[CODE4LIB] Next Generation ILS Project Annouced

2008-08-07 Thread John Little
Hi Code4Lib.

Back in January I posted a brief message about a next-gen ILS project we are
calling the Open Library Project.  Thanks to generous support of the Andrew
W. Mellon foundation the project received funding.  Support is also being
provided by a strong list of partners.  The press release just went out the
other day.  Since January the response has been positive and strong.  The
partners are a dynamic and motivated group.  You can find the press release
below and more detailed information at the project site:  
http://oleproject.org/ .

I hope you will find this project interesting and will join in the open
webcast and discussions.  The dates of the webcasts are TBD so please
subscribe to the alterts http://oleproject.org/subscribe/.

--John
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

Here's the press release...

- - -

A $475,700 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to the Duke University
Libraries will lead to the design of a next-generation, open-source library
system that is flexible, customizable and nimble enough to meet the changing
and complex needs of 21st-century libraries and library users.  The goal of
the Open Library Environment (OLE) Project is to develop a design document
for library automation technology that fits modern library workflows, is
built on Service Oriented Architecture, and offers an alternative to
commercial Integrated Library System products.



Leaders of the OLE Project, representing libraries in the U.S., Canada, and
Australia, will involve the library community in the design process through
workshops, meetings, webcasts and online discussions. Through those
activities, they will develop a plan for a library technology system that
breaks away from an emphasis on print-based workflows, reflects the changing
nature of library materials and new approaches to scholarly work, meshes
well with other enterprise systems, and can be modified easily to suit the
needs of different institutions. The project website at
http://oleproject.org http://www.oleproject.org/ gives detailed
information about the project and includes FAQs, recommended reading, and a
comment section.



The information environment is changing rapidly, but the technology of
library management systems has not kept pace, said Lynne O'Brien, principal
investigator on the project and Director of Academic Technology and
Instructional Services for Perkins Library at Duke University. This project
is a wonderful opportunity to design a system that supports library
innovation and better meets the needs of today's researchers.


 O'Brien is joined on the OLE Project team by colleagues from Duke as well
individuals from the University of Kansas, Lehigh University, the University
of Pennsylvania, the National Library of Australia, Library and Archives
Canada, Vanderbilt University, the Orbis Cascade Alliance, Rutgers
University, the University of Florida, the University of Chicago, Columbia
University, the University of Maryland and Whittier College.


 Because the OLE Project is a collaborative, community-based venture, there
will be many opportunities for individuals from other libraries to
participate in the project through regional and virtual meetings, discussion
of plans and documents, comments via the project website and listserv and
discussions at professional meetings.


In addition to its development of a design document, the OLE Project is
intended to create a community of interest that could be tapped to build the
planned system in a follow-on project.


-- 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
ILS Support Section Head
Duke University Libraries


[CODE4LIB] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Tim Spalding
After releasing all our series, award prizes and such, we've now
released all our covers. See the blog:

http://www.librarything.com/blog/2008/08/million-free-covers-from-librarything.php

I really hope this—or more probably what comes of this—ends the
selling of covers to libraries. Data companies are great. People want
data more and more every year. There are a million ways of making
money off selling to this need. (We're no Bowker, but we too make some
money off selling data.) But covers need to drop out the bottom and
become free.

Tim

-- 
Check out my library at http://www.librarything.com/profile/timspalding


Re: [CODE4LIB] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

This is awesome Tim, thanks very much.

My software these days investigates several sources of covers, and then 
decides based on availabilty which to use. If I wanted to check LT for a 
cover before deciding to display it, would I just access that kind of 
URL and see if I get a 404 or not?


Jonathan

Tim Spalding wrote:

After releasing all our series, award prizes and such, we've now
released all our covers. See the blog:

http://www.librarything.com/blog/2008/08/million-free-covers-from-librarything.php

I really hope this—or more probably what comes of this—ends the
selling of covers to libraries. Data companies are great. People want
data more and more every year. There are a million ways of making
money off selling to this need. (We're no Bowker, but we too make some
money off selling data.) But covers need to drop out the bottom and
become free.

