Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 19, 2019

2019-05-19 Thread David Nicosia
Chris,

Hopefully it is a cyclical thing. One of our best spots in Broome Co King
Street Town of Barker has had more migrants than I have seen in several
years. Diversity and numbers are up for most warblers and other neotropical
migrants this year. I also have noticed in a few other spots in the county
that there seems to be more neotropical migrants. I went to Cascade Valley
SF and pretty much everywhere there were ovenbirds and red-eyed vireos. The
numbers of blackburnian and magnolia warblers are up and so are black
throated green and canada warblers. I  had 12 least flycatchers along this
road which is well above previous years.  Our Hawthorne area in Upper Lisle
also has been fairly quiet. But the breeders in that area are in decent
numbers. Its been a great year down here for Bay-breasted and Cape May
Warblers.

Dave

Dave

On Sun, May 19, 2019 at 10:40 AM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> Thanks to Diane Morton, Ken Kemphues, and Paul Anderson for co-leading the
> Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard this morning. Another
> relatively quiet morning, despite favorable overnight conditions. There
> were many high flying migrating warblers throughout the morning.
>
> Please see my thoughts on Tortricidae moth larvae, below.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
> > Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
> > May 19, 2019 6:15 AM - 10:23 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.0 mile(s)
> > Comments: Repeat of Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn
> Orchard, in the hopes of better migrants stopping in to forage.
> >
> > There is very little evidence of leafroller moth larvae (Tortricidae)
> being pervasive throughout the Hawthorn Orchard this year. Most hawthorn
> trees and leaves appear quite healthy and undamaged.
> >
> > The significantly reduced findings of many warblers or vireos actively
> foraging in or making use of the hawthorns as a good food source, supports
> the idea and observation that the neotropical migrants are primarily
> targeting this location for the periodic abundance of food. The occurrence
> of leafroller moth larvae may be a biennial event or at least having some
> cyclical nature—hopefully the notable lack of larvae this year is not
> another example of the mass die-off of our insects.
> >
> > 56 species (+1 other taxa)
> >
> > Canada Goose  2
> > Mallard  1
> > Mourning Dove  5
> > Black-billed Cuckoo  1 Seen poorly by most, and in flight, in trees
> near large square retention pond to West of South rugby ball field.
> > Chimney Swift  1
> > Killdeer  1
> > Ring-billed Gull  1
> > Turkey Vulture  2
> > Osprey  1
> > Cooper's Hawk  1 Imm.
> > Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> > Downy Woodpecker  1
> > Hairy Woodpecker  1
> > Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> > Alder Flycatcher  1 Heard Pip and Reer notes heard well, near large
> square retention pond, West of South rugby ball field.
> > Least Flycatcher  2
> > Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> > Eastern Kingbird  1
> > Warbling Vireo  2
> > Red-eyed Vireo  7 Mostly foraging and singing in oaks along ravine,
> especially in NW corner clearing.
> > Blue Jay  54 Mostly low flying migrating flocks.
> > American Crow  1
> > Tree Swallow  2
> > Barn Swallow  7
> > Black-capped Chickadee  4
> > White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> > House Wren  2
> > Carolina Wren  2
> > Veery  1
> > Wood Thrush  4
> > American Robin  13
> > Gray Catbird  15
> > European Starling  12
> > Cedar Waxwing  4
> > House Finch  1
> > Purple Finch  2
> > American Goldfinch  5
> > Savannah Sparrow  1
> > Song Sparrow  10
> > Eastern Meadowlark  1
> > Baltimore Oriole  11
> > Red-winged Blackbird  12
> > Brown-headed Cowbird  8
> > Common Grackle  4
> > Tennessee Warbler  4
> > Nashville Warbler  1 Singing in oaks just South of the NW corner
> clearing.
> > Common Yellowthroat  2
> > American Redstart  2
> > Cape May Warbler  1 Heard flight notes only
> > Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Two different adults. Migrating/foraging
> through oaks and maples along North ravine.
> > Yellow Warbler  2
> > Blackpoll Warbler  1 One bird singing early AM from inside Hawthorn
> Orchard.
> > warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  15 Continuous high flyover migrants and
> a couple of fast moving warbler flocks, through tops of oaks.
> > Scarlet Tanager  6 Daytime migrating birds. Perch-sing-fly,
> continuing in general ENE direction.
> > Northern Cardinal  5
> > Indigo Bunting  3 Adult male seen in Northwest corner clearing;
> several buzzy flight notes heard from other migrants.
> > House Sparrow  6
> >
> > View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56485576
> >
> > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2017-05-09 Thread Suan Hsi Yong
> On Tue, May 9, 2017 at 10:30 AM, Peter  wrote:
> I was wondering if anyone can tell me how the warblers have been over at 
> Hawthorn Orchard. I've read in the Basin Birding Book that it's a good spot 
> for them. Has anyone birded it yet this year?
> 
> And how would that location compare with Shindagin Hollow?

The Hawthorn Orchard is a migrant trap, so bird density is subject to migrant 
movement (which is subject to wind and weather patterns, etc.). On the good 
days it's downright magical, but otherwise it can sometimes be quiet. This is 
the time of year for it, and I'm sure people are birding it every day; the 
relative dearth of reports suggests to me that there hasn't been any "magical" 
days yet, though already there has been golden-winged and orange-crowned found; 
and a lackluster day there could still be considered good by other standards.

And it's also very muddy this year, I hear.

Shindagin and other surrounding forests are good for breeding birds. Being 
larger tracts of taller trees, the density of migrants tend to be lower, and 
they also tend to stay higher in the trees.

Suan


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2017-05-09 Thread bob mcguire
Just returned from there. Lots going on. Multiple warbler species plus Wood 
Thrush. 

