[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Mar 12: Cancelled

2019-03-06 Thread Philip Garrison
Yesterday's change seminar was the last of the quarter. Next week's seminar
is cancelled, so we will resume in the spring on April 9. Enjoy spring
break, and good luck with the end of the quarter.

(April 9 is the second Tuesday of the quarter, as April 2nd is reserved for
our Change planning meeting, which anyone who wants to help run the seminar
is welcome to attend.)
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Mar 5: Cliff Schmidt, Amplio Network, Audio and Analytics

2019-03-05 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for today's Change seminar with Cliff Schmidt!

*Who:* Cliff Schmidt, of Amplio 
*When:* Tuesday, Mar 5, 12-1pm
*Where:* CSE 203
*What:* Audio and Analytics: Strengthening Health Knowledge and Outcomes in
Remote Communities

*Abstract: *In the most isolated and remote communities in Ghana and Kenya,
citizens face challenges in accessing credible, consistent information
about their health, well-being, and rights. Low literacy combined with poor
infrastructure, low nurse-patient ratios, and limited access to mainstream
media are barriers to the development of thriving and resilient
communities. To address these development challenges, Amplio Network’s
partners in Ghana and Kenya leverage the Talking Book, a rugged, hand-held,
battery-powered audio device, which provides on-demand access to
information for people who can't read. Our partners use Talking Books to
deliver targeted, behavior change messaging in the form of interviews,
songs, and dramas in local languages and dialects, to inform, educate, and
prompt rural communities to practice and adopt key behaviors to reduce
poverty, generate demand for essential services, and improve community
health and protection outcomes. A recent randomized control trial
co-designed by UNICEF Ghana found that people with access to health
messages on Talking Books were 50% more likely to use bed nets and 50% more
likely to wash their hands with soap.

*Bio*
Cliff founded Amplio Network (formerly named Literacy Bridge) in 2007 to
address global poverty and disease by making practical agriculture and
health knowledge accessible to those who need it most. He led the
development of an audio-based mobile device called the “Talking Book” for
people with minimal literacy skills living in rural areas without
electricity or Internet access. Cliff received the Microsoft alumni
Integral Fellow Award presented by Bill and Melinda Gates twice (in 2010
and 2014) and was selected as a member of the Clinton Global Initiative by
President Bill Clinton. He received the top prize at the Tech Awards in
2012 and Computerworld Honors in 2013 and was featured by the PBS Newshour
as one of five Agents for Social Change in 2013.

Prior to starting Amplio Network, Cliff was a software developer for
Microsoft and a nuclear engineering officer for the U.S. Navy Submarine
Force. Cliff holds a B.S. in cognitive science from MIT and an M.S. in
computer science and engineering from the University of Washington. Cliff loves
music and playing tenor saxophone.
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 26 : Moonjung Yim, UW i-School, ICTD evaluation: Exploring its foci and current gaps

2019-02-25 Thread Philip Garrison
Reminder: Moonjung's presentation is tomorrow.

On Thu, Feb 21, 2019, 11:40 AM Samia Ibtasam 
wrote:

> Please join us for an interactive Change Seminar next Tuesday (Feb 26) at
> noon in CSE 203 for a talk by Moonjung Yim from the University of
> Washington's Information School.
>
> Who: Moonjung Yim (Information School, University of Washington)
>
> What: ICTD evaluation: Exploring its foci and current gaps
>
> When: Tuesday, Feb 26, 12-1pm
>
> Where: CSE 203 (Paul G. Allen Center for Computer Science & Engineering
> )
>
> Abstract: Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have received
> much attention among the academics and practitioners as a possible catalyst
> in advancing people’s lives in the Global South, as they potentially allow
> information and knowledge sharing in varying forms with enhanced speed and
> high volume of content. However, the effectiveness of ICTD projects has
> been deeply questionable. As a response, researchers have been closely
> engaged in assessing how ICTs have been utilized, along with suggestions of
> a range of evaluation frameworks which apply theories, models, methods, and
> perspectives from various disciplines. However, ICTD evaluation is yet to
> be seen as a field with firm conceptual underpinnings. This study is
> motivated by the need to explore and identify characteristics of ICTD
> evaluation, in order to enhance its standing as a field of its own, which
> researchers can reasonably refer to and be aware of its expected criteria
> in a broad sense. The work seeks to address the above problem by examining
> what the foci of ICTD evaluation have been in the recent years and
> analyzing ICTD evaluation’s associations with other closely related areas,
> to explore where the gaps lie in ICTD evaluation and discuss how they can
> be possibly resolved.
>
> About the presenter: Moonjung Yim is currently a Ph.D. Candidate at the
> University of Washington Information School. Her research interest is on
> ICTD evaluation. She participated in research projects exploring the
> following: constructing an evaluation toolkit to assess intangible outcomes
> of ICTD projects based on Capability Approach (“Community Wellness
> Outcomes” toolkit); examining mobile phone uses and capability enhancement
> in the Global South; and understanding the implications of ICTD projects in
> individual and community development through the analytical lens of IT
> identity and social capital. Currently she works with UW Technology &
> Social Change Group (TASCHA) as a research assistant.
>
> About the session format: The presented preliminary findings are part of
> the presenter’s dissertation research. The session will begin with a brief
> explanation about the study and ask for attendees’ consent to participate 
> (*please
> see below***). Preliminary findings will be presented, followed by some
> time for participants to fill in a short feedback response sheet. We plan
> to have some time for discussion to share thoughts on the findings and Q
>
> ***The seminar session is planned to be voice recorded and written
> feedback response sheets will be collected from each participant (names
> won’t be collected). These will be incorporated as part of the study
> findings. *
>
> Best,
> Samia Ibtasam 
> Computer Science & Engineering
> University of Washington
>
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>
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 12: Meg Young, UW iSchool, Data Governance

2019-02-11 Thread Philip Garrison
Tomorrow's seminar is canceled.

On Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 8:27 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Lunch will not be provided at tomorrow's talk, due to inclement weather.
> Assuming UW operations resume tomorrow, please bring your own lunch to the
> talk.
>
> On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 5:41 PM Philip Garrison <
> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> Reminder: Looking forward to Meg's talk on Tuesday! Hopefully the weather
>> will work with us.
>>
>> On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 2:58 AM Philip Garrison <
>> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 12) at noon in CSE 203, with
>>> a talk by Meg Young.
>>>
>>> If UW operations are suspended (https://emergency.uw.edu/), the talk
>>> will be canceled.
>>> Last week's canceled talk (Cliff Schmidt) has been rescheduled to March
>>> 5.
>>>
>>> *Who:* Meg Young
>>> *What:* Data Ownership is Not Dispositive: Data Ownership and Access in
>>> Outsourced "Smart City" Data Programs
>>> *When:* Tuesday, Feb 12, 12-1pm
>>> *Where:* CSE 203
>>>
>>> *Abstract:*
>>> Recent and intensifying interest in how companies govern user data has
>>> been met with an emphasis on users' rights with respect to their own data.
>>> However, a closer look at how data "ownership" works in practice reveals
>>> that ownership does not ensure that data is governed as owners (and
>>> subjects) intend. In this talk, I argue that data ownership is not
>>> determinative of the rights and obligations that the metaphor suggests. I
>>> draw on examples from three data sharing configurations in my dissertation
>>> fieldwork on access, accountability and proprietary systems in outsourced
>>> local government data programs: (1) ORCA card readers, (2) transit agencies
>>> providing first- and last-mile service to transit stations, and (3) a
>>> UW-based "data trust" for cross-sector data sharing. In each case, I
>>> explore what "work" data ownership does in practice, and find that it is
>>> not indicative of who can access data and for what purpose.
>>>
>>> *Bio:*
>>> Meg is a PhD Candidate in the UW Information School and a member of the
>>> Tech Policy Lab, Critical Platform Studies Group, and Data Lab. She
>>> primarily conducts ethnographic work on technology policy and smart cities
>>> programs.
>>> ___
>>> change mailing list
>>> change@change.washington.edu
>>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>>
>> ___
>> change mailing list
>> change@change.washington.edu
>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
> ___
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>
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 12: Meg Young, UW iSchool, Data Governance

2019-02-11 Thread Philip Garrison
Lunch will not be provided at tomorrow's talk, due to inclement weather.
Assuming UW operations resume tomorrow, please bring your own lunch to the
talk.

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 5:41 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Reminder: Looking forward to Meg's talk on Tuesday! Hopefully the weather
> will work with us.
>
> On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 2:58 AM Philip Garrison 
> wrote:
>
>> Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 12) at noon in CSE 203, with
>> a talk by Meg Young.
>>
>> If UW operations are suspended (https://emergency.uw.edu/), the talk
>> will be canceled.
>> Last week's canceled talk (Cliff Schmidt) has been rescheduled to March 5.
>>
>> *Who:* Meg Young
>> *What:* Data Ownership is Not Dispositive: Data Ownership and Access in
>> Outsourced "Smart City" Data Programs
>> *When:* Tuesday, Feb 12, 12-1pm
>> *Where:* CSE 203
>>
>> *Abstract:*
>> Recent and intensifying interest in how companies govern user data has
>> been met with an emphasis on users' rights with respect to their own data.
>> However, a closer look at how data "ownership" works in practice reveals
>> that ownership does not ensure that data is governed as owners (and
>> subjects) intend. In this talk, I argue that data ownership is not
>> determinative of the rights and obligations that the metaphor suggests. I
>> draw on examples from three data sharing configurations in my dissertation
>> fieldwork on access, accountability and proprietary systems in outsourced
>> local government data programs: (1) ORCA card readers, (2) transit agencies
>> providing first- and last-mile service to transit stations, and (3) a
>> UW-based "data trust" for cross-sector data sharing. In each case, I
>> explore what "work" data ownership does in practice, and find that it is
>> not indicative of who can access data and for what purpose.
>>
>> *Bio:*
>> Meg is a PhD Candidate in the UW Information School and a member of the
>> Tech Policy Lab, Critical Platform Studies Group, and Data Lab. She
>> primarily conducts ethnographic work on technology policy and smart cities
>> programs.
>> ___
>> change mailing list
>> change@change.washington.edu
>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 12: Meg Young, UW iSchool, Data Governance

2019-02-10 Thread Philip Garrison
Reminder: Looking forward to Meg's talk on Tuesday! Hopefully the weather
will work with us.

