Re: KiCad pcb file

2019-09-20 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Paul,

Sure! Always good to have more contacts in industry.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 8:57 PM Paul Anderson via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I know someone out west who makes boards for DEC systems. If you want ,
> I'll look for his contact info this weekend.
>
> Paul
>
> On Wed, Sep 18, 2019 at 4:09 PM systems_glitch via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
> > We have to clean it up but we've got the pattern for a quad height
> > prototype board. I can share the outline and edge connectors once it's
> 100%
> > verified.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
> >
> > On Tue, Sep 17, 2019 at 7:54 PM David Bridgham via cctalk <
> > cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > > On 9/17/19 15:00, Ed Groenenberg via cctalk wrote:
> > > > Hello.
> > > >
> > > > I'm looking for a PCB layout file / template of a 2 slot Unibus card,
> > > > which I want to use in KiCad.
> > > >
> > > > Can someone help me with this?
> > >
> > >
> > > Here's a KiCad template for a double-height QBUS card.  I haven't
> > > verified it or cleaned it up but it ought to make a good starting point
> > > and deleting the QBUS bits will be easy.  Eventually I'll need to do a
> > > quad-height Unibus card too.
> > >
> > > http://pdp10.froghouse.org/qsic/qbus-template.tar.gz
> > >
> > > If you're building your own DEC boards, this is the best dimensional
> > > diagram I've come across; I pulled it out of a uVAX manual.  The one
> bug
> > > I've found in it is the "1.00±.010" in the corner where the edge
> fingers
> > > start.  I think it's supposed to be "0.100±.010" but I'd double-check
> > > that against other diagrams or measure a real board.
> > >
> > > http://pdp10.froghouse.org/qsic/qbus-dimensions.pdf
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
>


Re: KiCad pcb file

2019-09-18 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
We have to clean it up but we've got the pattern for a quad height
prototype board. I can share the outline and edge connectors once it's 100%
verified.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Sep 17, 2019 at 7:54 PM David Bridgham via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 9/17/19 15:00, Ed Groenenberg via cctalk wrote:
> > Hello.
> >
> > I'm looking for a PCB layout file / template of a 2 slot Unibus card,
> > which I want to use in KiCad.
> >
> > Can someone help me with this?
>
>
> Here's a KiCad template for a double-height QBUS card.  I haven't
> verified it or cleaned it up but it ought to make a good starting point
> and deleting the QBUS bits will be easy.  Eventually I'll need to do a
> quad-height Unibus card too.
>
> http://pdp10.froghouse.org/qsic/qbus-template.tar.gz
>
> If you're building your own DEC boards, this is the best dimensional
> diagram I've come across; I pulled it out of a uVAX manual.  The one bug
> I've found in it is the "1.00±.010" in the corner where the edge fingers
> start.  I think it's supposed to be "0.100±.010" but I'd double-check
> that against other diagrams or measure a real board.
>
> http://pdp10.froghouse.org/qsic/qbus-dimensions.pdf
>
>
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
As Jon said, from my analysis of busted-apart DEC connectors, there's a
selectively plated "pad" where the contact surface actually is.

I wouldn't be surprised if the bulk of the contact fingers is *phosphor
bronze* which is often used in springs. Perhaps we can get Connor to do a
metallurgical analysis once he gets the EDX attachment for his SEM going!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 10:21 PM Jon Elson via cctalk 
wrote:

> On 08/16/2019 05:59 PM, Noel Chiappa via cctalk wrote:
> >  > From: Brent Hilpert
> >
> >  > I've seen pieces of HP high-end lab equipment from thru the 60s
> that
> >  > used tin plating on the PCB edge fingers, mating into gold-plated
> edge
> >  > connectors on the backplane.
> >
> > ISTR that DEC used bronze contacts in their backplanes, but basically
> all the
> > boards had gold-plated fingers. (I think I've seen a few power supply
> boards
> > that had tinned fingers.)
> >
> > I think the bronze was preferred since the contacts bend back and forth
> as
> > cards are inserted/removed, and bronze is more durable; and being part
> tin,
> > has the same corrosion characteristics are the tin.
> >
> >   Noel
> >
> The contacts were mostly phosphor bronze, but they had a
> little spot of selectively plated gold where the PC board
> finger actually wiped.  I think they used basically the same
> technology from the PDP-8 era to the VAX 7xx series.
>
> Jon
>
> Jon
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
That *is* surprising, HP sometimes gold plated the whole thing!

In any case, I will continue to run edge connectors with the superior
albeit more expensive selective hard gold process :P

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 5:46 PM Brent Hilpert via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 2019-Aug-16, at 11:56 AM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 2:53 PM Paul Koning 
> wrote:
> >>
> >>> On Aug 16, 2019, at 2:43 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk <
> >>>
> >>> I'm sure DEC wouldn't have bothered with hard gold plating if their
> >>> connectors were metallurgically incompatible :P The few busted DEC
> >>> connectors I've replaced did indeed have selective gold plating on the
> >>> contact surfaces. Most quality edge connector slots are similarly
> >>> constructed.
> >>
> >> It's been a while and I never looked in depth, but it most definitely is
> >> not true that gold is only compatible with gold.
> >>
> >> From what I remember, the detailed analysis involves an "electrochemical
> >> series", which has metals like sodium at one end, copper closer to the
> >> middle, and gold at or near the other end.  Metals are compatible if
> their
> >> potential value differs by less than a limit.  The limit depends on the
> >> environment; in an office you can have a larger limit than on a ship
> where
> >> you have salt spray, or a tire factory with lots of SO2 in the air.
> >>
> >> There are also some twists; I think stainless steel is compatible with
> >> many things thanks to the alloy ("stainless") properties.  In fact, I
> think
> >> the subject came up in connection with failure analysis of coin cell
> >> battery holders.  The battery cases are stainless steel; the question is
> >> what contacts are acceptable.  Gold is; there may be others but some
> things
> >> that are used in the market are not good choices.
>
> > You can look it up in an electronegativity chart for a quick "will these
> > ruin each other" check.
> >
> > I think a lot of this comes from the SIMM era in PCs, where folks were
> told
> > to only use gold-flash SIMMs in gold sockets, and only tin plated SIMMs
> in
> > tin plated sockets.
>
>
> I've seen pieces of HP high-end lab equipment from thru the 60s that used
> tin plating on the PCB edge fingers, mating into gold-plated edge
> connectors on the backplane.
> Never quiet understood it, they (HP) were doing gold-plated edge fingers
> on other equipment at the same time.
>
>
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
You can look it up in an electronegativity chart for a quick "will these
ruin each other" check.

I think a lot of this comes from the SIMM era in PCs, where folks were told
to only use gold-flash SIMMs in gold sockets, and only tin plated SIMMs in
tin plated sockets.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 2:53 PM Paul Koning  wrote:

>
>
> > On Aug 16, 2019, at 2:43 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > I'm sure DEC wouldn't have bothered with hard gold plating if their
> > connectors were metallurgically incompatible :P The few busted DEC
> > connectors I've replaced did indeed have selective gold plating on the
> > contact surfaces. Most quality edge connector slots are similarly
> > constructed.
>
> It's been a while and I never looked in depth, but it most definitely is
> not true that gold is only compatible with gold.
>
> From what I remember, the detailed analysis involves an "electrochemical
> series", which has metals like sodium at one end, copper closer to the
> middle, and gold at or near the other end.  Metals are compatible if their
> potential value differs by less than a limit.  The limit depends on the
> environment; in an office you can have a larger limit than on a ship where
> you have salt spray, or a tire factory with lots of SO2 in the air.
>
> There are also some twists; I think stainless steel is compatible with
> many things thanks to the alloy ("stainless") properties.  In fact, I think
> the subject came up in connection with failure analysis of coin cell
> battery holders.  The battery cases are stainless steel; the question is
> what contacts are acceptable.  Gold is; there may be others but some things
> that are used in the market are not good choices.
>
> paul
>
> > On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 2:27 PM ben via cctalk 
> > wrote:
> >
> >> On 8/16/2019 12:13 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> >>> Dwight,
> >>>
> >>> I spot check boards. I lack sufficiently sensitive instruments to
> measure
> >>> actual thickness (even on a surface plate, it's the same for ENIG as
> hard
> >>> gold with an 0.0001" indicator) but ENIG won't stand up to a few swipes
> >>> with an ink eraser, whereas hard gold will stand up to it no problem.
> The
> >>> main issue I've seen, in buying other people's products and projects,
> is
> >>> board houses passing off ENIG as hard gold (and charging for it!) or
> >>> claiming they're using "extra heavy ENIG" -- which of course isn't a
> >> thing,
> >>> because ENIG is an ion swap!
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> Jonathan
> >>
> >> Is gold plating the best thing? I thought that gold plating only works
> >> best when matching other gold connections.
> >> Ben.
> >>
> >>
>
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'm sure DEC wouldn't have bothered with hard gold plating if their
connectors were metallurgically incompatible :P The few busted DEC
connectors I've replaced did indeed have selective gold plating on the
contact surfaces. Most quality edge connector slots are similarly
constructed.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 2:27 PM ben via cctalk 
wrote:

> On 8/16/2019 12:13 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > Dwight,
> >
> > I spot check boards. I lack sufficiently sensitive instruments to measure
> > actual thickness (even on a surface plate, it's the same for ENIG as hard
> > gold with an 0.0001" indicator) but ENIG won't stand up to a few swipes
> > with an ink eraser, whereas hard gold will stand up to it no problem. The
> > main issue I've seen, in buying other people's products and projects, is
> > board houses passing off ENIG as hard gold (and charging for it!) or
> > claiming they're using "extra heavy ENIG" -- which of course isn't a
> thing,
> > because ENIG is an ion swap!
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
>
> Is gold plating the best thing? I thought that gold plating only works
> best when matching other gold connections.
> Ben.
>
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Dwight,

I spot check boards. I lack sufficiently sensitive instruments to measure
actual thickness (even on a surface plate, it's the same for ENIG as hard
gold with an 0.0001" indicator) but ENIG won't stand up to a few swipes
with an ink eraser, whereas hard gold will stand up to it no problem. The
main issue I've seen, in buying other people's products and projects, is
board houses passing off ENIG as hard gold (and charging for it!) or
claiming they're using "extra heavy ENIG" -- which of course isn't a thing,
because ENIG is an ion swap!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 1:14 PM dwight via cctalk 
wrote:

> I was wondering, does anyone check the thickness of the gold plating
> anymore. Years ago, working at another large company, we saw quite a bit of
> cheating on this.
> Trust but verity.
> Dwight
>
> 
> From: cctalk  on behalf of Dennis Boone
> via cctalk 
> Sent: Friday, August 16, 2019 8:46 AM
> To: cctalk@classiccmp.org 
> Subject: Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board
>
> > I've gotten the distinct impression that US board houses really are
>  > only interested in government/military/aerospace work. I've often
>  > wondered what it would take to set up a modern "no human interaction"
>  > line and if one could be even a little competitive with the Chinese
>  > on it.
>
> Based on a couple of youtube videos I've seen in the last year (sorry,
> don't have links), I'm not sure it's entirely fair to describe the
> Chinese board house process as "no human interaction".  I mean, sure,
> web form submission, but they seem to have a lot of "engineers" checking
> designs, and factory workers, and...
>
> De
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Indeed, when I tried to get quotes for the first XT-IDE run, the best
US-based quote I got was around $15/board with a *16 WEEK* lead time.
Compare to my usual "does good hard gold" shop in China, PCB Cart, at
$8/board (final all-in cost) and 12 day lead time, including the initial
tooling fees. PCB Cart is the same shop that the former N8VEM project,
s100computers.com, etc. have used for their work, so they've got a long,
solid track record with the hobbyist community.

I've gotten the distinct impression that US board houses really are only
interested in government/military/aerospace work. I've often wondered what
it would take to set up a modern "no human interaction" line and if one
could be even a little competitive with the Chinese on it.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 11:18 AM Jon Elson  wrote:

> On 08/16/2019 08:59 AM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > Paul,
> >
> > I've got a board house I usually use, but if I can find a shop in the USA
> > that will do hard gold plating and provide a comparable cost-per-board,
> I'd
> > certainly switch!
> >
> >
> There are few board houses in the US anymore, and they are
> usually doing aerospace or government work, and are quite
> expensive.  Most of the supposedly US-based outfits now do
> almost all their fabrication in China.
>
> I use E-teknet, based in AZ, but their fabs are in China.
> They do VERY good work.  In the distant past I did a lot of
> boards with US makers, but had a constant problem that they
> would charge me for electrical test, and then just cheat and
> NOT actually test the boards, just do a visual inspection.
> So, I ended up with 4-layer boards with shorts on the inner
> layers!  And, only found those after stuffing the boards.  A
> MAJOR pain, and I would blacklist those companies.
> Well, E-teknet has never done that to me.  (The flying probe
> tester leaves TINY dots on the pads, so you can tell whether
> a board has been tested or not.)
>
> Jon
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Paul,

I've got a board house I usually use, but if I can find a shop in the USA
that will do hard gold plating and provide a comparable cost-per-board, I'd
certainly switch!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 12:55 AM Paul Anderson  wrote:

> Hi Jonathan,
>
> If you are looking for someone to make the boards, I know someone in CA.
> I'll try to dig up his contact info this weekend.
>
> Paul
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 14, 2019 at 7:14 PM systems_glitch via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
>> Connor Krukosky and I have been working on laying out a new quad-height
>> DEC
>> protoboard, which can also be sheared down into a dual-height board. Full
>> announce on the VC Forums:
>>
>>
>> http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?71177-GW-DEC-1-A-New-Quad-Height-DEC-Prototyping-Board=582892#post582892
>>
>> These should be available within a month or so. I'll be putting up a
>> preorder soon to gauge interest in the production run, which as usual will
>> have hard gold plating on the edge connectors. I haven't gotten a quote
>> for
>> the cost, but I expect them to be $30-40 each for production boards.
>> They'll be available at VCF Midwest as well as online!
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Jonathan
>>
>


Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-15 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
And then there's things that use the same connector, but it's none of the
three more common DEC buses! The need that led to the development of this
prototype board is actually replacing missing boards in a VT05!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Aug 15, 2019 at 10:21 AM Paul Birkel  wrote:

> -Original Message-
> From: cctech [mailto:cctech-boun...@classiccmp.org] On Behalf Of emanuel
> stiebler via cctech
> Sent: Thursday, August 15, 2019 4:23 AM
> To: systems_glitch; General Discussion: On-Topic and Off-Topic Posts
> Subject: Re: GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board
>
> On 2019-08-15 02:13, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > Connor Krukosky and I have been working on laying out a new quad-height
> DEC
> > protoboard, which can also be sheared down into a dual-height board. Full
> > announce on the VC Forums:
> >
> >
> http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?71177-GW-DEC-1-A-New-Quad-Height-DEC-Prototyping-Board=582892#post582892
>
> Was always hoping somebody would do something like that, but with the
> bus interface already on it ...
>
> -
>
> But which bus?  There are three ...
>
> -
>
>


GW-DEC-1: A New DEC Prototyping Board

2019-08-14 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Connor Krukosky and I have been working on laying out a new quad-height DEC
protoboard, which can also be sheared down into a dual-height board. Full
announce on the VC Forums:

http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?71177-GW-DEC-1-A-New-Quad-Height-DEC-Prototyping-Board=582892#post582892

These should be available within a month or so. I'll be putting up a
preorder soon to gauge interest in the production run, which as usual will
have hard gold plating on the edge connectors. I haven't gotten a quote for
the cost, but I expect them to be $30-40 each for production boards.
They'll be available at VCF Midwest as well as online!

