Re: [CODE4LIB] Ranking factors for library resources: Who really uses what?

2011-02-16 Thread LeVan,Ralph
As you pointed out, WorldCat does all sorts of tricky ranking.  I
believe there's a dashboard that they use for tuning the ranking.
Library holdings count, term frequencies, availability, FRBR, and
locality are all facets of that ranking.

In OCLC Research we do practically nothing without some sort of ranking.
In our VIAF project, we gather name authority records from 20-some
national libraries and merge matching records into a single VIAF record.
We rank search results by the size of the records, figuring that the
larger a record is, the more attention the component records got from
the national libraries and that size can be used as an indirect measure
of popularity.

In WorldCat Identities, we create author records from WorldCat data.
Simple SRU searches are ranked by the total number of items held in
libraries for that author.  There is also a fuzzy name searching service
for WorldCat Identities that uses a combination of holdings and
similarity to rank results.

We use WorldCat holdings information for ranking wherever we can.  For
instance, our FAST subject headings database returns results ranked by
holdings.

We've never done any usability testing on these ranking algorithms as
they are simply clearly superior to no ranking at all.

Ralph

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf
Of
 Till Kinstler

 ...

 So, if you implemented something beyond term statistics based ranking,
 speak up and show.


Re: [CODE4LIB] Ranking factors for library resources: Who really uses what?

2011-02-16 Thread Ian Mulvany
In Mendeley we are using number of readers to rank search results on
our catalog.

Our search index is in solr.

I don't have more fine grained details, but I could get them if people
are interested.

- Ian

On 16 February 2011 14:21, LeVan,Ralph le...@oclc.org wrote:
 As you pointed out, WorldCat does all sorts of tricky ranking.  I
 believe there's a dashboard that they use for tuning the ranking.
 Library holdings count, term frequencies, availability, FRBR, and
 locality are all facets of that ranking.

 In OCLC Research we do practically nothing without some sort of ranking.
 In our VIAF project, we gather name authority records from 20-some
 national libraries and merge matching records into a single VIAF record.
 We rank search results by the size of the records, figuring that the
 larger a record is, the more attention the component records got from
 the national libraries and that size can be used as an indirect measure
 of popularity.

 In WorldCat Identities, we create author records from WorldCat data.
 Simple SRU searches are ranked by the total number of items held in
 libraries for that author.  There is also a fuzzy name searching service
 for WorldCat Identities that uses a combination of holdings and
 similarity to rank results.

 We use WorldCat holdings information for ranking wherever we can.  For
 instance, our FAST subject headings database returns results ranked by
 holdings.

 We've never done any usability testing on these ranking algorithms as
 they are simply clearly superior to no ranking at all.

 Ralph

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf
 Of
 Till Kinstler

 ...

 So, if you implemented something beyond term statistics based ranking,
 speak up and show.




-- 
Ian Mulvany | VP New Product Development
http://www.mendeley.com/profiles/ian-mulvany/

Mendeley Limited | London, UK | www.mendeley.com
Registered in England and Wales | Company Number 6419015


[CODE4LIB] c4l-NYC Spring Forum: Web Frameworks

2011-02-16 Thread Yitzchak Schaffer

Hello all,

I hope everyone enjoyed the con - I wasn't personally able to go, but I 
almost felt like I was there thanks to the stream + #code4lib - hats off 
to the live stream organizer(s).


We are one month away from the METRO code4lib-nyc SIG spring meeting, 
Wed. March 16, 10a-noon, at METRO HQ (57 E 11th Street). We hope to have 
several presenters speaking about web frameworks.


At this point we are short on presenters, so if you are proficient in a 
framework (or in proud c4l tradition want to crash-course it and talk 
about how it went), drop a line to me or kevin.re...@gmail.com and we 
will put you in the lineup.


--
Yitzchak Schaffer


Re: [CODE4LIB] Ranking factors for library resources: Who really uses what?

2011-02-16 Thread Cary Gordon
generate artificial serendipity

Now my motto!

Cary

On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 11:02 AM, Simon Spero sesunc...@gmail.com wrote:
 There's another source of data for training library relevance ranking that I
 don't think has been exploited much yet.

 (for academic libraries)
 Searches against catalogs are usually intended to locate material to fill a
 specific information need.

 Often this information seeking results in circulation events.

 Many systems can identify the person who conducted a search session.
 Comparing the search results to actual checkout events  might be fruitful.

