[CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Eric Hellman
Getting back to the subject of a previous thread, (and digesting some wonderful 
contributions by Karen, Alex, Jeremy and Ed C.) I dug around some links that 
Jonathan posted, and I think they're worth further discussion.

The way that JHU has integrated Public Domain works into its catalog results 
with umlaut is brilliant and pragmatic; the new catalog (catalyst) interface 
based on Blacklight is a great improvement on the older Horizon version:
https://catalyst.library.jhu.edu/catalog/bib_816990

Clearly, Jonathan has gone through the process of getting his library to think 
through the integration, and it seems to work.

Has there been any opposition? 

What are the reasons that this sort of integration not more widespread? Are 
they technical or institutional? What can be done by producers of open access 
content to make this work better and easier? Are unified approaches being 
touted by vendors delivering something really different?

Looking forward, I wonder whether the print-first, then enrich with digital 
strategy required by today's infrastructure and work flow will decline compared 
to a more Googlish web-first strategy.

Eric


Eric Hellman
President, Gluejar, Inc.
http://www.gluejar.com/   
41 Watchung Plaza #132, Montclair NJ 07042
e...@hellman.net 
http://go-to-hellman.blogspot.com/
@gluejar


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Ross Singer
Although I sat in the room and nodded a lot in Athens when we picked
and chose our conference options and signed the contract, I remember
very few details of it anymore.

I do remember when the UGA Conference Center representative left the
room for a minute that we all thought that the prices we were looking
at must be the daily rate, since we couldn't imagine the total costs
being that cheap (in fact, it *was* the total cost).

UGA could actually have handled a conference much more the size of a
modern C4L (the plenary session room seats ~350).

What the Georgia Center doesn't have is polish ('zazz!) and Athens
definitely fits Kyle's and Joe's profile of being less accessible
(although that also applies to Bloomington, Asheville and Corvallis).
While I certainly appreciated the venues in Portland, Providence and
Asheville, I wouldn't say that they had a tremendous impact on the
outcome of the conference (I don't, for example, remember the food at
any and *none* of the plenary rooms were as good as Athens).  I do
remember the bars at Providence and Portland, though.

I'm not arguing for us returning to Athens, but don't think it's
completely unique (see: Corvallis).  If this desire to offset
conference costs is really deep (and I think that reducing the
dependency on sponsorship *should* be a goal, honestly -- it's a lot
of work and very unpredictable), then I think there are definitely
opportunities.  It's just a matter of scouting locations and figuring
out how to get the local population to get involved.  I think this
would be easier if there was some kind of insurance policy in place so
that the host isn't completely on the hook for all of the costs if
things go pear shaped.

-Ross.

On Tue, Jun 14, 2011 at 7:42 PM, Kyle Banerjee baner...@uoregon.edu wrote:
 The third code4lib conference was hosted in Portland, and the venue was a
 hotel. Costs were **much** higher in Portland, due mainly to the type of
 venue (hotel) and Portland being a larger city. To keep the registration
 fee at $125 (which I think it was, if memory serves me correctly), we
 needed to get $40k worth of sponsorships, which was about 4x the amount of
 either the previous two years. It was hectic and a bit nerve-wracking, but
 we hustled and worked hard and brought in the necessary sponsorships
 without the need to provide any special events - all of the sponsors we
 willing to sponsor us based on the general sponsorship levels that we've
 put out each year.


 This is exactly what is going on in Seattle.

 If we can attract $40K in sponsorships, the registration fee will be kept
 low. But that gives people an idea of what is being dealt with in the
 background as that works out to nearly $200 per attendee. Not trivial to do
 in today's climate, but you can be sure everyone will try their best.

 kyle



Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Karen Coyle

Quoting Eric Hellman e...@hellman.net:


What are the reasons that this sort of integration not more  
widespread? Are they technical or institutional? What can be done by  
producers of open access content to make this work better and  
easier? Are unified approaches being touted by vendors delivering  
something really different?


I've been struggling with this around the Open Library digital texts:  
how can we make them available to libraries through their catalogs?  
When I look at the install documentation for Umlaut [1](I was actually  
hoping to find a technical requirements list), it's obvious that it  
takes developer chops. We're not going to find that in a small,  
medium, or often even a large public library. It seems to me that this  
kind of feature will not be widely available until it is included in  
ILS software, since that's what most libraries have.


Does this mean that we should be meeting with library vendors and  
chatting them up about this? Or showing it to librarians so they can  
ask their vendor for it? Is it ok for this open code to be absorbed  
into proprietary systems?


kc
[1] http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/Umlaut_Installation



Looking forward, I wonder whether the print-first, then enrich with  
digital strategy required by today's infrastructure and work flow  
will decline compared to a more Googlish web-first strategy.


Eric


Eric Hellman
President, Gluejar, Inc.
http://www.gluejar.com/
41 Watchung Plaza #132, Montclair NJ 07042
e...@hellman.net
http://go-to-hellman.blogspot.com/
@gluejar





--
Karen Coyle
kco...@kcoyle.net http://kcoyle.net
ph: 1-510-540-7596
m: 1-510-435-8234
skype: kcoylenet


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Cary Gordon
In my experience accross countless conferences, not remembering the
food is usually a good thing.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 7:06 AM, Ross Singer rossfsin...@gmail.com wrote:
 Although I sat in the room and nodded a lot in Athens when we picked
 and chose our conference options and signed the contract, I remember
 very few details of it anymore.

 I do remember when the UGA Conference Center representative left the
 room for a minute that we all thought that the prices we were looking
 at must be the daily rate, since we couldn't imagine the total costs
 being that cheap (in fact, it *was* the total cost).

 UGA could actually have handled a conference much more the size of a
 modern C4L (the plenary session room seats ~350).

 What the Georgia Center doesn't have is polish ('zazz!) and Athens
 definitely fits Kyle's and Joe's profile of being less accessible
 (although that also applies to Bloomington, Asheville and Corvallis).
 While I certainly appreciated the venues in Portland, Providence and
 Asheville, I wouldn't say that they had a tremendous impact on the
 outcome of the conference (I don't, for example, remember the food at
 any and *none* of the plenary rooms were as good as Athens).  I do
 remember the bars at Providence and Portland, though.

 I'm not arguing for us returning to Athens, but don't think it's
 completely unique (see: Corvallis).  If this desire to offset
 conference costs is really deep (and I think that reducing the
 dependency on sponsorship *should* be a goal, honestly -- it's a lot
 of work and very unpredictable), then I think there are definitely
 opportunities.  It's just a matter of scouting locations and figuring
 out how to get the local population to get involved.  I think this
 would be easier if there was some kind of insurance policy in place so
 that the host isn't completely on the hook for all of the costs if
 things go pear shaped.