Bob McGuire
On May 9, 2017, at 10:30 AM, Peter  wrote:

> I was wondering if anyone can tell me how the warblers have been over at 
> Hawthorn Orchard. I've read in the Basin Birding Book that it's a good spot 
> for them. Has anyone birded it yet this year?
> 
> And how would that location compare with Shindagin Hollow?
> 
> Thanks much.
> 
> Pete Saracino
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 17, 2016 - 16 Warbler Species

2016-05-17 Thread Kenneth J. Kemphues
I can add to Chris’s Hawthorn list  2 Wilson’s warblers and 2 bay breasted 
warblers.  One of the Wilson’s warblers was called in by Chris’s spishing in 
the brush in the Southwest section (at least I assume it was Chris - I didn’t 
actually see him); the other was in the ravine in the northwest corner.  The 
bay breasted warblers were along the main path that parallels the ravine.


Kenneth J. Kemphues
Professor
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
435  Biotechnology Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

voice:  607-254-4805
fax: 607-255-6249
k...@cornell.edu






On May 17, 2016, at 10:03 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
> wrote:

Hawthorn Orchard
May 17, 2016
07:25
Traveling
1.50 miles
90 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: I didn't expect to encounter much this morning, so was pleasantly 
surprised with the abundance of birds foraging throughout the Hawthorn Orchard. 
There appears to be plenty of food now throughout for the birds to gorge 
themselves with.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

1 Chimney Swift
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Willow Flycatcher -- Single bird observed giving "whit" notes, no noticeable 
eyering.
7 Least Flycatcher -- These birds were scattered throughout; this number may be 
low.
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Warbling Vireo
1 Philadelphia Vireo -- Observed singing northeast corner
2 Red-eyed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
6 Barn Swallow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 Veery -- One bird was in the same area as the Indigo Bunting, just southwest 
of the northeast corner; the other bird was in the same area as the Ovenbird, 
in the central southern area.
1 Swainson's Thrush -- Easily visible bird foraging in the upper treetops of 
the hawthorns, just west of the northeast corner.
4 Wood Thrush
11 American Robin
14 Gray Catbird
6 European Starling

1 Ovenbird -- Single song burst in the central southern portion.
1 Blue-winged Warbler -- One singing male in the northeast corner
25 Tennessee Warbler -- Mostly males, a few females have moved in. Evenly 
distributed throughout the Hawthorn Orchard.
4 Nashville Warbler -- All in the southwest corner
7 Common Yellowthroat
6 American Redstart -- Males and females scattered throughout
3 Cape May Warbler -- All females in the top of the oak trees at the northeast 
corner.
2 Northern Parula -- Softly singing males. One in the northeast corner, one in 
the southwest corner
6 Magnolia Warbler -- Several singing males and at least one female mostly in 
the northeast corner and also in the southwest corner
1 Blackburnian Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
8 Yellow Warbler -- Males and females scattered throughout
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler -- Singing male northeast corner
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler -- Foraging female along the east edge
1 Canada Warbler -- Singing in the northeast corner

6 White-throated Sparrow -- Along the gravel path from the East Ithaca 
Recreation Way to the ballfields.
3 Song Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager -- Calling, Northeast corner
5 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak -- Calling, Northeast corner
1 Indigo Bunting -- Bright blue male silently foraging just Southwest of the 
northeast corner
4 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
6 Baltimore Oriole
2 American Goldfinch
6 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 50

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2016-05-13 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
In addition to the birds Bob and Chris saw this morning I can add Indigo 
Buntings, Common Yellowthroats, Magnolia, Blue-winged Warbler and one 
Lawrence's Warbler singing a blue-winged song.

Gary 

On May 13, 2016, at 11:36 AM, bob mcguire  wrote:

The area was fairly quiet when I entered from Mitchell Street around 6 this 
morning. Several LEAST and a GREAT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER were calling close to the 
E.I. Rec-way. As I progressed east I was surrounded by four singing WOOD 
THRUSHES and then at least six GRAY CATBIRDS. A YELLOW WARBLER was the only 
warbler I encountered in the NE corner. Then it began to rain thinly, and I ran 
into Chris T-Hymes. He pointed out a distant TENNESSEE WARBLER that I was 
unable to hear at first. Moving closer we found a second TENNESSEE. Chris 
headed into the middle of the thicket, and I worked my way back towards 
Mitchell Street. Just before emerging from the trees I ran into a foraging 
group of CHESTNUT-SIDED, BAY-BREASTED, and TENNESSEE WARBLERS. Apparently there 
was no major fallout last night - but there were still a few good birds around.

Bob McGuire
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2016-05-13 Thread David Nicosia
I noticed on radar that the bird echoes dropped of after sunrise (which is
typical) and THEN the rain came. So there was no major grounding of
birds that occurred overnight.


On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 11:34 AM, bob mcguire 
wrote:

> The area was fairly quiet when I entered from Mitchell Street around 6
> this morning. Several LEAST and a GREAT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER were calling
> close to the E.I. Rec-way. As I progressed east I was surrounded by four
> singing WOOD THRUSHES and then at least six GRAY CATBIRDS. A YELLOW WARBLER
> was the only warbler I encountered in the NE corner. Then it began to rain
> thinly, and I ran into Chris T-Hymes. He pointed out a distant TENNESSEE
> WARBLER that I was unable to hear at first. Moving closer we found a second
> TENNESSEE. Chris headed into the middle of the thicket, and I worked my way
> back towards Mitchell Street. Just before emerging from the trees I ran
> into a foraging group of CHESTNUT-SIDED, BAY-BREASTED, and TENNESSEE
> WARBLERS. Apparently there was no major fallout last night - but there were
> still a few good birds around.
>
> Bob McGuire
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10, 2016

2016-05-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Cool observation of the White-crowned Sparrows.