Tim

  


--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886 
rochkind (at) jhu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Lars Aronsson
Tim Spalding wrote:

 I really hope this—or more probably what comes of this—ends the 
 selling of covers to libraries.

Probably not, with all the restrictions you attached.

Still, this is a most interesting experiment.  Commercial sellers 
supposedly have a legal backing from contracts with publishers, 
which you don't?  How long will that last?  If it does last, it is 
indeed a big win.

In the blog entry, you wrote: Publishers and authors want 
libraries and bookstores to show their covers.  -- I'm not so 
sure.  I think publishers want copyright to make it hard to use 
out-of-print books, so people buy new books instead.  Back in 
1932, Aldous Huxley wrote: We don't want people to be attracted 
by old things. We want them to like the new ones.


-- 
  Lars Aronsson ([EMAIL PROTECTED])
  Aronsson Datateknik - http://aronsson.se


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

Both the law and the real world situation is unclear.

Clearly, publishers own the intellectual property of a cover graphic. 
Could using thumbnail images of lots of covers in aggregate be 
considered fair use?  Maybe, the law is not clear (there is some case 
law to suggest it could be, but it's hardly settled).


Would publishers mind if you are using their intellectual property like 
this? It's not clear. On the one hand, these days everyone thinks they 
should be getting paid if you are using their IP for anything. On the 
other hand, _some_ publishers are giving thumbnails for free to Internet 
Archive. Maybe publishers realize giving you this 'property' to, after 
all, let you advertise their wares for them, is a good thing. Of course 
Bowker/Syndetics (and I think Ingram has a cover service too?) don't 
like free covers because they make money from it. I am very very curious 
as to what terms Bowker has with the publishers; does Bowker have an 
_exclusive_ license with the publishers to do certain things?  How much, 
if any, do the publishers get paid for Bowker's use of their cover 
images? Very curious what the business situation is, because that helps 
us guess how various actors will behave.


If you use Bowker/Syndetics images in a way not covered by the license, 
that's a license issue. Amazon licenses from Bowker, and in turn 
licenses the end-user, so there are various parties there that could be 
violating licenses. Google also licenses either from Bowker or Ingram or 
someone else, not sure who, but I'm pretty sure they've gotten cover 
images by license.


The LibraryThing archive was not obtained by license. It was obtained by 
individual users scanning and uploading. So the only license involved is 
one between LibraryThing and the end-users of the images, there is no 
license violation with any provider of the image possible. Just possibly 
a copyright violation.


Jonathan

Lars Aronsson wrote:

Tim Spalding wrote:

  
I really hope this—or more probably what comes of this—ends the 
selling of covers to libraries.



Probably not, with all the restrictions you attached.

Still, this is a most interesting experiment.  Commercial sellers 
supposedly have a legal backing from contracts with publishers, 
which you don't?  How long will that last?  If it does last, it is 
indeed a big win.


In the blog entry, you wrote: Publishers and authors want 
libraries and bookstores to show their covers.  -- I'm not so 
sure.  I think publishers want copyright to make it hard to use 
out-of-print books, so people buy new books instead.  Back in 
1932, Aldous Huxley wrote: We don't want people to be attracted 
by old things. We want them to like the new ones.



  


--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886 
rochkind (at) jhu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Position Opening - Columbus, OH - Web Developer

2008-08-07 Thread Matt Polcyn
OHIONET, a not-for-profit library membership organization in Ohio,
seeks a web developer with 3 to 5 years of experience to develop,
maintain and support various aspects of OHIONET's public and internal
web sites and to coordinate web hosting and design and development
services provided to our members. In that capacity, this individual
will:

