, and global scales can be very 
challenging. I think you’re approach of combining state-listed species, global 
concern lists, and eBird records is exactly the right approach to take.

Another recent source with additional information on these species is the 
Partners in Flight Landbird Conservation Plan, also published in 2016: 
http://www.partnersinflight.org/  The only minor change since the State of the 
Birds report, is that Evening Grosbeak was added to the Watch List because of 
its steep declines — it could be added to your list as a winter visitor (now 
rare) on FLNF. Olive-sided Flycatcher (also on the Watch List) also could 
potentially be added as a migrant.

The Partners in Flight Plan also lists a group of “Common Birds in Steep 
Decline,” which are not yet on the Watch List, but have lost 50% or more of 
their global population since 1970 (according to the BBS), and are often 
representative of degraded habitats. These include the Yellow-billed Cuckoo, 
Field Sparrow, and Rusty Blackbird, which you have already listed as “honorable 
mentions,” as well as some other common local species — Bank Swallow (B), 
Blackpoll Warbler (migrant), Pine Siskin (W), Eastern Meadowlark (B), Chimney 
Swift (B), Wilson’s Warbler (M), Least Flycatcher (B), American Tree Sparrow 
(W), and Common Grackle (!).

If the FLNF has additional questions, or is going through a formal process to 
update their list, I would be happy to provide more input.

KEN


Kenneth V. Rosenberg
Conservation Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Office: 607-254-2412
cell: 607-342-4594
k...@cornell.edu

On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:42 PM, Joshua Snodgrass 
> wrote:

Hello all,
I've been volunteering in the Finger Lakes National Forest checking on the 
condition of bird boxes for the new biologist there. He is currently updating 
the Regional Forester Sensitive Species list for the forest, and asked for my 
input on any birds that should be added to the list that are in trouble. It 
would be irresponsible of me to give advice without asking for input from this 
community, who are far more knowledgeable than I am.
What I have done in my efforts to make good recommendations are to crosscheck 
eBird sightings with the NY DEC's list of state Endangered, Threatened, and 
Species of concern, as well as the most recent State of the Birds report for 
species that are in trouble versus those that occur in the forest. I included 
any birds in the SotB report that received a score of "13" or higher. If any of 
you have recommendations for additional species, or other edits, please let me 
know. Thank you all for any input. Below is the list of bird species I came up 
with that have been recorded in eBird as occuring in the Finger Lakes NF, with 
NYDEC sensitive species first.

Short-eared Owl- NY Endangered
Golden Eagle- NY Endangered (usually a migrant, one recent record of a perched 
bird)
Pied-billed Grebe- NY Threatened
Bald Eagle- NY Threatened
Northern Harrier- NY Threatened
Henslow's Sparrow- NY Threatened
Upland Sandpiper- NY Threatened (flyover record, but habitat seems amenable)
Northern Goshawk- NY Species of Concern (SoC)
Cooper's Hawk- NY SoC
Sharp-shinned Hawk- NY SoC
Red-shouldered Hawk- NY SoC
Common Nighthawk- NY Soc
Horned Lark- NY SoC
Vesper Sparrow- NY SoC
Grasshopper Sparrow- NY SoC

Birds not listed by NY DEC, but in trouble globally according to 2016 State of 
the BIrds report follow.  The State of the Birds Watch List includes any 
species with a score of 14 or higher, as well as those with a score of 13 and a 
rapidly declining population. I have included all species that scored a 13 or 
higher that are known to occur in the Finger Lakes NF below:

Bobolink- 14 breeding
Wood Thrush- 14 breeding
Canada Warbler- 14 breeding?
American Woodcock- 13 breeding
Black-billed Cuckoo- 13 breeding
Blue-winged Warbler- 13 breeding
Prairie Warbler- 13 breeding
Cape May Warbler- 13 migrant
Connecticut Warble- 13 migrant

Honorable mentions- birds that score a 12 that breed on Finger Lakes NF lands:
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Mourning Warbler (breeds?)
Veery
Field Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird (migrant?)

Links to the State of the Birds, and NYDEC species list, and breeding bird atlas
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/
http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7494.html
http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/

State of the Birds species table: 
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/resources/species-assessments/

 Thank for any input!
Josh



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[cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-15 Thread Joshua Snodgrass
Hello all,
I've been volunteering in the Finger Lakes National Forest checking on the
condition of bird boxes for the new biologist there. He is currently
updating the Regional Forester Sensitive Species list for the forest, and
asked for my input on any birds that should be added to the list that are
in trouble. It would be irresponsible of me to give advice without asking
for input from this community, who are far more knowledgeable than I am.
What I have done in my efforts to make good recommendations are to
crosscheck eBird sightings with the NY DEC's list of state Endangered,
Threatened, and Species of concern, as well as the most recent State of the
Birds report for species that are in trouble versus those that occur in the
forest. I included any birds in the SotB report that received a score of
"13" or higher. If any of you have recommendations for additional species,
or other edits, please let me know. Thank you all for any input. Below is
the list of bird species I came up with that have been recorded in eBird as
occuring in the Finger Lakes NF, with NYDEC sensitive species first.

Short-eared Owl- NY Endangered
Golden Eagle- NY Endangered (usually a migrant, one recent record of a
perched bird)
Pied-billed Grebe- NY Threatened
Bald Eagle- NY Threatened
Northern Harrier- NY Threatened
Henslow's Sparrow- NY Threatened
Upland Sandpiper- NY Threatened (flyover record, but habitat seems amenable)
Northern Goshawk- NY Species of Concern (SoC)
Cooper's Hawk- NY SoC
Sharp-shinned Hawk- NY SoC
Red-shouldered Hawk- NY SoC
Common Nighthawk- NY Soc
Horned Lark- NY SoC
Vesper Sparrow- NY SoC
Grasshopper Sparrow- NY SoC

Birds not listed by NY DEC, but in trouble globally according to 2016 State
of the BIrds report follow.  The State of the Birds Watch List includes any
species with a score of 14 or higher, as well as those with a score of 13
and a rapidly declining population. I have included all species that scored
a 13 or higher that are known to occur in the Finger Lakes NF below:

Bobolink- 14 breeding
Wood Thrush- 14 breeding
Canada Warbler- 14 breeding?
American Woodcock- 13 breeding
Black-billed Cuckoo- 13 breeding
Blue-winged Warbler- 13 breeding
Prairie Warbler- 13 breeding
Cape May Warbler- 13 migrant
Connecticut Warble- 13 migrant

Honorable mentions- birds that score a 12 that breed on Finger Lakes NF
lands:
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Mourning Warbler (breeds?)
Veery
Field Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird (migrant?)

Links to the State of the Birds, and NYDEC species list, and breeding bird
atlas
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/
http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7494.html
http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/

State of the Birds species table: http://www.stateofthebirds.
org/2016/resources/species-assessments/

 Thank for any input!
Josh

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