Below is the BNA excerpt describing something similar. Since these birds
aren't on their breeding grounds, this must be practice? Maybe the two
males you saw are actually good buddies travelling together and its kind of
like a sparring match at the gym...

Agonistic Behavior

Territorial male flies toward conspecific intruder, erects crown feathers,
puffs chest, and sings loudly. Aggressor may then adopt a threatening
posture, sleeking its body feathers, orienting its body to the horizontal,
and pointing its open bill toward the intruder. This may be accompanied by
a Wing-flutter Display in which male crouches, lowers and flutters its
wings, and raises its head and tail slightly (Moore 1984

, Baptista 1989
),
reminiscent of female’s Copulation-solicitation Display. Fighting is most
common early in territory establishment. Birds in a territorial dispute fly
at each other with feet pointed toward opponent. In prolonged combat, they
fall to the ground, grappling with their feet (Baptista 1989

).


Thanks for sharing,

Marc





Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist
Cornell Lab of Ornithology



On Tue, May 10, 2016 at 10:12 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> This morning, it was significantly colder than yesterday morning at the
> same time. Fewer birds in general (except for White-throated Sparrows) and
> fewer warbler species. A single Blue-winged Warbler was singing incessantly
> from near the middle of the Hawthorn Orchard throughout much of my time
> there.
>
> Highlight was the huge flock of about 62 White-throated Sparrows which are
> frequenting the hedgerow near the softball field. I got a fairly accurate
> count of that flock as they passed me from the East to the West along the
> hedgerow. They were headed to the grassy field beyond the softball field to
> feed on dandelion seeds. There was at least one White-crowned Sparrow here
> as well.
>
> On my way back to the truck, I encountered another three White-crowned
> Sparrows – two apparent males and an apparent female. They were just inside
> the fencing on the green of the outside tennis courts. The two males were
> in an apparent singing and displaying duel – something I’ve never observed
> before. The two males took turns singing. As one male sang upright, the
> other male would crouch down with back in horizontal and bill down with cap
> pointed at the singing male, subtly jerking its head back and forth and
> gently hopping side to side. Then, they would switch, with the previously
> singing male now taking a horizontal pose with bright black-and-white
> striped cap facing the now upright and singing opponent. They repeated this
> for at least a couple of minutes, each bird singing one song before getting
> into the horizontal pose again; this all happening while the non-vocal,
> apparent female, was hopping around nearby, watching from the sidelines.
> This was almost rapid-fire, like a tennis ball being hit back-and-forth
> across the net during a match.
>
> I think we need a few good days of warm weather to bring out the hawthorn
> flowers…
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>
> Hawthorn Orchard
> May 10, 2016
> 06:30
> Traveling
> 1.00 miles
> 149 Minutes
> All birds reported? Yes
> Comments: Cold start to the morning. ~ 30°
> Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62
>
> 9 Canada Goose
> 1 Great Blue Heron
> 2 Killdeer
> 2 Ring-billed Gull
> 3 Mourning Dove
> 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
> 2 Downy Woodpecker
> 1 Hairy Woodpecker
> 2 Least Flycatcher
> 1 Eastern Phoebe
> 23 Blue Jay
> 2 American Crow
> 11 Tree Swallow
> 1 Barn Swallow
> 7 Black-capped Chickadee
> 2 Tufted Titmouse
> 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
> 2 House Wren
> 6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> 3 Wood Thrush
> 14 American Robin
> 12 Gray Catbird
> 1 Brown Thrasher
> 8 European Starling
> 2 Cedar Waxwing
> 1 Ovenbird
> 2 Blue-winged Warbler
> 1 Black-and-white Warbler
> 9 Nashville Warbler
> 2 Common Yellowthroat
> 2 American Redstart
> 4 Magnolia Warbler
> 1 Yellow Warbler
> 1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
> 6 Yellow-rumped Warbler
> 1 Chipping Sparrow
> 4 White-crowned Sparrow
> 78 White-throated Sparrow
> 3 Song Sparrow
> 1 Scarlet Tanager
> 11 Northern Cardinal
> 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 8 Red-winged Blackbird
> 1 Eastern Meadowlark
> 6 Common Grackle
> 5 Brown-headed Cowbird
> 4 Baltimore Oriole
> 1 Purple Finch
> 1 Pine Siskin
> 10 American Goldfinch
>
> Number of Taxa: 50
>
> --
> Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
> Field Applications Engineer
> Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
> W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
> 

RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 15 May 2015

2015-05-15 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
My counts were different from Chris's I will type in only those which I saw 
more than Chris observed. I walk from southwest-end of the orchard so I may see 
somethings differently than others.


Tennessee 10+ individuals
Cape May 3 females and 2 males at least
Chestnut sided at least 3
Blackpolls 10+
Philadelphia Vireos 2
Scarlet Tanager 1

Also yesterday there was a Raven flying over the orchard that was chased by a 
Fish Crow! This is the second time I am hearing and seeing Fish Crow in this 
area. I wonder if it has taken residence in Six Mile Creek. And the raven was 
seen for the first time this year, but a colleague of mine told that she has  
been seeing and hearing the Raven on Eastern Heights road often this year.

Cheers
Meena

From: bounce-119239803-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119239803-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Christopher T. 
Tessaglia-Hymes
Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 11:35 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 15 May 2015

Just a quick note from today's visit. I didn't devote as much time actively 
birding today as I have on past days. But, it was a nice morning nonetheless. 
Others may post additional birds which I did not see or hear.