* Utilize web, graphics and database design, programming and usability
knowledge and skills to create dynamic web sites and/or web-based
solutions for ourmembers.
* Assume responsibility for all aspects of design and development
process, from the initial planning and assessment phases through
completion.
* Meet and/or communicate with members as appropriate to ensure
successful project outcomes.
* Perform server maintenance duties and tasks, including but not
limited to:  performing system backups, maintaining system logs and
performing other duties as assigned.
* Coordinate web site and web server service, maintenance and/or
replacement with other OHIONET staff, vendor representatives and
consultants.
* Utilize programming and design skills and technical knowledge for
OHIONET web presences and other applications.
* Serves as backup for other departmental staff when applicable

Qualifications:

* Bachelor's Degree or equivalent education/work experience required;
* Relevant certifications, an established portfolio and/or
demonstrated professional leadership and commitment preferred;
* Familiarity with current web and library systems and technologies preferred;
* Experience in web site development and design and graphics creation
and manipulation required (Experience using Dreamweaver and Adobe
PhotoShop and/or Creative Suite strongly preferred);
* Experience using XHTML markup, PHP server-side scripting and CSS required;
* Strong understanding of object-oriented programming required;
* Proficiency in using and maintaining web server and relational
database management system required (MySQL strongly preferred);
* Knowledge of web design and accessibility standards and principles
of usability required;
* Strong public/customer service background required;
* Must be capable of managing technical projects;
* Should possess excellent leadership,communication, analytic and
problem-solving skills and be capable of exercising sound judgment.

Salary:  Commensurate with qualifications and experience.  Excellent
benefits include 20 vacation days, 11 holidays, 12 days sick leave,
TIAA-CREF retirement plan.

Interested applicants should send a letter of application, resume and
three references with addresses and phone numbers to Jennifer Turner,
([EMAIL PROTECTED]), Director of Accounting and Business Services,
OHIONET, 1500 W. Lane Ave., Columbus OH 43221.   Electronic
submissions are acceptable.  Applications received by September 2 will
receive first consideration.


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Tim Spalding
First, IANAL, obviously.

 Clearly, publishers own the intellectual property of a cover graphic. Could
 using thumbnail images of lots of covers in aggregate be considered fair
 use?  Maybe, the law is not clear (there is some case law to suggest it
 could be, but it's hardly settled).

Publishers make their covers available to them and to others because
they desperately want their covers out there. You can get covers from
publishers with amazing ease. I do not suspect Amazon or Syndetics
have licensed the covers in any way.

LibraryThing asserts no copyright over the images. In most cases,
copyright rests with the publisher. (In the case of the cover I
designed for my wife's book, it rests with me; I'll tell you nobody at
Amazon has asked for my permission—snort!) As such, there are fair and
unfair uses of the images. Using images in connection with selling
product is generally considered fair use. That's why you can take a
picture of your cool decorate skateboard and post it on ebay, but you
can't make a huge photo of the skateboard and make posters of it.
Commentary is another fair use harbor. I've never seen OPAC use
directly mentioned, but I can't imagine it wouldn't fall under it as
well. If you can show a cover to sell a book, a library can surely
show a cover to patrons interested in checking it out.

 Would publishers mind if you are using their intellectual property like
 this? It's not clear.

Do publishers sell covers or books?

 On the one hand, these days everyone thinks they
 should be getting paid if you are using their IP for anything. On the other
 hand, _some_ publishers are giving thumbnails for free to Internet Archive.
 Maybe publishers realize giving you this 'property' to, after all, let you
 advertise their wares for them, is a good thing. Of course Bowker/Syndetics
 (and I think Ingram has a cover service too?) don't like free covers because
 they make money from it. I am very very curious as to what terms Bowker has
 with the publishers; does Bowker have an _exclusive_ license with the
 publishers to do certain things?

No. They don't.

How much, if any, do the publishers get
 paid for Bowker's use of their cover images? Very curious what the business
 situation is, because that helps us guess how various actors will behave.

I suspect the answer is nothing. There may be payments on either side
to make it happen easily.

Tim


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Jonathan Rochkind
I am actually pretty certain that Amazon _has_ licensed their covers, 
and particularly from Syndetics.


Where Syndetics gets their covers remains a mystery to me, one I am very 
curious about.