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: XXDP on PDP-11/03

2019-08-14 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yep, fun times on LSI-11/2! Some configurations also won't boot unless it's
on, if I remember correctly. I suppose this is part of the reason that
LSI-11/2 CPU boards are so cheap!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Aug 14, 2019 at 10:17 AM Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > From: Paul Koning
>
> > Isn't the interrupt disabled by RESET?
>
> Nope. On the -11/03 and KDF11-A, BEVNT is wired straight into the CPU, and
> there's no internal register to control it.
>
> The BDV11 does have a register which can enable/disable the LTC (it
> connects
> BEVNT to ground via a transistor when the appropriate register bit is
> cleared); but, ironically (given your question), BINIT/RESET does _not_
> clear
> that register! Only BPOK does. (My theory is they were short of a bus
> receiver
> for BINIT, and rather than put a whole extra chip on the card...) So, once
> on,
> it has to be explicitly turned off, or the 'boot' switch (which toggles
> BPOK)
> has to be hit.
>
> The KDF11-B and all KDJ11 machines do have the LTC register, which operates
> 'correctly'.
>
> Noel
>


Re: Control Data 9766 drive on epay

2019-08-12 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Being SMD, they could be connected to a number of things. PDP-11s, as
mentioned, as well as basically anything that talked SMD. Mine were hooked
up to Data General and Computer Automation gear.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Aug 12, 2019 at 4:55 PM Dave Wade via cctalk 
wrote:

> Pierre,
> I would suggest that as you haven't seen one in ages, the price reflects
> the rarity and the vendor is hoping for a rich collector to buy it.
>
> I don't know off hand of anyone who uses one. I know that the 4341 at LCM
> uses emulated DASD as does the ICL 2900 at TNMOC in the UK which I think
> has some EDS300 drives
>
> https://farm9.static.flickr.com/8314/7939054098_08c37818fe_b.jpg
>
> which look almost identical to the CDC drive on E-Bay, there are a few
> more pics here
>
> https://hiveminer.com/Tags/bletchleypark%2Cicl
>
> There are people using smaller exchangeable drives such as DEC RL01 and
> RL02 drives, and the similar drives on the IBM1130 and IBM1800 but those
> are a totally different ball game...
>
> Dave
>
> > -Original Message-
> > From: cctalk  On Behalf Of P Gebhardt via
> > cctalk
> > Sent: 12 August 2019 18:42
> > To: General Discussion: On-Topic and Off-Topic Posts <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org>
> > Subject: Control Data 9766 drive on epay
> >
> > Hi list,
> >
> > Just came across this:
> >
> > https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Computing-CDC-Magnetic-Peripherals-
> > Control-Data-9766-Storage-
> > Module/143351908424?hash=item2160708848:g:3yEAAOSw1oJdTo9u
> >
> > Haven't seen one listed in years. The price lets me assume that this
> offer
> > addresses customers that may use these drives in a production
> environment or
> > so...
> > I am not aware of museums or hobbyists who have such drives currently in
> a
> > functional state to read and write from and to 80MB (CDC 9762) or 300MB
> > (CDC 9766) disk packs. Maybe the CHM? ... not taking into consideration
> the
> > CHM activities related to the Xerox disk cartidge  (2315-equivalent)
> software
> > archive project.
> > Anybody out there? Would be interesting to know.
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Pierre
> >
> >
> -
> > http://www.digitalheritage.de
>
>


Re: Control Data 9766 drive on epay

2019-08-12 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Interesting, I've just picked up two 9766s and two OEMed CDC pack drives
(unsure of model # yet). I might be bugging you about spares :P

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Aug 12, 2019 at 2:09 PM William Donzelli via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> There is a Make Offer option, and it does look like the seller does
> take offers fairly regularly. I will not be buying it.
>
> If someone does, I have a huge amount of spares for 976x drives,
> including refurbished heads. It might take a while to find them in my
> mess, however.
>
> --
> Will
>
> On Mon, Aug 12, 2019 at 1:43 PM P Gebhardt via cctalk
>  wrote:
> >
> > Hi list,
> >
> > Just came across this:
> >
> >
> https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Computing-CDC-Magnetic-Peripherals-Control-Data-9766-Storage-Module/143351908424?hash=item2160708848:g:3yEAAOSw1oJdTo9u
> >
> > Haven't seen one listed in years. The price lets me assume that this
> offer addresses customers that may use these drives in a production
> environment or so...
> > I am not aware of museums or hobbyists who have such drives currently in
> a functional state to read and write from and to 80MB (CDC 9762) or 300MB
> (CDC 9766) disk packs. Maybe the CHM? ... not taking into consideration the
> CHM activities related to the Xerox disk cartidge  (2315-equivalent)
> software archive project.
> > Anybody out there? Would be interesting to know.
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Pierre
> >
> >
> -
> > http://www.digitalheritage.de
>


Re: Help ID'ing a PDP-8/A Omnibus board

2019-08-08 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
>From the layout and text font, I'd guess Sundstrand (CNC machine company)
but usually they put their logo/name on boards. I only have Unibus
Sundstrand boards in the shop at the moment, but none of them have that B
logo. Wouldn't be surprised if the B logo is from whoever made the boards,
as in the actual board fab house.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 12:07 PM Josh Dersch via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Hey all --
>
> Got a PDP-8/A at VCFW this past weekend.  It's an OEM model sans programmer
> panel and was apparently used in a CNC application.  It contains a board
> I'm trying to ID.  It says "PDP-8/A CONSOLE ROM" on it and has no other
> identifying marks other than a logo on the back.  See the pictures here:
>
> http://yahozna.dyndns.org/scratch/pdp-8/8aconsole1.jpg
> http://yahozna.dyndns.org/scratch/pdp-8/8aconsole2.jpg
> 
>
> None of the braintrust at VCF were able to identify this mark.  I'd guess
> that the board provides a simple ODT interface or something similar.  The
> three ICs in the upper-left with the handwritten labels are 82S129 256x4
> bipolar PROMs.  They're not socketed so I haven't read them in yet.  The
> 8/A's gonna need some TLC before I dare power it on...
>
> I'm mostly curious if anyone can ID the logo -- it would be interesting to
> know who made this thing.
>
> Thanks!
> Josh
>


Re: A few VT-320 and keyboard questions

2019-08-01 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
You can use a LK201 or the seemingly less desirable LK401 with the VT320.
There are a number of LK201s on eBay right now for reasonable prices. The
cheap ones are always going to be untested/dirty/possibly missing a key or
two.

The thing to do for MMJ converters is to get a MMJ cable and an adapter.
The 9-pin I use is a H8571-J, I don't have many of those so I can't provide
one. The 25-pin I use is H8575-A, I have a few of those so if you wanted to
buy a MMJ cable and a MMJ -> DB25F, I could sell you that combination for a
reasonable price. I have a huge spool of DEC OfficeConnect branded
Spectra-Strip flat cable, a ton of MMJ crimps, and the necessary crimp die
to make up cables of whatever length you'd like. Contact me off-list if
you're interested.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Jul 31, 2019 at 9:33 PM Adam Thornton via cctech <
cct...@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I just picked up a VT-320, with no keyboard.
>
> I have some questions:
>
> 1) the price on DEC keyboards, at least on eBay, is insane.  Does anyone
> have a VT-320 keyboard they’d be willing to let go cheaply?
>
> 2) …or, failing that, I found a posting of someone who’d done an
> Arduino-based key code mapper that let him use a PS/2 (or maybe it was an
> AT) keyboard as a replacement.  The link to the actual project was dead,
> though.  Anyone have schematic and source code for such a project?
>
> 3) If anyone's got a DB-9-or-25-to-MMP cable you’d sell cheap, I’d be
> happy to buy it instead or making my own.  OK, that’s not really a
> question.  There’s a blank insert where the 25-pin connector usually is;
> was that a “feature” of the B2 model?  (that’s a question but not much of
> one)
>
> …and while I’m here, another question.
>
> 4) I have a number of Apple IIs and one III that have sustained some
> keyboard damage.  Where can I get/what is the name of the little
> plus-shaped keyboard stems for those?  If I had a couple dozen that would
> be most helpful.
>
> Adam


Re: PDP-11/10 PSU Repair/Warning

2019-06-06 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I believe the big difference was in the current-supplying capability on the
+15V rail -- 1A vs. 4A. I haven't had to dig into a 5409730 though, and
haven't looked through the print sets. I believe it was mentioned as an
upgrade thing in one of the technical manuals I'd read some time ago.

It would be easy to make up a new harness to swap one in place of the
other, since the 5411086 goes to a Mate-n-Lok that plugs into the power
distribution board.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jun 6, 2019 at 2:17 PM Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > From: Paul Anderson
>
> >> (I also should check to see if the H742 uses the same 15V board; it
> >> uses the same 'bricks', so it may.)
>
> > Didn't the H7420 , which replaced the H742, use that also? The H742
> uses
> > a different one .
>
> Oooh, good catch! The H742 uses a 5409730, but the H7420 does use the
> 5411086,
> the same as in the H765. I always wondered what the difference was between
> the
> H742 and H7420.
>
> I wonder if the two boards (and thus the the power harness) have an
> identical
> pinout, or not.
>
> Noel
>


PDP-11/10 PSU Repair/Warning

2019-06-05 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
full writeup here: http://www.glitchwrks.com/2019/06/05/pdp1110-psu-repair

I finally fixed the power supply in my PDP-11/10S, it turned out to be a
shorted bridge rectifier on the 5411086 board, which provides +15 VDC, LTC,
and AC LO/DC LO. Unfortunately, when it failed, the rectifier burned up the
edge connector traces for the AC input to the board. I ended up cutting the
edge connector traces away (what was left) and soldering on a pigtail to
connect to the Mate-n-Lok coming from the AC transformer. I added a 15A
inline fuse, in the repair.

For those who have original 5411086s that haven't failed yet, you might
want to make up a little pigtail with an inline fuse holder. It'd be easy
to make up such that it could plug into the existing harness without
permanent modification, and it'll save your edge connector traces if the
rectifier shorts. It can happen in the other regulator modules too, but
they use a Mate-n-Lok instead of an edge connector, so any damage would be
repairable.

Anyway, the PDP-11/10S is back up and running!

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: RIP: John Parsons

2019-05-30 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
That's sad to hear. I'd wondered why I hadn't heard anything back about the
S-100 system he was working on. He had me build up a s100computers.com IDE
controller for it. Thanks for letting us know.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, May 29, 2019 at 2:53 PM William Sudbrink via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I have unfortunately just discovered that John Parsons, who shared my
> interest in the Cromemco Cyclops and spoke at VCF East XI, passed away on
> March 29th:
>
>
>
> https://www.kentandpelczarfh.com/obituary/john-parsons
>
>
>
> Bill S.
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>


Re: What do to with an Internet-connected PDP-11?

2019-04-29 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
If you get 2.11BSD up and going (which would require a CPU upgrade, it
won't run on the F11, needs split I+D), you can run a *native* IRC client!
One of the guys on #vc has written a minimalist IRC client that compiles
and runs on 2.11BSD on the PDP-11.

AFAIK, there was no TCP/IP stack for the BSDs that will run on the F11.
Anyone know of one?

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Apr 29, 2019 at 9:05 PM Grant Taylor via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 4/29/19 6:47 PM, Zane Healy via cctalk wrote:
> > I want to say that the OSU webserver for VMS supports running over
> > DECnet, but my memory could be faulty. I’ve only used WASD on VMS.
>
> I think this sounds like a neat ~> fun thing to do.
>
> But how does a web server run over DECnet?
>
> I guess conceptually you can serve web pages across any protocol that
> can carry HTTP.
>
> But I guess you could also have a client that ran over DECnet or need a
> gateway to TCP/IP.
>
> #confused #eagerToLearn
>
>
>
> --
> Grant. . . .
> unix || die
>


Re: Sun SS2 SBus memory expansion parts

2019-04-29 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
You can make the cable out of a section of ribbon cable and
DuPont/FCI/whoever-owns-it-now Mini-Latch PV connector housings, I made
that up for one of my SS2s. Note that it'll interfere with the top closing
on a SPARCstation IPX, if you put the board in the slot closest to the
memory expansion socket. I believe the real Sun cable did, too.

I've got one of the 32MB mezzanine boards, I've thought about reproducing
it as it seems to be just RAM chips, no special ICs. There would be a
significant cost in having it (destructively) scanned and the original
would be gone.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Apr 25, 2019 at 10:42 PM Chris Hanson via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Apr 25, 2019, at 7:39 PM, Chris Hanson via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > I have the 32MB memory expansion card for my SPARCstation 2 (P/N
> 501-1823) but not the accompanying cable (501-1814) or 32MB mezzanine card
> (501-1824).
>
> Of course I meant 530-1814 as the Sun part number for the cable.
>
> We deeply regret such grievous inaccuracy.
>
>   -- Chris
>
>
>


Re: HP board "gold recovery" garbage

2019-01-24 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I know folks get bent out of shape over board scrap listings, but like Will
said, there's actual money in those boards. It's my opinion that it
benefits the hobby to have scrappers listing stuff on eBay rather than just
putting them in the next Gaylord to go to the gold refiner guy. Of course,
I'd still rather have the whole machine get saved, but this stuff *is* junk
to 99% of the population.

I buy a lot of board scrap, both online and from clients, to either recover
parts for reuse, or to refurb boards (if they're in good enough shape). A
lot of it really is otherwise junk (boards from low volume custom
applications, stuff that's had catastrophic failures, etc.) and the scrap
guys for the most part don't really know the difference between "really is
junk" and "is something people want and will pay money for."

Jay, if you're really willing to pay out $300 for the one board, I'll see
if I can't acquire this lot of scrap too. I have no personal interest in HP
stuff, so anyone else wanting some is free to buy it. I won't try and get
it unless folks here are wanting to split it up though.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jan 24, 2019 at 11:29 AM Jon Elson via cctalk 
wrote:

> On 01/23/2019 08:20 PM, ED SHARPE via cctalk wrote:
> > I learn something  new  then... when   was  palladium used?   was it
> around in  the  2100  hp  days or  was this   used  later?   and  I had not
> heard of  it?
> >
> If palladium was used, it was in VANISHINGLY small
> quantities.  Many circuit boards use palladium to seed the
> plating in the plated-through holes.  But, the amounts there
> are in the micrograms for a whole board.  I suspect if
> palladium was used in multilayer caps that it was used for
> the same purpose, a wash over the surface of the capacitor
> material, allow it to dry and then electroplate with the
> desired electrode material.  They'd probably use a couple
> milligrams at most on each layer of a capacitor sheet, which
> would eventually be cut up into hundreds of thousands of caps.
> Some high-value MLCs can have 20 layers or so, so that would
> be milligrams * 20 / 100,000.
> Not a hell of a lot of palladium would be in an entire board
> full of them.
>
> Jon
>


WTB: Looking for several Intel manuals

2019-01-20 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
All,

I'm looking for hardcopy of:

* Intel MCS-80 System Design Kit User's Guide
* Intel MCS-8 Manual (8008)
* Intel PROMPT-48 Microcomputer User's Manual

I've got PDFs of these, but I like original dead tree format when I can
find it.

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: New takes on XT-IDE, a new FDC, and a new CM/S GAL WAS: RE: More old stuff incoming

2018-12-19 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
That FDC is not an XT-IDE, it's a copy of Sergey Kiesev's XT-FDC
controller. The same seller also saw fit to "cost optimize" the open source
XT-IDE rev 4 and remove my copyright/site info. It's no great step forward,
it's merely a copy of someone else's work with no attribution.

The controller chip used on that FDC is the same as found on some Adaptec
AHA-15xx series cards, which have been the go-to for a long time on adding
FM support to PCs whose onboard controllers don't support it.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Dec 19, 2018 at 3:01 PM Ali via cctalk 
wrote:

> > > "Tube Time" is the developer of the adlib (now sold by the Russians
> > on eBay) and the SnBl
> > > https://twitter.com/tubetimeus
>
>
> Has anyone seen these before? They seem to be a new take (just a shrink
> down) of the XT-IDE and an FDC controller that supports single density (FM)
> and 2.88 ED drives (along with the usual PC stuff). The FDC is interesting.
> I would have liked to have seen it be more like a CCIV w/ four drive
> support and addresses but given that most FDCs will not support FM this is
> a great step forward.
>
>
> www.ebay.com/itm/DeluxeFloppy-8-bit-ISA-Bootable-HD-Floppy-Serial/332861819300
>
>
> It also looks like someone tweaked the PAL code, originally decoded by
> Chuck G., on the SB CM/S upgrade to get rid of some of the
> incompatibilities...
>
>
> www.ebay.com/itm/Improved-CMS-Upgrade-Kit-for-Sound-Blaster-2-0-CT1350B-compatible-with-CT1336A/283307302605
>
> -Ali
>
>


Re: More old stuff incoming

2018-12-18 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Sure, the PS/2 Model 25 and 30 were 8086.

There's a lot of x86 gear still in production in industrial environments.
I've got a customer running part of a semiconductor line on industrial 286s
with no plans to retire them anytime soon. Not the oldest systems I support
for $day_job by far. And of course there's plenty of hobbyist interest in
older x86 stuff.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Dec 18, 2018 at 4:42 PM Grant Taylor via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 12/18/2018 02:08 PM, Zane Healy via cctalk wrote:
> > Cindy, I’m curious, is there really a market for 8086/88, 286, and
> > 386 computers?  What are folks using them for?
>
> I know that there is an active IBM PS/2 collectors community that would
> be happy with anything in that range.
>
> I think PS/2s range from 286 - (very few) Pentium.  I don't /think/
> there were any 8086 / 8088 PS/2s, but I could be mistaken.
>
>
>
> --
> Grant. . . .
> unix || die
>


Re: Core memory emulator using non volatile ram.

2018-12-15 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Chuck,

FRAM is destructive read on the die, from what I understand. It's just that
the onboard controller takes care of it for you, much like a core subsystem.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Dec 15, 2018 at 1:55 PM Chuck Guzis via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 12/15/18 10:01 AM, Guy Sotomayor Jr via cctalk wrote:
> > FRAM or MRAM.  I make extensive use of them in my projects.
> >
> > Everspin has a few (all SMT and 3.3v).  As I recall they run ~$20/ea for
> 4Mb (512K x 8 or 256K x 16).
>
> As neither MRAM nor FRAM requires a write-after-read refresh, I fail to
> see the "realism" in this that couldn't be satisfied with simple
> battery-backed RAM or even flash-backed RAM.
>
> Yes, MRAM is magnetic, but ti's not the same principle as real core.
>
> FWIW,
> Chuck
>
>


Re: Core memory emulator using non volatile ram.