Again, if you visit the Hawthorn Orchard, please submit your sightings into 
eBird.orghttp://eBird.org for the Hawthorn Orchard hotspot - even if you 
only report a handful of birds seen or heard, every checklist is valuable 
toward preservation of this site.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 15, 2015 8:25 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)

Comments: I didn't spend as much time searching and quantifying birds this 
morning as in past; Tennessee Warblers and Blackpoll Warblers seemed reduced in 
numbers, or just not singing as much today as yesterday. Others heard at least 
two Mourning Warblers earlier, as well as a flock of Swainson's Thrushes.
27 species

Merlin  1 Heard calling one of the two individual breeding birds which 
continue to be present opposite Mitchell Street from Hawthorn Orchard. If you 
drive up Mitchell Street from the City of Ithaca, look at the row of (blue?) 
spruce trees on the left side of the road immediately after the white house 
adjacent to the East Lawn Cemetery. A couple of spruces in along that row has 
an obvious dead branch sticking out. This is their preferred perch. I've seen 
the birds perched there while driving by in the afternoon and have seen them 
copulate on that branch a few times during AM birding (as visible from a couple 
spots in the Hawthorn Orchard).
Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  1
House Wren  1
Gray-cheeked Thrush  1 Likely individual heard giving repeated soft NFC's 
in dense undergrowth at top of slope just North of the NE corner; in area 
nearby where others observed several (a flock of) Swainson's Thrushes earlier 
in the morning. This happened shortly after another birder had been reviewing 
the calls of Gray-cheeked Thrush; I suspect this unintentional playback may 
have triggered a response from this bird. My initial reaction was: is that 
your audio playing? When the response was no, I realized that I was hearing 
a softly calling GCTH. The bird repeated at least 10-12 times, then ceased 
altogether. An attempt for visual confirmation was not made.
Swainson's Thrush  1 One individual actively calling drip notes in top of 
hawthorns, just SW of NE corner.
Wood Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  5
Tennessee Warbler  6 fewer Tennessee Warblers today.
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  3 adult males
Cape May Warbler  1 female
Northern Parula  2 This is new for me this year. Two adult males singing 
and foraging together just SW of the NE corner.
Magnolia Warbler  12 Evenly distributed and actively vocal today.
Bay-breasted Warbler  5 3 adult males and at least 2 females; mostly in the 
general NE corner area and to SW of NE corner.
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  3 Definitely seemed to be fewer birds today.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2 Likely two individuals. One singing 
repeatedly at length in area just North of NE corner; one singing farther to 
the SW of the NE corner.
Canada Warbler  1 male singing to SW of NE corner.
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1 Singing in area just SW of NE corner.
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Finch  1
House Sparrow  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23453355
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basicshttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
Rules and 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-13 Thread Asher Hockett
That it was close to the ground is another pretty typical Mourning clue.

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 7:31 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 It sounded like typical Mourning Warbler to me, a low-pitched, burry
 chorry-chorry-che-che-chew repeatedly sung. I kept looking for the bird
 as it moved around, but apparently it stayed within 2 feet of the ground in
 thick vegetation. I briefly glimpsed the bird as it crossed the path, but
 got no details other than that it was large, dark, and plain for a warbler,
 very unlike Chestnut-sided. I did hear an odd-to-me rambling Chestnut-sided
 Warbler song several times and was able to repeatedly verify that singer.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 07:00 PM, Brad Walker bm...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Dave, was the Mourning Warbler singing a typical song? Scott and I had a
 Chestnut-sided we would have sworn was a Mourning until we got a look at it
 in that same area.

 - Brad

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:50 PM Nancy Cusumano nancycusuman...@gmail.com
 wrote:

 WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp
 (45) slow them down early?

 Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
 Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but
 afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low
 in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard
 a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my
 warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling
 song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller,
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird
 here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good
 birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will
 be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more.
 Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had
 been able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great
 day. Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general
 North-type winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the
 Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing
 from every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent
 just inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+
 males; males singing variety 

[cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Dave Nutter
I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but 
afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low in 
the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard a 
NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my warbler 
list:

TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling song 
lacking the emphatic tag
BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported 
PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN 
MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller, 
which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

--Dave Nutter


On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird here 
 for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good birds 
 and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will be 
 posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY 
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more. Of 
 the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+ 
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been 
 able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day. Today 
 may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May Warblers I've 
 tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their silence at times. 
 Many observed foraging on the same branches together at the same time. Due to 
 my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good birds. Others reported 
 having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers and Blackburnian Warbler, 
 Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among others. Great day, 
 following overnight rain storms. Given general North-type winds in the 
 forecast, these guys may be returning to the Hawthorn Orchard to continue 
 foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm 
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing from 
 every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent just 
 inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+ males; 
 males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes given 
 (seet)
 Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
 Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
 White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  6
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4

 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 -- 
 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 Welcome and Basics
  
 Rules and Information
  
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
  
 Archives:
 The Mail Archive
  
 Surfbirds
  
 BirdingOnThe.Net
  
 Please submit your observations to eBird!
 -- 
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME

[cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Dave Nutter
It sounded like typical Mourning Warbler to me, a low-pitched, burry 
chorry-chorry-che-che-chew repeatedly sung. I kept looking for the bird as it 
moved around, but apparently it stayed within 2 feet of the ground in thick 
vegetation. I briefly glimpsed the bird as it crossed the path, but got no 
details other than that it was large, dark, and plain for a warbler, very 
unlike Chestnut-sided. I did hear an odd-to-me rambling Chestnut-sided Warbler 
song several times and was able to repeatedly verify that singer. 

--Dave Nutter


On May 12, 2015, at 07:00 PM, Brad Walker bm...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Dave, was the Mourning Warbler singing a typical song? Scott and I had a 
 Chestnut-sided we would have sworn was a Mourning until we got a look at it 
 in that same area.

 - Brad

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:50 PM Nancy Cusumano nancycusuman...@gmail.com 
 wrote:

 WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp 
 (45) slow them down early?

 Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
 Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, 
 but afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER 
 low in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also 
 heard a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's 
 my warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a 
 rambling song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported 
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN 
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller, 
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to 
 bird here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many 
 good birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or 
 will be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE 
 MAY WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing 
 more. Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 
 12+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had 
 been able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day. 
 Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May 
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their 
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at 
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good 
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers 
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among 
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general North-type 
 winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the Hawthorn Orchard 
 to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; 
 non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure 
 I'm underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE 
 corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively 
 singing from every 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Nancy Cusumano
WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp (45)
slow them down early?

Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but
 afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low
 in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard
 a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my
 warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling
 song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller,
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird
 here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good
 birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will
 be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more.
 Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been
 able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day.
 Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general
 North-type winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the
 Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing
 from every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent just
 inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+
 males; males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes
 given (seet)
 Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
 Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
 White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  6
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4

 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 --
  * Cayugabirds-L List Info: *
  Welcome and Basics  

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Brad Walker
Dave, was the Mourning Warbler singing a typical song? Scott and I had a
Chestnut-sided we would have sworn was a Mourning until we got a look at it
in that same area.

- Brad

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:50 PM Nancy Cusumano nancycusuman...@gmail.com
wrote:

 WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp
 (45) slow them down early?

 Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
 Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but
 afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low
 in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard
 a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my
 warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling
 song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller,
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird
 here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good
 birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will
 be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more.
 Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been
 able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day.
 Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general
 North-type winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the
 Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing
 from every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent
 just inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+
 males; males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes
 given (seet)
 Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
 Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
 White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  6
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4

 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Monday

2015-05-11 Thread Geo Kloppel
Hi Bob, you wrote:

 I almost forgot - we got good looks at a single Blackpoll Warbler. This 
 normally signals the end of spring migration. How many days do we have left??

The trouble with the Blackpoll benchmark is that at least a few Blackpolls pass 
through here early (10th of May!), though the main wave is still 2 or 3 weeks 
away (I hope!)  

Blue-winged Warbler only arrived at my place a couple of days ago, and just now 
I had a FOY Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my yard. So I'm counting on spring 
migration to continue for a while yet.

I'm just starting to watch for Common Nighthawks, which passed over West Danby 
on the 19th last year.

Yesterday I encountered Broad-winged Hawks twice (sorry, Jay!)
The first hawk was being chased by a Baltimore Oriole at the Sweedler Preserve. 
The second was incubating eggs in its nest in the woods about 100 yards from my 
house. A few days ago it was possible to view the nest from quite a respectful 
distance, but this heat wave has encouraged leaf-out, and now the hawks have 
much more privacy.

-Geo


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 8 May 2015

2015-05-08 Thread Tom Hoebbel
It was our first trip to Hawthorn this year and very worthwhile.  In
addition to Chris' list we heard a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER repeatedly in the NE
corner of the orchard before he arrived.  Also we say a GREEN HERON as we
arrived around 7AM.



...Time is the friend of the wonderful company, the enemy of the mediocre.
  ~Warren Buffett


 Thomas Hoebbel Photo~Video
 www.TH-Photo.com http://www.th-photo.com/
  607-539-6121




On Fri, May 8, 2015 at 10:49 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
c...@cornell.edu wrote:

  Good morning!

  I stopped by the Hawthorn Orchard this morning a tad later than
 yesterday.

  Ran into Nancy, Holly and Tom, and Jackie and Phil.

  Dynamic, relatively quiet, got quieter as the sun got higher and the
 heat began to intensify. Northeast corner around maple treetops seemed most
 active.

  As noted in my comment below, the hawthorn flowers are about to pop,
 which is probably the earliest I’ve ever observed. As a result, this could
 make for some very interesting birding there in the coming week or two, as
 food resources intensify. We could use some rain, though.

  Best birds were the CAPE MAY WARBLERS (early, there were two adult males
 in the top of the maple at the NE corner, which flew to the South; later,
 there were two adult males and a female which flew from the NE corner black
 walnut tree (?) into the maple treetops (in a South to Northeast direction)
 then all took flight and headed East toward East Hill Plaza), 1 NORTHERN
 PARULA (foraging in the Northeast corner), the 2 MERLINS in the spruces and
 white pines across Mitchell Street from the Hawthorn Orchard (perched and
 calling), and a single flyover COMMON LOON (for some reason, I always enjoy
 seeing high migrating Common Loons, with their distinctively direct and
 rubbery-winged flight).

  Good birding!

  Sincerely,
 Chris T-H




  Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
 May 8, 2015 8:15 AM - 9:29 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 mile(s)
 Comments: Hawthorns flowers about to pop. Near unprecedentedly early.
 85-90 degrees today. br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
 45 species

 Common Loon  1
 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
 Downy Woodpecker  2
 Northern Flicker  1
 Merlin  2
 Warbling Vireo  1
 Red-eyed Vireo  1
 Blue Jay  19
 American Crow  2
 Barn Swallow  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  5
 Tufted Titmouse  2
 House Wren  1
 Wood Thrush  2
 American Robin  5
 Gray Catbird  8
 Brown Thrasher  1
 European Starling  6
 Cedar Waxwing  1
 Nashville Warbler  3
 Common Yellowthroat  3
 American Redstart  1
 Cape May Warbler  3 2 ad males, 1 female
 Northern Parula  1
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
 Chipping Sparrow  2
 Song Sparrow  5
 White-throated Sparrow  2
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  2
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  1
 Bobolink  1
 Red-winged Blackbird  6
 Eastern Meadowlark  1
 Common Grackle  3
 Brown-headed Cowbird  3
 Baltimore Oriole  1
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4
 House Sparrow  3
   --
  Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
  Field Applications Engineer
  Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
  W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
  http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2014-05-18 Thread bob mcguire
Susan Danskin and I had a similar experience in the Hawthorns this morning. 
When we walked in along the north trail, everything was quiet (except for the 
ever-present Catbirds).  All of a sudden we began to hear TENNESSEE WARBLERS 
from some 100' south of the trail. When we got to them, we found ourselves 
under a vocal feeding flock that included at least 5 Tennessees, single 
CHESTNUT-SIDED and MAGNOLIA WARBLERS, both male and female BAY-BREASTED 
WARBLERS, 2 BLACKPOLLS and a Warbling Vireo. We tracked them for about 15 
minutes until they all fell silent together and, seemingly, disappeared. We 
spent the next 15 minutes trying to re-find them and finally worked our way 
back to the north trail. Whereupon we began hearing the Tennessees again, went 
back into the jungle, and again hit the same flock. 