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 2:58 AM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 12) at noon in CSE 203, with a
> talk by Meg Young.
>
> If UW operations are suspended (https://emergency.uw.edu/), the talk will
> be canceled.
> Last week's canceled talk (Cliff Schmidt) has been rescheduled to March 5.
>
> *Who:* Meg Young
> *What:* Data Ownership is Not Dispositive: Data Ownership and Access in
> Outsourced "Smart City" Data Programs
> *When:* Tuesday, Feb 12, 12-1pm
> *Where:* CSE 203
>
> *Abstract:*
> Recent and intensifying interest in how companies govern user data has
> been met with an emphasis on users' rights with respect to their own data.
> However, a closer look at how data "ownership" works in practice reveals
> that ownership does not ensure that data is governed as owners (and
> subjects) intend. In this talk, I argue that data ownership is not
> determinative of the rights and obligations that the metaphor suggests. I
> draw on examples from three data sharing configurations in my dissertation
> fieldwork on access, accountability and proprietary systems in outsourced
> local government data programs: (1) ORCA card readers, (2) transit agencies
> providing first- and last-mile service to transit stations, and (3) a
> UW-based "data trust" for cross-sector data sharing. In each case, I
> explore what "work" data ownership does in practice, and find that it is
> not indicative of who can access data and for what purpose.
>
> *Bio:*
> Meg is a PhD Candidate in the UW Information School and a member of the
> Tech Policy Lab, Critical Platform Studies Group, and Data Lab. She
> primarily conducts ethnographic work on technology policy and smart cities
> programs.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
___
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 12: Meg Young, UW iSchool, Data Governance

2019-02-07 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 12) at noon in CSE 203, with a
talk by Meg Young.

If UW operations are suspended (https://emergency.uw.edu/), the talk will
be canceled.
Last week's canceled talk (Cliff Schmidt) has been rescheduled to March 5.

*Who:* Meg Young
*What:* Data Ownership is Not Dispositive: Data Ownership and Access in
Outsourced "Smart City" Data Programs
*When:* Tuesday, Feb 12, 12-1pm
*Where:* CSE 203

*Abstract:*
Recent and intensifying interest in how companies govern user data has been
met with an emphasis on users' rights with respect to their own data.
However, a closer look at how data "ownership" works in practice reveals
that ownership does not ensure that data is governed as owners (and
subjects) intend. In this talk, I argue that data ownership is not
determinative of the rights and obligations that the metaphor suggests. I
draw on examples from three data sharing configurations in my dissertation
fieldwork on access, accountability and proprietary systems in outsourced
local government data programs: (1) ORCA card readers, (2) transit agencies
providing first- and last-mile service to transit stations, and (3) a
UW-based "data trust" for cross-sector data sharing. In each case, I
explore what "work" data ownership does in practice, and find that it is
not indicative of who can access data and for what purpose.

*Bio:*
Meg is a PhD Candidate in the UW Information School and a member of the
Tech Policy Lab, Critical Platform Studies Group, and Data Lab. She
primarily conducts ethnographic work on technology policy and smart cities
programs.
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 5: Cliff Schmidt, Amplio Network

2019-02-05 Thread Philip Garrison
Change will be canceled today, since most UW operations are suspended due
to icy conditions.

-Philip

On Mon, Feb 4, 2019, 12:39 PM Philip Garrison  Reminder: the Change seminar will meet tomorrow in CSE 203, with a talk by
> Cliff Schmidt.
>
> *Title:* Audio and Analytics: Strengthening Health Knowledge and Outcomes
> in Remote Communities
>
> *Abstract: *In the most isolated and remote communities in Ghana and
> Kenya, citizens face challenges in accessing credible, consistent
> information about their health, well-being, and rights. Low literacy
> combined with poor infrastructure, low nurse-patient ratios, and limited
> access to mainstream media are barriers to the development of thriving and
> resilient communities. To address these development challenges, Amplio
> Network’s partners in Ghana and Kenya leverage the Talking Book, a rugged,
> hand-held, battery-powered audio device, which provides on-demand access to
> information for people who can't read. Our partners use Talking Books to
> deliver targeted, behavior change messaging in the form of interviews,
> songs, and dramas in local languages and dialects, to inform, educate, and
> prompt rural communities to practice and adopt key behaviors to reduce
> poverty, generate demand for essential services, and improve community
> health and protection outcomes. A recent randomized control trial
> co-designed by UNICEF Ghana found that people with access to health
> messages on Talking Books were 50% more likely to use bed nets and 50% more
> likely to wash their hands with soap.
>
> On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 4:18 PM Philip Garrison <
> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 5) at noon in CSE 203.
>>
>> *Who:* Cliff Schmidt, of Amplio <https://www.amplio-network.org/>
>> *When:* Tuesday, Feb 5, 12-1pm
>> *Where:* CSE 203
>>
>> Cliff will speak about his time running Amplio Network (formerly Literacy
>> Bridge), a Seattle-based nonprofit organization that uses its Talking Book
>> audio device to help global partners amplify and widen their impact. Topics
>> may include: the Talking Book technology, the business model, evaluation
>> approaches, and/or partnerships.
>>
>> *Bio*
>> Cliff founded Amplio Network (formerly named Literacy Bridge) in 2007 to
>> address global poverty and disease by making practical agriculture and
>> health knowledge accessible to those who need it most. He led the
>> development of an audio-based mobile device called the “Talking Book” for
>> people with minimal literacy skills living in rural areas without
>> electricity or Internet access. Cliff received the Microsoft alumni
>> Integral Fellow Award presented by Bill and Melinda Gates twice (in 2010
>> and 2014) and was selected as a member of the Clinton Global Initiative by
>> President Bill Clinton. He received the top prize at the Tech Awards in
>> 2012 and Computerworld Honors in 2013 and was featured by the PBS Newshour
>> as one of five Agents for Social Change in 2013.
>>
>> Prior to starting Amplio Network, Cliff was a software developer for
>> Microsoft and a nuclear engineering officer for the U.S. Navy Submarine
>> Force. Cliff holds a B.S. in cognitive science from MIT and an M.S. in
>> computer science and engineering from the University of Washington. Cliff
>> loves music and playing tenor saxophone.
>> ___
>> change mailing list
>> change@change.washington.edu
>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 5: Cliff Schmidt, Amplio Network

2019-02-04 Thread Philip Garrison
Reminder: the Change seminar will meet tomorrow in CSE 203, with a talk by
Cliff Schmidt.

*Title:* Audio and Analytics: Strengthening Health Knowledge and Outcomes
in Remote Communities

*Abstract: *In the most isolated and remote communities in Ghana and Kenya,
citizens face challenges in accessing credible, consistent information
about their health, well-being, and rights. Low literacy combined with poor
infrastructure, low nurse-patient ratios, and limited access to mainstream
media are barriers to the development of thriving and resilient
communities. To address these development challenges, Amplio Network’s
partners in Ghana and Kenya leverage the Talking Book, a rugged, hand-held,
battery-powered audio device, which provides on-demand access to
information for people who can't read. Our partners use Talking Books to
deliver targeted, behavior change messaging in the form of interviews,
songs, and dramas in local languages and dialects, to inform, educate, and
prompt rural communities to practice and adopt key behaviors to reduce
poverty, generate demand for essential services, and improve community
health and protection outcomes. A recent randomized control trial
co-designed by UNICEF Ghana found that people with access to health
messages on Talking Books were 50% more likely to use bed nets and 50% more
likely to wash their hands with soap.

On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 4:18 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 5) at noon in CSE 203.
>
> *Who:* Cliff Schmidt, of Amplio <https://www.amplio-network.org/>
> *When:* Tuesday, Feb 5, 12-1pm
> *Where:* CSE 203
>
> Cliff will speak about his time running Amplio Network (formerly Literacy
> Bridge), a Seattle-based nonprofit organization that uses its Talking Book
> audio device to help global partners amplify and widen their impact. Topics
> may include: the Talking Book technology, the business model, evaluation
> approaches, and/or partnerships.
>
> *Bio*
> Cliff founded Amplio Network (formerly named Literacy Bridge) in 2007 to
> address global poverty and disease by making practical agriculture and
> health knowledge accessible to those who need it most. He led the
> development of an audio-based mobile device called the “Talking Book” for
> people with minimal literacy skills living in rural areas without
> electricity or Internet access. Cliff received the Microsoft alumni
> Integral Fellow Award presented by Bill and Melinda Gates twice (in 2010
> and 2014) and was selected as a member of the Clinton Global Initiative by
> President Bill Clinton. He received the top prize at the Tech Awards in
> 2012 and Computerworld Honors in 2013 and was featured by the PBS Newshour
> as one of five Agents for Social Change in 2013.
>
> Prior to starting Amplio Network, Cliff was a software developer for
> Microsoft and a nuclear engineering officer for the U.S. Navy Submarine
> Force. Cliff holds a B.S. in cognitive science from MIT and an M.S. in
> computer science and engineering from the University of Washington. Cliff
> loves music and playing tenor saxophone.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
___
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Feb 5: Cliff Schmidt, Amplio Network

2019-01-31 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Feb 5) at noon in CSE 203.

*Who:* Cliff Schmidt, of Amplio 
*When:* Tuesday, Feb 5, 12-1pm
*Where:* CSE 203

Cliff will speak about his time running Amplio Network (formerly Literacy
Bridge), a Seattle-based nonprofit organization that uses its Talking Book
audio device to help global partners amplify and widen their impact. Topics
may include: the Talking Book technology, the business model, evaluation
approaches, and/or partnerships.

*Bio*
Cliff founded Amplio Network (formerly named Literacy Bridge) in 2007 to
address global poverty and disease by making practical agriculture and
health knowledge accessible to those who need it most. He led the
development of an audio-based mobile device called the “Talking Book” for
people with minimal literacy skills living in rural areas without
electricity or Internet access. Cliff received the Microsoft alumni
Integral Fellow Award presented by Bill and Melinda Gates twice (in 2010
and 2014) and was selected as a member of the Clinton Global Initiative by
President Bill Clinton. He received the top prize at the Tech Awards in
2012 and Computerworld Honors in 2013 and was featured by the PBS Newshour
as one of five Agents for Social Change in 2013.