2018-12-15 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Another vote for RAMtron/Cypress FeRAM. I've used their FeRAMs in a number
of systems, here's a writeup on my "core board" for S-100:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2016/03/29/ferroelectric-ram-part-1

I've got a bunch of FM18W08s in stock if you need one, I can stick it on a
DIP adapter if needed. One thing to be aware of, RAMtron FeRAMs latch the
address bus when *CS goes low, so make sure everything's set up before *CS
goes low.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Dec 15, 2018 at 11:11 AM Anders Nelson via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Texas Instruments' MSP430 MCUs use FRAM. This one for example:
> http://www.ti.com/product/msp430fr5969 costs ~$2.30.
>
> You could do some emulation in the same package, too. Not sure what your
> speed requirements are of course!
>
> =]
> --
> Anders Nelson
>
> +1 (517) 775-6129
>
> www.erogear.com
>
>
> On Sat, Dec 15, 2018 at 10:37 AM alan--- via cctalk  >
> wrote:
>
> >
> > Ramtron had most of the patents on Ferroelectric RAM in the past.
> > Cypress acquired them many years ago.
> >
> > New production FRAM is still sold on Digikey - in 5V SOIC packages.  Not
> > cheap though:
> >
> > 8K x 8 - $12.72 (qty 1):
> >
> >
> >
> https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/cypress-semiconductor-corp/FM16W08-SGTR/428-3774-1-ND/6181520
> >
> > 32K x 8 - $19.54 (qty 1):
> >
> >
> >
> https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/cypress-semiconductor-corp/FM18W08-SGTR/428-3775-1-ND/6181516
> >
> > Completely non-volatile.  Faster than most SRAM of the day (130ns cycle
> > time).  And good for 100+ trillion write cycles and more than a century
> > of endurance.
> >
> > -Alan
> >
> >
> > On 2018-12-15 05:19, Paul Birkel via cctech wrote:
> > > Perhaps Cypress FM1808 (32Kx8).  Obsolete, but available on eBay.  SOP
> > > for a bit of extra challenge!
> > >
> > > -Original Message-
> > > From: cctech [mailto:cctech-boun...@classiccmp.org] On Behalf Of Rod
> > > G8DGR via cctech
> > > Sent: Saturday, December 15, 2018 4:22 AM
> > > To: General Discussion: On-Topic and Off-Topic Posts
> > > Subject: Core memory emulator using non volatile ram.
> > >
> > > I have an idea to produce an MM-8  clone using RAM that acts like core
> > > when turned off.
> > > Can anybody suggest a chip that will do this?
> > >
> > > Rod Smallwood
> > >
> > >
> > > Sent from Mail for Windows 10
> >
>


Re: SUN SPARC station ELC

2018-12-09 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Can't comment on the monitor, but I haven't had good luck with modern 48T02
devices and old Sun systems. Apparently ST changed something in how the
clock section works, iirc it's timing related. Definitely rebuild your old
NVRAMs! I've got a little repair board I made up for it:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2017/08/01/gw-48t02-1

The files are on GitHub if you want to run your own, or I've got them
assembled and ready to be installed on your NVRAM.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Dec 9, 2018 at 10:55 AM Guy Dunphy via cctalk 
wrote:

> Checking out a SUN SPARC station ELC tonight. It powers up, passes self
> test.
> Boot fails because the CMOS RAM battery is dead, so it's lost boot config.
> That's no problem, it's an ST MK48T02B-25 'TIMEKEEPER RAM' 2K x 8, which
> is still available. Or I'll probably just cut open the tophat and connect
> a new battery.
> Then RTFM to find how to tell it to boot from external SCSI device 3.
> By extreme good fortune this machine came with a complete set of manuals.
>
> The main problem is the video monitor worked for a few minutes, then
> dropped to
> about half brightness - and since then is randomly varying in brightness.
> Before I open it up and start connector wiggling and hunting bad caps, dry
> joints
> and so one, does anyone know if schematics for the monitor exist online?
>
> Guy
>


Re: PDP-8/e

2018-12-07 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Indeed, unless you need character pacing.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Dec 7, 2018 at 12:13 PM Guy Sotomayor Jr via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I just use ‘cat’.  Seems to work fine.  ;-)
>
> TTFN - Guy
>
> > On Dec 7, 2018, at 4:57 AM, Pete Turnbull via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > On 07/12/2018 09:59, Rod G8DGR via cctalk wrote:
> >
> >> OK now I need a little help.
> >> Does anybody know of a terminal emulation program that will simulate
> the reader on an ASR33?
> >> I know about   RIM and BIN loaders but how and what to feed them I have
> long forgotten
> >
> > For a Unix or Linux machine, there's send and rsend, and several other
> utilities, that you can find at Kevin McQuiggin's web page:
> > http://highgate.comm.sfu.ca/pdp8/
> > and on mine:
> > http://www.dunnington.info/public/PDP-8/
> >
> > --
> > Pete
> > Pete Turnbull
>
>


Re: PDP-8/e

2018-12-07 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
minicom on Linux/*BSD and OS X, TeraTerm under Windows.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Dec 7, 2018 at 11:48 AM Jon Elson via cctalk 
wrote:

> On 12/07/2018 03:59 AM, Rod G8DGR via cctalk wrote:
> >
> > Does anybody know of a terminal emulation program that will simulate the
> reader on an ASR33?
> > I know about   RIM and BIN loaders but how and what to feed them I have
> long forgotten
> > My PDP-8 course completion certificate is dated November 1975.
> >
> > Rod Smallwood
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent from Mail for Windows 10
> >
> >
> I use minicom on Linux, but don't know if a Windows version
> is available.  It has allowed me to connect to a bunch of
> older devices and send data back and forth.
>
> Jon
>


Re: SPARCstation 20 with SCSI2SD

2018-12-05 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Nice work, indeed! The clearance issue is part of why I made the repair
module boards.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 9:54 AM Maciej W. Rozycki via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Sun, 2 Dec 2018, Jeffrey S. Worley via cctalk wrote:
>
> > The re-work of that Dallas nvram chip is just beautiful.  It makes me
> > ashamed of myself.  (I just chopped into the epoxy with a pocket knife,
> > soldered two leads, and velcroed the new batteries somewhere inside the
> > machine I installed it in.)
>
>  There is very little clearance in DECstation 5000 systems, like .1", as
> per the TURBOchannel specification, between the top of the Dallas chip and
> the bottom of any TURBOchannel option placed right above it (some have
> components underneath, including large ICs), and I think the risk of
> breaking such a non-standard wiring while shuffling option cards is not to
> be ignored either.  Also the design of the system box makes it very
> difficult to choose a suitable location for a distant battery holder that
> would not obstruct anything.
>
>  So I decided to do that properly at the cost of it taking perhaps a
> little longer to rework a single chip.
>
>  NB a CR1220 cell is supposed to last for ~8 years in this application if
> running on battery power all the time, which I think is good enough.  A
> CR2032 cell would last ~50 years, which I think is an overkill, given that
> the seal is expected to fail much earlier, like after 10 years.
>
>  An encapsulated power module could instead be used such as the Renata
> 175-0, where space permits, which would indeed last some 50 years, being
> airtight, but I haven't seen any reports of its use in this application (I
> have a couple of those on DEC NVRAM boards and last time I checked they
> still had the power to hold 1MiB SRAM memory contents after 25+ years).
>
> > I salute you sir.
>
>  :)  So far I only made 2 of these, but more are in the pipeline (waiting
> for a free weekend).
>
>   Maciej
>


Re: NVRAM resuscitation (Was Re: SPARCstation 20 with SCSI2SD)

2018-11-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'd modified them as Jeff described in the past, but having the repair
boards saves significant time when doing a bunch. It also allows
non-precision cuts, since it doesn't matter if you accidentally destroy the
old connections down to the IC body. It also results in a repaired module
with no battery-on-a-wire, but is still short enough to fit under SBus
cards for the machines that have NVRAM under card slots. Since the repair
boards come panelized in 2x5 grids, I can assemble 10 at a time, which
again, when you're doing a heap of NVRAMs, saves a lot of time.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 4:05 PM Alan Perry via cctalk 
wrote:

> One reason that I buy the new NVRAMs is that I keep failing at modifying
> them. Got the polarity wrong and fried one. I destroyed one cutting down
> to the terminals. I got one working, but have had problems convincing
> the battery to stay in place and not rip the leads off. There is a
> reason I am a software, not a hardware, guy :)
>
> alan
>
> On 11/27/18 12:34 PM, Jeffrey S. Worley via cctalk wrote:
> > When I bought that Sparcstation 4/330 at Computer Parts Barn, the 48T02
> > was one of the problems with it.  The chip looks like a piggieback rom
> > encapsulated in epoxy.
> >
> > I was not reinventing the wheel at the time, I think, because it was
> > the year 2000 or so, but I looked for a replacement and found them hard
> > to come by.  So, knowing the battery was most likely the fault, I went
> > about fixing that bit.
> >
> > The battery accounts for the high profile.  You do not have to cut the
> > entire doggone batter off, the terminals are at one side, iirc, the
> > right-hand side if the notch is to your left.  It is high on the epoxy,
> > so all you need do is cut down an eighth of an inch in that region,
> > just shave that top edge until you expose the battery terminals.  I
> > forget how I determined the polarity of them, perhaps I plugged it into
> > the board after and tested the terminals for power, but all you do once
> > you've exposed the terminals is solder a power and a ground wire to
> > them and attach a 3volt battery.  I used a pack with two AA's, in a
> > case so they are user-replaceable.  They are probably STILL keeping
> > time in that machine, wherever DHS took it and my MEGA ST4 and DG
> > MV4000/dc...  That's another story.
> >
> > So refurbishing these chips is a cakewalk, takes 15 minutes (the second
> > time 'round), and will work til' doomsday.
> >
> > Best regards,
> >
> > Jeff
> >
>
>


Re: FixMeStick

2018-11-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Scorched earth, it's the only way to be sure.

Never trusted a system after compromise, even vintage ones :P

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 5:57 AM Doug Jackson via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I am working on a USB interface for my Sinclair ZX 80.
>
> The biggest problem im facing is how to buffer the 16GB through my 1kb of
> program RAM.   It's proving to be very slow.
>
> Just as soon as I can get that working I'm hoping to be able to read these
> devices.
>
>
> On Tue, 27 Nov. 2018, 4:57 pm ED MAJDEN via cctalk  wrote:
>
> >
> > Hello group:
> > Has anyone used a FixMeStick to fix computer issues like virus
> > problems and key tracking hacking?  Does it really fix such problems or
> > create new ones?
> > Thanx for any comments that are posted.
> > Ed
> >
> >
> >
>


Re: SPARCstation 20 with SCSI2SD

2018-11-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
For fully potted parts like the 48T59, I make four cuts along the sides of
the encapsulation, on the short ends I cut until I hit metal (pins coming
up from the IC to the crystal/battery). On the long ends I just cut deep
enough to get through the pot shell and into the potting compound a little.
Then I put a small chisel or large screwdriver in one of the cuts on the
short ends, and strike it with a small ball peen hammer. This will usually
split the encapsulation right off, but sometimes you have to flip it over
and do the same on the other short end.

I probably need to do a writeup on fully potted parts, like the 48T59 and
DS1287.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 6:52 AM Al Kossow via cctalk 
wrote:

>
>
> On 11/26/18 2:42 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > I'm not sure, I don't personally see it as something worthwhile to
> > investigate when you can just rebuild the old NVRAMs.
>
> What is the best way to decap 28 pin parts? 24-pin ones come apart pretty
> easily but they don't leave a gap on the 28 pin ones.
>
>
>


Re: SPARCstation 20 with SCSI2SD

2018-11-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'm not sure, I don't personally see it as something worthwhile to
investigate when you can just rebuild the old NVRAMs. Even if you do use a
SNAPHAT type replacement, you're still stuck with proprietary batteries
that will one day no longer be made, versus an extremely common CR1225
cell. I've made total replacements for NVRAMs that are not easily rebuilt,
such as the Dallas DS1244:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2018/03/17/gw-1244-1

But, that's a lot more effort and expense than just sawing the top off a
dead 48T02, gluing on one of my repair boards, and soldering the leads :P

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Nov 26, 2018 at 5:40 PM  wrote:

> > Also, to anyone buying NVRAMs on eBay, don't expect anything from China
> to
> > actually be new NVRAMs. I've bought a bunch to disassemble, in the course
>
> Are any of the SMD NVRAMs with the battery caps compatible? Throw them on
> a DIP to SOIC PCB?
>
> - Ethan
>
>
> --
> : Ethan O'Toole
>
>
>


Re: SPARCstation 20 with SCSI2SD

2018-11-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
> Don't have any spare modules? What happened to the half dozen that I sent
you? :)

In the queue somewhere! They'll likely go to replace the modules I'd stolen
from other machines over the years, as I get around to fixing them.

Also, to anyone buying NVRAMs on eBay, don't expect anything from China to
actually be new NVRAMs. I've bought a bunch to disassemble, in the course
of making repair boards for a number of different NVRAMs/RTCs, and every
single one has been a relabel. All had low battery voltages, on the few
where I actually totally destroyed the encapsulation to examine the
innards, the batteries often carried dates 10+ years old, even though the
outside markings suggested it was a year or two old. Not that fakes/remarks
from China should be a surprise.

Thanks,
Jonathan


On Mon, Nov 26, 2018 at 5:20 PM Alan Perry via cctalk 
wrote:

>
>
> On 11/26/18 2:08 PM, systems_glitch wrote:
> >
> >
> > I don't have any spare modules to rebuild, so I don't have premade
> > replacements up at the moment. I've been rebuilding them for people
> > when they send in their dead modules, but I'd guess most people here
> > can do the rebuild themselves, time permitting. I wouldn't cut into
> > the encapsulation with a powered tool like a Dremel, unless you're
> > going to wear a face mask. I use a hacksaw with Lenox fine kerf
> > blades. Any blade will do if you're only rebuilding a few NVRAMs.
> >
> >
> Don't have any spare modules? What happened to the half dozen that I
> sent you? :)
>
> alan
>
> P.S. Out of my dozen Sun systems, almost all of them are using new IDPROMs.
>
>
>


Re: SPARCstation 20 with SCSI2SD

2018-11-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
They're still made, but the new ones don't always work in place of the old
ones -- not 100% anyway. It's been my experience that, on sun4c and sun4m,
new 48T02s and 48T08s aren't 100% compatible. I've mentioned others'
suggestions on what the differences are in my Tindie listings, and on the
writeup on my site. That's why I designed the rebuild modules I've got
available, I had around 50 48T02s to process! Writeup here:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2017/08/01/gw-48t02-1

(it's for the 48T02, but the process is the same...just the GW-48T08-1 is a
little longer)

The "not 100% compatible" symptom is that the clock fails power-on
diagnostics, and some machines will drop to OpenBoot/firmware monitor
prompt when that happens. NVRAM settings will be retained, but the clock
may or may not run, and some machines won't auto-boot.

I don't have any spare modules to rebuild, so I don't have premade
replacements up at the moment. I've been rebuilding them for people when
they send in their dead modules, but I'd guess most people here can do the
rebuild themselves, time permitting. I wouldn't cut into the encapsulation
with a powered tool like a Dremel, unless you're going to wear a face mask.
I use a hacksaw with Lenox fine kerf blades. Any blade will do if you're
only rebuilding a few NVRAMs.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Nov 25, 2018 at 11:30 PM Alan Perry via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
> On 11/25/18 7:49 PM, Ethan via cctalk wrote:
> >
> >
> >> The NVRAM is totally dead; I've been reloading the IDPROM contents each
> >> time. I've already ordered replacement NVRAMs from China; we'll see how
> >> they do. Otherwise, I'll be going with the filing/coin cell trick.
> >
> > Interesting. Are they no longer made? I should get one for my Voyager.
> >
> They are still made. I usually get M48T08s or M48T18s from Mouser.
>
> In the long run, it is probably a good idea to mod the IDPROM to use an
> external, replaceable battery, Glitch Works makes a board that one can
> solder on to do that
> (
> https://www.tindie.com/products/glitchwrks/gw-48t08-1-repair-board-module/
> ).
>
> alan
>
>


Re: Odd Hp leds in dip package

2018-11-21 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Looks like the HDSP-2490:

http://www.decadecounter.com/vta/articleview.php?item=9

Datasheet:

https://mkmakerspace.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/HDSP-2490.pdf

These are shift register displays, you clock in column data on a common
clock. Similar to the HDSP-2010 and relatives. Quite expensive when new,
still very desirable today. Don't let the smoke out :P

Thanks,
Jonathan



On Wed, Nov 21, 2018 at 12:36 PM Curious Marc via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Try to look up HDSP-2450. These are 5x7 alphanumeric displays with shift
> register drivers included. Yours might be an earlier version of that, or
> just a commercial temp version  of that (the HDSPs are extended temp
> -55/85C). Maybe the internal part used in the HP9825 or HP 9830 displays,
> then later commercially sold as the HDSP 2xxx series. I can scan the HDSP
> data sheet if you can’t find it online. Maybe this will help:
> https://www.google.com/url?sa=t=j==s=web=5=2ahUKEwirg4e0_-XeAhWHd98KHVa5AD8QFjAEegQIJhAC=http%3A%2F%2Felectron-pv.com%2FPDFs%2FLED%2FHDSP-2xxx%2520AppNote.pdf=AOvVaw1JF1llgVbDdAbcK8UMBie9
>
> If you don’t need them I’ll take them :-D
>
> Marc
>
>
>
> From: cctalk  on behalf of "
> cctalk@classiccmp.org" 
> Reply-To: devin davison , "cctalk@classiccmp.org" <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org>
> Date: Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at 7:53 AM
> To: "cctalk@classiccmp.org" 
> Subject: Odd Hp leds in dip package
>
>
>
> Hello. Encountered a couple odd parts in the pile today, not sure if they
>
> are anything special. Hp branded dip packages with gold leads. They appear
>
> to be leds in 4 grid patterns on the face. Im curious what they are out of,
>
> most likely an old hp computer or calculator.
>
>
>
> Part number on the back is hp5033592-101
>
>
>
> i could not find any information online about them. If they are of use to
>
> someone with a hp conputer let me know. If not im trying to find a
>
> datasheet and use them in a project.
>
>
>
> Pictures :
>
>
>
> https://i.postimg.cc/dtJTGZfm/2018-11-21-10-48-34.jpg
>
>
>
> https://i.postimg.cc/pL6hNGLq/2018-11-21-10-49-19.jpg
>
>
>
> https://i.postimg.cc/C1Nw054S/2018-11-21-10-50-37.jpg
>
>
>
>


Re: desoldering (was Re: VAX 9440)

2018-11-14 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Another Hakko 472D owner here. Got mine in pieces as used/nonworking.
They're easy to rebuild. I've used the 808s at workshops/friends' places,
there's no comparison IMO. I use the "pencil" style handpiece, we had the
"gun" style at a previous job, I definitely like the "pencil" style better.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 6:38 PM Ed C. via cctalk 
wrote:

> I have the combo unit including solder. I do not have any other experience
> with any high-end ware but I can say that this unit does all I need and
> does it well.
>
> On Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 7:17 PM Chuck Guzis via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
> > On 11/13/18 7:38 AM, Mark J. Blair via cctalk wrote:
> >
> > > Instead, I use two pencil-type irons, one in each hand, working under
> > > a stereo microscope. The tips are much better, and manipulating each
> > > tip independently provides great control of what's going on. Only
> > > drawback is that if you want to use a fancy, expensive iron, now you
> > > get to buy two of them. If you're tempted by a soldering station with
> > > two or more outputs, make sure that it can drive both simultaneously.
> > > There are dual-output stations that have two outputs but can only run
> > > one at a time, as well as ones which can drive two irons at once.
> >
> > After seeing the video on the ZD-985 some years ago on Dave's EEVBlog:
> >
> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft50m8UU5WQ
> >
> > I've been wondering if it's a worthwhile tool.  Does anyone have one of
> > these things?
> >
> > --Chuck
> >
> >
>


Re: Looking for optical grid mouse pad

2018-11-13 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
There's a blue-and-black grid, and an all-black grid, at least with Sun
mice. Mice that work on one won't work on the other. At least with the
blue-and-black grid, spacing didn't seem to matter -- I've got three sizes
of spacing, all three work with the mice that support it.