After following the flock for another 10 minutes, we headed back out, on the 
way encountering a singing CANADA WARBLER. Meanwhile Susan picked out a distant 
perched MERLIN across the creek in the cemetery. It called once as we were 
making our way out.

Bob McGuire
On May 18, 2014, at 10:45 AM, Meena Madhav Haribal wrote:

 Hi all,
 Today I spent a couple of hours at Hawthorn in the morning. Mostly it was 
 quiet except for the singing Tennessee warblers.
 My counts were as follows;
 Through out the orchard at various locations Tennessee at 7
  
 Most of the other warblers I found in an oak tree near the North west corner. 
 It was very hard to see them as they were hiding in the oak leaves. At one 
 point everyone was quiet without movement for 10 minutes at least. I was 
 wondering where they went as nobody was flitting. After waiting some time 
 they became active again. May be there was a predator at that point.
  
 Bay Breasted Warbler (1 male and 1 female)
 Cape May Warbler (1 female)
 Black-throated Green (1 male and 1 female)
 Philadelphia Vireo (2)
 Red-eyed Vireo (several)
 There were many more warblers but could not get definite ID, one looked like 
 a female Yellow-rumped but could have been a female Cape May as I never got 
 wing pattern detail.
  
 Later I also found a singing Magnolia and a silent female/ or young Redstart.
 There were several Yellow Warblers and Common Yellowthroat. 
 Other common birds but unusual birds were scarce.
  
 Meena 
  
  
 Meena Haribal
 Ithaca NY 14850
 42.429007,-76.47111
 http://haribal.org/
 http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
  
  
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard this morning

2014-05-17 Thread Karen Steffy
:)  That was me. I was at that corner from 8:15 until close to 10.  It was just 
too fun to leave.  At one point, I had both the Wilson's and a Tennessee in my 
binocs (which bird to watch first?).   I kept thinking about leaving, but 
something would pop up.  Even if I had seen it before, it was just fun.  My 
total species count for the day at the Hawthorns was 28, including a brown 
thrasher and a female RTH, which I watched preening.  For warblers, I had black 
and white, Tennessee, Canada, Magnolia (either the same bird multiple times or 
several of them), Wilson's, chestnut-sided, yellow and common yellowthroat.  

At around 10, I went towards the pond, but it was pretty quiet there.  On the 
way back, I found another Tennessee, and a hermit thrush.  I was surprised that 
I didn't see the number of redstarts that were there last weekend, and no 
yellow-rumps.

Karen

From: bounce-115588025-25410...@list.cornell.edu 
bounce-115588025-25410...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Anne Marie Johnson 
annemariejohn...@frontiernet.net
Sent: Saturday, May 17, 2014 11:58 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard this morning

Things were fairly quiet, but when I arrived at 8:15, the sun was out and
there were at least 6 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in the vicinity of the
northeast corner. Shortly after that, it clouded up and the Tennessees fell
silent for the most part.

In the middle of the orchard toward the northwest side, I found a singing
WILSON'S WARBLER and a MAGNOLIA WARBLER. I also found a SWAINSON'S THRUSH
in this general area. Later the WILSON'S had moved further north and was
joined by a female-type REDSTART and a silent BAY-BREASTED WARBLER.

When I was leaving, I ran into someone who had seen CANADA WARBLER and
another Magnolia Warbler and Wilson's Warbler along the shrubbery beside
the softball field and the northeast corner of the orchard viewed from
outside the orchard.

Anne Marie Johnson

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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard in the morning

2014-05-11 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
Yesterday in my email  I forgot to note two more warblers in the HO 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN (2) and an OVENBIRD singing in the middle of the orchard.  
So that makes  it to 13 species of warblers!



Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/



From: bounce-115350036-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
bounce-115350036-3493...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Meena Madhav Haribal 
m...@cornell.edu
Sent: Saturday, May 10, 2014 3:56 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hathorn Orchard in the morning


I spent about 2.5 hours in the HO. Main orchard itself did not have many birds, 
but both ends I encountered some warblers.

Right on strawberry circle, I found two NAHSVILLE WARBLERS feeding on crab 
apples. I go a photo of one with its beak open containing a tiny caterpillar.  
Later I encountered another 10 or so. Most of them were to the Southwest side 
in the willows. Here I also saw several CHESTNUT-SIDEDS, MAGNOLIA, 
YELLOW-RUMPED, COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, YELLOW WARBLERS, REDSTARTS AND RED-EYED 
VIREO, A PHILADELPHIA VIREO AND two WARBLING VIREO.

Further in the middle of the orchard one NORTHERN PARULA, a few more Nashvilles 
and Common Yellowthroats and LEAST FYCATHCHERS (at least five) were heard or 
seen.