Prior to starting Amplio Network, Cliff was a software developer for
Microsoft and a nuclear engineering officer for the U.S. Navy Submarine
Force. Cliff holds a B.S. in cognitive science from MIT and an M.S. in
computer science and engineering from the University of Washington. Cliff
loves music and playing tenor saxophone.
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[change] UW Change Seminar Jan 29: Cancelled

2019-01-24 Thread Philip Garrison
There will be no Change talk next week.

Look forward to the following week's talk (Feb 5) by Cliff Schmidt of Amplio


-Philip
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Jan 22: Sara Vannini, Visual methodologies in participatory ICT4D

2019-01-21 Thread Philip Garrison
See you all tomorrow, and enjoy the day off!

-Philip

On Wed, Jan 16, 2019 at 9:11 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Jan 22) at noon in *CSE 203*.
>
> *Who:* Sara Vannini, UW Communication & Integrated Social Sciences
> *What:* Visual methodologies in participatory ICT4D
> *When:* Tuesday, Jan 22, 12-1pm
> *Where:* CSE 203
>
>
>
> *Abstract:*
>
> In this talk, Sara Vannini will present the reflections from a published
> article with colleagues Caitlin Bentley (Nanyang Technological University)
> and David Nemer (University of Kentucky), which analyzes the use of visual
> methodologies in participatory research in ICT4D. While new methods are
> needed to shed light on unique and integrative concepts of ICT across
> cultures, this presentation explores the use of visual methods to
> facilitate critical engagement with ICT—defined as situational awareness,
> reflexive ICT practice and power and control over ICT. This definition of
> critical ICT engagement is informed by a cultural identity lens, and
> intends to improve participatory methods in ICT for Development (ICT4D) and
> community technology design and application. Three case studies will be
> presented, each employing visual methods to shed light on concepts and
> practices of ICT cross-culturally. The presentation aims to offer a way for
> researchers and practitioners to engage with cultural issues in
> community-based research and design using visual methodologies.
>
>
> *Bio:*
>
> Sara Vannini is a Lecturer at the Department of Communication and at the
> Integrated Social Sciences program at UW. Sara’s research is in the field
> of Information and Communication Technologies for Development, focusing in
> particular on issues of Public Access to ICTs, social appropriation of
> technologies, information and migration, and participatory and visual
> methodologies of inquiry. Sara holds a Ph.D. in Communication Sciences from
> the University of Lugano, Switzerland, and an M.A. in Latin American
> Literatures from Bologna University, Italy.
>
> See more at: http://www.saravannini.com
> ___
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> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Jan 22: Sara Vannini, Visual methodologies in participatory ICT4D

2019-01-16 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for Change next Tuesday (Jan 22) at noon in *CSE 203*.

*Who:* Sara Vannini, UW Communication & Integrated Social Sciences
*What:* Visual methodologies in participatory ICT4D
*When:* Tuesday, Jan 22, 12-1pm
*Where:* CSE 203



*Abstract:*

In this talk, Sara Vannini will present the reflections from a published
article with colleagues Caitlin Bentley (Nanyang Technological University)
and David Nemer (University of Kentucky), which analyzes the use of visual
methodologies in participatory research in ICT4D. While new methods are
needed to shed light on unique and integrative concepts of ICT across
cultures, this presentation explores the use of visual methods to
facilitate critical engagement with ICT—defined as situational awareness,
reflexive ICT practice and power and control over ICT. This definition of
critical ICT engagement is informed by a cultural identity lens, and
intends to improve participatory methods in ICT for Development (ICT4D) and
community technology design and application. Three case studies will be
presented, each employing visual methods to shed light on concepts and
practices of ICT cross-culturally. The presentation aims to offer a way for
researchers and practitioners to engage with cultural issues in
community-based research and design using visual methodologies.


*Bio:*

Sara Vannini is a Lecturer at the Department of Communication and at the
Integrated Social Sciences program at UW. Sara’s research is in the field
of Information and Communication Technologies for Development, focusing in
particular on issues of Public Access to ICTs, social appropriation of
technologies, information and migration, and participatory and visual
methodologies of inquiry. Sara holds a Ph.D. in Communication Sciences from
the University of Lugano, Switzerland, and an M.A. in Latin American
Literatures from Bologna University, Italy.

See more at: http://www.saravannini.com
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Jan 8: Dominic Widdows, Southeast Asia, NLP, and Grab

2019-01-07 Thread Philip Garrison
Tomorrow's seminar will be BYOL: Bring Your Own Lunch. We haven't gotten
our catering set up for the new quarter.
Hopefully we will have some small snacks/salad/drinks provided.

-Philip

On Sun, Jan 6, 2019 at 4:11 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us Tuesday at noon in *CSE 203* for the first Change talk of
> the quarter with Dominic Widdows of Grab.
>
> *Who:* Dominic Widdows
> *What:* Southeast Asia, NLP, and Grab
> *When:* Tuesday, Jan 8, 12-1pm
> *Where:* CSE 203
>
> *Abstract*
> Grab has become the leading transportation company, and increasingly
> technology platform, throughout Southeast Asia. We have unique challenges
> and opportunities with language understanding and interfaces. Grab needs to
> support a bigger range of languages than any of the comparable ridehailing
> companies, and Southeast Asian languages are much less well-resourced than
> other world languages that have far fewer speakers. At the same time, we
> have large amounts of text through reviews, customer service, and chat, and
> some of the unsupervised learning techniques currently at the forefront of
> Natural Language Processing and Artificial Intelligence are well-placed to
> make use of these texts to enhance our language understanding capabilities.
> Long-term dreams include a seamless way to interact with Grab’s products as
> if you’re talking to a very knowledgeable concierge. Interim steps include
> understanding customer service inquiries, translation, and various kinds of
> sentiment analysis. This talk will be a very brief introduction to the
> language landscape, NLP techniques, and how we can use them.
>
> *About the speaker*
> From a background in differential geometry, Dominic started work in NLP in
> 2001, developing vector space models for language representation and
> reasoning back when this was still an esoteric and obscure avenue of
> research. He’s best known in this field for the book Geometry and Meaning,
> the use of quantum logic to represent search queries and word meanings, and
> the SemanticVectors package, which has been building word embedding models
> since 2007 and is freely available on GitHub for anyone to play with. He’s
> worked on NLP, machine learning, information extraction, and transportation
> logistics at Google and Microsoft, before joining Grab in 2016, hoping to
> contribute in some of the world’s most exciting and challenging places
> ___
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Jan 8: Dominic Widdows, Southeast Asia, NLP, and Grab

2019-01-06 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us Tuesday at noon in *CSE 203* for the first Change talk of
the quarter with Dominic Widdows of Grab.

*Who:* Dominic Widdows
*What:* Southeast Asia, NLP, and Grab
*When:* Tuesday, Jan 8, 12-1pm
*Where:* CSE 203

*Abstract*
Grab has become the leading transportation company, and increasingly
technology platform, throughout Southeast Asia. We have unique challenges
and opportunities with language understanding and interfaces. Grab needs to
support a bigger range of languages than any of the comparable ridehailing
companies, and Southeast Asian languages are much less well-resourced than
other world languages that have far fewer speakers. At the same time, we
have large amounts of text through reviews, customer service, and chat, and
some of the unsupervised learning techniques currently at the forefront of
Natural Language Processing and Artificial Intelligence are well-placed to
make use of these texts to enhance our language understanding capabilities.
Long-term dreams include a seamless way to interact with Grab’s products as
if you’re talking to a very knowledgeable concierge. Interim steps include
understanding customer service inquiries, translation, and various kinds of
sentiment analysis. This talk will be a very brief introduction to the
language landscape, NLP techniques, and how we can use them.

*About the speaker*
>From a background in differential geometry, Dominic started work in NLP in
2001, developing vector space models for language representation and
reasoning back when this was still an esoteric and obscure avenue of
research. He’s best known in this field for the book Geometry and Meaning,
the use of quantum logic to represent search queries and word meanings, and
the SemanticVectors package, which has been building word embedding models
since 2007 and is freely available on GitHub for anyone to play with. He’s
worked on NLP, machine learning, information extraction, and transportation
logistics at Google and Microsoft, before joining Grab in 2016, hoping to
contribute in some of the world’s most exciting and challenging places
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[change] Fwd: [jsde] Prashant Bharadwaj -- Joint Seminar in Development Economics -- December 10

2018-12-05 Thread Philip Garrison
This upcoming talk about M-Shwari may be relevant to many of us.

-- Forwarded message -
From: Rachel Heath 
Date: Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 2:58 PM
Subject: [jsde] Prashant Bharadwaj -- Joint Seminar in Development
Economics -- December 10
To: , , 


Please join us *Monday, December 10 *for the Joint Seminar in Development
Economics with Prashant Bharadwaj from UCSD. The seminar is from *11:00am -
12:30pm in Savery 410.* Title and abstract below. We hope to see you there!


Sign up here to meet Prashant, or go to lunch here


---

Can Digital Loans Deliver?
Take Up and Impacts of Digital Loans in Kenya
(with William Jack and Tavneet Suri)

Developing world lenders are taking advantage of fintech tools to create
fully digital loans on mobile phones. We investigate the take up and
impacts of one of the most popular digital loan products, M-Shwari in
Kenya, using a regression discontinuity design. While 34% of those eligible
for the loan take it, this does not substitute for other formal or informal
credit. The loans improve household resilience against shocks and increase
their propensity to spend on education. These digital loans could therefore
be an important way to improve financial access, but they are not a panacea
for greater credit market failures.





-- 

Rachel Heath
Associate Professor of Economics
Milliman Distinguished Scholar
University of Washington
rmhe...@uw.edu

http://faculty.washington.edu/rmheath/
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Dec 4: Tara Patricia Cookson, Unjust Conditions

2018-12-03 Thread Philip Garrison
I'd like to strongly encourage everyone to come for this final talk of the
quarter (tomorrow); it should be very interesting!