Not sure if it applies to your situation, but the Mouse Systems mice with
two holes, one emitting red light, work with the blue-and-black pads, and
the newer Sun mice with a single hole works on the black grid. The
blue-and-black grid looks metallic blue until you take a close look with a
lighted magnifier.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 5:40 PM Rico Pajarola via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 10:32 PM Tomasz Rola via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
> > On Sat, Nov 10, 2018 at 07:12:49PM +0100, Camiel Vanderhoeven via cctech
> > wrote:
> > > On 11/10/18, 6:49 PM, "Rico Pajarola"  wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > I have tried to print my own mousepad, but the mouse only works in
> > > the y direction on it.
> > >
> > > there were 2 versions of that mousepad, and the symptom of using the
> > > wrong one was that the mouse would only move in one direction.
> >
> > Out of curiosity, would it work if you printed this one-directional
> > grid on a translucent plastic and overlaid it on top of white paper
> > sheet? If yes, then would it work if you printed two such translucent
> > plastic grids and ovelaid them one on the other turned 90 degrees and
> > that on white paper?
> >
> I never tried, but I don't think this would work. AIUI, it has a minimum
> and a maximum spacing for the lines.
>
> The white noise sheet "works" because some the black-white-black
> transitions come with the right spacing, no matter what that spacing is (it
> has to be the right order of magnitude, and it doesn't work as well as the
> real thing). Crumpled tin-foil has been reported to work, too.
>
>
>
> > --
> > Regards,
> > Tomasz Rola
> >
> > --
> > ** A C programmer asked whether computer had Buddha's nature.  **
> > ** As the answer, master did "rm -rif" on the programmer's home**
> > ** directory. And then the C programmer became enlightened...  **
> > ** **
> > ** Tomasz Rola  mailto:tomasz_r...@bigfoot.com **
> >
>


Re: Advice needed: Entry point into things PDP-8

2018-10-23 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
There's also our Ohio Scientific 560Z "Processor Lab" reproduction:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2017/02/26/osi-560z-build

It uses the Intersil IM6100 and executes PDP-8 code. Memory management is
implemented in handlers written in 6502 assembly on the host system, so you
can have whatever memory management you like. I believe one of the guys on
the osiweb.org forums has PDP-8/e memory management working. I don't know
if he has OS/8 running yet, but does have at least FOCAL going. You of
course need a 12-bit memory board, which we also make (uses modern
components, works with FeRAM for a core-like experience). And you'll need
some sort of host system, the simplest being an Ohio Scientific 502 at the
moment (basically a single-board 6502 system with serial console).

That's probably the cheapest/most reliable *non-emulation* route. Of
course, emulation is going to be both cheaper and more reliable.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Oct 23, 2018 at 12:17 AM Paul Anderson via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Hi Carlos,
>
> With the cost of PDP-8 parts and the need for maintenance and repair, if
> you can find an emulator that will do what you want, go for it.
>
> Paul
>
> On Mon, Oct 22, 2018 at 10:39 PM Carlos E Murillo-Sanchez via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
> > Greetings all...
> >
> > I have been pondering something and would love to receive feedback from
> > you.  The thing
> > is, I would like to have something pdp8-ish that would allow me to play
> > a little bit
> > with the programming languages that were available for these machines,
> > FORTRAN 4K and
> > FORTRAN IV in particular.  Now,  I would love to be able to time some
> > FORTRAN jobs just
> > to get an idea about what it was like back then.  I am aware of PiDP-8,
> > simh, as well as
> > SBC6120, SBC6120RBC.
> >
> > I happen to have three VT78 cpu boards (sans the RAM board) and two
> > vt278 cpu boards.
> > All were in rather sorry condition; I picked them up from a junk pile
> > that was stacked
> > several feet high and in which the contents were mostly random. Thus,
> > the VT78 boards'
> > components were scratched and in fact two of them are missing the
> > control panel ROM chip.
> > Otherwise they are complete, but I am missing the RAM boards.  The VT278
> > boards
> > were further abused by someone who yanked out the oscillators and a few
> > TTL chips,
> > damaging several traces, which I have now repaired.  Alas, only one of
> > them has the
> > HM6120 cpu chip, and I do not know if it is good or not. Both are
> > missing the SMC5037
> > CRT generator chip.  Other than that, they are complete.
> >
> > So, now that we all know what I have, let me say out loud what I've been
> > thinking:
> >
> > If I try to build actual hardware:
> >
> > I've read that the VT278 has serious software compatibility issues with
> > older software
> > due to the use of the HM6121 I/O chip.  So even if I get an adequate
> > keyboard, buy the
> > CRT chip and manage to use it to drive a monitor, I would need an
> > original floppy drive
> > system and media, because I do not have the DP278 serial comms board
> > that would allow me
> > to send the VT278 a program to run;
> >
> > For the VT78, I would need to hack a memory board, and, since it can be
> > coaxed to accept
> > a program to run if it is fooled into thinking that it is loading a
> > program from an
> > MR78/paper tape, perhaps I could make it boot something.  I would need
> > to wire-up
> > and arduino or something like it to translate the keyboard and display
> > terminal
> > chatter in the serial console into something usable.  But, that's three
> > hardware
> > projects (memory board, MR78-like contraption, microcontrolled serial
> > console
> > translator)...
> >
> > The last hardware option is to go and make an SBC6120RBC;  I would need
> > to buy
> > programmers for the GAL/PAL devices, and I've heard that not all
> > programmers can deal
> > with the kind of chips used in it.  And, if it turns out that the HM6120
> > chip that I
> > have is bad, I would have to hunt down one of those rare beasts.. It
> > would be awesome, though,
> > to have an SBC6120RBC up and running, and be able to time actual
> > hardware running
> > FORTRAN.
> >
> > And then comes the emulation option, with the PiDP-8.  I have to say
> > that the emulation
> > of the blinkenlights is very, very attractive to me, and this option is
> > a no-brainer
> > hardware-wise.
> >
> > So...  am I missing something in my estimation of the effort involved in
> > these options?
> >
> > What would _you_ do?
> >
> > Carlos.
> >
> >
>


Re: Softcard (Was: Microsoft-Paul Allen

2018-10-21 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'd heard, but have no sources for said hearsay, that the most common CP/M
machine in volume was the Apple II.

There were definitely knockoffs of the Microsoft Z80 Softcard. One of my
IIe systems has one from SPACE BYTE, the other is no-name. I've personally
seen more knockoffs than actual Microsoft cards. The two I have currently
are definitely "photocopy" type knockoff/clone cards, the layout is nearly
identical to the real Microsoft card I've got. That of course doesn't speak
for what was actually deployed.

Some Apple II compatibles also came with CP/M compatibility out of the box,
I don't personally know if that was MS Z80 Softcard compatible or something
else.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Oct 20, 2018 at 5:54 PM Fred Cisin via cctalk 
wrote:

> >> The Softcard was a Z-80 based single-board
> >> computer
>
> On Sat, 20 Oct 2018, Eric Smith via cctalk wrote:
> > It wasn't. It was only a processor card.
> > No version of the Softcard had it's own video output. It used normal
> Apple
> > video  output. If you wanted 80x24, you had to use a separate third-party
> > 80-column card, or (later) and Apple IIe, IIc, IIc+, or IIgs.
> > I'm not sure what you're referring to by "etc.", but the vast majority of
> > Softcards and their clones did not have their own RAM, and used that of
> the
> > Apple II.
> > The PCPI Applicard and it's clones had their own RAM. Some very late
> models
> > of the Softcard had their own RAM.
>
> I remember hearing, at one point, a statement (not necessarily reliable),
> that said that 20% of Apple computers had a Softcard.
> What was the approximate percentage in 1980/1981, when IBM contacted
> Microsoft?
> (or number that had been sold, which would include ones not actually in
> use)
>
> What was the PEAK percentage?
> (or number that had been sold, which would include ones not actually in
> use)
>
> Were there other brands, or imitations, available then (1980/1981)?
>
> Later, what percentage were imitations?
>
> Speculatively, how much were they used V use of the machine in non-Z80
> ways?  (How many people bought it just ot have the capability, without
> necessarily being active CP/M users?)
>
>
> This is definitely not the first time that I have heard that IBM had
> assumed that CP/M was a Microsoft product.
>
>
>
>


Re: WTB: BA11-K Rack Rails

2018-10-08 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yep, just like the lower picture! It is indeed steel, I thought it was
aluminum from a quick look.

I'd prefer a set of original outer rails, but something newer or something
I have to modify a little would be fine.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Oct 8, 2018 at 7:38 PM Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > From: systems_glitch
>
> > I do have the inner rails/latch system for tilting the box, they are
> > plain aluminum.
>
> Like the lower picture:
>
>   http://gunkies.org/wiki/BA11-K_mounting_box
>
> there? I'm guessing that's zinc-plated steel.
>
> Alas, I don't know who made those (may have been DEC themselves), or a
> source
> for them. _But_
>
>
> I have some Chassis Trak outers which are almost compatible. (I say
> 'outers',
> but actually many slide sets are 3-part; there's an outer which bolts to
> the
> rack, an inner which bolts to the mounting box. and then a third piece, a
> 'middle' I guess we can call them. Sometimes the middle and outer can be
> separated, with a safety latch you have to release - but I think I recall
> seeing one set where you can't extract the middle mrom the outer - at least
> not out the front.)
>
> Anyway, the silver inners do fit into the track in the middles of those CT
> units - all except the two wheels at the inside end of the inners! Too bad,
> because I have no use for these outers, and would be happy to hand them
> over
> to you.
>
> The other possibilithy is that I _might_ have a spare set of the silver
> outers. I have 2 sets of the outers (2 left, 2 right), 4 of the special
> pivot
> bolts - but only one set of inners - at least that I can quickly find. Let
> me
> have a look around, and see if I'm really missing the inners - if so. I
> might
> be up for trading you a set of outers for something I can use.
>
> Noel
>


Re: WTB: BA11-K Rack Rails

2018-10-08 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Bill,

I think I have the outers for the BA11-D currently installed in the rack. I
know a PDP-11/05 lived in here at one point.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Oct 8, 2018 at 6:41 PM Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > From: Bill Degnan
>
> > What is the part number for the -D ?
>
> Do you have the inners? The only -D inners I know of are the kind shown
> here:
>
>   http://gunkies.org/wiki/BA11-D_Mounting_Box
>
> and if you have those, you're in luck; the outers from a still-available
> Chassis Track unit are perfect replacements for the original outers. Kinda
> pricy, mind, but at least they're available.
>
> If you have a different inner, I'd love an image, so I can see what it is,
> and document it.
>
> If you have no inners, kinda ugly. You can buy that CT unit, but you'll
> have
> to drill matching holes in the inner - and you lose the rotational
> capability.
>
> Noel
>


Re: WTB: BA11-K Rack Rails

2018-10-08 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
It's the BA11-K with the H765 power supply on the back end. I do have the
inner rails/latch system for tilting the box, they are plain aluminum. The
outer rails probably went with the rack.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Oct 8, 2018 at 12:40 PM Bill Degnan via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> >
> >
> > > Looking for a pair of rack rails for my PDP-11/10.
> >
> > Is it in a BA11-K (as suggested by the Subject line), or BA11-D?
> (-11/10's
> > came in both, for the 10-1/2" box.) The -K has the power supply on the
> end,
> > the -D down one side.
> >
> > 
>
> > If you've got the inners, you're home free; I can give you a
> > General Devices 'Chassis Trak' part number that will provide working
> outers
> > (although you'd probably have to modify the locking hole for the lock to
> > work).
> >
> >
> What is the part number for the -D ?
> Bill
>


WTB: BA11-K Rack Rails

2018-10-08 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Looking for a pair of rack rails for my PDP-11/10.

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: Advice requested on proper disposal of Seagate ST3000DM001 disk drives

2018-09-21 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Burning of potassium permanganate to manganese greensand will often get it
going. You are on your own for figuring out how to do that.

Thermite is not the ultimate destructive force some people seem to think it
is. If you're trying to totally liquefy the platters you'll probably need
to remove them from the drives and put them in something capable of
containing the thermite for at least a little while (e.g. graphite
crucible). The usual, "put it in a flower pot" will likely either result in
a mess or a smallish hole through the platter, which really isn't any
better than running a drill through it. The suggestion of using an
acetylene torch is far more practical, if you for some reason are really
needing to turn platters into blobs.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Sep 21, 2018 at 8:45 AM Robert via cctalk 
wrote:

> If my memory of O Level chemistry classes is anything to go by, the
> idea was that you used a piece of Magnesium ribbon to ignite it. I
> don't recall Manganese Dioxide being part of the recipe.
> On Thu, Sep 20, 2018 at 10:20 PM Eric Smith via cctalk
>  wrote:
> >
> > Anyone have advice on making thermite? Ingredients, sources, proportions?
> >
> > The internet seems to think that just using aluminum powder with ferric
> > oxide is relatively hard to ignite, and that some manganese dioxide would
> > help with that.
> >
> > Without spending too much time shopping, it looks like I can get:
> > * aluminum powder, 5 micron, 2 lb for $34
> > * ferric oxide, 10 lb for $27
> > * manganese dioxide, 1 lb for $39
>


Re: I finally got to see a LMI Lambda in real life...

2018-09-19 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
A worthy detour on the way to Midwest in the Conmega-bus! Good to meet you
as well as seeing these machines get another shot at life!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Sep 17, 2018 at 1:20 AM Guy Sotomayor Jr via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I finally dug up the link to the CADR stuff (there’s probably some other
> useful links there as well).
> http://www.unlambda.com/index.php?n=Main.Symbolics <
> http://www.unlambda.com/index.php?n=Main.Symbolics>.
>
> The CADR emulator and all of the microcode and OS (disk) images are in the
> download
> directory.  Even if you don’t use the emulator, if you ever want to get
> the CADR running again
> you’ll need the microcode and OS images.
>
> TTFN - Guy
>
> > On Sep 14, 2018, at 3:10 PM, Guy Sotomayor Jr via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > Without the console doing much with the CADR is going to be tough.  Not
> having the disk isn’t too terrible as the basic contents (uCode and system
> code) are available.  There’s even an emulator for the CADR though I don’t
> have the link handy at the moment.  Ping me if you have trouble finding it.
> >
> > Good luck with the LMIs!
> >
> > I have several Symbolics machines (3620, 2 3640, 3650) that are more or
> less complete.  The 3620 works (at least the last time I powered it on it
> did…not enough time to “play”).  At least one of the 3640s has shown signs
> of life and the 3650  (which came back to me after a vacation of 10 years
> or so) needs some “love” but it’ll be worth it because in addition to the
> normal console it has the “good” color frame buffer!  The biggest issue for
> me is consoles.  I have 3 but one is in need of repair.
> >
> > TTFN - Guy
> >
> >> On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:55 PM, Daniel Seagraves via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >>
> >> Two of them in fact, and a CADR - In my garage, no less!
> >>
> >> The Lambdas are in bad shape, and the CADR is in very bad shape and
> missing its console and disk. It’s going to take awhile to get them cleaned
> up and see how viable they are.
> >>
> >> On the plus side, I got a some spares and debugging equipment, and I
> have a working PDP-11 to debug the CADR with if it gets that far, so
> there’s a good chance I should be able to get at least one working.
> >>
> >> I’ll post more as things develop.
> >>
> >
>
>


Re: VCFMW

2018-09-19 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
A great show indeed! My first time to Midwest, glad to finally meet a lot
of the folks I know online!

Still recovering from the drive back.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Sep 19, 2018 at 1:31 AM Jim Brain via cctalk 
wrote:

>
> https://www.facebook.com/pg/go4retro/photos/?tab=album_id=1088786634614459
>
>
>


Re: VT100's

2018-09-06 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'm personally interested in an original because it's the physical standard
that a lot of imitations and emulations decided to implement. For similar
reasons, I have a LSI ADM-3A -- not because it's the best terminal ever,
but because it is so interwoven into the history of UNIX.

I personally seem to use a VT220 for most of my general hacking. It's nice
to have the current loop interface!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 11:37 AM Carlo Pisani via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> cause it's the simples, I guess
> Il giorno gio 6 set 2018 alle ore 17:35 Zane Healy via cctalk
>  ha scritto:
> >
> > Let me start by saying this isn’t intended to start a flame war or
> anything.  I’m genuinely curious.
> >
> > Why is the VT100 so popular?
> >
> > Personally I prefer the VT420’s, though I’d love a VT340/340+ or VT525.
> >
> > I have VT100’s, 320’s and 420’s.  I really only use VT420’s.  In fact I
> have one sitting next to my desk in my office hooked to a DECserver 90TL.
> >
> > Zane
> >
> >
> >
>


Re: VCFMW DEC VTs, LAs

2018-09-06 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Definitely interested in a VT5x or VT78 terminal, potentially a real VT100
as well (currently have a C.Itoh CIT-101).