Jonathan

Tim Spalding wrote:

First, IANAL, obviously.

  

Clearly, publishers own the intellectual property of a cover graphic. Could
using thumbnail images of lots of covers in aggregate be considered fair
use?  Maybe, the law is not clear (there is some case law to suggest it
could be, but it's hardly settled).



Publishers make their covers available to them and to others because
they desperately want their covers out there. You can get covers from
publishers with amazing ease. I do not suspect Amazon or Syndetics
have licensed the covers in any way.

LibraryThing asserts no copyright over the images. In most cases,
copyright rests with the publisher. (In the case of the cover I
designed for my wife's book, it rests with me; I'll tell you nobody at
Amazon has asked for my permission—snort!) As such, there are fair and
unfair uses of the images. Using images in connection with selling
product is generally considered fair use. That's why you can take a
picture of your cool decorate skateboard and post it on ebay, but you
can't make a huge photo of the skateboard and make posters of it.
Commentary is another fair use harbor. I've never seen OPAC use
directly mentioned, but I can't imagine it wouldn't fall under it as
well. If you can show a cover to sell a book, a library can surely
show a cover to patrons interested in checking it out.

  

Would publishers mind if you are using their intellectual property like
this? It's not clear.



Do publishers sell covers or books?

  

On the one hand, these days everyone thinks they
should be getting paid if you are using their IP for anything. On the other
hand, _some_ publishers are giving thumbnails for free to Internet Archive.
Maybe publishers realize giving you this 'property' to, after all, let you
advertise their wares for them, is a good thing. Of course Bowker/Syndetics
(and I think Ingram has a cover service too?) don't like free covers because
they make money from it. I am very very curious as to what terms Bowker has
with the publishers; does Bowker have an _exclusive_ license with the
publishers to do certain things?



No. They don't.

  

How much, if any, do the publishers get
paid for Bowker's use of their cover images? Very curious what the business
situation is, because that helps us guess how various actors will behave.



I suspect the answer is nothing. There may be payments on either side
to make it happen easily.

Tim

  


--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886 
rochkind (at) jhu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Thomas Dowling

On 08/07/2008 04:04 PM, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:
I am actually pretty certain that Amazon _has_ licensed their covers, 
and particularly from Syndetics.




Contrariwise, Wikipedia includes book and DVD covers and movie posters, 
with a pretty verbose explanation of why they think they're allowed to 
do so (see for example 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:StarWarsMoviePoster1977.jpg).


I guess they just define their use as allowed and wait for someone to 
challenge them on it?



--
Thomas Dowling
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread David Pattern
 Publishers make their covers available to them and to others because
 they desperately want their covers out there. You can get covers from
 publishers with amazing ease. I do not suspect Amazon or Syndetics
 have licensed the covers in any way.

Having worked for a number of years for a children's library book supplier in 
the mid 1990s in the UK, I can concur with Tim -- all of the publishers we 
dealt with (which included all of the major players) were more than happy to 
supply us with book cover scans to use on our web site.  The only issue for us 
was the wide variety in quality (from tiny GIFs to massive TIFFs), so we ended 
up doing all of the cover scanning ourselves inhouse (again, the publishers 
we're happy for us do this).

On the subject of copyright, wasn't there a recent case brought against 
Google's Image Search where the judge ruled that thumbnails do not violate the 
copyright of the original image?

regards
Dave Pattern
University of Huddersfield









This transmission is confidential and may be legally privileged. If you receive 
it in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail and remove it from your 
system. If the content of this e-mail does not relate to the business of the 
University of Huddersfield, then we do not endorse it and will accept no 
liability.


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Edward M. Corrado
I think the lawsuit you are talking about is the image linking suit, Perfect
10 v. Google. Information on this lawsuit can be found at:
http://www.eff.org/cases/perfect-10-v-google

I haven't read the decision, but the EFF says While it leaves some
questions open, the bottom line is that the Court upheld important policies
of fair use and freedom online and resisted Perfect 10's plea to put
copyright owners completely in charge of how and when search engines and
other online intermediaries can provide their users with links to images.