Then in its usual location was the BLUE-WINGED WARBLER singing at the end of 
the orchard in the  ravine. Then I met Sara Jane and she told me about the 
Chat, but I went to a wrong location, but it was worth going there. Here I 
encountered another pocket of warblers consisting of several CHESTNUT- SIDEDS, 
TWO BLACK AND WHITE, ONE BAY BREASTED, ONE CAPE MAY, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, 
FILED SPARROW, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATHCER and other usual birds.

Also I saw three different BROWN THRASHER. One of the thrashers when it started 
calling in the NE corner, I was excited thinking I may be listening to a CHAT, 
but on locating the bird I found out it was a thrasher, still it was worth 
looking at the bird.  Overall it was very slow in the orchard.



Cheers

Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn orchard south-west end

2013-09-28 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
I forgot to add sparrows to the list

1 White Crowned sparrow

several White-throated sparrows

2 Song Sparrows

were also see in the same vicinity.





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


From: bounce-108076890-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-108076890-3493...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Meena Madhav Haribal 
[m...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Saturday, September 28, 2013 1:19 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn orchard south-west end


Hi all,

I spent a couple of hours in the morning (10.30 to 12.30 hr) in the Hawthorn 
Orchard, but saw most of the birds in the poplars and ashes grove of south west.



The group consisted of

several Magnolia

several  Yellow-rumps

3 Black-throated greens

1 Pine Warbler

1 Nashville feeding on goldenrod flowers/fruits or insects on the flowers/fruits

1 Blackpoll

1 Blackburnian

2 Common yellowthroats (elsewhere in the Hawthorn)

1 Carolina Wren

3 Catbirds

several Am. Robins

3 or 4 Cedar waxwings

3 or 4 Tufted Titmouse

1 Juvenile Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

1 Red-bellied

1 Downy

and several Chickadees

After watching them for an hour, I spent sometime in other parts of the 
Hawthorn Orchard finding nothing I came back to the original spot. Birds were 
still going round and round of the poplar grove.





Overall, it was a pleasant fall walk in the morning.



Cheers

Meena













Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Park Preserve

2013-05-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I can add to this list a single Great Crested Flycatcher calling to the NW of 
the Hawthorns and a single quiet skulking Brown Thrasher just at the SW corner. 
There was a flock of 4-6 White-throated Sparrows working the bushes along the 
stream to the South of the Hawthorns and a single Swamp Sparrow upstream from 
them, near the main path which crosses the stream in line with the East edge of 
the Hawthorn Orchard. I heard a single Yellow-rumped flyover when I was there 
earlier and saw a single probable Yellow-rump flyover while chatting with 
Chris, Jessie and Grant.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 2, 2013, at 10:54 AM, Christopher Wood wrote:

We spent about an hour migration watching from between the Hawthorn Orchard and 
tennis courts on the east side this morning and had a few birds. Highlights 
included Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and some nice patch birds 
like Purple Martin, Chimney Swift, Red-brested Nuthatch and Pine Siskins. A 
complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13962187

Grant and I also went to the Park Preserve earlier in the day. Highlights 
included NINE species of warblers including Magnolia, Prairie, Black-throated 
Blue, Nashville, Black-and-white and parula. A complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13961726

Cheers,
Chris

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.orghttp://ebird.org/
http://birds.cornell.eduhttp://birds.cornell.edu/
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W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 13 and 14 May 2012 - Devoid of Migrants

2012-05-14 Thread Suan Hsi Yong
Yesterday (Sunday, 5/13) our SFO group made a quick stop at the
Hawthord Orchards at ~7:20am, where we heard a CANADA WARBLER singing
in the NE corner (near the white house), saw a female BLACK-AND-WHITE
WABLER, near the NE entrances, and saw/heard a BLUE-HEADED VIREO in
that NE forest/ravine. We didn't explore the orchards beyond just a
small NE loop, and didn't see/hear any other migrants.

Suan


On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 11:50 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
c...@cornell.edu wrote:
 The past couple of mornings, the Hawthorn Orchard has been devoid of
 migrants. It was unnervingly quiet today and yesterday. It certainly appears
 that most migrants in the area have moved on and have not been replaced by
 anything new coming in from the South. The Wood Thrush that was holding an
 apparent territory at the Northeast corner may have departed, since I’ve not
 heard that bird since Saturday morning.



 Only bird as a possible migrant today was a single Least Flycatcher, and
 that was actually to the South of the horse-jumping pasture, South of the
 Hawthorn Orchard. Sunday morning, I did hear and partially see a single
 probable migrant warbler (Nashville/Tennessee-like) giving a few “seet”
 notes from some buckthorn just West of the South rugby field. I couldn’t get
 a good-enough look at that bird, though.



 Presumably this lack of migration is all weather-related. It is mid-May, is
 it not?



 Good birding, at any rate!



 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H



 --

 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

 TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp





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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 3:

2012-05-03 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
I'm confessing that I officially love the Hawthorn Orchard during migration ! 

I've only been able to get there in late  afternoon yesterday and today, but 
still had 46 and 51 total species with 15 different Warblers. I missed some 
warblers, like Orange-crowned and Ovenbird, so 20+ warbler species are possible 
on one walk around. What's cool is that on every loop around you can see and 
hear different birds.

Evan, Dave and Jay have pretty much summed up what's there. The only birds I 
can add today are Green Heron, Broad-winged Hawk, Bald Eagle and Osprey. 

Gary 



On May 3, 2012, at 1:46 PM, Dave Nutter wrote:

My dozen warbler species were different from Evan's, so add Ovenbird, 
Orange-crowned Warbler and Blackburnian Warbler to today's Hawthorn Orchard 
list.
--Dave Nutter

Begin forwarded message:


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 3:

2012-05-03 Thread geokloppel
Not to detract in any way from the spectacularly magnetic Hawthorn Orchard, but 
I too found 15 warbler species today, without moving more than 1000 feet from 
my house, and probably could have made it 20 without leaving the greater West 
Danby area. There are lots of birds around!