On Sat, Dec 1, 2018, 3:50 PM Philip Garrison  Please join us for the Change Seminar next week *Tuesday 12/4/2018* in JHN
> 111.
>
> *Who: *Dr. Tara Patricia Cookson
> *What:* Unjust Conditions: Women’s Work and the Hidden Cost of Cash
> Transfer Programs
> *When: *Tuesday, Dec 4th, 12-1pm
> *Where:* Johnson Hall 111
>
>
> *Abstract* Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs are praised as
> efficient mechanisms for changing poor people’s health and education
> seeking behavior, and promoting financial inclusion. Yet behind the good
> intentions, CCT programs’ successes ring hollow, based solely on metrics
> for children’s attendance at school and health appointments. This talk
> presents ethnographic findings from a new book on the World Bank's "model"
> CCT program in Peru. In looking beyond routine program evaluations, it
> reveals a host of hidden costs for the mothers who meet the conditions, and
> will provide pragmatic recommendations for research and policy.
>
> *Bio* Dr. Tara Patricia Cookson is Co-Founder and Director of Ladysmith,
> a Social Purpose Corporation that provides research services for
> international development organizations including UN Women, UNICEF, and the
> OECD.  She is author of Unjust Conditions: Women’s Work and the Hidden Cost
> of Cash Transfer Programs, which is based on her PhD research at the
> University of Cambridge, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar. In 2014
> she received the Bill Gates Sr Prize for founding a leadership program for
> early career researchers called Learning for Purpose. Tara is currently a
> SSHRC Research Fellow at the University of British Columbia, and is a
> Seattle Women’s Commissioner.
> ___
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> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Dec 4: Tara Patricia Cookson, Unjust Conditions

2018-12-01 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar next week *Tuesday 12/4/2018* in JHN
111.

*Who: *Dr. Tara Patricia Cookson
*What:* Unjust Conditions: Women’s Work and the Hidden Cost of Cash
Transfer Programs
*When: *Tuesday, Dec 4th, 12-1pm
*Where:* Johnson Hall 111


*Abstract* Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs are praised as
efficient mechanisms for changing poor people’s health and education
seeking behavior, and promoting financial inclusion. Yet behind the good
intentions, CCT programs’ successes ring hollow, based solely on metrics
for children’s attendance at school and health appointments. This talk
presents ethnographic findings from a new book on the World Bank's "model"
CCT program in Peru. In looking beyond routine program evaluations, it
reveals a host of hidden costs for the mothers who meet the conditions, and
will provide pragmatic recommendations for research and policy.

*Bio* Dr. Tara Patricia Cookson is Co-Founder and Director of Ladysmith, a
Social Purpose Corporation that provides research services for
international development organizations including UN Women, UNICEF, and the
OECD.  She is author of Unjust Conditions: Women’s Work and the Hidden Cost
of Cash Transfer Programs, which is based on her PhD research at the
University of Cambridge, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar. In 2014
she received the Bill Gates Sr Prize for founding a leadership program for
early career researchers called Learning for Purpose. Tara is currently a
SSHRC Research Fellow at the University of British Columbia, and is a
Seattle Women’s Commissioner.
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[change] No seminar this week

2018-11-26 Thread Philip Garrison
Hi all,

There will be no Change seminar tomorrow. Enjoy your Tuesday!

-Philip
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Nov 20: Naveena Karusala

2018-11-20 Thread Philip Garrison
The talk (in 30 minutes) will be livestreamed at
https://meet.google.com/ath-yqem-owj, or by phone at +1 470-241-4852 with
PIN: 997 635 986#

On Tue, Nov 20, 2018 at 9:37 AM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Naveena's talk is today at noon!
>
>
> *The Artful Integration of Digital Payments into Public Health
> Organizations in Rural Kenya*
>
> *Abstract: *Globally, industry, government, and non-profit actors have
> been making concerted efforts to push the adoption of digital financial
> services (DFS) within complex organizations. This effort is motivated by
> the notion that DFS will support goals such as financial inclusion of
> workers, efficiency of operations, and organizational governance. We
> explore this premise through a qualitative study of how public health
> organizations in rural Kenya use digital payments to pay health workers,
> backdropped by ongoing issues with delayed and missing payments. Drawing
> from interviews with salaried and non-salaried health workers as well as
> staff of governmental and non-governmental organizations, we describe the
> articulation work---or ad hoc, corrective work---required to make bank and
> mobile money payments usable. We highlight how this work and workers'
> socioeconomic and salaried status impact perceptions of digital payments
> and the process of following up with payment issues. We complicate the
> prevalent narrative that digital payments support financial inclusion,
> efficiency, and governance, offering implications for the design of digital
> payment processes that must serve diverse individual and organizational
> stakeholders.
>
> On Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 2:52 PM Philip Garrison <
> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> Please join us for the Change Seminar next week *Tuesday 9/20/2018* in *JHN
>> 111*.
>>
>> *Who:* Naveena Karusala, UW CSE
>> *What:* The Artful Integration of Digital Payments into Public Health
>> Organizations in Rural Kenya
>> *When:* Tuesday, Nov 20th, 12-1pm
>> *Where:* Johnson Hall 111
>>
>> *Abstract:* Globally, industry, government, and non-profit actors have
>> been making concerted efforts to push the adoption of digital financial
>> services (DFS) within complex organizations. This effort is motivated by
>> the notion that DFS will support goals such as financial inclusionof
>> workers, efficiency of operations, and organizational governance. Weexplore
>> this premise through a qualitative study of how public health organizations
>> in rural Kenya use digital payments to pay health workers, backdropped by
>> ongoing issues with delayed and missing payments. Drawing frominterviews
>> with salaried and non-salaried health workers as well as staffof
>> governmental and non-governmental organizations, we describe the
>> articulation work---or ad hoc, corrective work---required to make bank and
>> mobile money payments usable. We highlight how this work and workers'
>> socioeconomic and salaried status impact perceptions of digital payments
>> and theprocess of following up with payment issues. We ! complicat e the
>> prevalent narrative that digital payments support financial inclusion,
>> efficiency,and governance, offering implications for the design of digital
>> payment processes that must serve diverse individual and organizational
>> stakeholders.
>>
>> *Bio:* Naveena Karusala is a Ph.D. student at the University of
>> Washington’s Paul Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering. She
>> graduated with a Computer Science degree from Georgia Tech in 2016. Naveena
>> has engaged extensively in research projects in the area of human-centered
>> computing and global development in the domains of health, gender,
>> language, usability, and human-centered AI tools. She has conducted work in
>> India, the United States, and Kenya.
>> ___
>> change mailing list
>> change@change.washington.edu
>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
> ___
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> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Nov 20: Naveena Karusala

2018-11-20 Thread Philip Garrison
Naveena's talk is today at noon!


*The Artful Integration of Digital Payments into Public Health
Organizations in Rural Kenya*

*Abstract: *Globally, industry, government, and non-profit actors have been
making concerted efforts to push the adoption of digital financial services
(DFS) within complex organizations. This effort is motivated by the notion
that DFS will support goals such as financial inclusion of workers,
efficiency of operations, and organizational governance. We explore this
premise through a qualitative study of how public health organizations in
rural Kenya use digital payments to pay health workers, backdropped by
ongoing issues with delayed and missing payments. Drawing from interviews
with salaried and non-salaried health workers as well as staff of
governmental and non-governmental organizations, we describe the
articulation work---or ad hoc, corrective work---required to make bank and
mobile money payments usable. We highlight how this work and workers'
socioeconomic and salaried status impact perceptions of digital payments
and the process of following up with payment issues. We complicate the
prevalent narrative that digital payments support financial inclusion,
efficiency, and governance, offering implications for the design of digital
payment processes that must serve diverse individual and organizational
stakeholders.

On Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 2:52 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for the Change Seminar next week *Tuesday 9/20/2018* in *JHN
> 111*.
>
> *Who:* Naveena Karusala, UW CSE
> *What:* The Artful Integration of Digital Payments into Public Health
> Organizations in Rural Kenya
> *When:* Tuesday, Nov 20th, 12-1pm
> *Where:* Johnson Hall 111
>
> *Abstract:* Globally, industry, government, and non-profit actors have
> been making concerted efforts to push the adoption of digital financial
> services (DFS) within complex organizations. This effort is motivated by
> the notion that DFS will support goals such as financial inclusionof
> workers, efficiency of operations, and organizational governance. Weexplore
> this premise through a qualitative study of how public health organizations
> in rural Kenya use digital payments to pay health workers, backdropped by
> ongoing issues with delayed and missing payments. Drawing frominterviews
> with salaried and non-salaried health workers as well as staffof
> governmental and non-governmental organizations, we describe the
> articulation work---or ad hoc, corrective work---required to make bank and
> mobile money payments usable. We highlight how this work and workers'
> socioeconomic and salaried status impact perceptions of digital payments
> and theprocess of following up with payment issues. We ! complicat e the
> prevalent narrative that digital payments support financial inclusion,
> efficiency,and governance, offering implications for the design of digital
> payment processes that must serve diverse individual and organizational
> stakeholders.
>
> *Bio:* Naveena Karusala is a Ph.D. student at the University of
> Washington’s Paul Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering. She
> graduated with a Computer Science degree from Georgia Tech in 2016. Naveena
> has engaged extensively in research projects in the area of human-centered
> computing and global development in the domains of health, gender,
> language, usability, and human-centered AI tools. She has conducted work in
> India, the United States, and Kenya.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Nov 20: Naveena Karusala

2018-11-16 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar next week *Tuesday 9/20/2018* in *JHN
111*.

*Who:* Naveena Karusala, UW CSE
*What:* The Artful Integration of Digital Payments into Public Health
Organizations in Rural Kenya
*When:* Tuesday, Nov 20th, 12-1pm
*Where:* Johnson Hall 111

*Abstract:* Globally, industry, government, and non-profit actors have been
making concerted efforts to push the adoption of digital financial services
(DFS) within complex organizations. This effort is motivated by the notion
that DFS will support goals such as financial inclusionof workers,
efficiency of operations, and organizational governance. Weexplore this
premise through a qualitative study of how public health organizations in
rural Kenya use digital payments to pay health workers, backdropped by
ongoing issues with delayed and missing payments. Drawing frominterviews
with salaried and non-salaried health workers as well as staffof
governmental and non-governmental organizations, we describe the
articulation work---or ad hoc, corrective work---required to make bank and
mobile money payments usable. We highlight how this work and workers'
socioeconomic and salaried status impact perceptions of digital payments
and theprocess of following up with payment issues. We ! complicat e the
prevalent narrative that digital payments support financial inclusion,
efficiency,and governance, offering implications for the design of digital
payment processes that must serve diverse individual and organizational
stakeholders.