 For example, if a search for certain keywords resulted in checkout events
 for items other than those listed, but within  shelf browsing distance,
 there may be a strong relationship between the words and the information
 need satisfied by those concepts.

 Incidentally, this is the kind of association that would me much easier to
 find if the LCSH hierarchy hadn't been so badly mangled by computer. If the
 hierarchy were intact it would be possible to aggregate subjects to deal
 with the sparseness of the circulation events.

 Note that getting hold of this data may require working with central IT
 (e.g. If the library only has ip addresses, and the holder of that ip
 address at that time is known only via dhcp logs; or if the computers in the
 library require login, those logs may not be accessible to library systems
 staff directly.)  This kind of work should also go through the IRB, even if
 their approval is not explicitly required.  They may have good ideas for
 avoiding possible privacy violations.

 Simon
 p.s.
 If the physical layout of the library is known, you could also estimate scan
 radius. You could also calculate, based on checkouts of items seemingly
 unrelated to the search, from shelves passed on the way to the elevator, how
 to generate artificial serendipity by randomly throwing a few such items
 into the search results.

 Simon




-- 
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


[CODE4LIB] Introducing TILE 0.9 - redesigned website | public release

2011-02-16 Thread James Neal
MITH (Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities) is excited to
announce the redesigned website for and public release of The Text-Image
Linking Environment (TILE) http://mith.umd.edu/tile/ 
http://mith.umd.edu/tile/, a
web-based tool for creating and editing image-based electronic editions and
digital archives of humanities texts. This initial release of TILE 0.9
features tools for importing and exporting transcript lines and images of
text, an image markup tool, a semi-automated line recognizer that tags
regions of text within an image, and plugin architecture to extend the
functionality of the software.

There are a number of ways to try TILE 0.9 and learn more. You can visit the
MITH-hosted sandbox version that allows you to use the tool online, or
download a customizable version of the software.

If you’d like to learn more, we’ve made end-user and developer
documentationhttp://mith.umd.edu/tile/documentation/
 http://mith.umd.edu/tile/documentation/ available, and we’re ready to
answer your questions on our forums http://mith.umd.edu/tile/forums/ 
http://mith.umd.edu/tile/forums/.

Supported by an NEH Preservation and Access Grant, TILE is a collaboration
between the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (Doug
Reside, Dave Lester) and Indiana University (Dot Porter, John Walsh).


[CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Michele DeSilva
Hi Code4Lib-ers,

I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from the 
conference.

I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list of 
databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do 
something that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a great 
article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal  Mario 
Bernado) about building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm also 
wondering what other institutions have done as far as in-house solutions. I 
know there're products we could buy, but, like everyone else, we don't have 
much money at the moment.

Thanks for any info or advice!

Michele DeSilva
Central Oregon Community College Library
Emerging Technologies Librarian
541-383-7565
mdesi...@cocc.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Jonathan Rochkind
We have Metalib and use Xerxes as a front-end to Metalib, so we just use 
Xerxes as our A-Z list, or directory or databases too.


But what I'd really like to do is just _use the catalog_.  If there was 
a good interface for the catalog, and these resources were included in 
it's search... why would need an entirely separate interface for 
databases, why not just use the catalog to find stuff?  That's what I'm 
working towards. First step, use Blacklight to have a catalog with a 
usable interface.


On 2/16/2011 4:18 PM, Michele DeSilva wrote:

Hi Code4Lib-ers,

I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from the 
conference.

I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list of 
databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do something 
that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a great article in 
the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal  Mario Bernado) about 
building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm also wondering what other 
institutions have done as far as in-house solutions. I know there're products we 
could buy, but, like everyone else, we don't have much money at the moment.

Thanks for any info or advice!

Michele DeSilva
Central Oregon Community College Library
Emerging Technologies Librarian
541-383-7565
mdesi...@cocc.edu



Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Naomi Dushay

if you put the info in a Solr index, you could use Blacklight on top.

On Feb 16, 2011, at 1:18 PM, Michele DeSilva wrote:


Hi Code4Lib-ers,

I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming  
archive from the conference.


I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z  
list of databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd  
like to do something that looks more modern and is far more user  
friendly. I found a great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12,  
by Danielle Rosenthal  Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A  
to Z list using Drupal. I'm also wondering what other institutions  
have done as far as in-house solutions. I know there're products we  
could buy, but, like everyone else, we don't have much money at the  
moment.


Thanks for any info or advice!