 -Ross.

 On Tue, Jun 14, 2011 at 7:42 PM, Kyle Banerjee baner...@uoregon.edu wrote:
 The third code4lib conference was hosted in Portland, and the venue was a
 hotel. Costs were **much** higher in Portland, due mainly to the type of
 venue (hotel) and Portland being a larger city. To keep the registration
 fee at $125 (which I think it was, if memory serves me correctly), we
 needed to get $40k worth of sponsorships, which was about 4x the amount of
 either the previous two years. It was hectic and a bit nerve-wracking, but
 we hustled and worked hard and brought in the necessary sponsorships
 without the need to provide any special events - all of the sponsors we
 willing to sponsor us based on the general sponsorship levels that we've
 put out each year.


 This is exactly what is going on in Seattle.

 If we can attract $40K in sponsorships, the registration fee will be kept
 low. But that gives people an idea of what is being dealt with in the
 background as that works out to nearly $200 per attendee. Not trivial to do
 in today's climate, but you can be sure everyone will try their best.

 kyle





-- 
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind
I honestly don't think it's a disaster if registration fee approaches 
$200 either. (I realize you said $200 in _addition_ to the usual $125, 
I'm saying $200, heh).


I think $200 is about the max that seems okay to me, but $200 does. 
That's still a good price for the conf, and still fairly affordable, and 
with inflation from the original $125 like five years ago not totally 
out of line even.


$300 would be really unfortunate though. But $180? We'll live.

On 6/14/2011 7:42 PM, Kyle Banerjee wrote:

The third code4lib conference was hosted in Portland, and the venue was a
hotel. Costs were **much** higher in Portland, due mainly to the type of
venue (hotel) and Portland being a larger city. To keep the registration
fee at $125 (which I think it was, if memory serves me correctly), we
needed to get $40k worth of sponsorships, which was about 4x the amount of
either the previous two years. It was hectic and a bit nerve-wracking, but
we hustled and worked hard and brought in the necessary sponsorships
without the need to provide any special events - all of the sponsors we
willing to sponsor us based on the general sponsorship levels that we've
put out each year.


This is exactly what is going on in Seattle.

If we can attract $40K in sponsorships, the registration fee will be kept
low. But that gives people an idea of what is being dealt with in the
background as that works out to nearly $200 per attendee. Not trivial to do
in today's climate, but you can be sure everyone will try their best.

kyle



Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

On 6/15/2011 9:31 AM, Eric Hellman wrote:

Clearly, Jonathan has gone through the process of getting his library to think 
through the integration, and it seems to work.


Thank you!


Has there been any opposition?


Not opposition exactly, but it doesn't work perfectly, and people are 
unhappy when it doesn't work. It can sometimes find the _wrong_ match on 
a 'foreign' site like Amazon etc.  Or avoid finding a right one of course.


Or the definition of right/wrong can be not entirely clear too -- on a 
bib record for a video of an opera performed, is it right or wrong to 
supply a link to the print version of the opera? What if the software 
isn't smart enough to _tell_ you it's an alternate format (it's not), 
and the link is just in the single flat list of links?


Also issues with avoiding duplicate double URLs when things are in bib 
records AND in SFX kb AND maybe looked for otherwise by Umlaut. (we have 
_some_ HathiTrust URLs in our bib records, that came that way from OCLC, 
who knew?)


These things get really complicated, quickly.  I am constantly finding 
time to do more tweaking, but it'll never be perfect, so people have to 
get used to lack of perfection. Still when I ask, okay, this 
HathiTrust/Amazon/Google linking feature is not going to be perfect, 
would you rather keep it with imperfections we may not be able to fix, 
or eliminate it -- nobody says eliminate.



What are the reasons that this sort of integration not more widespread? Are they 
technical or institutional? What can be done by producers of open access content to make 
this work better and easier? Are unified approaches being touted by vendors 
delivering something really different?


I think they are mostly technical.  This stuff is _hard_, because of the 
(lack of) quality of our own metadata, the lack of quality of third 
party metadata, the lack of sufficient APIs and Services, and the lack 
of a local technical infrastructure to support tying everythign together.


So on the one hand, I'm trying to find time for an overhaul of Umlaut to 
make it easier for people to install and maintain, and I'm hoping I can 
get some more adoption at that point.  To at least provide some open 
source local technical infrastructure. Umlaut is intentionally 
designed to be as easy as possible to integrate with your existing 
catalog or other service points, as well as to provide 'just in time' 
services from third party external searches -- that's it's mission, this 
kind of just-in-time service. (easy as possible -- or as easy as I can 
make it, which sometimes still isn't easy enough, especially if you 
don't have local technical resources).


But still, it's metadata, metadata, metadata.  So what can producers of 
open access content do to make this work better and easier?


1) Have good metadata for their content, especially including as many 
identifiers as possible -- ISBN, OCLCnum, LCCN.   Even if you aren't an 
OCLC member and don't have an OCLC record, if you can figure out what 
OCLC record represents this thing you've got, list it in the metadata.  
Even if the ISBN/OCLCnum/LCCN doesn't represent the _exact_ same thing, 
list it -- ideally somehow identified as 'an alternate manifestation'.  
Also have author, title, publisher, publication year  metadata.  If you 
can have author metadata as an NAF/VIAF controlled form or identifier, 
even better.  Metadata is expensive, but metadata is valuable, the 
better it is, the better Umlaut's approach can work.


Share the metadata publically, in case someone wants to do something 
with it.


2) Provide an API that allows lookup of your open access content, 
searching against the good metadata from #1. Including identifier 
searches.  The thing is, each of (dozens, hundreds, thousands) of open 
access content providers having such an API --- it's a burdensome 
expense for each of them, but it's also unrealistic for client software 
to talk to dozens/hundreds/thousands of APIs.


So this stuff needs to be aggregated in fewer major service points.  It 
could be an aggregator of just metadata that links to content hosted on 
individual hosts, or it could be an aggregator of content itself. Either 
way, it needs a good API based on good metadata. Google doesn't work 
as such an aggregator, the APIs it has are too limited functionally and 
by ToS, and the results do not have sufficient metadata.  Maybe the 
Internet Archive does -- although IA's API's and metadata are sometimes 
a bit sketchy (If you do put it in IA, make sure it somehow shows in the 
Open Library section and it's APIs -- the OL API's IA has are 
sufficient for Umlaut's use, but general Internet Archive APIs are 
not).  Or maybe a new aggregator(s) have to be collectively created.