*Bio:* Naveena Karusala is a Ph.D. student at the University of
Washington’s Paul Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering. She
graduated with a Computer Science degree from Georgia Tech in 2016. Naveena
has engaged extensively in research projects in the area of human-centered
computing and global development in the domains of health, gender,
language, usability, and human-centered AI tools. She has conducted work in
India, the United States, and Kenya.
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[change] UW Change Seminar today Tuesday, Nov 13: Zerina Kapetanovic, FarmBeats

2018-11-13 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar *today* *Tuesday 9/13/2018* in *JHN
111*.

*Who:* Zerina Kapetanovic, UW ECE
*What:* FarmBeats: An AI and IoT solution for Data-driven Agriculture
*When:* Tuesday, Nov 13th, 12-1pm
*Where:* Johnson Hall 111

*Presentation Description: *Data-driven techniques help boost agricultural
productivity by increasing yields, reducing losses, and cutting down input
costs. However, these techniques have seen sparse adoption owing to the
high costs of manual data collection and limited connectivity solutions.
FarmBeats, is an AI and IoT platform for agriculture that enables seamless
data collection from various sensors, cameras, and drones. Our system
design explicitly accounts for weather-related power and Internet outages,
and has had several long-term deployments across the US.

*Bio:* Zerina Kapetanovic is a PhD student in Electrical and Computer
Engineering department at the University of Washington. She works with
Professor Joshua Smith in the Sensor Systems lab and focuses on wireless
technology such as battery-free sensing and low-power communication.
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Nov 6: Matt Johnson, Distributed LTE

2018-11-06 Thread Philip Garrison
Starting in 2 hours!

On Mon, Nov 5, 2018, 10:10 AM Philip Garrison  Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 9/6/2018* in *JHN
> 111*.
>
> *Who:* Matt Johnson (UW CSE)
> *What:* Distributed LTE
> *When:* Tuesday, Nov 6th, 12-1pm
> *Where:* Johnson Hall 111
>
> *Abstract: *The radio interfaces and network architectures of WiFi and
> cellular systems are converging along many dimensions. While both systems
> are largely adopting the centralized architecture of traditional cellular
> deployments, this design comes with fundamental disadvantages that limit
> how these networks grow and develop. As a response, we present Distributed
> LTE (dLTE), an architecture offering the high radio performance of licensed
> and coordinated waveforms as well as the openness to organic expansion and
> growth of traditional WiFi. We challenge the assumption that good
> performance requires a centralized packet processing core, and propose
> hybrid approaches to coordination that prioritize system openness. We argue
> that dLTE is a particularly good fit for rural areas, where the LTE
> waveform is more appropriate than WiFi, yet it is uneconomical for
> centralized providers to deploy traditional cellular systems.
>
>
> *Bio: *Matthew Johnson is a graduate student at the University of
> Washington working with Dr. Kurtis Heimerl on new tools for community
> cellular networks. He was fortunate to receive an NSF Graduate Research
> Fellowship and the Gaetano Borriello fellowship at UW to support his work.
> Previously he has interned for X (formerly Google-X) working on balloon
> based rural access, and worked at TrellisWare Technologies building
> mobile-ad-hoc networks. He received a Bachelors of Science in Electrical
> and Computer Engineering at the Rice University in Houston, Texas. Outside
> of networking, he is excited about sustainable living, bikes, and
> photography!
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Nov 6: Matt Johnson, Distributed LTE

2018-11-05 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 9/6/2018* in *JHN
111*.

*Who:* Matt Johnson (UW CSE)
*What:* Distributed LTE
*When:* Tuesday, Nov 6th, 12-1pm
*Where:* Johnson Hall 111

*Abstract: *The radio interfaces and network architectures of WiFi and
cellular systems are converging along many dimensions. While both systems
are largely adopting the centralized architecture of traditional cellular
deployments, this design comes with fundamental disadvantages that limit
how these networks grow and develop. As a response, we present Distributed
LTE (dLTE), an architecture offering the high radio performance of licensed
and coordinated waveforms as well as the openness to organic expansion and
growth of traditional WiFi. We challenge the assumption that good
performance requires a centralized packet processing core, and propose
hybrid approaches to coordination that prioritize system openness. We argue
that dLTE is a particularly good fit for rural areas, where the LTE
waveform is more appropriate than WiFi, yet it is uneconomical for
centralized providers to deploy traditional cellular systems.


*Bio: *Matthew Johnson is a graduate student at the University of
Washington working with Dr. Kurtis Heimerl on new tools for community
cellular networks. He was fortunate to receive an NSF Graduate Research
Fellowship and the Gaetano Borriello fellowship at UW to support his work.
Previously he has interned for X (formerly Google-X) working on balloon
based rural access, and worked at TrellisWare Technologies building
mobile-ad-hoc networks. He received a Bachelors of Science in Electrical
and Computer Engineering at the Rice University in Houston, Texas. Outside
of networking, he is excited about sustainable living, bikes, and
photography!
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 30: Nadya Peek, Machine Agency

2018-10-30 Thread Philip Garrison
We will have a livestream for this talk:
To join the video meeting, click this link:
https://meet.google.com/tsd-cpue-xop
Otherwise, to join by phone, dial +1 470-241-5109 and enter this PIN: 130
436 030#

On Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 10:01 AM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Reminder: we're meeting in 2 hours in JHN 111.
>
> -Philip
>
> On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 8:25 PM Philip Garrison <
> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 10/30/2018* in *JHN
>> 111*.
>>
>> *Who:* Nadya Peek
>> *What:* Machine Agency
>> *When:* Tuesday, Oct 16th, 12-1pm
>> *Where:* Johnson Hall 111
>>
>> *Machine Agency*
>> Abstract: How can we harness the precision of machines for the creativity
>> of individuals? Digital fabrication tools promise quality production in low
>> volume and are now accessible in maker spaces worldwide. However, the maker
>> context is very different from the historical industrial settings in which
>> digital fabrication was developed. Yet these differences have not led to
>> many changes in contemporary tools. I argue that personal fabrication
>> requires a rethinking of production infrastructure, and in this talk
>> outline a research roadmap for machine agency.
>>
>> Bio: Nadya Peek develops unconventional digital fabrication tools, small
>> scale automation, networked controls, and advanced manufacturing systems.
>> Spanning electronics, firmware, software, and mechanics, her research
>> focuses on harnessing the precision of machines for the creativity of
>> individuals.
>>
>> Nadya directs the Machine Agency at the University of Washington where
>> she is an assistant professor in Human-Centered Design and Engineering.
>> Machines and systems Nadya has built are shared widely including at
>> SIGGRAPH, CHI, Guggenheim Berlin, and the White House Maker Faire, and she
>> has given keynotes at Chaos Computer Congress, SolidCon, and H.O.P.E. Nadya
>> is an active member of the global fab lab community, making digital
>> fabrication more accessible with better CAD/CAM tools and developing open
>> source hardware machines and control systems. She is VP of the Open Source
>> Hardware Association, half of the design studio James and the Giant Peek,
>> plays drum machines and synths in the band Construction and got her PhD at
>> MIT in the Center for Bits and Atoms.
>> ___
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>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 30: Nadya Peek, Machine Agency

2018-10-30 Thread Philip Garrison
Reminder: we're meeting in 2 hours in JHN 111.

-Philip

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 8:25 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 10/30/2018* in *JHN
> 111*.
>
> *Who:* Nadya Peek
> *What:* Machine Agency
> *When:* Tuesday, Oct 16th, 12-1pm
> *Where:* Johnson Hall 111
>
> *Machine Agency*
> Abstract: How can we harness the precision of machines for the creativity
> of individuals? Digital fabrication tools promise quality production in low
> volume and are now accessible in maker spaces worldwide. However, the maker
> context is very different from the historical industrial settings in which
> digital fabrication was developed. Yet these differences have not led to
> many changes in contemporary tools. I argue that personal fabrication
> requires a rethinking of production infrastructure, and in this talk
> outline a research roadmap for machine agency.
>
> Bio: Nadya Peek develops unconventional digital fabrication tools, small
> scale automation, networked controls, and advanced manufacturing systems.
> Spanning electronics, firmware, software, and mechanics, her research
> focuses on harnessing the precision of machines for the creativity of
> individuals.
>
> Nadya directs the Machine Agency at the University of Washington where she
> is an assistant professor in Human-Centered Design and Engineering.
> Machines and systems Nadya has built are shared widely including at
> SIGGRAPH, CHI, Guggenheim Berlin, and the White House Maker Faire, and she
> has given keynotes at Chaos Computer Congress, SolidCon, and H.O.P.E. Nadya
> is an active member of the global fab lab community, making digital
> fabrication more accessible with better CAD/CAM tools and developing open
> source hardware machines and control systems. She is VP of the Open Source
> Hardware Association, half of the design studio James and the Giant Peek,
> plays drum machines and synths in the band Construction and got her PhD at
> MIT in the Center for Bits and Atoms.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 30: Nadya Peek, Machine Agency

2018-10-29 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 10/30/2018* in *JHN
111*.

*Who:* Nadya Peek
*What:* Machine Agency
*When:* Tuesday, Oct 16th, 12-1pm
*Where:* Johnson Hall 111

*Machine Agency*
Abstract: How can we harness the precision of machines for the creativity
of individuals? Digital fabrication tools promise quality production in low
volume and are now accessible in maker spaces worldwide. However, the maker
context is very different from the historical industrial settings in which
digital fabrication was developed. Yet these differences have not led to
many changes in contemporary tools. I argue that personal fabrication
requires a rethinking of production infrastructure, and in this talk
outline a research roadmap for machine agency.