Michele DeSilva
Central Oregon Community College Library
Emerging Technologies Librarian
541-383-7565
mdesi...@cocc.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Dhanushka Samarakoon
Hi Michele,
We created one using wordpress (which is not yet live)
If you are interested in that route, I'll be happy to share the details with
you.
Dhanushka.

On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 3:18 PM, Michele DeSilva mdesi...@cocc.edu wrote:

 Hi Code4Lib-ers,

 I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from
 the conference.

 I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list of
 databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do
 something that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a
 great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal 
 Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm
 also wondering what other institutions have done as far as in-house
 solutions. I know there're products we could buy, but, like everyone else,
 we don't have much money at the moment.

 Thanks for any info or advice!

 Michele DeSilva
 Central Oregon Community College Library
 Emerging Technologies Librarian
 541-383-7565
 mdesi...@cocc.edu



Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Dhanushka Samarakoon
If search is your priority, then I think solr would be a better option.

On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 3:23 PM, Dhanushka Samarakoon dhan...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Michele,
 We created one using wordpress (which is not yet live)
 If you are interested in that route, I'll be happy to share the details
 with you.
 Dhanushka.

 On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 3:18 PM, Michele DeSilva mdesi...@cocc.eduwrote:

 Hi Code4Lib-ers,

 I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from
 the conference.

 I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list
 of databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do
 something that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a
 great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal 
 Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm
 also wondering what other institutions have done as far as in-house
 solutions. I know there're products we could buy, but, like everyone else,
 we don't have much money at the moment.

 Thanks for any info or advice!

 Michele DeSilva
 Central Oregon Community College Library
 Emerging Technologies Librarian
 541-383-7565
 mdesi...@cocc.edu





Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Nadaleen F Tempelman-Kluit
We user Xerxes too to serve up our databases A-Z list but as we have so many 
databases (900 or so.) that it takes a really long time for the page to 
load, as the way Xerxes is currently designed, it loads the whole A-Z list at 
once. So if you have a large number of databases, be warned that providing them 
through Xerxes may result in your users waiting awhile...

Nadaleen Tempelman-Kluit
Discovery and Digital Access Librarian 
Bobst Library, New York University
n...@nyu.edu
(212) 998-2469



- Original Message -
From: Naomi Dushay ndus...@stanford.edu
Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:29 pm
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU


 if you put the info in a Solr index, you could use Blacklight on top.
 
 On Feb 16, 2011, at 1:18 PM, Michele DeSilva wrote:
 
  Hi Code4Lib-ers,
 
  I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming  
  archive from the conference.
 
  I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z  
 
  list of databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd  
 
  like to do something that looks more modern and is far more user  
  friendly. I found a great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, 
  
  by Danielle Rosenthal  Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A 
  
  to Z list using Drupal. I'm also wondering what other institutions  
 
  have done as far as in-house solutions. I know there're products we  
 
  could buy, but, like everyone else, we don't have much money at the  
 
  moment.
 
  Thanks for any info or advice!
 
  Michele DeSilva
  Central Oregon Community College Library
  Emerging Technologies Librarian
  541-383-7565
  mdesi...@cocc.edu


[CODE4LIB] Do you have Project Gutenberg (or other public domain e-books) MARC Records in your OPAC?

2011-02-16 Thread Matt Amory
If so can you send me a URL?

Thanks much!
Matt Amory

On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 4:18 PM, Michele DeSilva mdesi...@cocc.edu wrote:

 Hi Code4Lib-ers,

 I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from
 the conference.

 I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list of
 databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do
 something that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a
 great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal 
 Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm
 also wondering what other institutions have done as far as in-house
 solutions. I know there're products we could buy, but, like everyone else,
 we don't have much money at the moment.

 Thanks for any info or advice!

 Michele DeSilva
 Central Oregon Community College Library
 Emerging Technologies Librarian
 541-383-7565
 mdesi...@cocc.edu




-- 
Matt Amory
(917) 771-4157
matt.am...@gmail.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Thompson, Keri
We have a home grown system built on CF/MSSQL.  It currently manages our 
electronic serials licensing workflow (or part of it at least) as well as 
generating the A-Z list.  One peculiarity of the list, and one reason why we're 
still using it, is that staff wanted to be able to include select free/open 
access serials in a list while *not* adding them to the catalog. 
I hope to replace it with something more automated in the near future.