[CODE4LIB] Islandora Camp T-Shirt Design

2011-06-15 Thread VRE Support
Are you this year’s Islandora t-shirt designer?

We are calling out to our community in our best open-source fashion, to see if 
anybody wants to participate in the design of the official 2011 Islandora Camp 
t-shirt. 

You can find a link to source files here: 

The winning design will use the Islandora Camp logo, and may optionally use our 
“yak.” Please submit vector artwork (.ai or .eps) to vresupp...@upei.ca. !

Please turn in all submissions by June 24, 2011. Full credit will be given to 
the person with the winning design at Islandora Camp. 


[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Susan Kane
Hi Anj,

Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you were coming
and I was leaving for Boston!

I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've put the
word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that I manage on
LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology companies.
Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list want to
try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone could add a link
about sponsorships to the conference section of the website.

--- promotional blurb ---

c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but influential
group of library technologists each year. Next year's conference is Feb 6-9,
2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships -- great
visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!   If
you can help, please contact me privately through your preferred contact
method here.

http://code4lib.org/conferencehttp://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2Fconferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet

-- promotional blurb ---

Susan Kane
Harvard University OIS


[CODE4LIB] Islandora Camp T-Shirt Design *edit*

2011-06-15 Thread VRE Support
*** Sorry about the double post, but I forgot the link!***

Are you this year’s Islandora t-shirt designer?

We are calling out to our community in our best open-source fashion, to see if 
anybody wants to participate in the design of the official 2011 Islandora Camp 
t-shirt.

You can find a link to source files here: http://islandora.ca/icamptshirt.

The winning design will use the Islandora Camp logo, and may optionally use our 
“yak.” Please submit vector artwork (.ai or .eps) to vresupp...@upei.ca. !

Please turn in all submissions by June 24, 2011. Full credit will be given to 
the person with the winning design at Islandora Camp. 


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Tania Fersenheim
In Providence we had little carrot cake whoopie pies at lunch one day, with
a fluffy cream cheese filling.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:19 AM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:

 In my experience accross countless conferences, not remembering the
 food is usually a good thing.

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 7:06 AM, Ross Singer rossfsin...@gmail.com
 wrote:
 [snip]
 
  While I certainly appreciated the venues in Portland, Providence and
  Asheville, I wouldn't say that they had a tremendous impact on the
  outcome of the conference (I don't, for example, remember the food at
  any and *none* of the plenary rooms were as good as Athens).  I do
  remember the bars at Providence and Portland, though.
 

 --
 Cary Gordon
 The Cherry Hill Company
 http://chillco.com




-- 

Tania Fersenheim
Manager of Library Systems

Brandeis University
Library and Technology Services

415 South Street, (MS 017/P.O. Box 549110)
Waltham, MA 02454-9110
Phone: 781.736.4698
Fax: 781.736.4577
email: tan...@brandeis.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind
So maybe part of the problem is our venue voting system -- people vote 
for flashy locations, which are also expensive locations. The people 
voting (which is anyone who wants to) don't neccesarily consider all the 
ramifications (don't neccesarily have the experience/background to do so 
even if they thought of it).


Heresy I know, but I wonder if we should change conf host/site selection 
from an open vote, to a conf selection committee that chooses.  Then the 
committee could say to themselves you know, even though the hosts say 
no problem keeping costs as usual, we don't think an expensive city like 
that is the best thing for us. Of course, in addition to being 
heretical, that would rely on there being some people who wanted to fill 
that role, which there may not be.


On 6/15/2011 10:06 AM, Ross Singer wrote:

Although I sat in the room and nodded a lot in Athens when we picked
and chose our conference options and signed the contract, I remember
very few details of it anymore.

I do remember when the UGA Conference Center representative left the
room for a minute that we all thought that the prices we were looking
at must be the daily rate, since we couldn't imagine the total costs
being that cheap (in fact, it *was* the total cost).

UGA could actually have handled a conference much more the size of a
modern C4L (the plenary session room seats ~350).

What the Georgia Center doesn't have is polish ('zazz!) and Athens
definitely fits Kyle's and Joe's profile of being less accessible
(although that also applies to Bloomington, Asheville and Corvallis).
While I certainly appreciated the venues in Portland, Providence and
Asheville, I wouldn't say that they had a tremendous impact on the
outcome of the conference (I don't, for example, remember the food at
any and *none* of the plenary rooms were as good as Athens).  I do
remember the bars at Providence and Portland, though.

I'm not arguing for us returning to Athens, but don't think it's
completely unique (see: Corvallis).  If this desire to offset
conference costs is really deep (and I think that reducing the
dependency on sponsorship *should* be a goal, honestly -- it's a lot
of work and very unpredictable), then I think there are definitely
opportunities.  It's just a matter of scouting locations and figuring
out how to get the local population to get involved.  I think this
would be easier if there was some kind of insurance policy in place so
that the host isn't completely on the hook for all of the costs if
things go pear shaped.

-Ross.

On Tue, Jun 14, 2011 at 7:42 PM, Kyle Banerjeebaner...@uoregon.edu  wrote:

The third code4lib conference was hosted in Portland, and the venue was a
hotel. Costs were **much** higher in Portland, due mainly to the type of
venue (hotel) and Portland being a larger city. To keep the registration
fee at $125 (which I think it was, if memory serves me correctly), we
needed to get $40k worth of sponsorships, which was about 4x the amount of
either the previous two years. It was hectic and a bit nerve-wracking, but
we hustled and worked hard and brought in the necessary sponsorships
without the need to provide any special events - all of the sponsors we
willing to sponsor us based on the general sponsorship levels that we've
put out each year.


This is exactly what is going on in Seattle.

If we can attract $40K in sponsorships, the registration fee will be kept
low. But that gives people an idea of what is being dealt with in the
background as that works out to nearly $200 per attendee. Not trivial to do
in today's climate, but you can be sure everyone will try their best.

kyle



Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

On 6/15/2011 12:51 PM, Susan Kane wrote:

great
visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!



That's an interesting point too -- you pay for a booth at ALA ($), 
you DO reach a whole lot of people, but it's a lot more expensive than 
even our 'platinum' sponsorship, no? And we're talking about giving 
people really even more exposure potentially (a presentation to a 
captive audience at a banquet?) then you get from a booth at ALA (albeit 
many fewer people).