Bio: Nadya Peek develops unconventional digital fabrication tools, small
scale automation, networked controls, and advanced manufacturing systems.
Spanning electronics, firmware, software, and mechanics, her research
focuses on harnessing the precision of machines for the creativity of
individuals.

Nadya directs the Machine Agency at the University of Washington where she
is an assistant professor in Human-Centered Design and Engineering.
Machines and systems Nadya has built are shared widely including at
SIGGRAPH, CHI, Guggenheim Berlin, and the White House Maker Faire, and she
has given keynotes at Chaos Computer Congress, SolidCon, and H.O.P.E. Nadya
is an active member of the global fab lab community, making digital
fabrication more accessible with better CAD/CAM tools and developing open
source hardware machines and control systems. She is VP of the Open Source
Hardware Association, half of the design studio James and the Giant Peek,
plays drum machines and synths in the band Construction and got her PhD at
MIT in the Center for Bits and Atoms.
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 23: Matt Ziegler

2018-10-23 Thread Philip Garrison
We have set up a livestream for the talk.
Connect by video: https://meet.google.com/ath-yqem-owj
Or by phone: dial +1 470-241-4852 and enter this PIN: 997 635 986#

-Philip

On Tue, Oct 23, 2018 at 10:39 AM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> See you all in JHN 111 for Matt's talk at noon!
>
> -Philip
>
> On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 2:32 PM Philip Garrison <
> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> Please join us for the Change Seminar *Tuesday 10/23/2018 *in *JHN 111.*
>>
>> *Who:* Matt Ziegler
>> *What:* Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information
>> System for Bihari Vegetable Farmers
>> *When: *Tuesday, Oct 23rd, 12-1pm
>> *Where: *Johnson Hall 111
>>
>> *Abstract: Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information
>> System for Bihari Vegetable Farmers*
>> Agricultural Market Information (MI) services provide users with
>> convenient access to price information and have demonstrated potential to
>> improve smallholder farmers’ incomes. Some recent evaluations of MI
>> systems, however, have shown disappointing results and brought forth many
>> complicating factors. Cautious of the mixed literature, we consider the
>> possibility of an MI service extension to Loop, a shared
>> transport-to-market service for smallholder farmers
>> selling vegetables and other perishable produce.
>>
>> We use Buxar, Bihar, India as a case study to investigate the potential
>> effectiveness and likely limitations of an MI service for improving
>> smallholder farmers’ livelihoods. We present evidence from interviews with
>> 17 farmers and 3 commission agents as well as interface prototyping
>> exercises. Consistent with “information scarcity” and “information
>> asymmetry” theories, we found that many farmers in this area regularly use
>> mobile phones to check prices for choosing markets and negotiation.
>> Participants also reported increases in the numbers of traders and price
>> stabilization since the arrival of mobile phones. However, we found many
>> other diverse factors which often supersede the importance of market prices
>> and present barriers to market access including time and convenience,
>> unfamiliarity with new markets, lack of connections, personal
>> relationships, market gluts and price crashes, production volume, attitudes
>> towards risk, credit relationships, and danger. Finally, we present
>> findings from exploratory user-interface studies for addressing some
>> market-access barriers including price volatility, market connections,
>> transportation, and payoff estimation.
>>
>> *Speaker bio:*
>> Matt Ziegler is a 1st-year PhD student in computer science at the
>> University of Washington, working at the crossroads of ICTD and
>> environmental studies.  Combining backgrounds as a biologist, environmental
>> researcher and computer scientist, Matt's research interests include
>> environmental justice, computational tools for natural resource management,
>> and technologies for community governance of conservation projects.  Matt
>> has worked in primate behavioral ecology, environmental education, and
>> insect biodiversity, and recently held internships at Mensrupedia and at
>> Digital Green.
>> ___
>> change mailing list
>> change@change.washington.edu
>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
> ___
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> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] Fwd: UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 23: Matt Ziegler

2018-10-23 Thread Philip Garrison
Do we have livestreaming?

-- Forwarded message -
From: Mary Jo Kochendorfer 
Date: Tue, Oct 23, 2018 at 10:55 AM
Subject: Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 23: Matt Ziegler
To: 


Hi Philip,
Will there be any call in details for this meeting or is it in-person only?

Thanks,
Mary Jo

On Tue, Oct 23, 2018 at 10:37 AM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> See you all in JHN 111 for Matt's talk at noon!
>
> -Philip
>
> On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 2:32 PM Philip Garrison <
> phili...@cs.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> Please join us for the Change Seminar *Tuesday 10/23/2018 *in *JHN 111.*
>>
>> *Who:* Matt Ziegler
>> *What:* Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information
>> System for Bihari Vegetable Farmers
>> *When: *Tuesday, Oct 23rd, 12-1pm
>> *Where: *Johnson Hall 111
>>
>> *Abstract: Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information
>> System for Bihari Vegetable Farmers*
>> Agricultural Market Information (MI) services provide users with
>> convenient access to price information and have demonstrated potential to
>> improve smallholder farmers’ incomes. Some recent evaluations of MI
>> systems, however, have shown disappointing results and brought forth many
>> complicating factors. Cautious of the mixed literature, we consider the
>> possibility of an MI service extension to Loop, a shared
>> transport-to-market service for smallholder farmers
>> selling vegetables and other perishable produce.
>>
>> We use Buxar, Bihar, India as a case study to investigate the potential
>> effectiveness and likely limitations of an MI service for improving
>> smallholder farmers’ livelihoods. We present evidence from interviews with
>> 17 farmers and 3 commission agents as well as interface prototyping
>> exercises. Consistent with “information scarcity” and “information
>> asymmetry” theories, we found that many farmers in this area regularly use
>> mobile phones to check prices for choosing markets and negotiation.
>> Participants also reported increases in the numbers of traders and price
>> stabilization since the arrival of mobile phones. However, we found many
>> other diverse factors which often supersede the importance of market prices
>> and present barriers to market access including time and convenience,
>> unfamiliarity with new markets, lack of connections, personal
>> relationships, market gluts and price crashes, production volume, attitudes
>> towards risk, credit relationships, and danger. Finally, we present
>> findings from exploratory user-interface studies for addressing some
>> market-access barriers including price volatility, market connections,
>> transportation, and payoff estimation.
>>
>> *Speaker bio:*
>> Matt Ziegler is a 1st-year PhD student in computer science at the
>> University of Washington, working at the crossroads of ICTD and
>> environmental studies.  Combining backgrounds as a biologist, environmental
>> researcher and computer scientist, Matt's research interests include
>> environmental justice, computational tools for natural resource management,
>> and technologies for community governance of conservation projects.  Matt
>> has worked in primate behavioral ecology, environmental education, and
>> insect biodiversity, and recently held internships at Mensrupedia and at
>> Digital Green.
>> ___
>> change mailing list
>> change@change.washington.edu
>> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>>
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>


-- 
Mary Jo Kochendorfer
US Mobile: +1 (612) 703 - 5034
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 23: Matt Ziegler

2018-10-23 Thread Philip Garrison
See you all in JHN 111 for Matt's talk at noon!

-Philip

On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 2:32 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for the Change Seminar *Tuesday 10/23/2018 *in *JHN 111.*
>
> *Who:* Matt Ziegler
> *What:* Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information System
> for Bihari Vegetable Farmers
> *When: *Tuesday, Oct 23rd, 12-1pm
> *Where: *Johnson Hall 111
>
> *Abstract: Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information
> System for Bihari Vegetable Farmers*
> Agricultural Market Information (MI) services provide users with
> convenient access to price information and have demonstrated potential to
> improve smallholder farmers’ incomes. Some recent evaluations of MI
> systems, however, have shown disappointing results and brought forth many
> complicating factors. Cautious of the mixed literature, we consider the
> possibility of an MI service extension to Loop, a shared
> transport-to-market service for smallholder farmers
> selling vegetables and other perishable produce.
>
> We use Buxar, Bihar, India as a case study to investigate the potential
> effectiveness and likely limitations of an MI service for improving
> smallholder farmers’ livelihoods. We present evidence from interviews with
> 17 farmers and 3 commission agents as well as interface prototyping
> exercises. Consistent with “information scarcity” and “information
> asymmetry” theories, we found that many farmers in this area regularly use
> mobile phones to check prices for choosing markets and negotiation.
> Participants also reported increases in the numbers of traders and price
> stabilization since the arrival of mobile phones. However, we found many
> other diverse factors which often supersede the importance of market prices
> and present barriers to market access including time and convenience,
> unfamiliarity with new markets, lack of connections, personal
> relationships, market gluts and price crashes, production volume, attitudes
> towards risk, credit relationships, and danger. Finally, we present
> findings from exploratory user-interface studies for addressing some
> market-access barriers including price volatility, market connections,
> transportation, and payoff estimation.
>
> *Speaker bio:*
> Matt Ziegler is a 1st-year PhD student in computer science at the
> University of Washington, working at the crossroads of ICTD and
> environmental studies.  Combining backgrounds as a biologist, environmental
> researcher and computer scientist, Matt's research interests include
> environmental justice, computational tools for natural resource management,
> and technologies for community governance of conservation projects.  Matt
> has worked in primate behavioral ecology, environmental education, and
> insect biodiversity, and recently held internships at Mensrupedia and at
> Digital Green.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
___
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 23: Matt Ziegler

2018-10-19 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar *Tuesday 10/23/2018 *in *JHN 111.*

*Who:* Matt Ziegler
*What:* Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information System
for Bihari Vegetable Farmers
*When: *Tuesday, Oct 23rd, 12-1pm
*Where: *Johnson Hall 111

*Abstract: Fresh Insights: User Research Towards a Market Information
System for Bihari Vegetable Farmers*
Agricultural Market Information (MI) services provide users with convenient
access to price information and have demonstrated potential to improve
smallholder farmers’ incomes. Some recent evaluations of MI systems,
however, have shown disappointing results and brought forth many
complicating factors. Cautious of the mixed literature, we consider the
possibility of an MI service extension to Loop, a shared
transport-to-market service for smallholder farmers
selling vegetables and other perishable produce.