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 9:22 AM Marc Howard via cctalk 
wrote:

> Never mind.  I saw the DEC VT in the subject line and skipped over the
> VCFMW.
>
> Maec
>
> On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 5:39 AM Marc Howard  wrote:
>
> > Bring where?  The Silicon Valley swap meet this Saturday?
> >
> > I'd be interested in VT-52 parts or a VT-100.
> >
> > Marc
> >
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 5:33 AM David Griffith via cctalk <
> > cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> >> On September 5, 2018 8:55:45 PM PDT, Paul Anderson via cctalk <
> >> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >> >Is anyone interested in any DEC VT50, VT52(ONE WITH PRINTER), VT78,
> >> >any of the VT100 family, or any other video terminals or monitors or
> >> >parts?
> >> >
> >> >LA35, LA36, LA120, any other printer or parts?
> >> >
> >> >Anything else?  If asked, I will try to bring.
> >> >
> >> >Thanks, Paul
> >>
> >> I'm looking for a "1" key and a "data" key for an LA-12 "Correspondent"
> >> --
> >> David Griffith
> >> d...@661.org
> >>
> >
>


Re: VWoCW - New Items Posted for Sale from Sellam's Collection

2018-09-03 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
The little A.R.T. EPP-1 programmer is a handy little device, I've got one.
Doesn't have the most massive range of supported devices, but it's very
convenient to use! You just dump Intel HEX files in through the serial
port, from any computer with RS-232 and a terminal program.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 2:54 AM Sellam Ismail via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Hello Folks.
>
> I've got a new batch of stuff for your weekend perusing:
>
> A.R.T. Dutch Design EPP-1F E(E)Prom Programmer
> Radio Shack TRS-80 Twelve Meg Disk System
> Radio Shack TRS-80 Twelve Meg Disk System
> Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer Mini Disk
> Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer Mini Disk
> Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer Mini Disk
> Exatron Stringy Floppy Drive
> Exatron Stringy Floppy Drive
> Panasonic JR-200U Personal Computer
> Panasonic RK-P400C 4-color Graphic Penwriter
> Qume QumeTrak 842 8" floppy disk drive
> 1-800-FLOPPYS Smart Communications System
> MFJ MFJ-1278B Multi-mode Data Controller
> Suncom side-mount joystick controller
> TI PHP1200 Peripheral Expansion System
> Network Computing Devices NCD XploraPro XQ
>
> As always, an index of links to the specific items above is available for
> your convenience in the New Arrivals Niche:
>
>
> https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1I53wxarLHlNmlPVf_HJ5oMKuab4zrApI_hiX0pNmy48/edit?pli=1#gid=949372371=A1
>
> Thanks!
>
> Sellam
>


Re: WTB: Altair 680, Any Condition, Any Configuration

2018-09-02 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yes, that's Grant Stockly's site. As far as I know, he's not currently
making any kits. Further, he's had several of my S-100 boards for, at this
point, years, and seems to be unwilling to return them to me.

I recently contacted him about purchasing the design documents for the
Altair 680 Kit. I haven't heard back. Grant, if you're reading these emails
and just not responding, please give me a reply or a phone call -- you have
my email address and phone number.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 9:02 PM Tapley, Mark  wrote:

> Jonathan,
> no connection to this site:
>
> http://www.altair680kit.com
>
> but I assume you are familiar with it?
> - Mark
> 210-522-6025 office
>  210-379-4635cell
>
>
>
> > On Sep 2, 2018, at 7:43 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > All,
> >
> > I'm looking for an Altair 680. I've been working with Jeff Albrecht's
> A680
> > during the RAM board design process, and would like to continue working
> on
> > a few things for the 680, but I'd also like to send Jeff's machine back
> to
> > him!
> >
> > Configuration is not particularly important to me. I'd like something
> with
> > a non-rev 0 motherboard in it if possible -- the easiest way to tell is
> > that there will be a slot for the expansion riser. Front panel vs.
> turnkey,
> > branding, etc. are not important to me.
> >
> > I'd potentially be interested in even an empty case!
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
>
>


WTB: Altair 680, Any Condition, Any Configuration

2018-09-02 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
All,

I'm looking for an Altair 680. I've been working with Jeff Albrecht's A680
during the RAM board design process, and would like to continue working on
a few things for the 680, but I'd also like to send Jeff's machine back to
him!

Configuration is not particularly important to me. I'd like something with
a non-rev 0 motherboard in it if possible -- the easiest way to tell is
that there will be a slot for the expansion riser. Front panel vs. turnkey,
branding, etc. are not important to me.

I'd potentially be interested in even an empty case!

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-09-01 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
And, like many Allied Telesyn/Telesis products, NO POWER BRICK! An
auto-switching supply is built right into the hub.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Sep 1, 2018 at 2:45 PM Cameron Kaiser via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > Speaking of AUI and hubs etc., any interest in a 10baseT hub with an AUI
> port?
> > Allied Telesyn/CentreCom MR820T
>
> I have (two of) the MR820TR, which has all of the above plus 10b2. Great
> device, incredibly reliable, running non-stop for years.
>
> --
>  personal:
> http://www.cameronkaiser.com/ --
>   Cameron Kaiser * Floodgap Systems * www.floodgap.com *
> ckai...@floodgap.com
> -- yankee hotel foxtrot. yankee hotel foxtrot. yankee hotel foxtrot.
> konec. ---
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-08-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yeah, Allied Telesyn/Telesis made (and still makes!) really decent hardware
at a midrange price. I often recommend their gigabit and PoE switches for
cost-sensitive projects, especially where management isn't really needed.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 5:56 PM Cameron Kaiser via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > Allied Telesis made a "multi port tap" that provided four AUI ports off a
> > single Ethernet tap. I don't know if it was a repeater/hub inside, or
> what.
> > It was much smaller than a DELNI or DEREP.
>
> Pretty sure I know the device you're talking about and I think it was
> a hub internally. I liked it a lot better than the DELNI.
>
> Come to think of it, I liked most of Allied Telesyn's stuff. I still have
> a 10Mbit hub of theirs handling the low speed systems and the 10b2 segment
> going to the HP 9000, and a whole mess of the transceivers which are
> periodically useful on AUI-only systems.
>
> --
>  personal:
> http://www.cameronkaiser.com/ --
>   Cameron Kaiser * Floodgap Systems * www.floodgap.com *
> ckai...@floodgap.com
> -- #include 
> 
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-08-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Allied Telesis made a "multi port tap" that provided four AUI ports off a
single Ethernet tap. I don't know if it was a repeater/hub inside, or what.
It was much smaller than a DELNI or DEREP.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 3:33 PM Paul Koning via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
> > On Aug 31, 2018, at 3:25 PM, Grant Taylor via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > On 08/31/2018 01:07 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> >> Yeah, I forget what the original allowed length was for drop cables,
> but I seem to remember it striking me as quite long! A few feet of CAT5 (or
> even better, STP) has a lot of wiggle room :P
> >
> > I think I've seen reports of multi AUI port taps.  Correct?
>
> You may be thinking of the DELNI, a multi AUI hub.  Not a repeater,
> apparently.  DEC also made a repeater in that era, the DEREP -- just two
> ports.  That may be why the DELNI was built, as a way to get more fanout
> without the complexity of a multiport repeater built out of discrete
> electronics.
>
> > Could you have one multi-port tap in a computer lab (of 5 ~ 20 machines)
> and connect them all to the single tap?  Sort of like what is done with
> 10BaseT cables to a hub in the room?
>
> Yes, the DELNI allowed for that, you'd plug in up to 8 NICs and then
> connect the uplink port to a transceiver.
>
> paul
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-08-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yeah, I forget what the original allowed length was for drop cables, but I
seem to remember it striking me as quite long! A few feet of CAT5 (or even
better, STP) has a lot of wiggle room :P

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 3:08 PM Paul Koning  wrote:

>
>
> > On Aug 31, 2018, at 2:45 PM, systems_glitch 
> wrote:
> >
> > Yeah, you can make up your own AUI cables with less-than-spec wire and
> get away with it no problem, but I was referring to NOS premade AUI cables
> being a limited resource.
> >
> > I've made them with DA15s and CAT5 cable before, and it works for short
> runs.
>
> That figures; the impedance is not quite the same but close enough (78
> ohms vs. 100) and AUI cable is supposed to be shielded.  But there should
> be a fair amount of margin.
>
> paul
>
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-08-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yeah, you can make up your own AUI cables with less-than-spec wire and get
away with it no problem, but I was referring to NOS premade AUI cables
being a limited resource.

I've made them with DA15s and CAT5 cable before, and it works for short
runs.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 1:21 PM Paul Koning  wrote:

> I understand 10Base5 cable being limited, though regular 50 ohm coax
> generally works fine if you work around the lack of stripes.
>
> AUI cable, though, that doesn't seem much of a problem.  Straightforward N
> pair twisted pair cable, terminated with DA15 connectors.  The slide locks
> are not quite common but I believe still exist in parts catalogs, and you
> can do without them in any case.
>
> paul
>
> > On Aug 31, 2018, at 11:25 AM, systems_glitch via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > Honestly? I'm worried about someone reading the list archive and hoarding
> > them all away. It's a limited resource.
> >
> > I'll send you the link off-list.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
> >
> > On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:18 AM Grant Taylor via cctalk <
> > cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> >> On 08/31/2018 08:04 AM, systems_glitch wrote:
> >>> Excellent, glad it made it there quickly and safely!
> >>
> >> Me too.
> >>
> >>> If anyone needs AUI cables, I don't have a bunch on hand, but I can
> pass
> >>> on the seller I buy them from -- 1m cable, $20 shipped in the US.
> >>
> >> Is there any reason not to go ahead and share the information publicly?
> >>
> >> I know that I will eventually need to acquire some AUI cables.
> >>
> >> The kicker is that I had two, exactly what I need and the NICs to
> >> connect them to before a cross country move that I got rid of a LOT of
> >> stuff.  (I keep finding out exactly how much I'm replacing.  :-(  No
> fun.)
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Grant. . . .
> >> unix || die
> >>
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-08-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Honestly? I'm worried about someone reading the list archive and hoarding
them all away. It's a limited resource.

I'll send you the link off-list.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:18 AM Grant Taylor via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 08/31/2018 08:04 AM, systems_glitch wrote:
> > Excellent, glad it made it there quickly and safely!
>
> Me too.
>
> > If anyone needs AUI cables, I don't have a bunch on hand, but I can pass
> > on the seller I buy them from -- 1m cable, $20 shipped in the US.
>
> Is there any reason not to go ahead and share the information publicly?
>
> I know that I will eventually need to acquire some AUI cables.
>
> The kicker is that I had two, exactly what I need and the NICs to
> connect them to before a cross country move that I got rid of a LOT of
> stuff.  (I keep finding out exactly how much I'm replacing.  :-(  No fun.)
>
>
>
> --
> Grant. . . .
> unix || die
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-08-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Excellent, glad it made it there quickly and safely! If anyone needs AUI
cables, I don't have a bunch on hand, but I can pass on the seller I buy
them from -- 1m cable, $20 shipped in the US.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 1:14 AM Grant Taylor via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 06/25/2018 03:20 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > Anyone interested in cable can email me directly (please change the
> > subject line, it'll get binned into my cctalk folder otherwise). I can
> > provide any level of "kit" from just the cable to fully ready to go. I
> > do have a very few NOS Cabletron ST-500-01 transceiver/non-intrusive
> > tap kits as well.
>
> Hi Jonathan,
>
> I wanted to take a moment and say "Thank You!" for making it a
> possibility for me to have a functional 10Base5 / Thicknet / Hosepipe
> network segment.
>
> I received mine in the mail today.  :-)
>
> I look forward to picking up a couple of NICs with AUI interfaces and
> the requisite AUI cables to connect to the transceivers that you provided.
>
> If this was eBay I'd say:  5 out of 5 - I would do business with
> Jonathan again.
>
> Thank you again.  :-)
>
>
>
> --
> Grant. . . .
> unix || die
>


Re: Color of Leaky Electrolyic Caps?

2018-08-29 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Black is a common wrap color for electrolytics, wouldn't be surprised if
the majority are black wrapper. Plenty of leaky brown wrappers, too. And
yes, blue :)

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018 at 6:33 PM Marvin Johnston via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I was just checking out the leaky capacitors on the model 100
> motherboard, and they are all colored black. And ditto for the HX-20.
> The ones that are both light and dark blue look to be fine (no leakage.)
>
> So am I just seeing an anomaly, or is this the experience of most people
> here?
>


Re: Unknown Z80 CPU board and backplane ID anyone?

2018-07-30 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
403 Forbidden.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 1:27 PM, Adrian Graham via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Hi folks,
>
> A friend of mine in the UK is looking for any info on the following
> boards. The CPU board is marked ‘VA 03-907023-00’ and features a Z80 with
> 16K RAM and an 18.432MHz crystal. The backplane is also VA and has 11
> 132-pin slots that aren’t all identical implying usage for different cards
> in those locations. Voltages are +5/-5/+12V.
>
> Pics:
>
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30.jpg <
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30.jpg>
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30-1.jpg <
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30-1.jpg>
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30-2.jpg <
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30-2.jpg>
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30-3.jpg <
> http://www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk/tynemouthsw_2018-Jul-30-3.jpg>
>
> My duckduckgo-fu has let me down.
>
> Cheers!
>
> --
> adrian/witchy
> Owner of Binary Dinosaurs, the UK's biggest home computer collection?
> t: @binarydinosaursf: facebook.com/binarydinosaurs
> w: www.binarydinosaurs.co.uk
>
>
>
>


WTB: Data I/O 351A-070, 071, 072 Socket Adapters

2018-07-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
All,

I'm looking for any or all of the following Data I/O Socket Adapters:

351A-070 (8741, 8748, etc)
351A-071 (8751)
351A-072 (8755A)

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: SuperBrain

2018-07-12 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'd be interested if Doug isn't.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jul 12, 2018 at 12:50 PM, Bill Degnan via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Doug Crawford has one of these, he may want this.
>
> On Thu, Jul 12, 2018 at 12:24 PM Diane Bruce via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
> > I've discovered a SuperBrain manual and two floppy disks in my basement.
> > Anyone want them? Free to a good home.
> >
> > Diane
> > --
> > - d...@freebsd.org d...@db.net http://www.db.net/~db
> >
>


Re: Can anyone identify this S100 serial board?

2018-07-10 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Got it:

ftp://filedump.glitchwrks.com/manuals/s100/national_multiplex/Computer_Aid_2SIO-R.pdf

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: Can anyone identify this S100 serial board?

2018-07-10 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I've got the manual for this one -- I've got one myself. I'll get it
scanned and uploaded.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jul 10, 2018 at 10:20 PM, Richard Cini via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> The two connectors at the top remind me of the MITS 2SIO board.
> Chip on the left with the label seems odd — looks like an EPROM. Not sure
> why they’d use a UART (40-pin chip) and an ACIA, but it’s an interesting
> two-port combo board.
>
>
>
> Get Outlook for iOS
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 10, 2018 at 10:17 PM -0400, "dwight via cctalk" <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I'm thinking one serial and one cassette. The 8251 for the cassette.
>
> I can't make out all the chips at the pins? The board was hand laid out.
> Is there nothing on the bottom but traces?
>
> Dwight
>
>
> 
> From: cctalk  on behalf of Ethan via cctalk
> Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 6:43:12 PM
> To: cctalk@classiccmp.org
> Subject: Can anyone identify this S100 serial board?
>
>
> Trying to identify the S100 serial board in my Imsai 8080.
>
> https://imgur.com/eZyOVT5
>
> I assume it was a kit. There are wires from behind one of the ICs that go
> to DB25 on the rear, along with other DB25s with a few pins (maybe
> cassette input.)
>
> Any help appreciated.
>
>
> --
> : Ethan O'Toole
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


Re: SMS floppy disk controller

2018-07-08 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
eBay is redirecting you because the auction is ended, This is a new
"feature."

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 9:34 PM, Bill Degnan via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> ?? It's a 1981 Godbout RAM board with 6116's in it.  Did you send the wrong
> link?
> b
>
> On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 9:27 PM Al Kossow via cctalk  >
> wrote:
>
> > https://www.ebay.com/itm//163128936661
> >
> > ok, I'm guessing this is an SMS floppy controller
> > why is someone willing to pay $50+ for it in the condition its in?
> >
> >
>


Re: Looking for North star software

2018-07-04 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I've got a Horizon so native console is no problem.

I originally got Dave Dunfield's NST working with my IMSAI and Dajen SCI
monitor board, on a North Star MDC single-density controller. I couldn't
get NST configured properly with the Dajen monitor (you're supposed to be
able to give it a format for poking bytes into memory), so I ended up
customizing Dave's RAMless 512 byte monitor for the SCI's serial port and
getting loaded up that way.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 12:35 PM, allison via cctalk 
wrote:

> On 07/04/2018 08:37 AM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > Yeah, you do need a monitor or something to get started on either Mike
> > Douglas's solution or Dave Dunfield's NST. I've used both successfully.
> >
> > If you have hard-sectored disks, I can just make you a boot disk. I have
> > both single and double density controllers.
> Makes sure they are configured for the NS* native IO.  If they are not
> your still
> stuck as then the OS is looking for an IO board that is foreign.
>
> I know that as before the horizon I had the bare NS* MDS in the Altair
> using the SIO as serial.
>
> Putting a boot monitor in is by far the easy way out.  I did that early on
> and it has serial transfer and embedded loader for soft sector controller.
>
> I rarely use the stock  NS* system but the older one with all the changes
> is still in use.  Hard disk (2x 31mb) makes it more useful.
>
> There is one excuse I use occasionally for pulling out the stock NS,
> UCSD Pascal.  The first IDE.
>
> Allison
>
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
> >
> > On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 12:39 AM, dwight via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> I'm told that the N* controller can write H89 formated disk but the H89
> >> controller can't do N* format. I could have that backwards but that is
> what
> >> I recall. One can't do the other.
> >>
> >> The H89 hard sectored controller is single density only, while the newer
> >> N* can do both single and double density, still hard sectored though.
> There
> >> is always confusion on the N* controllers as to which can do double
> >> density. My research indicates that the MDC-nA are single density only
> and
> >> the MDC-nDA can do both ( n is a rev. number 1, 2, 3, or 4).
> >>
> >> Dwight
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> 
> >> From: cctalk  on behalf of Fred Cisin
> via
> >> cctalk 
> >> Sent: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 11:08:18 AM
> >> To: General Discussion: On-Topic and Off-Topic Posts
> >> Subject: Re: Looking for North star software
> >>
> >> On Tue, 3 Jul 2018, dwight via cctalk wrote:
> >>> I'm not as worried about 10 hard secrtored disk. I still have the punch
> >>> I had made for my H89. I can create 10 sector from old 360K disk.
> >> If you have a working H89 (hard sectored), then you should be able to
> >> write a program to run on the H89 to write hard sectored disk images!
> >> Can it do single density 256 byte sectors?  or MFM 512 byte sectors?
> >>
> >> .ASM for PCTOFLOP should be available, as a guide to what you need, but
> >> will need modification for the H89 disk controller.
> >>
> >> Most of the NorthStar disk images should be availablem once you've got
> the
> >> H89 writing disks from them!
> >>
> >> Once you've got the NorthStar booting CP/M plus a copy of PIP, you can
> >> then continue on it.
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>


Re: Looking for North star software

2018-07-04 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yeah, you do need a monitor or something to get started on either Mike
Douglas's solution or Dave Dunfield's NST. I've used both successfully.