Keri Thompson
Head, Web Services Department
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
e. thomps...@si.edu t. 202.633.1716
www.sil.si.edu || www.smithsonianlibraries.si.edu || www.biodiversitylibrary.org
.: yes, we're on twitter @silibraries :.


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of 
Nadaleen F Tempelman-Kluit
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:37 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

We user Xerxes too to serve up our databases A-Z list but as we have so many 
databases (900 or so.) that it takes a really long time for the page to 
load, as the way Xerxes is currently designed, it loads the whole A-Z list at 
once. So if you have a large number of databases, be warned that providing them 
through Xerxes may result in your users waiting awhile...

Nadaleen Tempelman-Kluit
Discovery and Digital Access Librarian 
Bobst Library, New York University
n...@nyu.edu
(212) 998-2469



- Original Message -
From: Naomi Dushay ndus...@stanford.edu
Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:29 pm
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU


 if you put the info in a Solr index, you could use Blacklight on top.
 
 On Feb 16, 2011, at 1:18 PM, Michele DeSilva wrote:
 
  Hi Code4Lib-ers,
 
  I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming  
  archive from the conference.
 
  I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z  
 
  list of databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd  
 
  like to do something that looks more modern and is far more user  
  friendly. I found a great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, 
  
  by Danielle Rosenthal  Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A 
  
  to Z list using Drupal. I'm also wondering what other institutions  
 
  have done as far as in-house solutions. I know there're products we  
 
  could buy, but, like everyone else, we don't have much money at the  
 
  moment.
 
  Thanks for any info or advice!
 
  Michele DeSilva
  Central Oregon Community College Library
  Emerging Technologies Librarian
  541-383-7565
  mdesi...@cocc.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Do you have Project Gutenberg (or other public domain e-books) MARC Records in your OPAC?

2011-02-16 Thread Gerry, Michelle
The Colorado Library Consortium provides MARC records for nearly 500 most 
user-requested resources from Project Gutenberg:

http://www.clicweb.org/import-marc-records


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of Karen 
Coyle
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 3:16 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Do you have Project Gutenberg (or other public domain 
e-books) MARC Records in your OPAC?

Matt, there are about a million public domain ebooks in the Open  
Library and I have been trying to come up with a way to export MARC  
records with the URLs. It's tricky, but only because some scripting  
needs to be done. If anyone here has extracted the ebook records or  
who would like to help out so we can do this, please let me know. I'm  
happy to provide code-like specs for the steps that need to be taken.

kc

Quoting Matt Amory matt.am...@gmail.com:

 If so can you send me a URL?

 Thanks much!
 Matt Amory

 On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 4:18 PM, Michele DeSilva mdesi...@cocc.edu wrote:

 Hi Code4Lib-ers,

 I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from
 the conference.

 I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list of
 databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do
 something that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a
 great article in the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal 
 Mario Bernado) about building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm
 also wondering what other institutions have done as far as in-house
 solutions. I know there're products we could buy, but, like everyone else,
 we don't have much money at the moment.

 Thanks for any info or advice!

 Michele DeSilva
 Central Oregon Community College Library
 Emerging Technologies Librarian
 541-383-7565
 mdesi...@cocc.edu




 --
 Matt Amory
 (917) 771-4157
 matt.am...@gmail.com




-- 
Karen Coyle
kco...@kcoyle.net http://kcoyle.net
ph: 1-510-540-7596
m: 1-510-435-8234
skype: kcoylenet


Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Jonathan Rochkind
Yeah, as one of the developers of Xerxes, I've been meaning to fix that 
long-page problem. If any other PHP developers want to contribute a patch, 
please feel free. It won't take any herculean RD to fix that feature, just 
figuring out what the interface ought to look like and making it so.  (Fixing 
the caching headers so a browser can cache that page wouldn't hurt either). 
Just hasn't been a big enough priority for me to get to.  Open source, 
developers work on what's a priority for them locally,  if you need something 
else please help fix it! 

As far as librarians wanting certain resources to be findable but NOT through 
the catalog... this is a mystery to me. If you want users to find it, why would 
you want it not to be findable thorugh the catalog? In my experience, sometimes 
there are semi-reasonable reasons behind this, that don't really mean what they 
seem to mean:

1) We don't want it in the ILS back-end because it will confuse our data 
management prctices, and having it in the ILS back-end is the only way to get 
it in the catalog.  This really means the ILS back-end workflow is crap (as 
all of ours are), but a solution (in addition to getting a better ILS), would 
be creating a 'discovery layer' on top of the ILS that is your front-end 
catalog, but can include records not actually in the back-end ILS. (But you're 
going to run into problems with (de-)duplication if SOME of your 'extra' 
content is ALSO in the catalog and others isn't. What we really need is a 
back-end metadata management system that actually WORKS WELL, but none of us 
have it.)