We use Buxar, Bihar, India as a case study to investigate the potential
effectiveness and likely limitations of an MI service for improving
smallholder farmers’ livelihoods. We present evidence from interviews with
17 farmers and 3 commission agents as well as interface prototyping
exercises. Consistent with “information scarcity” and “information
asymmetry” theories, we found that many farmers in this area regularly use
mobile phones to check prices for choosing markets and negotiation.
Participants also reported increases in the numbers of traders and price
stabilization since the arrival of mobile phones. However, we found many
other diverse factors which often supersede the importance of market prices
and present barriers to market access including time and convenience,
unfamiliarity with new markets, lack of connections, personal
relationships, market gluts and price crashes, production volume, attitudes
towards risk, credit relationships, and danger. Finally, we present
findings from exploratory user-interface studies for addressing some
market-access barriers including price volatility, market connections,
transportation, and payoff estimation.

*Speaker bio:*
Matt Ziegler is a 1st-year PhD student in computer science at the
University of Washington, working at the crossroads of ICTD and
environmental studies.  Combining backgrounds as a biologist, environmental
researcher and computer scientist, Matt's research interests include
environmental justice, computational tools for natural resource management,
and technologies for community governance of conservation projects.  Matt
has worked in primate behavioral ecology, environmental education, and
insect biodiversity, and recently held internships at Mensrupedia and at
Digital Green.
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 16: Isabel Carrera Zamanillo

2018-10-16 Thread Philip Garrison
Starting in an hour and a half!

-Philip

On Mon, Oct 15, 2018 at 11:44 AM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 10/16/2018 *in *JHN
> 111.*
>
> *Who:* Isabel Carrera Zamanillo, UW College of the Environment
> *What:* Foodways at the intersection of environmental and cultural
> identities
> *When: *Tuesday, Oct 16th, 12-1pm
> *Where: *Johnson Hall 111
> * Abstract: Foodways at the intersection of environmental and cultural
> identities*
> In face of global threats such as climate change, environmental policies
> around the world have adopted universalistic positions rooted American
> standards in nature conservation. Unfortunately, mainstream environmental
> values do not represent the reality of local communities, especially those
> located in the global south. As an alternative to giving voice to
> silenced communities and as a continuation of my doctoral research, I
> plan to implement a new photovoice project that integrates protocols used
> in participatory photo mapping. The main goal of this project is to
> generate a community-based analysis of traditional foodways of Latinx
> families in the Seattle metropolitan area to provide a better understanding
> of the link between cultural and ecological values. Furthermore, this
> approach can be used to explore issues regarding food security and food
> sovereignty, as well as to record the participants’ knowledge regarding
> their natural and built environments. This research constitutes an attempt
> to study socio-ecological systems from an interdisciplinary perspective and
> integrate them into the context of social and environmental justice
> initiatives.
>
>
> *Bio:*
> Dr. Isabel Carrera Zamanillo has over a decade of non-profit and community
> organizing experience. Currently, Isabel works for the College of the
> Environment Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the University
> of Washington, promoting a more inclusive and collaborative climate that
> expands educational opportunities for all. Formerly, she worked at the
> Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium, creating culturally responsive
> material in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
> education. Isabel’s academic interests revolve around the study of how
> scientific practices transform and are transformed by local and global
> sociocultural factors. Her experience working in environmental
> justice-related projects in Mexico and the United States has allowed her
> to collaborate in sustainable development project inside and outside
> academia. Isabel’s main goal is to become a bridge builder between the
> scientific and non-scientific communities by promoting an active and
> collaborative participation to create solutions for environmental
> problems.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> https://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 16: Isabel Carrera Zamanillo

2018-10-15 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar tomorrow *Tuesday 10/16/2018 *in *JHN
111.*

*Who:* Isabel Carrera Zamanillo, UW College of the Environment
*What:* Foodways at the intersection of environmental and cultural
identities
*When: *Tuesday, Oct 16th, 12-1pm
*Where: *Johnson Hall 111
* Abstract: Foodways at the intersection of environmental and cultural
identities*
In face of global threats such as climate change, environmental policies
around the world have adopted universalistic positions rooted American
standards in nature conservation. Unfortunately, mainstream environmental
values do not represent the reality of local communities, especially those
located in the global south. As an alternative to giving voice to silenced
communities and as a continuation of my doctoral research, I plan to
implement a new photovoice project that integrates protocols used in
participatory
photo mapping. The main goal of this project is to generate a
community-based analysis of traditional foodways of Latinx families in the
Seattle metropolitan area to provide a better understanding of the link
between cultural and ecological values. Furthermore, this approach can be used
to explore issues regarding food security and food sovereignty, as well as
to record the participants’ knowledge regarding their natural and built
environments. This research constitutes an attempt to study
socio-ecological systems from an interdisciplinary perspective and
integrate them into the context of social and environmental justice
initiatives.


*Bio:*
Dr. Isabel Carrera Zamanillo has over a decade of non-profit and community
organizing experience. Currently, Isabel works for the College of the
Environment Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the University of
Washington, promoting a more inclusive and collaborative climate that
expands educational opportunities for all. Formerly, she worked at the
Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium, creating culturally responsive
material in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
education. Isabel’s academic interests revolve around the study of how
scientific practices transform and are transformed by local and global
sociocultural factors. Her experience working in environmental
justice-related projects in Mexico and the United States has allowed her to
collaborate in sustainable development project inside and outside academia.
Isabel’s main goal is to become a bridge builder between the scientific and
non-scientific communities by promoting an active and collaborative
participation to create solutions for environmental problems.
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Re: [change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 9: Jon Froehlich

2018-10-09 Thread Philip Garrison
The first Change seminar of the quarter starts at noon today in Johnson
Hall 111!

Johnson Hall is north of Drumheller fountain, across the way from Mary
Gates Hall.

-Philip

On Fri, Oct 5, 2018 at 4:29 PM Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> Please join us Tuesday for the first Change seminar of the new academic
> year! We will be in *Johnson Hall* *111 *this quarter.
>
> *Who:* Jon Froehlich, UW CSE
> *What:* Project Sidewalk: Mapping the Accessibility of the World through
> Google Street View
> *When: Tuesday, Oct 9th, 12-1pm*
> *Where: **Johnson Hall 111*
>
> *Project Sidewalk: Mapping the Accessibility of the World through Google
> Street View*
> Digital maps such as Google Maps, Waze, and Yelp have transformed the way
> people travel and access information about the physical world. While these
> systems contain terabytes of data about road networks and points of
> interest (POIs), their information about physical accessibility is
> commensurately poor. GIS websites like Axsmap.com, Wheelmap.org, and
> AccessTogether.org aim to address this problem by collecting
> location-based accessibility information provided by volunteers (i.e.,
> crowdsourcing). While these efforts are important and commendable, their
> value propositions are intrinsically tied to the amount and quality of data
> they collect. In a recent review of accessibility-oriented GIS sites, Ding
> et al. found that most suffered from serious data sparseness issues. One
> key limiting factor is the reliance on local populations with physical
> experience of a place for data collection. While local users who report
> data are likely to be reliable, the dependence on in situ reporting
> dramatically limits scalability—both who can supply data and how much data
> they can easily supply.
>
> In contrast, we are exploring a different approach embodied in a new
> interactive tool called Project Sidewalk (http://projectsidewalk.io),
> which enables online crowdworkers to contribute physical-world
> accessibility information by virtually walking through city streets in
> Google Street View (GSV)—similar to a first-person video game. Rather than
> pulling solely from local populations, our potential pool of users scales
> to anyone with an Internet connection and a web browser. In this talk, I
> will describe the design of Project Sidewalk and a recent 18-month
> deployment study in Washington DC. I will close with a discussion of our
> current and future work investigating correlates to urban accessibility,
> training machine learning algorithms to automatically assess accessibility,
> and interactive tools that create better transparency about accessible
> infrastructure. Our overarching goal is to transform how accessibility data
> is collected and visualized.
>
> *Bio:* http://www.cs.umd.edu/~jonf/
> I received my Phd in Computer Science from the University of Washington in
> December 2011 where I was a Microsoft Research Graduate Fellow and the 2010
> College of Engineering "Graduate Innovator of the Year." My PhD
> dissertation entitled "Sensing and Feedback of Everyday Activities to
> Promote Environmental Behaviors" won numerous awards including the 2012
> University of Washington Distinguished Dissertation Award and an honorable
> mention for the national 2012 Council of Graduate Schools Distinguished
> Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences, and Engineering.
>
> At UW, I was co-advised by James Landay and Shwetak Patel. I also have an
> MS in Information and Computer Science from the University of California,
> Irvine where I was advised by Paul Dourish. During my graduate studies, I
> was fortunate to intern at a number of great research labs including
> Telefonica Research in Barcelona, Microsoft Research in Redmond, and Intel
> Research in Seattle.
>
>
> We will try to get a livestream up for this talk.
> ___
> change mailing list
> change@change.washington.edu
> http://changemm.cs.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/change
>
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[change] UW Change Seminar Tuesday, Oct 9: Jon Froehlich

2018-10-05 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us Tuesday for the first Change seminar of the new academic
year! We will be in *Johnson Hall* *111 *this quarter.

*Who:* Jon Froehlich, UW CSE
*What:* Project Sidewalk: Mapping the Accessibility of the World through
Google Street View
*When: Tuesday, Oct 9th, 12-1pm*
*Where: **Johnson Hall 111*

*Project Sidewalk: Mapping the Accessibility of the World through Google
Street View*
Digital maps such as Google Maps, Waze, and Yelp have transformed the way
people travel and access information about the physical world. While these
systems contain terabytes of data about road networks and points of
interest (POIs), their information about physical accessibility is
commensurately poor. GIS websites like Axsmap.com, Wheelmap.org, and
AccessTogether.org aim to address this problem by collecting location-based
accessibility information provided by volunteers (i.e., crowdsourcing).
While these efforts are important and commendable, their value propositions
are intrinsically tied to the amount and quality of data they collect. In a
recent review of accessibility-oriented GIS sites, Ding et al. found that
most suffered from serious data sparseness issues. One key limiting factor
is the reliance on local populations with physical experience of a place
for data collection. While local users who report data are likely to be
reliable, the dependence on in situ reporting dramatically limits
scalability—both who can supply data and how much data they can easily
supply.