If you have hard-sectored disks, I can just make you a boot disk. I have
both single and double density controllers.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 12:39 AM, dwight via cctalk 
wrote:

> I'm told that the N* controller can write H89 formated disk but the H89
> controller can't do N* format. I could have that backwards but that is what
> I recall. One can't do the other.
>
> The H89 hard sectored controller is single density only, while the newer
> N* can do both single and double density, still hard sectored though. There
> is always confusion on the N* controllers as to which can do double
> density. My research indicates that the MDC-nA are single density only and
> the MDC-nDA can do both ( n is a rev. number 1, 2, 3, or 4).
>
> Dwight
>
>
>
> 
> From: cctalk  on behalf of Fred Cisin via
> cctalk 
> Sent: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 11:08:18 AM
> To: General Discussion: On-Topic and Off-Topic Posts
> Subject: Re: Looking for North star software
>
> On Tue, 3 Jul 2018, dwight via cctalk wrote:
> > I'm not as worried about 10 hard secrtored disk. I still have the punch
> > I had made for my H89. I can create 10 sector from old 360K disk.
>
> If you have a working H89 (hard sectored), then you should be able to
> write a program to run on the H89 to write hard sectored disk images!
> Can it do single density 256 byte sectors?  or MFM 512 byte sectors?
>
> .ASM for PCTOFLOP should be available, as a guide to what you need, but
> will need modification for the H89 disk controller.
>
> Most of the NorthStar disk images should be availablem once you've got the
> H89 writing disks from them!
>
> Once you've got the NorthStar booting CP/M plus a copy of PIP, you can
> then continue on it.
>
>
>


Re: Looking for North star software

2018-07-02 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Mike Douglas has a bunch of North Star utilities that you can use to "bare
metal bootstrap" disks:

http://deramp.com/northstar.html

Unless you have a stockpile of hard-sector disks, you probably also want
his Virtual Sector Generator board:

http://deramp.com/vsg.html

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 8:16 PM, dwight via cctalk 
wrote:

> I was thinking someone has already done this. If no, as you say, it is not
> an impossible task.
>
> The TSS/B is suppose to be their scientific package. It at least has BASIC
> in it. I have another disk marked CP/M in the same box. I should be able to
> put something together under CP/M.
>
> It is a North Star Horizon. There seems to be some images out there so I
> don't know how they are being captured.
>
> Dwight
>
>
> 
> From: cctalk  on behalf of Fred Cisin via
> cctalk 
> Sent: Monday, July 2, 2018 3:27:09 PM
> To: General Discussion: On-Topic and Off-Topic Posts
> Subject: Re: Looking for North star software
>
> On Mon, 2 Jul 2018, dwight via cctalk wrote:
> > I have a machine that I'm just now bringing up. I have some boot
> > software but it is TSS/A that is the accounting multi-user package. I'd
> > really like the TSS/B floppies instead. I'd settle for images.
>
> Sounds like fun!
>
> What model Northstar?
>
> Once you get some images, have you worked out a way to get the images onto
> hard-sector disks?
>
> AFTER you boot the machine, with some minimal programs, you can transfer
> data into the machine through serial port.
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-28 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Thanks for the clarifications, Paul!

Indeed, some thinnet devices do have terminators built in. On a fair bit of
Allied Telesyn gear, there's a switch for it.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Paul Koning via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
> > On Jun 28, 2018, at 4:52 AM, Peter Coghlan via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > On 2018-06-27 19:34:38 -07:00, Chuck Guzis via cctalk wrote:
> >> On 06/27/2018 04:19 PM, Antonio Carlini via cctalk wrote:
> >>
> >>> No idea. But on thickwire the taps were all supposed to be made at
> >>> specifically marked positions (for the reason given earlier).
> >>> Perhaps someone (incorrectly) thought that the terminator should also
> be
> >>> at such a position and so a terminator could not be located at a tap?
> >>
> >> It had occurred to me to wonder if some poor tech had measured out, say,
> >> 151 meters of cable where 152.5 was called for by the "exactly every
> >> 2.5M spec).  It would seem that any attempt to add an extra 1.5 was
> >> believed to be called for in order to install a terminator would have
> >> resulted in a "cure" worse than simple adding the terminator at the end
> >> of the cable.
> >>
> >
> > I guess one of the keys to a successful networking technology is that it
> > should be possible to specify how to install it in a way that people not
> > familiar with the inner workings of the technology can readily deal with.
> > There are advantages to keeping the instructions as simple, short and
> easy
> > to follow as possible with a minimum of exceptions and special cases.
>
> Yes, and indeed the Ethernet spec does that.
>
> > It might make sense to state that everything should be spaced 2.5m apart
> > even when there is no advantage to this in the special case of
> terminators.
> > The advantage is in reducing the complexity of the instructions.  The
> > disadvantage is it might lead to difficult cases like this one.
>
> The spec is fine.  What seems to happen is that people who don't
> understand EE made up their own additional rules for no good reason.
> Section 7.6.1 talks about cable lengths; 7.6.2 describes transceiver
> placement.  Those rules are clear and sufficient, but neither says anything
> about terminator placement.
>
> > On a slightly different point, didn't the thickwire spec call for the
> outer
> > conductor of the cable to be earthed at exactly one point, presumably for
> > safety reasons in case the cable contacted something at high voltage?
>
> Yes, Ethernet spec section 7.6.3.  Also for static discharge, though it
> doesn't say that explicitly.
>
> > This requirement was somehow not carried forward into thinwire, perhaps
> > because the entirity of a thinwire network, including the connectors was
> > supposed to be insulated and therefore not a danger to anyone?  DEC
> produced
> > insulated thinwire connectors and terminators but other than that I think
> > this requirement was honoured more in the breach.
>
> Looking at 802.3, it says that a Thinwire segment MAY be grounded at one
> point, but not at multiple points.  It also requires a static discharge
> path at each transceiver, 1 Mohm to ground.  So you don't necessarily have
> a hard ground for the case where the cable is shorted to an AC power line
> -- I assume the reasoning was that this is unlikely enough it doesn't need
> to be considered.  The Ethernet spec doesn't have anything analogous for
> 10Base-5 transceivers, so there the hard ground is necessary for a static
> discharge path.
>
> Both coax types, of course, require termination at each end.  And both
> have a stated requirement for all connectors to be insulated.  In practice,
> you can be a little loose with that if you place things so they stay away
> from other metal objects.
>
> You may not see the terminator at both ends on thinwire, if you're dealing
> with repeaters that are designed to sit at the segment end.  Those have the
> terminator for that end inside the box.
>
> paul
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-28 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Thinnet is supposed to be grounded at one point, and only one point, as
well. Supposedly that's what the chain on some terminators is for. Some
hubs have a grounding and termination option built in. I don't know offhand
if this was specced in the standard or not. Of course, this often wasn't
followed, or was followed incorrectly and the segment ended up grounded in
multiple spots, which can cause ground loops.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 4:52 AM, Peter Coghlan via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 2018-06-27 19:34:38 -07:00, Chuck Guzis via cctalk wrote:
> > On 06/27/2018 04:19 PM, Antonio Carlini via cctalk wrote:
> >
> > > No idea. But on thickwire the taps were all supposed to be made at
> > > specifically marked positions (for the reason given earlier).
> > > Perhaps someone (incorrectly) thought that the terminator should also
> be
> > > at such a position and so a terminator could not be located at a tap?
> >
> > It had occurred to me to wonder if some poor tech had measured out, say,
> > 151 meters of cable where 152.5 was called for by the "exactly every
> > 2.5M spec).  It would seem that any attempt to add an extra 1.5 was
> > believed to be called for in order to install a terminator would have
> > resulted in a "cure" worse than simple adding the terminator at the end
> > of the cable.
> >
>
> I guess one of the keys to a successful networking technology is that it
> should be possible to specify how to install it in a way that people not
> familiar with the inner workings of the technology can readily deal with.
> There are advantages to keeping the instructions as simple, short and easy
> to follow as possible with a minimum of exceptions and special cases.
>
> It might make sense to state that everything should be spaced 2.5m apart
> even when there is no advantage to this in the special case of terminators.
> The advantage is in reducing the complexity of the instructions.  The
> disadvantage is it might lead to difficult cases like this one.
>
> On a slightly different point, didn't the thickwire spec call for the outer
> conductor of the cable to be earthed at exactly one point, presumably for
> safety reasons in case the cable contacted something at high voltage?
> This requirement was somehow not carried forward into thinwire, perhaps
> because the entirity of a thinwire network, including the connectors was
> supposed to be insulated and therefore not a danger to anyone?  DEC
> produced
> insulated thinwire connectors and terminators but other than that I think
> this requirement was honoured more in the breach.
>
> Regards,
> Peter Coghlan.
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
So then we're in agreement that screwing the N terminator directly to an
intrusive tap shouldn't make a difference? No need for a jumper off the end
of the tap for the terminator to live on?

As a high school CCNA hopeful, I accepted this as, "it's what you do," and
I hadn't really given it any thought since then, as I hadn't had to mess
with thicknet since then. I agree that it doesn't really make sense when
you actually *think* about it, and, like I said to start with, it's what I
recall being told back then anyway -- I could be remembering wrong to start
with :)

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 8:02 PM, Paul Koning via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
> > On Jun 26, 2018, at 7:20 PM, Eric Smith via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 4:37 PM, Chuck Guzis via cctalk <
> > cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> >> On 06/26/2018 03:15 PM, Grant Taylor via cctalk wrote:
> >>
> >>> I can only guess that having a terminator too close interferes with or
> >>> weakens the signal too much in some way.
> >>
> >> Exactly what would the effect be?  I recall putting terminators on
> >> 10base2 coax just hanging off one leg of a BNC tee.  Really, no distance
> >> at all.  Didn't seem to affect speed or distance.
> >
> >
> > If the termination resistance matches the characteristic impedance of the
> > cable, there should be no difference. When terminated properly, there is
> no
> > reflection from the terminator, so it looks equivalent to an infinitely
> > long cable, though in practical terms with less leakage than an "actual"
> > infinitely long cable would have.
> >
> > Of course, in reality it will never be terminated perfectly, so there
> will
> > always be a small reflection, which can be seen with a TDR. If the
> > termination resistance is pretty close, the reflection will be small
> enough
> > not to matter at all for Ethernet.
>
> Exactly.  And the specs for the Ethernet terminator are quite tight for
> that reason.  The connectors themselves have non-zero impact but very
> small; they are high quality microwave grade connectors.
>
> You got the definition precisely correct: a terminator is a device that is
> electrically equivalent to an infinite length cable.  You can cut the
> unused part of a coax anywhere you want and put a terminator at that point
> instead, and as far as the rest of the cable is concerned nothing has
> changed (apart from very small effects because the components are not
> perfect).
>
> There clearly is confusion about what terminators are and how they work.
> It's all perfectly straightforward elementary classic E & M, and any
> halfway decent RF theory textbook will make things clear.  Even a source as
> elementary as the ARRL Radio Amateur Handbook will serve.
>
> paul
>
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
(re-send due to not reply-all'ing as required)

Sorry, I think that came across wrong due to my wording -- we were told it
wasn't general practice to screw the terminator directly to the intrusive
tap, as you would with a BNC tee on thinnet. We were told to use a jumper
to extend somewhat past the tap, if it was the last thing on the segment.

Ethan sneaked in a reply that mentions a lack of distance between the last
tap's impedance bump and the end of the transmission line. Perhaps someone
with more of a transmission line engineering background can confirm or deny
that.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 3:16 PM, Paul Koning  wrote:

>
>
> > On Jun 26, 2018, at 3:07 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > I've confirmed that I now have N connector intrusive taps! These have a N
> > female connector on each end, like the leftmost transceiver in this
> picture:
> >
> > https://oelzant.priv.at/~aoe/images/galleries/hardware/802_
> 3_transceivers/DSC_0927_med.jpg
> >
> > I seem to recall the CCNA instructor telling us that you weren't really
> > supposed to screw a 50 ohm terminator onto an intrusive tap; I don't know
> > if there's good reason for it or if it was just a general practice.
>
> I'm not sure if I understood that correctly.  It sounds flat out wrong,
> and it presumably would not be general practice because an Ethernet segment
> with a missing terminator either doesn't work at all, or works very poorly.
>
> An Ethernet segment must have a 50 ohm terminator at each end (and nowhere
> else).  Always. The spec is crystal clear about this, and so is elementary
> transmission line physics.
>
> If you have an intrusive (connectorized) tap, installed at the very end of
> the cable, the other side of the tap must have a terminator since that's
> the end of the segment.
>
> I once saw an article in a magazine ("DEC Professional" or "RSTS
> Professional", a US based rag for PDP11 users) that talked about thick and
> thin Ethernet.  It mentioned that you can connect the two -- which is
> correct.  But it showed the wrong way -- with a T connector and a
> terminator attached to one of the legs of the T.  In other words, a
> "terminator" in the MIDDLE of the segment.  The correct way, of course, is
> a BNC to N adapter, and you have to use the thin Ethernet length and
> station limits.
>
> So it sounds like your instructor was just as ignorant as the writers of
> that magazine.
>
> paul
>
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I've confirmed that I now have N connector intrusive taps! These have a N
female connector on each end, like the leftmost transceiver in this picture:

https://oelzant.priv.at/~aoe/images/galleries/hardware/802_3_transceivers/DSC_0927_med.jpg

I seem to recall the CCNA instructor telling us that you weren't really
supposed to screw a 50 ohm terminator onto an intrusive tap; I don't know
if there's good reason for it or if it was just a general practice. In any
case, I've got 40 of the things now, which makes a lot of the existing
transceiver surplus (usually missing the tap) useful again!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 2:50 PM, systems_glitch 
wrote:

> Indeed, the AMP coring tool is more a cutter than a drill, and it doesn't
> go all the way to the center conductor, which would short out the segment
> as the cutter is metallic. It doesn't screw in though, it has a shoulder
> that stops on the seating surface of the vampire tap body. I don't know if
> this is consistent with the original 3 mbit Ethernet, as I've never worked
> with that.
>
> The "stinger" contact gets screwed into the threaded hole in the vampire
> tap body. Some AMP literature refers to the stinger as being spring loaded,
> but none of mine are, and I don't think any of the ones from CCNA days were
> either. The shaft of the stinger contact is insulated, only the very tip is
> bare. The tip is finished in a sharp conical point, which penetrates the
> last little bit of the foamed dielectric and actually makes contact with
> the center conductor. I don't know how far it penetrates into the copper, I
> suspect it just displaces a small divot around itself.
>
> Cutting/coring is absolutely necessary to get through the quad shield
> ground layer on real Belden 9880 or 89880 Ethernet coax. It's tough stuff.
> I have to comb out the outer braid and cut the first foil layer to get the
> inner braid to open enough for the N connector to seat!
>
> In case anyone was wondering about the color and designation, the yellow
> coax is typically Belden 9880 and is non-plenum, whereas the orange stuff I
> have is Belden 89880 plenum rated cable.
>
> If I had better video-recording equipment, I'd make a video of the N
> connector crimping and tap installation process. I think it'd be easier to
> demonstrate that way.
>
> Thanks,
> Jonathan
>
> On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 2:37 PM, Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
>> > From: Paul Koning
>>
>> > I believe the original concept was just a probe that would poke
>> through
>> > the cable to contact the center connector. The drill came because
>> the
>> > cable was too tough to penetrate without it.
>>
>> No, the original 3 Mbit Ethernet also used a 'drill' (actually, a
>> cylindrical
>> cutter which screwed into the thread of the tap housing; threading which
>> was
>> then used to screw in the transceiver).
>>
>> Anyway, there has to be a hole cut _through_ the cylindrical ground layer
>> (foil, or woven wire) around the center conductor. If you just stuck a
>> probe
>> into the cable to the center conductor, it would short it out.
>>
>> Noel
>>
>
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Indeed, the AMP coring tool is more a cutter than a drill, and it doesn't
go all the way to the center conductor, which would short out the segment
as the cutter is metallic. It doesn't screw in though, it has a shoulder
that stops on the seating surface of the vampire tap body. I don't know if
this is consistent with the original 3 mbit Ethernet, as I've never worked
with that.

The "stinger" contact gets screwed into the threaded hole in the vampire
tap body. Some AMP literature refers to the stinger as being spring loaded,
but none of mine are, and I don't think any of the ones from CCNA days were
either. The shaft of the stinger contact is insulated, only the very tip is
bare. The tip is finished in a sharp conical point, which penetrates the
last little bit of the foamed dielectric and actually makes contact with
the center conductor. I don't know how far it penetrates into the copper, I
suspect it just displaces a small divot around itself.

Cutting/coring is absolutely necessary to get through the quad shield
ground layer on real Belden 9880 or 89880 Ethernet coax. It's tough stuff.
I have to comb out the outer braid and cut the first foil layer to get the
inner braid to open enough for the N connector to seat!

In case anyone was wondering about the color and designation, the yellow
coax is typically Belden 9880 and is non-plenum, whereas the orange stuff I
have is Belden 89880 plenum rated cable.

If I had better video-recording equipment, I'd make a video of the N
connector crimping and tap installation process. I think it'd be easier to
demonstrate that way.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 2:37 PM, Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> > From: Paul Koning
>
> > I believe the original concept was just a probe that would poke
> through
> > the cable to contact the center connector. The drill came because the
> > cable was too tough to penetrate without it.
>
> No, the original 3 Mbit Ethernet also used a 'drill' (actually, a
> cylindrical
> cutter which screwed into the thread of the tap housing; threading which
> was
> then used to screw in the transceiver).
>
> Anyway, there has to be a hole cut _through_ the cylindrical ground layer
> (foil, or woven wire) around the center conductor. If you just stuck a
> probe
> into the cable to the center conductor, it would short it out.
>
> Noel
>


Re: Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-26 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
The intrusive part does indeed refer to the "intrusive to continued
service" aspect (e.g. cutting the line, crimping new ends...or at best
unscrewing the N connectors and removing a coupler fitting). I'm not sure
about the lesser insertion loss/impedance bump of vampire taps vs. N
connectors, but the vampire taps almost certainly make it much simpler to
keep the taps at 2.5 meter intervals, thus lessening the "stacking up"
effect of reflections from the small impedance bumps of the taps.