Depending on the site, if there's room in the registration area for a 
couple other tables, we could also offer sponsors a conference-long 
table to sit at and hand out stuff, if they wanted it. I don't know if 
they'd want it or not. But that would be a benefit unlikely to upset 
anyone. probably.


Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

On 6/15/2011 10:55 AM, Karen Coyle wrote:


I've been struggling with this around the Open Library digital texts: 
how can we make them available to libraries through their catalogs? 
When I look at the install documentation for Umlaut [1](I was actually 
hoping to find a technical requirements list), it's obvious that it 
takes developer chops. 


This isn't neccesarily un-fixable. I have plans to make it easier -- 
it's totally possible to make it easier (largely because Rails, on which 
Umlaut is based, has gotten so much better at being easier to 
install/deploy things and have em Just Work), I just need to find time 
(that I'm having trouble finding) to make the changes.


Eric, as well as Karen,  also asked why no vendors seem interested in 
supplying a product like this -- may be a bit of a chicken and an egg, 
there may not be a market for it -- I have trouble explaining to people 
why Umlaut is actually really cool in the first place, even other 
libraries. Although these conversations help me learn new ways to 
talk/think about it.


So, I can definitely make Umlaut easier to install and run -- but there 
are still going to be some technical craziness, involved with dealing 
with your local metadata in all it's local idiosyncracies, and dealing 
with matching it to 'remote' data in a way that meets local use cases. 
Like I said before, this is inherently imperfect, but that means that 
there are a bunch of choices to make about what imperfect trade-offs you 
want to make, and these inevitably have to do with the nature of your 
local (mostly cataloging) metadata, and the use cases you are supporting.


Really, I'm not sure I have faith in our existing vendors to be able to 
do a good job with it -- this is a really complicated thing that Umlaut 
is trying to do, in the end. (from my experience; it didn't sound that 
complicated at first, but it ends up so. Trouble-shooting problems ends 
up being incredibly complex, because there are so many different systems 
involved, and a bug or bad metadata on any one can mess things up).


So I guess what I'm saying is, if you're talking about Umlaut's approach 
-- it is a technically hard problem in our existing environment. 
(existing environment means our really bad local cataloging metadata, 
our multiple silo's of local metadata, and our pretty awful 'link 
resolver' products with poor API's, etc -- also the third party content 
host's poor metadata, lack of API's, etc.  None of these things are 
changing anytime soon). So if you're talking about this approach in 
particular, when Erik asks is it technical or is political -- my 
experience with Umlaut definitely definitely says 'technical', not 
'political'. I've gotten no opposition to what Umlaut's trying to do, 
once people understand it, only dissatisfaction with how well it does it 
(a technical issue).


Jonathan


Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Ross Singer
I think one thing that's often overlooked about the Umlaut and was a
constant source of frustration for me, in the early days, which is now
Jonathan's burden, is that the Umlaut was designed specifically for
two purposes:

1) Reduce the extremely high percentage of failure in identifying
known and locally (or consortially) available resources in the link
resolver chain
  a) The main use case here was conference proceedings, but wound up
being broadly applicable to all sorts of things in the library's
collection, you know, like books.
2) Provide access to items not physically (or electronically) in the
library's collection but have a freely available surrogate on the web
(pre/post prints/digitized copies/illegal copy on person's web site
crawled by Google/etc.).

#1 has sort of a solution via services such as Summon and its ilk - if
you have a fulltext index of everything your library owns or
subscribes to, it makes it a lot easier to find things.  Having them
all in the same bucket simplifies this even more.

This, in my mind, isn't a great approach, but it at least can address
that particular problem.

#2, however, has been largely ignored.  While you might get
centralized repositories like HathiTrust, arxiv.org or Citeseer in a
system like Summon or EDS (although I don't actually see the latter
two listed in their sources lists), Google Scholar shows just how much
literature is available outside of any controlled silo.

The fact that libraries have, so far, completely ignored this freely
available content (and let's face it, the fact that not all of it
*should* be freely available is neither here nor there - if it's the
article you need and it's found via simple Google-ing, it's game) and
have constrained the discovery/delivery process to the tiny percentage
of the universe that they own or lease is mind blowing and completely
antithetical to what libraries are supposedly about.

Karen, you're right - the Umlaut is not going to be viable most
libraries (case in point: Georgia Tech, an ARL library, didn't feel
that they could maintain it after I left and shut it down), but that
was never its intention.  The point of the Umlaut was not for hundreds
or thousands of libraries to run Umlauts, but to show that a single
person, toiling in the basement of a single library (originally in
Georgia, now in Maryland) with a single application can solve all of
these problems that our vendors are apparently unwilling or unable to
do.  The simplest parts of the Umlaut could be automated, the harder
bits could be abstracted a bit and crowdsourced.  I'm not aware of any
part of Umlaut (besides it's x-identifier stuff) that has trickled
back into a vendor product.  I don't know of any library project,
commercial or otherwise, that is using Google, Yahoo! or Bing (and,
granted, neither is Umlaut anymore).

The stuff the Umlaut does isn't hard, but it requires somebody to
*care* and be dedicated enough when things change or break to tweak
things as necessary.

The fact that libraries find this to be *too much work* is just
absolutely demoralizing to me.

-Ross.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:07 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:
 On 6/15/2011 9:31 AM, Eric Hellman wrote:

 Clearly, Jonathan has gone through the process of getting his library to
 think through the integration, and it seems to work.

 Thank you!

 Has there been any opposition?

 Not opposition exactly, but it doesn't work perfectly, and people are
 unhappy when it doesn't work. It can sometimes find the _wrong_ match on a
 'foreign' site like Amazon etc.  Or avoid finding a right one of course.

 Or the definition of right/wrong can be not entirely clear too -- on a bib
 record for a video of an opera performed, is it right or wrong to supply a
 link to the print version of the opera? What if the software isn't smart
 enough to _tell_ you it's an alternate format (it's not), and the link is
 just in the single flat list of links?

 Also issues with avoiding duplicate double URLs when things are in bib
 records AND in SFX kb AND maybe looked for otherwise by Umlaut. (we have
 _some_ HathiTrust URLs in our bib records, that came that way from OCLC, who
 knew?)

 These things get really complicated, quickly.  I am constantly finding time
 to do more tweaking, but it'll never be perfect, so people have to get used
 to lack of perfection. Still when I ask, okay, this HathiTrust/Amazon/Google
 linking feature is not going to be perfect, would you rather keep it with
 imperfections we may not be able to fix, or eliminate it -- nobody says
 eliminate.