-Geo
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2011-05-13 Thread bob mcguire
There are two birds I need to add to this morning's Hawthorn list. All  
of the morning's birds were in the NE corner or along the northern  
edge of the Orchard. I never got out south into the tangle.


NASHVILLE WARBLER   2
BALCK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER	This guy was foraging in the flowering  
trees at the edge of the ravine. It was notable because he was singing  
both the primary and alternate songs in rapid succession. He sang  
continuously, for over 15 minutes, while foraging. And the song was  
muted, almost like a whisper song. At first I thought it was two  
birds, one singing each song.


Bob


On May 13, 2011, at 9:55 AM, bob mcguire wrote:

I spent from 6:30 until 9:00 am in the Hawthorns this morning and  
ran into at least 9 other birders! The morning began quietly, with  
an occasional Tennessee Warbler song, a few yellows and  
yellowthroats. By 7 - 7:30 the pace picked up markedly. There seemed  
to be Tennessee Warblers everywhere. Here are the highlights:


GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER	 in the NE corner, foraging with a Magnolia  
Warbler and others on the edge of the ravine
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER: at least three in one group, and I heard  
reports of another group of 4 males and 1 female. NE corner

TENNESSEE WARBLER   X
Magnolia Warbler - at least 4, likely more
Chestnut-sided Warbler - at least 5
Blackburnian Warbler1
Wilson's Warbler1
Black and White Warbler 1
Canada Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler (female)1
American Redstart   X
Yellow Warbler  X
Common Yellowthroat X
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER 	1  There were several Least Flycatchers  
present giving the chebeck call. The Yellow-bellied never  
vocalized, but several of us got good 			enough looks at it to  
confirm the ID.
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO  It first began calling from the north section  
of the orchard around 9 AM.


Bob McGuire







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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/12/2011 - 16 1/2 Warblers, Philly Vireo, Pewee, Swainson's Thrush

2011-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
After reviewing my pictures, I realized that I forgot to mention a couple of 
birds: two, grunting, Common Mergansers that were circling over the Hawthorn 
Orchard in the pre-dawn twilight, and I had flushed two Green Herons that had 
been roosting in the Hawthorn Orchard. The Green Herons had been roosting in 
the Western middle portion of the Hawthorn Orchard. This is the same location 
where I suspect the group of Green Herons arose from yesterday. Some crummy 
shots of some of my sightings from today are at this link (after the White-eyed 
Vireo):

https://picasaweb.google.com/cth4th/2011HawthornOrchardBirds#

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 12, 2011, at 9:57 AM, Chris Tessaglia-Hymes wrote:

Since I was up early this morning, I decided to head over to the Hawthorn 
Orchard earlier than expected. I was there birding from 5:30am until 8:15am.

Highlights include: EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, SWAINSON’S THRUSH, 
BREWSTER’S WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, WILSON’S WARBLER, and CANADA WARBLER.

Here is the more complete list:

1 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE (singing constantly from the South knoll area, West of the 
South ball field)
2 Least Flycatchers
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
3 EASTERN KINGBIRDS (in migration moving ENE, similar in height to the 
migrating Blue Jays)

2 Warbling Vireos
1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (heard and then observed singing from the maples at the NE 
corner of the Hawthorn Orchard)
2-3 Red-eyed Vireos

15+ Blue Jays (a few locals, several in migration)
6-8 House Wrens
1 SWAINSON’S THRUSH (whisper-singing in ravine area to North of Hawthorn 
Orchard)
1 Wood Thrush (on territory in Western portion of the South knoll area)
15+ Gray Catbirds
12 Cedar Waxwings

1 BLUE-WINGED WARBLER (at NE corner of the South knoll by the streamlet)
1 BREWSTER’S WARBLER (Golden-winged/Blue-winged Hybrid along North edge of 
Hawthorn Orchard, near the large Oak tree)
3 TENNESSEE WARBLERS (2 early that took flight from a tall willow tree to the 
ENE, later 1 singing in West portion of the Hawthorn Orchard)
12-15 Nashville Warblers
1 Northern Parula (by Meena in cottonwoods of South knoll area)
10-12 Yellow Warblers
3-4 Chestnut-sided Warblers (also near cottonwoods early, then in NE corner of 
Hawthorn Orchard)
3+ Magnolia Warblers
4 Yellow-rumped Warblers (in South knoll area early, then flew off to ENE)
1 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER (in NE area of Hawthorn Orchard)
1 BLACKPOLL WARBLER (in NW area of Hawthorn Orchard)
3-4 American Redstarts
2-3 OVENBIRDS (1 in South knoll area, 2 in Northern section of Hawthorn Orchard)
1 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (calling and singing from streamlet by South knoll)
12-15 Common Yellowthroats
1 WILSON’S WARBLER (working West along South hedgerow of maples at NE corner of 
Hawthorn Orchard)
1 CANADA WARBLER (also working West along South hedgerow of maples, into NE 
corner of Hawthorn Orchard)

3-4 Scarlet Tanagers (all briefly stopping through as they continued 
terrestrial migration to ENE)
8-10+ Song Sparrows
4-5 White-throated Sparrows
3 White-crowned Sparrows (in hedgerow at NW corner of South ball field)
8-10 Northern Cardinals
2-3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
4-5+ INDIGO BUNTINGS (2 males in NE section of Hawthorn Orchard, the rest as 
calling flyovers)
2-3 Bobolinks
4-5 Eastern Meadowlarks
4-5 Baltimore Orioles
1 Purple Finch
4-6 American Goldfinches

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

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Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
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Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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