Interestingly, Cabletron even calls the ST-500-02, which comes with a BNC
adapter, a "tap." This "tap" gets tee'd in to a 10base2/thinnet run like
any other thinnet card. The N type tap seems to be the least common, at
least judging by surplus channels. Which is kind of weird when you think
about it -- you'd sort of expect that most vampire taps were abandoned in
place, on the cable they were installed on.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 1:36 PM, Paul Koning via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
> > On Jun 26, 2018, at 1:19 PM, Chuck Guzis via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> >
> > On 06/26/2018 10:04 AM, Grant Taylor via cctalk wrote:
> >
> >> My assumption was that "tap" comes from the second form.  I always
> >> thought there was a different name for the first form.  But I believe
> >> they were less common, hence fall under the "tap" term which is more
> >> popular.
> >
> > My impression from the old days of this system was that the so-called
> > "vampire taps" were superior in that they caused less of an impedance
> > "bump" when attached, as compared to the cut-and-connector-only type.
> >
> > Perhaps that's not true--can anyone verify this?
>
> I haven't heard that, and it sounds questionable.  All taps are impedance
> bumps because they attach a stub to the cable.  The spec limits the length
> of that stub for this reason.  But N connectors are constant-impedance
> types, in RF service rated up into the GHz range, so the connectors should
> certainly not be an issue.
>
> If a cut type "tap" were designed as a substantial size PCB with a
> connector at each end and wires (rather than transmission line) in between,
> that would certainly be bad, but that's just an example of the fact that
> you have to use transmission line design techniques when dealing with
> transmission lines.
>
> A cut design could allow for shorter stubs than is mechanically feasible
> with a vampire tap, so if anything it would seem that the cut design has
> the potential of being better.  But it doesn't really matter; a correctly
> built vampire tap installed properly will give you a compliant Ethernet,
> and a thicknet segment can be quite large because the design was done so
> carefully.
>
> paul
>
>


Thicknet/10base5 Test Segment: The Cable is In!

2018-06-25 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
All,

A few months ago, I mentioned one of my suppliers had Belden 89880 thicknet
Ethernet cable. Well, last week I finally made it down to his warehouse and
picked it up! The final bits for a test segment came in today, so I set up
a little link between my SPARCstation 10 and DEChub 90:

https://imgur.com/a/GDUR36j

Anyone interested in cable can email me directly (please change the subject
line, it'll get binned into my cctalk folder otherwise). I can provide any
level of "kit" from just the cable to fully ready to go. I do have a very
few NOS Cabletron ST-500-01 transceiver/non-intrusive tap kits as well.

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: DEC VT 420 comm cable?

2018-06-18 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I've got 1000 feet of DEC OfficeConnect flat cable, a bunch of MMJ ends,
and the crimp dies for them, if anyone finds themselves in need of cable.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 9:11 PM, Bill Degnan via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I have a 7-part lecture series titled "The DEC MMJ  Cable and You" I often
> present on luxury cruise ships if you're interested.
> Bill
>
>
> On Fri, Jun 15, 2018, 7:57 PM W2HX via cctalk 
> wrote:
>
> > A hearty thank you to Bill D. Dave W., Jonathan C and Warner! Everything
> > you ever wanted to know about MMJ (and then some)! Gracias!
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>


Re: Assessing Plastibands for QIC Tension Band Replacement

2018-06-18 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I'd seen your posts earlier, as luck would have it I've also been going
through some QIC tapes lately. I've been working with a US-based custom
rubber products manufacturer on finding replacement drive bands. Nothing to
report back yet, first round of samples felt like the right material but
were the wrong size (my goof, I think).

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 4:26 PM, jacob--- via cctalk 
wrote:

> On Mon, 4 Jun 2018, AJ Palmgren via cctalk wrote:
>
> If anyone is interested, I just published a few videos showing my testing
>> of PlastiBands for QIC Tape Cartridge replacement.
>>
>> https://youtu.be/irOrR-ZYwjw
>>
>> and
>>
>> https://youtu.be/GVsYHLvCvZY
>>
>> A special thank you to CuriousMarc, Al Kossow, and Chuck(G) for their
>> help,
>> leadership and inspiration in this area!
>>
>
>
>> And my page dedicated to QIC Tension Bands...
>>
>> http://qicreader.blogspot.com/p/drive-belts.html
>>
>> As always, I welcome feedback, and hope this is of value to some here.
>>
>
> Have just been through 25 qic tapes of amiga bbs backups , after 23 years
> of being stored in a attic, the majority of tapes was in good order, only 3
> had bad tension band.
> A single 3M had lost all tension,causing  slipping, and had gotten tangled
> up, turned out to the the hardest of the lot to read, after replacing
> the band and untangling it.
>
> Your site was really helpful, had my doubt but your videos showed it wasnt
> that hard after all to replace and untangle those tapes.
>
> Restored 1.7gb data, mix of diavolo backup and amiback2 from two differnt
> amiga bbs .
>
>
> --
> Jacob Dahl Pind | telefisk.org | fidonet 2:230/38.8
>
>


Re: New Listings for Sellam's Collection Sales

2018-06-07 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Prices have seemed fair to me, I've bought a bit of stuff off Sellam over
the last few months and he's been prompt in shipping, as well as willing to
combine shipping costs. Nothing wrong in not giving your hardware away.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Thu, Jun 7, 2018 at 12:59 AM, Sellam Ismail via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Hi Randy.
>
> I have stuff that you can't find on eBay.  And I am not offering the eBay
> experience.  This is me, Sellam, you are dealing with.
>
> When I can find actual closing sales online (I need some place to start), I
> generally go on the lower end of the mean of the data I find.  It's a
> collectors market, sometimes I'm high, sometimes I'm low, but I'm trying.
> Do you know how to assess the value of items as diverse as what I'm
> listing?  I do, it's a lot of work.  Come help out if you have the time,
> I'll trade you for stuff.
>
> The listed prices are what I'm asking, as stated.  I'm always open to
> offers, as stated.  I price fairly, to move it, and if something sits for a
> while, you have a good chance of negotiating a price more to your liking,
> if you ask, but know that I am willing to sit on some things.  I invested a
> lot of time, effort, blood, sweat, tears and money into my collection over
> many years.  I'd like to recoup some of it.
>
> All you have done is propounded a broad-based whine.  if there's something
> that interests you but the price is not right, let me know.  I'm making
> many sales and many deals, stuff is moving.  Ask and ye may well receive.
> Just be reasonable.
>
> Sellam
>
> On Wed, Jun 6, 2018 at 7:57 PM, Randy Dawson 
> wrote:
>
> > Inspired by ebay for all the items there that never sell for the asking
> > price.
> >
> >
> > C'mon Sellam, you want to get out, how about lowering the prices a bit to
> > move things along?
> >
> >
> > --
> > *From:* cctalk  on behalf of Ed Sharpe
> via
> > cctalk 
> > *Sent:* Wednesday, June 6, 2018 7:50 PM
> > *To:* sellam.ism...@gmail.com; cctalk@classiccmp.org;
> > cctalk@classiccmp.org
> > *Subject:* Re: New Listings for Sellam's Collection Sales
> >
> > do the prices keep increasing?
> >
> > In a message dated 6/4/2018 10:02:53 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
> > cctalk@classiccmp.org writes:
> >
> >
> >  Hi Folks.
> >
> > I've reorganized my sales listings into a Google Sheets set. The
> > introductory page is here:
> >
> > https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1I53wxarLHlNmlPVf_
> > HJ5oMKuab4zrApI_hiX0pNmy48/edit#gid=0
> >
> > Use the tabs on the bottom of the sheet to navigate to the various
> "rooms".
> >
> > New items have been added and are listed here:
> >
> > https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1I53wxarLHlNmlPVf_
> > HJ5oMKuab4zrApI_hiX0pNmy48/edit#gid=949372371
> >
> > New items are always added to the New Arrivals Niche, so that's the first
> > place you should check when you visit my virtual online warehouse. I will
> > post a message to this list and the VCFed forums whenever new items are
> > listed, which will occur more regularly.
> >
> > As always, please inquire directly to me via e-mail for the fastest
> > response.
> >
> > Thanks!
> >
> > Sellam
> >
>


Re: SPARCstation rescue giveaway (Was: Kei cars and motorcycles (Was: Rick Dickinson, ZX Spectrum designer, RIP))

2018-04-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
You can always send me the dead modules and I'll rebuild them (GlitchWorks
== me, my wife sometimes helps with assembly). Whatever you do, don't throw
out the dead NVRAMs -- I'll buy them or pay for you to ship them or
whatever, they're not making more and they're the only solution that's 100%
compatible.

Yeah, the "still works but pukes errors" is the typical symptom of the
newer, slightly incompatible 48T02s in Sun machines. I don't recall if mine
kept accurate time with the newer modules.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 6:28 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> The ones from Mouser work well enough in every system that I have used
> them in. I still get the IDPROM corrupt message on boot on some systems,
> but it holds the MAC and the systems boot without intervention.
>
> I tried to repair a few and botched most of them. I know that I should be
> using the GlitchWorks stuff, but it has been easier to just buy something
> that I can plug in.
>
> alan
>
>
> On 4/27/18 3:15 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
>
>> Don't get the new MK48T02/MK48T08s from Mouser et al, they're not fully
>> compatible. They will retain NVRAM but the clock part is different and
>> you'll get an error on that (system won't autoboot). Rebuild your old
>> NVRAM! I made up some little boards to make the repair cleaner and faster
>> to do (I had about 50 NVRAMs to repair):
>>
>> http://www.glitchwrks.com/2017/08/01/gw-48t02-1
>>
>> There are other guides for tacking on a coin cell holder without cutting
>> off the entire top encapsulation, but if you do that, it may not fit under
>> SBus cards if you're doing it on a system that puts SBus slots over the
>> NVRAM.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Jonathan
>>
>> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 6:03 PM, Glen Slick via cctalk <
>> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>>
>> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 1:55 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk
>>> <cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>>>
>>>> - SPARCstation 1. Chassis is intact. It has a bad IDPROM; aside from
>>>> that
>>>>   it passes onboard diagnostics. It has 12M memory, no HDD now, and a
>>>> 3.5"
>>>>   floppy drive. It has no SBus cards. Aside from the IDPROM, it doesn't
>>>>   have any issues (but I haven't run an OS on it yet). Like the SS2, it
>>>>   needs a bath. A small portion of the plastic cover over the rear of
>>>> the
>>>>   case is broken off.
>>>>
>>>> What are these "actual parts expenses"? IDPROMs are around $25 on
>>>> Mouser.
>>>> SCSI HDDs start around $70 shipped on eBay and SCSI2SD are $60 plus
>>>> shipping to me plus the SD price. Given the price of 25 year old HDDs
>>>>
>>> with
>>>
>>>> a stated service life of 5 years (according to one spec sheet that I
>>>>
>>> read),
>>>
>>>> SCSI2SD looks pretty attractive.
>>>>
>>>> When you say IDPROM, is that a Dallas built-in battery NVRAM type of
>>> thing? I have an SS1 with a dead NVRAM thing. Are the currently
>>> available versions of those new at Mouser fully compatible? Those are
>>> one of those things that the new versions aren't always fully
>>> compatible with the old versions for some systems, even though they
>>> are supposed to be.
>>>
>>> My SS1 is also in the Seattle area. If there is much demand for those
>>> it's probably one of those systems I'll never get around to doing
>>> anything with it myself. I also have a 4/110. Those seem to be a lot
>>> less common, and maybe more collectible.
>>>
>>>
>


Re: SPARCstation rescue giveaway (Was: Kei cars and motorcycles (Was: Rick Dickinson, ZX Spectrum designer, RIP))

2018-04-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Tip on replacement hard drives: you can use a SCA drive with an adapter
inside some Sun boxes, or my personal favorite, a Sun "UniDisk" enclosure
with a SCA drive inside. SCA drives are really cheap, even for big ones
(they go up to 300 GB), and you can still get some of the later production
drives with 0 hours on them. You'll usually need to create a partition less
than 1 GB within the first 1 GB of the drive, or your Sun won't be able to
boot it. Larger partitions after that are OK.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 6:15 PM, systems_glitch 
wrote:

> Don't get the new MK48T02/MK48T08s from Mouser et al, they're not fully
> compatible. They will retain NVRAM but the clock part is different and
> you'll get an error on that (system won't autoboot). Rebuild your old
> NVRAM! I made up some little boards to make the repair cleaner and faster
> to do (I had about 50 NVRAMs to repair):
>
> http://www.glitchwrks.com/2017/08/01/gw-48t02-1
>
> There are other guides for tacking on a coin cell holder without cutting
> off the entire top encapsulation, but if you do that, it may not fit under
> SBus cards if you're doing it on a system that puts SBus slots over the
> NVRAM.
>
> Thanks,
> Jonathan
>
> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 6:03 PM, Glen Slick via cctalk <
> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 1:55 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk
>>  wrote:
>> >
>> > - SPARCstation 1. Chassis is intact. It has a bad IDPROM; aside from
>> that
>> >  it passes onboard diagnostics. It has 12M memory, no HDD now, and a
>> 3.5"
>> >  floppy drive. It has no SBus cards. Aside from the IDPROM, it doesn't
>> >  have any issues (but I haven't run an OS on it yet). Like the SS2, it
>> >  needs a bath. A small portion of the plastic cover over the rear of the
>> >  case is broken off.
>> >
>> > What are these "actual parts expenses"? IDPROMs are around $25 on
>> Mouser.
>> > SCSI HDDs start around $70 shipped on eBay and SCSI2SD are $60 plus
>> > shipping to me plus the SD price. Given the price of 25 year old HDDs
>> with
>> > a stated service life of 5 years (according to one spec sheet that I
>> read),
>> > SCSI2SD looks pretty attractive.
>> >
>>
>> When you say IDPROM, is that a Dallas built-in battery NVRAM type of
>> thing? I have an SS1 with a dead NVRAM thing. Are the currently
>> available versions of those new at Mouser fully compatible? Those are
>> one of those things that the new versions aren't always fully
>> compatible with the old versions for some systems, even though they
>> are supposed to be.
>>
>> My SS1 is also in the Seattle area. If there is much demand for those
>> it's probably one of those systems I'll never get around to doing
>> anything with it myself. I also have a 4/110. Those seem to be a lot
>> less common, and maybe more collectible.
>>
>
>


Re: SPARCstation rescue giveaway (Was: Kei cars and motorcycles (Was: Rick Dickinson, ZX Spectrum designer, RIP))

2018-04-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Don't get the new MK48T02/MK48T08s from Mouser et al, they're not fully
compatible. They will retain NVRAM but the clock part is different and
you'll get an error on that (system won't autoboot). Rebuild your old
NVRAM! I made up some little boards to make the repair cleaner and faster
to do (I had about 50 NVRAMs to repair):

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2017/08/01/gw-48t02-1

There are other guides for tacking on a coin cell holder without cutting
off the entire top encapsulation, but if you do that, it may not fit under
SBus cards if you're doing it on a system that puts SBus slots over the
NVRAM.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 6:03 PM, Glen Slick via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 1:55 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk
>  wrote:
> >
> > - SPARCstation 1. Chassis is intact. It has a bad IDPROM; aside from that
> >  it passes onboard diagnostics. It has 12M memory, no HDD now, and a 3.5"
> >  floppy drive. It has no SBus cards. Aside from the IDPROM, it doesn't
> >  have any issues (but I haven't run an OS on it yet). Like the SS2, it
> >  needs a bath. A small portion of the plastic cover over the rear of the
> >  case is broken off.
> >
> > What are these "actual parts expenses"? IDPROMs are around $25 on Mouser.
> > SCSI HDDs start around $70 shipped on eBay and SCSI2SD are $60 plus
> > shipping to me plus the SD price. Given the price of 25 year old HDDs
> with
> > a stated service life of 5 years (according to one spec sheet that I
> read),
> > SCSI2SD looks pretty attractive.
> >
>
> When you say IDPROM, is that a Dallas built-in battery NVRAM type of
> thing? I have an SS1 with a dead NVRAM thing. Are the currently
> available versions of those new at Mouser fully compatible? Those are
> one of those things that the new versions aren't always fully
> compatible with the old versions for some systems, even though they
> are supposed to be.
>
> My SS1 is also in the Seattle area. If there is much demand for those
> it's probably one of those systems I'll never get around to doing
> anything with it myself. I also have a 4/110. Those seem to be a lot
> less common, and maybe more collectible.
>


Re: Digilog DLM III?

2018-04-23 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I've got one as well, not sure if it's the same revision or not. Mine may
have come with a manual, I thought it had been folded up inside the front
cover but I just checked and it's not -- the lot of equipment it came with
included many Rubbermaid tubs full of documentation, so it's possibly
somewhere in there.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 12:07 AM, Ethan Dicks via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 11:21 PM, W2HX via cctalk 
> wrote:
> > Hi friends. Looking for a user manual (or anything) for this data line
> monitor.  Here is a picture:
> >
> > http://w2hx.com/x/Digilog/Digilog-DLM-III.jpg
>
> I have one of those (rescued from Software Results Corp. 25 years
> ago).  And astoundingly, the Operator Manual was stored right on top.
> About 60 single-sided pages.  It's not an original manual.  It's
> already a Xerox copy but it appears to be in fair shape, not too much
> copy fade.  I can see about scanning it this week.
>
> I didn't see a copy of the manual online anywhere, but I did find
> several mentions in Computerworld, like this one from 11 Oct 1982
> announcing a price cut on the DLM III from $3775 to $2995.
>
> https://books.google.com/books?id=LW9X-GFY68sC=PA64=PA64
>
> -ethan
>


Re: 8085 Dissasembly?

2018-04-16 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
IDA Pro will do 8080/8085 and is very nice -- especially if you have no
source and are having to reverse-engineer the whole thing yourself. The
commercial version is expensive, but there's a free version. I don't
remember if the free version includes 8080/8085 mode.