 What are the reasons that this sort of integration not more widespread?
 Are they technical or institutional? What can be done by producers of open
 access content to make this work better and easier? Are unified approaches
 being touted by vendors delivering something really different?

 I think they are mostly technical.  This stuff is _hard_, because of the
 (lack of) quality of our own metadata, the lack 

Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Kevin S. Clarke
On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 1:27 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:

 Heresy I know, but I wonder if we should change conf host/site selection
 from an open vote, to a conf selection committee that chooses.  Then the
 committee could say to themselves you know, even though the hosts say no
 problem keeping costs as usual, we don't think an expensive city like that
 is the best thing for us. Of course, in addition to being heretical, that
 would rely on there being some people who wanted to fill that role, which
 there may not be.

What is the problem we're trying to solve again?  Do we think that the
recent conferences have cost too much for the attendees?  That this
year's will cost too much?  Are we worried about not finding places to
host in the future?  Are we worried about needing the level of
sponsorship that we currently do?

This seems, to me, like a solution in search of a problem.  If we've
trying to address the conference's relationship with its sponsors,
Jaf's suggestion (e.g., define our expectations and see what happens)
seems like a reasonable first step to me.

Kevin


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Sean Hannan
Honestly, I'm the most concerned that there was only one proposal last year.
Let's try to solve that problem.

-Sean


On 6/15/11 1:46 PM, Kevin S. Clarke kscla...@gmail.com wrote:

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 1:27 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:
 
 Heresy I know, but I wonder if we should change conf host/site selection
 from an open vote, to a conf selection committee that chooses.  Then the
 committee could say to themselves you know, even though the hosts say no
 problem keeping costs as usual, we don't think an expensive city like that
 is the best thing for us. Of course, in addition to being heretical, that
 would rely on there being some people who wanted to fill that role, which
 there may not be.
 
 What is the problem we're trying to solve again?  Do we think that the
 recent conferences have cost too much for the attendees?  That this
 year's will cost too much?  Are we worried about not finding places to
 host in the future?  Are we worried about needing the level of
 sponsorship that we currently do?
 
 This seems, to me, like a solution in search of a problem.  If we've
 trying to address the conference's relationship with its sponsors,
 Jaf's suggestion (e.g., define our expectations and see what happens)
 seems like a reasonable first step to me.
 
 Kevin


Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Eric Lease Morgan
On Jun 15, 2011, at 1:36 PM, Ross Singer wrote:

 The fact that libraries have, so far, completely ignored this freely
 available content (and let's face it, the fact that not all of it
 *should* be freely available is neither here nor there - if it's the
 article you need and it's found via simple Google-ing, it's game) and
 have constrained the discovery/delivery process to the tiny percentage
 of the universe that they own or lease is mind blowing and completely
 antithetical to what libraries are supposedly about.


YES!!! I can not agree with Ross any more strongly! The library profession has 
all but shot itself in the foot because it continues to spend so much time and 
energy on purchased/licensed content. Our supposed knowledge of our clientele 
coupled with freely available full text content could make our collections so 
much more useful and relevant. Instead, we continue to license our rights away, 
buy back the stuff we've already paid someone to create, and in the end have 
very little to show for it. Grrr...

-- 
Eric Lease Morgan
University of Notre Dame


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

On 6/15/2011 1:46 PM, Kevin S. Clarke wrote:


What is the problem we're trying to solve again?  Do we think that the
recent conferences have cost too much for the attendees?  That this
year's will cost too much?  Are we worried about not finding places to
host in the future?  Are we worried about needing the level of
sponsorship that we currently do?


I guess I'm worried that conferences have become more expensive and more 
work to put on. This means:


a) It's harder to find people to host, and harder for them to do it in a 
way that makes the community happy, and that doesn't destroy themselves.


b) They need to find a lot more sponsorship, which is risky, and 
potentially means giving sponsors privileges that change the nature or 
feel of the conf.


This thread began with a suggestion from current conf hosts that they 
need to find more things to give sponsors. Which reminded me of last 
year's sponsored banquet, which ended up not having a presentation from 
the vendor, but which was supposed to, which I would not have liked, 
having a sponsor deliver a presentation to a captive conf audience in 
return for sponsorship.


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Ross Singer
On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 1:51 PM, Sean Hannan shan...@jhu.edu wrote:
 Honestly, I'm the most concerned that there was only one proposal last year.
 Let's try to solve that problem.

+1

-Ross.


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Anjanette Young
Hey Susan,

Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

http://code4lib.org/node/417

(Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship, but the
options on the page are standard.
Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to travel to
Seattle for the conference.

--Anj

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kane adarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Anj,

 Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you were
 coming
 and I was leaving for Boston!

 I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've put the
 word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that I manage on
 LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology companies.
 Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

 Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list want to
 try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone could add a
 link
 about sponsorships to the conference section of the website.

 --- promotional blurb ---

 c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but
 influential
 group of library technologists each year. Next year's conference is Feb
 6-9,
 2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships -- great
 visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!   If
 you can help, please contact me privately through your preferred contact
 method here.

 http://code4lib.org/conference
 http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2Fconferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
 

 -- promotional blurb ---

 Susan Kane
 Harvard University OIS




-- 
Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206.616.2867


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Ross Singer
On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 1:46 PM, Kevin S. Clarke kscla...@gmail.com wrote:
 What is the problem we're trying to solve again?  Do we think that the
 recent conferences have cost too much for the attendees?  That this
 year's will cost too much?  Are we worried about not finding places to
 host in the future?  Are we worried about needing the level of
 sponsorship that we currently do?

I don't think the issue is the registration cost, but the total cost
of the conference itself, which, minus sponsorship affects
registration cost at some level.

While any conference is going to need to be subsidized by the
sponsorships to keep registration costs down to our (low!)
satisfactory levels, it makes some sense to mitigate risk by having
the conference in cheaper venues.  Sponsorship, after all, is not a
guarantee.

-Ross.


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread todd.d.robb...@gmail.com
Just a heads up: I and about 5 other MLIS/MSIM students at the UW iSchool
are very interested in helping. Looking forward to the event!

Tod Robbins
MLIS '12
Information School
University of Washington


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update.

2011-06-15 Thread Cary Gordon
More tales from DrupalCon-land...