In contrast, we are exploring a different approach embodied in a new
interactive tool called Project Sidewalk (http://projectsidewalk.io), which
enables online crowdworkers to contribute physical-world accessibility
information by virtually walking through city streets in Google Street View
(GSV)—similar to a first-person video game. Rather than pulling solely from
local populations, our potential pool of users scales to anyone with an
Internet connection and a web browser. In this talk, I will describe the
design of Project Sidewalk and a recent 18-month deployment study in
Washington DC. I will close with a discussion of our current and future
work investigating correlates to urban accessibility, training machine
learning algorithms to automatically assess accessibility, and interactive
tools that create better transparency about accessible infrastructure. Our
overarching goal is to transform how accessibility data is collected and
visualized.

*Bio:* http://www.cs.umd.edu/~jonf/
I received my Phd in Computer Science from the University of Washington in
December 2011 where I was a Microsoft Research Graduate Fellow and the 2010
College of Engineering "Graduate Innovator of the Year." My PhD
dissertation entitled "Sensing and Feedback of Everyday Activities to
Promote Environmental Behaviors" won numerous awards including the 2012
University of Washington Distinguished Dissertation Award and an honorable
mention for the national 2012 Council of Graduate Schools Distinguished
Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences, and Engineering.

At UW, I was co-advised by James Landay and Shwetak Patel. I also have an
MS in Information and Computer Science from the University of California,
Irvine where I was advised by Paul Dourish. During my graduate studies, I
was fortunate to intern at a number of great research labs including
Telefonica Research in Barcelona, Microsoft Research in Redmond, and Intel
Research in Seattle.


We will try to get a livestream up for this talk.
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Re: [change] 5/29 seminar: Expanding financial inclusion for Seattle-area immigrants and refugees

2018-05-29 Thread Philip Garrison
Starting in under an hour!

On Sat, May 26, 2018, 16:12 Philip Garrison 
wrote:

> *Who*: Students from the Jackson School Applied Research Program, led by
> Jessica Beyer
> *What*: Expanding financial inclusion for Seattle-area immigrants and
> refugees
>
> *Where*: EEB 037
>
> *When*: Noon-1pm, Tuesday, 5/29
>
> *Abstract:*
>
> As immigrants and refugees migrate to new home countries, many experience
> difficulties adjusting to their new home nation’s financial systems. Issues
> relating to language, education, and cultural sensitivity contribute to
> these populations’ barriers to entry. As a result, many immigrants and
> refugees remain unbanked or underbanked. To ensure their successful
> integration to financial systems and the establishment of financial
> well-being, a team of researchers from the Jackson School of International
> Studies Applied Research Project team seeks to understand how populations
> of immigrants and refugees interact with the financial systems in the
> Greater Seattle Area. The report begins by examining established legal
> definitions of different types of immigrants. It then explores the
> demographic makeup of people arriving in Washington State and the Greater
> Seattle Area before examining the existing financial systems in Seattle.
> The report concludes with an in-depth overview of the various obstacles to
> financial inclusion for specific target populations by examining three case
> studies: the Somali population, Eritrean and Ethiopian populations, and
> Latino communities. This project was completing in collaboration with the
> University of Washington Computer Science and Engineering department.
>
>
>
> *Bio:*
>
> *Jessica Beyer,* *Faculty Lead*: Jessica Beyer is a Research Scientist in
> the Henry M. Jackson School for International Studies and the Technology &
> Social Change Group in the Information School. Jessica holds her Ph.D. in
> Political Science from the University of Washington.
>
> *Allison Anderson, ARP Program Manager*: Allison Anderson is a Ph.D.
> student at the Jackson School of International Studies. Her research
> interests are centered around gender, development, and information and
> communications technologies (ICTs) in the Arab world.
>
> *Grant Dailey, Senior Research Fellow*: Grant Dailey is currently
> enrolled as a concurrent degree candidate pursuing a Master of Public
> Administration with the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, and a
> Master of Arts in International Studies with the Jackson School of
> International Studies.
>
> *Nabilla Gunawan*: Nabilla Gunawan is a junior pursuing a B.A. in
> International Studies with an emphasis on Political Economy and Development.
>
> *Mardav Jain*:  Mardav Jain is a junior pursuing a BA in Economics and
> International Studies with a focus on Foreign Security and Diplomacy.
>
> *Sertseleul Kebede*: Sertseluel D. Kebede is a senior at the Henry M.
> Jackson School of International Studies majoring in International Studies.
>
> *Jinyong Um*: Jinyong Um is currently a junior at the Henry M. Jackson
> School of International Studies studying Foreign Policy, Diplomacy, Peace
> and Security. He also is an Informatics minor.
>
> *Jaime White*: Jaime White is a second-year master's student at the
> Jackson School of International Studies. Her research focuses on narrative
> and rhetoric in Hindu and Buddhist movements, and communal violence in South
>
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[change] 5/29 seminar: Expanding financial inclusion for Seattle-area immigrants and refugees

2018-05-26 Thread Philip Garrison
*Who*: Students from the Jackson School Applied Research Program, led by
Jessica Beyer
*What*: Expanding financial inclusion for Seattle-area immigrants and
refugees

*Where*: EEB 037

*When*: Noon-1pm, Tuesday, 5/29

*Abstract:*

As immigrants and refugees migrate to new home countries, many experience
difficulties adjusting to their new home nation’s financial systems. Issues
relating to language, education, and cultural sensitivity contribute to
these populations’ barriers to entry. As a result, many immigrants and
refugees remain unbanked or underbanked. To ensure their successful
integration to financial systems and the establishment of financial
well-being, a team of researchers from the Jackson School of International
Studies Applied Research Project team seeks to understand how populations
of immigrants and refugees interact with the financial systems in the
Greater Seattle Area. The report begins by examining established legal
definitions of different types of immigrants. It then explores the
demographic makeup of people arriving in Washington State and the Greater
Seattle Area before examining the existing financial systems in Seattle.
The report concludes with an in-depth overview of the various obstacles to
financial inclusion for specific target populations by examining three case
studies: the Somali population, Eritrean and Ethiopian populations, and
Latino communities. This project was completing in collaboration with the
University of Washington Computer Science and Engineering department.



*Bio:*

*Jessica Beyer,* *Faculty Lead*: Jessica Beyer is a Research Scientist in
the Henry M. Jackson School for International Studies and the Technology &
Social Change Group in the Information School. Jessica holds her Ph.D. in
Political Science from the University of Washington.

*Allison Anderson, ARP Program Manager*: Allison Anderson is a Ph.D.
student at the Jackson School of International Studies. Her research
interests are centered around gender, development, and information and
communications technologies (ICTs) in the Arab world.

*Grant Dailey, Senior Research Fellow*: Grant Dailey is currently enrolled
as a concurrent degree candidate pursuing a Master of Public Administration
with the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, and a Master of Arts
in International Studies with the Jackson School of International Studies.

*Nabilla Gunawan*: Nabilla Gunawan is a junior pursuing a B.A. in
International Studies with an emphasis on Political Economy and Development.

*Mardav Jain*:  Mardav Jain is a junior pursuing a BA in Economics and
International Studies with a focus on Foreign Security and Diplomacy.

*Sertseleul Kebede*: Sertseluel D. Kebede is a senior at the Henry M.
Jackson School of International Studies majoring in International Studies.

*Jinyong Um*: Jinyong Um is currently a junior at the Henry M. Jackson
School of International Studies studying Foreign Policy, Diplomacy, Peace
and Security. He also is an Informatics minor.

*Jaime White*: Jaime White is a second-year master's student at the Jackson
School of International Studies. Her research focuses on narrative and
rhetoric in Hindu and Buddhist movements, and communal violence in South
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[change] Recruiting participants: Navigating new financial systems

2018-02-05 Thread Philip Garrison
Hi friends!

We are recruiting participants for a research project that focuses on *how
people who have moved or traveled to a new country navigate new financial
systems* and digital financial services. Our goal is to understand the
complexities of the transition process in order to better design digital
financial tools.

We would *love* to hear your stories! If you are interested in
participating in an interview (in person or online), please fill out the
following 30 second (we promise) screening survey
https://goo.gl/forms/zVEIWlLzPLmBIjBI3.

Please forward this to anyone you know who might be interested, and feel
free to contact us with any questions.

Thanks a bunch!
Philip and Naveena
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[change] UW Change Seminar 1/16 in EEB 003: Negin Dahya, Exploring the Role of ICTs in Refugee Education

2018-01-13 Thread Philip Garrison
Please join us for the Change Seminar this week on *Tuesday 1/9/2018* in *EEB
003*.

*Who:* Negin Dahya, Assistant Professor, The Information School, Adjunct
Assistant Professor, Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies
*What: **Exploring the Role of ICTs in Refugee Education: Teaching and
Learning Networks in Kenyan Refugee Camps*
*When: *Tuesday, Jan 16th, 12-1pm
*Where: EEB 003*

*Abstract: *The study of information and communication technology in
development settings is a rich and complex field of research and practice.
Mobile phones have become a crucial part of this landscape, amplifying
possibilities for information sharing, formal and informal education, and
for building community networks locally and globally. Refugee camps are
unique and hazardous environments where each limited resource available can
have lasting and meaningful implications for individual lives and for the
make-up of entire communities. The focus of this talk will be on the role
of mobile technologies to support teachers in their ongoing, in practice
professional development, and specifically with regard to changing the
social and cultural beliefs and practices related to girls going to school
in the Dadaab and Kakuma refugee camps in Kenya.

*Bio: *Dr. Negin Dahya is an Assistant Professor at the University of
Washington Information School. She completed her PhD in Education at York
University (Toronto, Ontario). Dr. Dahya’s research is focused on the
social and cultural context of technology use among girls and women of
color in North America and internationally. Her research has explored how
girls of color in North America use digital media in educational settings,
as well as how digital and social media influence educational opportunities
for refugee girls and women in refugee camps in Kenya.  Dr. Dahya is part
of the Digital Youth Lab at the University of Washington Information School
and serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the UW Department of
Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies. She is also an Affiliate Faculty at The
Center for Communication, Difference & Equity in the UW Department of
Communication and serves on committees for the non-profit organization Reel
Grrls and The Inter-Network Agency for Education in Emergencies.
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