The strings may be packed ASCII, to save space. There were a few methods of
doing this.

If there's a checksum it's not inherent to the CPU. There would need to be
custom hardware on the board to enforce a hardware ROM checksum; otherwise,
it's left to software and you can easily update that :)

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018 at 3:01 PM, W2HX via cctalk 
wrote:

> Hi friends. I have a 1990's vintage commercial radio system that uses an
> 80C85A CPU. I am looking to hopefully modify the firmware to make some
> small changes in its behavior.  The firmware is contained in two EPROMS.
>
>
> Can anyone recommend a decent disassembler to use with this? Preferably
> something that ran in windows 10 or windows 7? A dos box would be fine too.
>
>
> Also, I looked through the dumped contents of the EPROM. In the past I
> have seen EPROM ascii dumps where most is unintelligible to the naked eye
> but typically text messages give to the users during interaction with the
> program are human readable. In this case, the ASCII dump shows only other
> HEX data.  I believe I read that there is a HEX format and that I might
> need to convert from HEX to BIN before disassembling. Of course, an ideal
> tool would do both if anyone knows such a thing.
>
>
> I am not familiar with 8085 stuff but any insight would be appreciated.
>
>
> Lastly, I wonder if there might be some kind of checksum check to prevent
> tampering. Is there a common way this is handled in 8085 world? Or is it
> entirely programmer dependent?
>
>
> Thanks for your time
>
> Eugene W2HX?
>
>
>


Re: To be scrapped in as little as 2 months

2018-04-15 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Oh, I don't need them in particular, I just really enjoy fixing them up! As
long as they're not going to be junked.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 7:12 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> The SPARC boxes are safe from the recycler. Those are the ones that I am
> primarily interested in. But I have lots of Sun boxes, so I am willing to
> share.
>
> alan
>
>
> On 4/15/18 4:04 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
>
>> If anyone is making their way to VCF East, I'd be interested in saving the
>> SPARCstations from the recycler.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Jonathan
>>
>> On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 6:43 PM, Bill Gunshannon via cctalk <
>> cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> On 04/15/2018 03:30 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 4/15/18 11:59 AM, Bill Gunshannon via cctalk wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 04/15/2018 02:37 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 4/15/18 11:30 AM, Bill Gunshannon via cctalk wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 04/15/2018 01:44 PM, Ed Sharpe via cctalk wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> wish this  was  closer!  ed#
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Me too.  I could use an Alpha or two for running VMS.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> Where are you? I am picking up the Alphas so they don't get scrapped.
>>>>>> I will be looking for homes for them once I get them here and check
>>>>>> out their condition.
>>>>>>
>>>>> Wrong side of the country.  Scranton, PA.  And if they are as
>>>>> sturdy as the Alphas I have worked with in the past the cost
>>>>> of shipping one would be very prohibitive.
>>>>>
>>>> Are you willing to drive to Wellsboro, PA for one or two? I am heading
>>>> down to PDX because I am a motorsports official. The first weekend of
>>>> June, the series will be in Wellsboro. If you are interested, I  can
>>>> see if one of the teams is willing to haul one or two Alphas that way.
>>>>
>>>> Yeah, I could probably do Wellsboro.  It's  about halfway across the
>>> state from here.
>>> One, two or three.  If I can't use them I  have a lot of contacts with
>>> other people trying
>>> to find machines for VMS Hobbyist program.  They will have good homes.
>>>
>>> bill
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>


Re: To be scrapped in as little as 2 months

2018-04-15 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
If anyone is making their way to VCF East, I'd be interested in saving the
SPARCstations from the recycler.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 6:43 PM, Bill Gunshannon via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
>
> On 04/15/2018 03:30 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk wrote:
> >
> >
> > On 4/15/18 11:59 AM, Bill Gunshannon via cctalk wrote:
> >>
> >> On 04/15/2018 02:37 PM, Alan Perry via cctalk wrote:
> >>>
> >>> On 4/15/18 11:30 AM, Bill Gunshannon via cctalk wrote:
>  On 04/15/2018 01:44 PM, Ed Sharpe via cctalk wrote:
> > wish this  was  closer!  ed#
> >
>  Me too.  I could use an Alpha or two for running VMS.
> >>> Where are you? I am picking up the Alphas so they don't get scrapped.
> >>> I will be looking for homes for them once I get them here and check
> >>> out their condition.
> >> Wrong side of the country.  Scranton, PA.  And if they are as
> >> sturdy as the Alphas I have worked with in the past the cost
> >> of shipping one would be very prohibitive.
> >
> > Are you willing to drive to Wellsboro, PA for one or two? I am heading
> > down to PDX because I am a motorsports official. The first weekend of
> > June, the series will be in Wellsboro. If you are interested, I  can
> > see if one of the teams is willing to haul one or two Alphas that way.
> >
>
> Yeah, I could probably do Wellsboro.  It's  about halfway across the
> state from here.
> One, two or three.  If I can't use them I  have a lot of contacts with
> other people trying
> to find machines for VMS Hobbyist program.  They will have good homes.
>
> bill
>
>
>


Re: DEC bus edge connectors

2018-03-18 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
+1 for Douglas Electronics. I use them for a few of their prototyping
resources. I'd never have bothered to lay out an Apple II protoboard if
they hadn't stopped carrying them!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Fri, Mar 16, 2018 at 9:26 PM, Charles Dickman via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Fri, Mar 16, 2018 at 8:59 PM, Noel Chiappa via cctalk
>  wrote:
> > Have you looked through Douglas Electronics' offerings? They have a lot
> of
> > DEC-backplane compatible boards that might be what you want, e.g.:
> >
> >   http://www.douglas.com/index.php/18-de-77.html
> >
> > this one.
>
> Interesting. I have looked at them before on the larger perf boards,
> but that is a good price for what I want. Thanks for the pointer,
>
> -chuck
>


Re: GRI 771 Keyboard Info

2018-03-12 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Martin Eberhard got me the schematic for the GR 721, which is very similar
-- I traced the pinout on the DB25 and it's correct for the 771. In case
anyone else needs it:

http://deramp.com/downloads/mfe_archive/030-Keyboards/George%20Risk/GR%20721%20Keyboard%20Schematic.JPG

The 771 needs +5 and -12 for its keyboard controller and the mix of 7400
series logic on it. There are apparently versions that take unregulated
power, and even some with a built-in AC power supply. It's got internal
jumpers for selecting strobe (+/- pulse, +/- level). The lower 7 bits of
the ASCII data is gated onto the bus by the strobe, but the high bit
(parity) is always being fed out.

Anyway, I have it hooked up to a bench supply for power, and jumpered to
the Polymorphic VTI's keyboard port. It reads fine, there's still something
going on with the CPU board though.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Mon, Mar 12, 2018 at 1:13 PM, dwight via cctalk <cctalk@classiccmp.org>
wrote:

> What kind of parts does it have? If it is all ttl, you only need to
> connect 5 volts and ground. There will be a strobe, 7 or 8 bits of data and
> possible wires for repeat ( usually these go directly to the keyboards
> repeat switch, without logic.
>
> Older keyboards required a negative rail. This was usually for a ROM or
> EPROM.
>
> With ttl parts, finding power and ground is easy. A little checking with a
> scope and ascii table will quickly find the rest.
>
> Many keyboards had stable data for both positive and negative edges of the
> strobe so that may not be an issue.
>
> Dwight
>
>
> 
> From: cctalk <cctalk-boun...@classiccmp.org> on behalf of Chuck Guzis via
> cctalk <cctalk@classiccmp.org>
> Sent: Monday, March 12, 2018 9:27:33 AM
> To: systems_glitch via cctalk
> Subject: Re: GRI 771 Keyboard Info
>
> On 03/12/2018 07:44 AM, systems_glitch via cctalk wrote:
> > All,
> >
> > I'm looking for info on a George Risk 771 parallel ASCII keyboard. I've
> got
> > one but no documentation or existing cabling. I'd like to interface it to
> > my Poly-88.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
> >
>
>
> Wasn't there something about that keyboard in the Apple I documentation?
>  I can't recall exactly, but it sounds familiar.
>
>
> --Chuck
>


GRI 771 Keyboard Info

2018-03-12 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
All,

I'm looking for info on a George Risk 771 parallel ASCII keyboard. I've got
one but no documentation or existing cabling. I'd like to interface it to
my Poly-88.

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: KDF11-B ROM machine-readable source

2018-02-11 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Yep, popular hack, to run the KDF11 ROMs in the BDV11. That's what I've
done for my MINC-23:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/2016/03/19/bdv11-roms

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 6:39 PM, Noel Chiappa via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> Is the code for the KDF11-B ROMs available in machine-readable source
> anywhere? I looked with Google, but couldn't find anything.
>
> Eventually I recalled having seen it in the fiche, which was better than
> nothing (disassembling something that size to see how it worked was, ah,
> unappealing, shall we say?), but it's still pretty hard to work with
> (where is
> 'FOO:' in all these pages), hence the interest in the machine-readable
> source.
>
>
> BTW, it appears these ROMs can be used in the BDV11, too - which is nice
> because the stock BDV11 code only checks 256 KB, whereas the KDF11-B code
> does
> the whole 4MB (and, IIRC, support more devices, too). I bought a BDV11
> which
> had EPROM's in it which did more than 256KB, and looking at them, they
> appear
> to contain the KDF11-B code. So I promptly made a bunch of copies and
> installed
> them in place of the stock ones in my other BDV11's! :-)
>
>  Noel
>


Re: CLASSICCMP vs. RackSpace or Gmail

2018-02-06 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Same as Dave, using GMail but I'm filtering into IMAP folders.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Feb 6, 2018 at 4:40 AM, Dave Wade via cctalk 
wrote:

> Zane,
>  I have few problems with GMAIL but I do have a couple of rules that route
> these e-mails to a separate folder, never to spam.
> Dave
>
> > -Original Message-
> > From: cctalk [mailto:cctalk-boun...@classiccmp.org] On Behalf Of Zane
> Healy
> > via cctalk
> > Sent: 06 February 2018 05:07
> > To: cctalk@classiccmp.org
> > Cc: heal...@avanthar.com
> > Subject: CLASSICCMP vs. RackSpace or Gmail
> >
> > Is anyone able to get email from this list via either CLASSICCMP or
> > RackSpace?  When I first changed over to using the heal...@avanthar.com
> > address, I was able to receive email from the list for a short time.
> > I've even tried to subscribe with a gmail account, and no luck.  My
> aracnet
> > address is no longer reliable, and will not willingly be renewed.
> >
> > Zane
> >
>
>
>


Re: Bluebox boards, anyone?

2018-01-31 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Neat! I'd be interested in a board. I missed out on the ones being handed
out at HOPE in 2008 (The Last HOPE, for which a friend and I embarked on a
last-minute trip to NYC for I think around $150 total, for the both of us).

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 8:04 AM, David Griffith via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
> Would anyone like a bluebox PCB or two?
>
> This project was inspired by Don Froula's ProjectMF[1] in which he
> presents a PIC-based bluebox[2] and PCB (handed out at HOPE in 2008).  A
> big reason I like AVRs more than PICs is because the development software
> is OSS and free.  So I reimplemented Don's bluebox in C for an AVR
> ATtiny85.  The PCB started off an a drop-in replacement, but evolved into
> something designed to fit into a Hammond 1591XXM box instead of functioning
> as a lid for a Radio Shack 230-1801 box.  The Hammond box also comes in
> transluscent blue!
>
> The firmware code[3] is done.  I just have to do some tweaks once some
> test PCBs[4] are made because on the prototype, I wired up the keypad a bit
> strangely.  The code implements a 13-key bluebox, a DTMF keypad, a redbox
> for US, Canada, and UK, greenbox, and 2600 dial pulse.  The PCB needs work
> to correct some early design decisions that turned out to be non-optimal.
>
> [1] http://projectmf.org/
> [2] http://projectmf.org/bluebox.html
> [3] https://github.com/DavidGriffith/bluebox-avr
> [4] https://github.com/DavidGriffith/bluebox-esquire
>
> --
> David Griffith
> d...@661.org
>
> A: Because it fouls the order in which people normally read text.
> Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
> A: Top-posting.
> Q: What is the most annoying thing in e-mail?
>


Re: Interest Check: Belden Thicknet 10base5 Ethernet Coax

2018-01-30 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
I believe my guy referenced that listing as his basis for his price. I'm
sure freight would bring it up to about the same per-foot cost, if not
higher. I am sometimes out near the seller of that particular eBay listing,
so I'll send them an email and see if they're interested in a local pick-up
deal.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 7:48 PM, Glen Slick via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 4:06 PM, systems_glitch via cctalk
> <cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:
> > Full disclosure on price: right now if I buy one spool, it'll be
> $0.60/foot
> > to me, I was thinking I'd charge $1/foot for moderate lengths, of course
> > I'm willing to make a deal on bulk purchases, especially if it ends up
> > being local pick-up (here in VA or VCF East). I haven't dressed out cable
> > this large for N connectors in a long time (last stuff was Times
> Microwave
> > LMR400 for long-range 802.11b stuff) so I'm not sure what the N
> connectors
> > cost nowadays or how long it'll take me to crimp them on.
> >
> > Here's the datasheet on the stuff:
> >
> > https://catalog.belden.com/techdata/EN/89880_techdata.pdf?ip=false
> >
> > DEC spec, orange jacket, plenum rated.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jonathan
>
> There is also this seller with a couple of 1100 foot spools of Belden
> 89880 for $480 also in VA. The datasheet says 125 pounds per 1000 feet
> so if you had to ship one of those I would expect that to add a fair
> amount to the cost.
>
> https://www.ebay.com/itm/291786649807
>


Re: Interest Check: Belden Thicknet 10base5 Ethernet Coax

2018-01-30 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Full disclosure on price: right now if I buy one spool, it'll be $0.60/foot
to me, I was thinking I'd charge $1/foot for moderate lengths, of course
I'm willing to make a deal on bulk purchases, especially if it ends up
being local pick-up (here in VA or VCF East). I haven't dressed out cable
this large for N connectors in a long time (last stuff was Times Microwave
LMR400 for long-range 802.11b stuff) so I'm not sure what the N connectors
cost nowadays or how long it'll take me to crimp them on.

Not sure how tightly it can coil, but I bet I can fit a load of it in a
15x15x4 box, of which I have plenty. Shortish sections should be able to
ship USPS for decent rates, for larger quantities I can use my UPS
shipper's account (I have negotiated rates with them).

Here's the datasheet on the stuff:

https://catalog.belden.com/techdata/EN/89880_techdata.pdf?ip=false

DEC spec, orange jacket, plenum rated.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 6:54 PM, Grant Taylor via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> On 01/30/2018 04:52 PM, Chuck Guzis via cctalk wrote:
>
>> I'm sure that someone will be interested in it--there's usually a good
>> supply of masochists around.
>>
>
> Hay!  I resemble that!!!
>
>
>
>
> --
> Grant. . . .
> unix || die
>


Interest Check: Belden Thicknet 10base5 Ethernet Coax

2018-01-30 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
All,

Per the recent discussion on thicknet/early Ethernet, I figured I'd see if
there's any interest in cut-to-length Belden thicknet/10base5 Ethernet
cable. I've got a local surplus guy who's got at least one 1100 foot roll.
It's the real Ethernet spec stuff, sez so on the cable, and it has the
bands to locate your vampire taps.

If there's enough interest, I'll buy the spool off of him and cut it to
length for whoever's interested in buying some. I can crimp N terminations
on as well.

Thanks,
Jonathan


Re: TESTFDC

2018-01-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
Another vote for the FDADAP. Could've built my own, but it's reasonably
priced, handles TG43, does RX50, and I like supporting John's work.

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Jan 27, 2018 at 7:06 PM, Adrian Graham via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

>
> *sigh* Fat fingers again.
>
> > On 27 Jan 2018, at 22:58, Mike Loewen via cctalk 
> wrote:
> >
> > On Sat, 27 Jan 2018, Adrian Graham via cctalk wrote:
> >
>  Now where did I put that 8? drive...
> >>>
> >>> I'm using a Tandon 848 on mine.
> >>
> >> My pair are Tandons, they?re in a CPT8500 word processor which I?d also
> like to get going at some point. Any tips on coaxing them back into life?
> >
> >  Nothing specific to the drive, but I think well of the FDADAP 8" floppy
> disk adapter to connect the drive to the controller:
> >
> > http://www.dbit.com/fdadap.html
>
> Yep, I was looking at those yesterday, hooked in by the mention of an
> RX50. $40 including postage to the UK is a pretty decent price.
>
> Cheers,
>
> A
>
>
> —
> Adrian/Witchy
> Binary Dinosaurs - Celebrating Computing History from 1972 onwards
> w: binarydinosaurs.co.uk t: @binarydinosaurs
> f: facebook.com/binarydinosaurs
>
>


Re: TESTFDC

2018-01-27 Thread systems_glitch via cctalk
That came off of the original import from Dave's old registry. I've still
got to go through and approve the new submissions, planning on doing that
this weekend, as well as adding a few of my own!

Thanks,
Jonathan

On Sat, Jan 27, 2018 at 2:16 PM, Adrian Graham via cctalk <
cctalk@classiccmp.org> wrote:

> I’d like to thank whoever it was who added the Abit K8V Pro/Winbond
> W83627HF with its test results to the TESTFDC page for writing SSSD disks.
> I’ve been trying to get a similar setup going for a fortnight now and last
> week found this motherboard on e*ay for Not Many UK Pounds. Coupled with a
> scrap Athlon64 system from work and a scratched Windows98 CD I eventually
> got it going earlier and can now read/write single density floppies meaning
> I can archive the disks I got with my Research Machines 380Z :D
>
> Typical of my luck a contact has also found an Adaptec 1522A that he’ll
> hopefully send me too, then I’m covered for all eventualities.
>
> Now where did I put that 8” drive...
>
> —
> Adrian/Witchy
> Binary Dinosaurs - Celebrating Computing History from 1972 onwards
> w: binarydinosaurs.co.uk  t:
> @binarydinosaurs
> f: facebook.com/binarydinosaurs
>
>


  1   2   >