2) The catalog interface sucks, nobody will ever be able to find databases in 
there. Solution here obviously is a better catalog interface, possibly 
including the ability to list/limit just the things you call 'databases'. 

3) We just don't want them in the catalog, because they don't belong there. 
Okay, on this one I'm stymied. Some people are insane. 

I think we need to do it with an interface that works for users, and we need to 
do it without making back-end workflow more expensive (ideally it should make 
it LESS expensive to not have to maintain seperate datastores for this stuff!), 
but I can't see any reason we should _intentionally_ present our users with 
multiple search interfaces, each of which searches over different types of 
content. Oh, you use THIS form to find e-journals, and you use this OTHER 
interface that works completely differently to find databases (what's a 
'database' exactly? Well, you see, I dunno, I know it when I see it), and you 
use this OTHER thing we call 'the catalog' to find, well, it's hard to say 
exactly what's in there, it's just everything else, except for the things that 
aren't in it either. 

I understand how some of us are stuck doing that because we can't figure out a 
way out that doesn't mess up workflows and that  works for users -- but I 
absolutely and completely do not understand doing that with INTENTION. 

From: Code for Libraries [CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of Thompson, Keri 
[thomps...@si.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 5:46 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

We have a home grown system built on CF/MSSQL.  It currently manages our 
electronic serials licensing workflow (or part of it at least) as well as 
generating the A-Z list.  One peculiarity of the list, and one reason why we're 
still using it, is that staff wanted to be able to include select free/open 
access serials in a list while *not* adding them to the catalog.
I hope to replace it with something more automated in the near future.


Keri Thompson
Head, Web Services Department
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
e. thomps...@si.edu t. 202.633.1716
www.sil.si.edu || www.smithsonianlibraries.si.edu || www.biodiversitylibrary.org
.: yes, we're on twitter @silibraries :.


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of 
Nadaleen F Tempelman-Kluit
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:37 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

We user Xerxes too to serve up our databases A-Z list but as we have so many 
databases (900 or so.) that it takes a really long time for the page to 
load, as the way Xerxes is currently designed, it loads the whole A-Z list at 
once. So if you have a large number of databases, be warned that providing them 
through Xerxes may result in your users waiting awhile...

Nadaleen Tempelman-Kluit
Discovery and Digital Access Librarian
Bobst Library, New York University
n...@nyu.edu
(212) 998-2469



- Original Message -
From: Naomi Dushay ndus...@stanford.edu
Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:29 pm
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU


 if you put the info in a Solr index, you could use Blacklight on top.

 On Feb 16, 2011, at 1:18 PM, Michele DeSilva wrote:

  Hi Code4Lib-ers,
 
  I want to 

Re: [CODE4LIB] A to Z lists

2011-02-16 Thread Markus Fischer

The cheapest and best A to Z list i know is the german EZB:

http://rzblx1.uni-regensburg.de/ezeit/index.phtml?bibid=Acolors=7lang=en

This list is maintained by hunderds of libraries. You just mark those 
journals you have licensed and that's it.


Not very widely known: they do also provide an API which you can use as 
a free linkresolver. There are free tools you can plug into this API and 
you've got your linkresolver.


The list is incredible accurate and you'll have almost no effort: any 
change made by one library is valid for all.


Let me know if you need more information.

Markus Fischer

Am 16.02.2011 22:18, schrieb Michele DeSilva:

Hi Code4Lib-ers,

I want to chime in and say that I, too, enjoyed the streaming archive from the 
conference.

I also have a question: my library has a horribly antiquated A to Z list of 
databases and online resources (it's based in Access). We'd like to do something 
that looks more modern and is far more user friendly. I found a great article in 
the Code4Lib journal (issue 12, by Danielle Rosenthal  Mario Bernado) about 
building a searchable A to Z list using Drupal. I'm also wondering what other 
institutions have done as far as in-house solutions. I know there're products we 
could buy, but, like everyone else, we don't have much money at the moment.

Thanks for any info or advice!

Michele DeSilva
Central Oregon Community College Library
Emerging Technologies Librarian
541-383-7565
mdesi...@cocc.edu