Before we professionalized our events, we had a competitive system
like C4L. That was fine as long as we had one solid proposal. In 2008,
the only proposal for out European event was from Szeged, Hungary,
near the borders with Romania and Serbia, and a long way from anywhere
mot westerners would like to fly in to. We drew 500 folks and broke
even. 125 of them were from North America, so it really wasn't
successful in terms of building our European community. Interestingly,
hardly any of the Hungarian developers showed up. They had a bigger
turnout in Barcelona, a year earlier.

I don't think that C4L should professionalize its conference. Our
needs and scale don't support that. I do think that It wouldn't be a
bad idea to start planning two years out front.

The primary attendee concern and single biggest budget item for
DrupalCon is IP. We now hire Marriette Associates, the folks who do IP
for Apple's WWDC, to manage our conference IP. We were fortunate in
getting to do one event in a place with an open pipe, which gave us
some great metrics and reduced the amount of guesswork going forward.
This spring, we had our conference in a Chicago hotel that had great,
'90s era service, so we put a point-to-point tower on the roof and did
it ourselves.

For the upcoming C4L, we looked at three venues and were very
fortunate to find one that had sufficient bandwidth, decent
infrastructure, and perhaps most importantly, a qualified tech. The
other two were black holes.

Since it is doubtful that, unless we want to sell a lot more
sponsorships, we will be able to afford to run our own networks
(although this is more doable in a single room event than on four
floors of a hotel), moving the timeline out an extra year could be
very helpful.

Thanks,

Cary

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 10:51 AM, Sean Hannan shan...@jhu.edu wrote:
 Honestly, I'm the most concerned that there was only one proposal last year.
 Let's try to solve that problem.

 -Sean


 On 6/15/11 1:46 PM, Kevin S. Clarke kscla...@gmail.com wrote:

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 1:27 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:

 Heresy I know, but I wonder if we should change conf host/site selection
 from an open vote, to a conf selection committee that chooses.  Then the
 committee could say to themselves you know, even though the hosts say no
 problem keeping costs as usual, we don't think an expensive city like that
 is the best thing for us. Of course, in addition to being heretical, that
 would rely on there being some people who wanted to fill that role, which
 there may not be.

 What is the problem we're trying to solve again?  Do we think that the
 recent conferences have cost too much for the attendees?  That this
 year's will cost too much?  Are we worried about not finding places to
 host in the future?  Are we worried about needing the level of
 sponsorship that we currently do?

 This seems, to me, like a solution in search of a problem.  If we've
 trying to address the conference's relationship with its sponsors,
 Jaf's suggestion (e.g., define our expectations and see what happens)
 seems like a reasonable first step to me.

 Kevin




-- 
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Kyle Banerjee
One form of recognition that I think is almost a no brainer is a Sponsor
page containing appropriately sized logos in sponsorship level order that
has the sole purpose of recognizing the sponsors. A link to the sponsor page
would be provided at the top of the conference page. This would be
unobtrusive yet informative.

I've missed the last few meetings, but a sponsor page in the packets when
people arrive along the web page idea also seems like a decent idea as it
helps make sponsors visible without being in the way. Only the Platinum
would get to include a handout as well.

Anything involving captive audiences sounds as unattractive as a timeshare
presentation. Aside from being annoying, such situations disrupt exactly the
sort of interaction we hope to achieve by meeting in person.

As far as tables go, I am agnostic if space allows. But I suspect it would
be better for the conference and vendors alike if they just participate and
mix it up with other attendees rather sitting around somewhere handing out
slick brochures.

kyle


On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 10:36 AM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.eduwrote:

 On 6/15/2011 12:51 PM, Susan Kane wrote:

 great
 visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!



 That's an interesting point too -- you pay for a booth at ALA ($), you
 DO reach a whole lot of people, but it's a lot more expensive than even our
 'platinum' sponsorship, no? And we're talking about giving people really
 even more exposure potentially (a presentation to a captive audience at a
 banquet?) then you get from a booth at ALA (albeit many fewer people).

 Depending on the site, if there's room in the registration area for a
 couple other tables, we could also offer sponsors a conference-long table to
 sit at and hand out stuff, if they wanted it. I don't know if they'd want it
 or not. But that would be a benefit unlikely to upset anyone. probably.




-- 
--
Kyle Banerjee
Digital Services Program Manager
Orbis Cascade Alliance
baner...@uoregon.edu / 503.877.9773


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Cary Gordon
In a modern version of Drupal, you can set a path alias for any page.
Unfortunately, C4L does not appear to be in a modern version of
Drupal. It looks like 4.7 or earlier.

I would be happy to volunteer to help manage it.

Cary

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:13 AM, Anjanette Young
youn...@u.washington.edu wrote:
 Hey Susan,

 Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

 Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

 http://code4lib.org/node/417

 (Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

 There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship, but the
 options on the page are standard.
 Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to travel to
 Seattle for the conference.

 --Anj

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kane adarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Anj,

 Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you were
 coming
 and I was leaving for Boston!

 I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've put the
 word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that I manage on
 LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology companies.
 Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

 Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list want to
 try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone could add a
 link
 about sponsorships to the conference section of the website.

 --- promotional blurb ---

 c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but
 influential
 group of library technologists each year. Next year's conference is Feb
 6-9,
 2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships -- great
 visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!   If
 you can help, please contact me privately through your preferred contact
 method here.

 http://code4lib.org/conference
 http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2Fconferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
 

 -- promotional blurb ---

 Susan Kane
 Harvard University OIS




 --
 Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
 University of Washington Libraries
 Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
 Phone: 206.616.2867




-- 
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Rob Casson
i've got admin rights on the code4lib drupal, so i went ahead and set the alias:

 http://code4lib.org/code4lib_2012_sponsorship

cary: i'll look into getting you the correct privileges.  you're
highermath, correct?

cheers,
rob

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 3:15 PM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:
 In a modern version of Drupal, you can set a path alias for any page.
 Unfortunately, C4L does not appear to be in a modern version of
 Drupal. It looks like 4.7 or earlier.

 I would be happy to volunteer to help manage it.

 Cary

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:13 AM, Anjanette Young
 youn...@u.washington.edu wrote:
 Hey Susan,

 Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

 Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

 http://code4lib.org/node/417

 (Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

 There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship, but the
 options on the page are standard.
 Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to travel to
 Seattle for the conference.

 --Anj

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kane adarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Anj,

 Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you were
 coming
 and I was leaving for Boston!

 I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've put the
 word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that I manage on
 LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology companies.
 Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

 Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list want to
 try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone could add a
 link
 about sponsorships to the conference section of the website.