Edward

On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 4:48 PM, David Pattern [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

  Publishers make their covers available to them and to others because
  they desperately want their covers out there. You can get covers from
  publishers with amazing ease. I do not suspect Amazon or Syndetics
  have licensed the covers in any way.

 Having worked for a number of years for a children's library book supplier
 in the mid 1990s in the UK, I can concur with Tim -- all of the publishers
 we dealt with (which included all of the major players) were more than happy
 to supply us with book cover scans to use on our web site.  The only issue
 for us was the wide variety in quality (from tiny GIFs to massive TIFFs), so
 we ended up doing all of the cover scanning ourselves inhouse (again, the
 publishers we're happy for us do this).

 On the subject of copyright, wasn't there a recent case brought against
 Google's Image Search where the judge ruled that thumbnails do not violate
 the copyright of the original image?

 regards
 Dave Pattern
 University of Huddersfield









 This transmission is confidential and may be legally privileged. If you
 receive it in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail and remove it
 from your system. If the content of this e-mail does not relate to the
 business of the University of Huddersfield, then we do not endorse it and
 will accept no liability.



Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

Yeah, the law is pretty unclear.

I don't think LT or Wikipedia are taking an unreasonable risk. Odds are, 
the publishers aren't going to complain. If they do, and you are willing 
to go to court, it's a toss up as to whether you'd win or not.


Jonathan

Thomas Dowling wrote:

On 08/07/2008 04:04 PM, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:
I am actually pretty certain that Amazon _has_ licensed their covers, 
and particularly from Syndetics.




Contrariwise, Wikipedia includes book and DVD covers and movie 
posters, with a pretty verbose explanation of why they think they're 
allowed to do so (see for example 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:StarWarsMoviePoster1977.jpg).


I guess they just define their use as allowed and wait for someone to 
challenge them on it?





--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886 
rochkind (at) jhu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

David Pattern wrote:


On the subject of copyright, wasn't there a recent case brought against 
Google's Image Search where the judge ruled that thumbnails do not violate the 
copyright of the original image?
  
Yes, but the facts in that case weren't quite the same as the facts in 
the hypothetical case we are talking about. It woudln't neccesarily be 
decided the same, although the defense lawyers in our hypothetical case 
would certainly cite that case.


At any event, if the publishers don't mind, it doesn't matter.

And as seeing a post from Dave reminds me, even what I know about the 
murky grey areas of this issue is only US law, I have absolutely no idea 
how it would turn out in other countries. But if the publishers don't 
mind, it won't matter.


Jonathan


 
regards

Dave Pattern
University of Huddersfield
 
 

 






This transmission is confidential and may be legally privileged. If you receive 
it in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail and remove it from your 
system. If the content of this e-mail does not relate to the business of the 
University of Huddersfield, then we do not endorse it and will accept no 
liability.

  


--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886 
rochkind (at) jhu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] A million free covers, from LibraryThing

2008-08-07 Thread Nate Vack
On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 12:09 PM, Tim Spalding [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 After releasing all our series, award prizes and such, we've now
 released all our covers. See the blog:

 http://www.librarything.com/blog/2008/08/million-free-covers-from-librarything.php

 I really hope this—or more probably what comes of this—ends the
 selling of covers to libraries. Data companies are great. People want
 data more and more every year. There are a million ways of making
 money off selling to this need. (We're no Bowker, but we too make some
 money off selling data.) But covers need to drop out the bottom and
 become free.

While this looks like a really cute service, if you *really* want to
kill the whole 'selling covers to libraries' thing, why not just tar
'em up and drop 'em into a torrent? Put a README file in there that
says Hi, we're LibraryThing and we gave y'all these covers. If you
want to buy our other data services, that'd be neat? and be done with
it. As an added bonus, your scaling concerns would go away.

Or, at least drop the no sharing or competing with us restrictions.
I highly(!) doubt that someone's gonna take these covers and use them
to destroy you.

Cheers,
-Nate