 --- promotional blurb ---

 c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but
 influential
 group of library technologists each year. Next year's conference is Feb
 6-9,
 2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships -- great
 visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!   If
 you can help, please contact me privately through your preferred contact
 method here.

 http://code4lib.org/conference
 http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2Fconferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
 

 -- promotional blurb ---

 Susan Kane
 Harvard University OIS




 --
 Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
 University of Washington Libraries
 Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
 Phone: 206.616.2867




 --
 Cary Gordon
 The Cherry Hill Company
 http://chillco.com



Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Cary Gordon
That's me!

It is probably a good time to move this to a newer version, perhaps
Drupal 7, if for no other reason than security. The only downside is
that the theme would either need to be recreated or change. No biggy,
really.

If someone wants to send me the code and a DB dump, I will do it in my
less-than-ample spare time.

Cary

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:21 PM, Rob Casson rob.cas...@gmail.com wrote:
 i've got admin rights on the code4lib drupal, so i went ahead and set the 
 alias:

     http://code4lib.org/code4lib_2012_sponsorship

 cary: i'll look into getting you the correct privileges.  you're
 highermath, correct?

 cheers,
 rob

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 3:15 PM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:
 In a modern version of Drupal, you can set a path alias for any page.
 Unfortunately, C4L does not appear to be in a modern version of
 Drupal. It looks like 4.7 or earlier.

 I would be happy to volunteer to help manage it.

 Cary

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:13 AM, Anjanette Young
 youn...@u.washington.edu wrote:
 Hey Susan,

 Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

 Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

 http://code4lib.org/node/417

 (Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

 There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship, but the
 options on the page are standard.
 Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to travel to
 Seattle for the conference.

 --Anj

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kane adarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Anj,

 Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you were
 coming
 and I was leaving for Boston!

 I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've put the
 word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that I manage on
 LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology companies.
 Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

 Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list want to
 try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone could add a
 link
 about sponsorships to the conference section of the website.

 --- promotional blurb ---

 c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but
 influential
 group of library technologists each year. Next year's conference is Feb
 6-9,
 2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships -- great
 visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost of ALA!   If
 you can help, please contact me privately through your preferred contact
 method here.

 http://code4lib.org/conference
 http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2Fconferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
 

 -- promotional blurb ---

 Susan Kane
 Harvard University OIS




 --
 Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
 University of Washington Libraries
 Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
 Phone: 206.616.2867




 --
 Cary Gordon
 The Cherry Hill Company
 http://chillco.com





-- 
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Wick, Ryan
Thanks for offering to help. I agree about the need to upgrade, and this is a 
pretty quiet time to do so.

I'm guessing the theme will need to be done from scratch. It was already 
cobbled together.

I'll try and send you some more information later today. If anyone else really 
wants in on this, let me know.

Ryan Wick

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of Cary 
Gordon
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 12:31 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

That's me!

It is probably a good time to move this to a newer version, perhaps Drupal 7, 
if for no other reason than security. The only downside is that the theme would 
either need to be recreated or change. No biggy, really.

If someone wants to send me the code and a DB dump, I will do it in my 
less-than-ample spare time.

Cary

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:21 PM, Rob Casson rob.cas...@gmail.com wrote:
 i've got admin rights on the code4lib drupal, so i went ahead and set the 
 alias:

     http://code4lib.org/code4lib_2012_sponsorship

 cary: i'll look into getting you the correct privileges.  you're 
 highermath, correct?

 cheers,
 rob

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 3:15 PM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:
 In a modern version of Drupal, you can set a path alias for any page.
 Unfortunately, C4L does not appear to be in a modern version of 
 Drupal. It looks like 4.7 or earlier.

 I would be happy to volunteer to help manage it.

 Cary

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:13 AM, Anjanette Young 
 youn...@u.washington.edu wrote:
 Hey Susan,

 Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

 Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

 http://code4lib.org/node/417

 (Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

 There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship, 
 but the options on the page are standard.
 Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to 
 travel to Seattle for the conference.

 --Anj

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kane adarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Anj,

 Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you 
 were coming and I was leaving for Boston!

 I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've 
 put the word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that 
 I manage on LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology 
 companies.
 Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

 Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list 
 want to try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone 
 could add a link about sponsorships to the conference section of 
 the website.

 --- promotional blurb ---

 c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but 
 influential group of library technologists each year. Next year's 
 conference is Feb 6-9,
 2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships -- 
 great visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost 
 of ALA!   If you can help, please contact me privately through 
 your preferred contact method here.

 http://code4lib.org/conference
 http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2F
 conferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
 

 -- promotional blurb ---

 Susan Kane
 Harvard University OIS




 --
 Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
 University of Washington Libraries
 Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
 Phone: 206.616.2867




 --
 Cary Gordon
 The Cherry Hill Company
 http://chillco.com





--
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Cary Gordon
The theme looks like a minor hack of the Chameleon theme, so it should
not be difficult to reproduce.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:46 PM, Wick, Ryan ryan.w...@oregonstate.edu wrote:
 Thanks for offering to help. I agree about the need to upgrade, and this is a 
 pretty quiet time to do so.

 I'm guessing the theme will need to be done from scratch. It was already 
 cobbled together.

 I'll try and send you some more information later today. If anyone else 
 really wants in on this, let me know.

 Ryan Wick

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of Cary 
 Gordon
 Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 12:31 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

 That's me!

 It is probably a good time to move this to a newer version, perhaps Drupal 7, 
 if for no other reason than security. The only downside is that the theme 
 would either need to be recreated or change. No biggy, really.

 If someone wants to send me the code and a DB dump, I will do it in my 
 less-than-ample spare time.

 Cary

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:21 PM, Rob Casson rob.cas...@gmail.com wrote:
 i've got admin rights on the code4lib drupal, so i went ahead and set the 
 alias:

     http://code4lib.org/code4lib_2012_sponsorship

 cary: i'll look into getting you the correct privileges.  you're
 highermath, correct?

 cheers,
 rob

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 3:15 PM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:
 In a modern version of Drupal, you can set a path alias for any page.
 Unfortunately, C4L does not appear to be in a modern version of
 Drupal. It looks like 4.7 or earlier.

 I would be happy to volunteer to help manage it.

 Cary

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:13 AM, Anjanette Young
 youn...@u.washington.edu wrote:
 Hey Susan,

 Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

 Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

 http://code4lib.org/node/417

 (Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

 There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship,
 but the options on the page are standard.
 Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to
 travel to Seattle for the conference.

 --Anj

 On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kane 
 adarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi Anj,

 Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you
 were coming and I was leaving for Boston!

 I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've
 put the word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that
 I manage on LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology 
 companies.
 Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

 Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list
 want to try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone
 could add a link about sponsorships to the conference section of
 the website.

 --- promotional blurb ---

 c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but
 influential group of library technologists each year. Next year's
 conference is Feb 6-9,
 2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships --
 great visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost
 of ALA!   If you can help, please contact me privately through
 your preferred contact method here.

 http://code4lib.org/conference
 http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2F
 conferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
 

 -- promotional blurb ---

 Susan Kane
 Harvard University OIS




 --
 Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
 University of Washington Libraries
 Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
 Phone: 206.616.2867




 --
 Cary Gordon
 The Cherry Hill Company
 http://chillco.com





 --
 Cary Gordon
 The Cherry Hill Company
 http://chillco.com




-- 
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind
I doubt anyone is particularly wedded to the particularities of the 
current theme. It probably doesn't matter, as long as you can put the 
code4lib logo at the top with a banner-menu, if the theme changes, even 
significantly. As long as it has pretty much the same functionality 
exposed that it has now (and even that probably isn't that carefully 
thought out).


On 6/15/2011 4:23 PM, Cary Gordon wrote:

The theme looks like a minor hack of the Chameleon theme, so it should
not be difficult to reproduce.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:46 PM, Wick, Ryanryan.w...@oregonstate.edu  wrote:

Thanks for offering to help. I agree about the need to upgrade, and this is a 
pretty quiet time to do so.

I'm guessing the theme will need to be done from scratch. It was already 
cobbled together.

I'll try and send you some more information later today. If anyone else really 
wants in on this, let me know.

Ryan Wick

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of Cary 
Gordon
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 12:31 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Seattle Update

That's me!

It is probably a good time to move this to a newer version, perhaps Drupal 7, 
if for no other reason than security. The only downside is that the theme would 
either need to be recreated or change. No biggy, really.

If someone wants to send me the code and a DB dump, I will do it in my 
less-than-ample spare time.

Cary

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 12:21 PM, Rob Cassonrob.cas...@gmail.com  wrote:

i've got admin rights on the code4lib drupal, so i went ahead and set the alias:

 http://code4lib.org/code4lib_2012_sponsorship

cary: i'll look into getting you the correct privileges.  you're
highermath, correct?

cheers,
rob

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 3:15 PM, Cary Gordonlistu...@chillco.com  wrote:

In a modern version of Drupal, you can set a path alias for any page.
Unfortunately, C4L does not appear to be in a modern version of
Drupal. It looks like 4.7 or earlier.

I would be happy to volunteer to help manage it.

Cary

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:13 AM, Anjanette Young
youn...@u.washington.edu  wrote:

Hey Susan,

Sweet! Language. Information. Social niceties.

Here is the link to the 2012 sponsor page.

http://code4lib.org/node/417

(Anyone know how to make that a nicer url on drupal?)

There seems to be discussion on expanding options for sponsorship,
but the options on the page are standard.
Thank you for the words.  Hope that it turns out that you able to
travel to Seattle for the conference.

--Anj

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 9:51 AM, Susan Kaneadarconsult...@gmail.comwrote:


Hi Anj,

Nice to see your name again after meeting briefly at UW when you
were coming and I was leaving for Boston!

I doubt I'll be able to attend the conference this year but I've
put the word out to the group of Ex Libris and Endeavor alumni that
I manage on LinkedIn.  Many people now work for other library technology 
companies.
Will let you know if anything useful comes back.

Here's a copy of my promotional message, in case others on the list
want to try their own networks.  It might help our cause if someone
could add a link about sponsorships to the conference section of
the website.

--- promotional blurb ---

c4l -- code4lib is a unique conference that attracts a small but
influential group of library technologists each year. Next year's
conference is Feb 6-9,
2012 in Seattle, WA. They are still seeking vendor sponsorships --
great visibility with influential folks for a fraction of the cost
of ALA!   If you can help, please contact me privately through
your preferred contact method here.

http://code4lib.org/conference
http://www.linkedin.com/redirect?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcode4lib%2Eorg%2F
conferenceurlhash=-Iyx_t=tracking_anet
-- promotional blurb ---

Susan Kane
Harvard University OIS




--
Anjanette Young | Systems Librarian
University of Washington Libraries
Box 352900 | Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206.616.2867




--
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com




--
Cary Gordon
The Cherry Hill Company
http://chillco.com






Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Peter Noerr
I would just like to confirm from years of practical experience that Jonathan 
is right - this is hard technically. Not in principle, but the devil is in the 
details and they are all different, and often change. The very neat addition to 
the JHU catalog that Eric reported on that started this thread 
(https://catalyst.library.jhu.edu/catalog/bib_816990) is an example of what we 
call secondary searching and/or enrichment. 

And it is available - in our commercial software (not a plug - we don't sell 
it, just noting that it is not the sort of thing to try yourself on any scale - 
it takes a lot of resources). Our software is incorporated in the offerings of 
a number of the ILS and content vendors. Admittedly almost exclusively for 
federated searching, but the problems are the same. And Jonathan enumerates 
them pretty well below. So, to answer Karen's question, it can be done if the 
ILS vendors make the functionality available, and the libraries configure it.

Peter

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of 
 Jonathan Rochkind
 Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 10:34 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works
 
 On 6/15/2011 10:55 AM, Karen Coyle wrote:
 
  I've been struggling with this around the Open Library digital texts:
  how can we make them available to libraries through their catalogs?
  When I look at the install documentation for Umlaut [1](I was actually
  hoping to find a technical requirements list), it's obvious that it
  takes developer chops.
 
 This isn't neccesarily un-fixable. I have plans to make it easier --
 it's totally possible to make it easier (largely because Rails, on which
 Umlaut is based, has gotten so much better at being easier to
 install/deploy things and have em Just Work), I just need to find time
 (that I'm having trouble finding) to make the changes.
 
 Eric, as well as Karen,  also asked why no vendors seem interested in
 supplying a product like this -- may be a bit of a chicken and an egg,
 there may not be a market for it -- I have trouble explaining to people
 why Umlaut is actually really cool in the first place, even other
 libraries. Although these conversations help me learn new ways to
 talk/think about it.
 
 So, I can definitely make Umlaut easier to install and run -- but there
 are still going to be some technical craziness, involved with dealing
 with your local metadata in all it's local idiosyncracies, and dealing
 with matching it to 'remote' data in a way that meets local use cases.
 Like I said before, this is inherently imperfect, but that means that
 there are a bunch of choices to make about what imperfect trade-offs you
 want to make, and these inevitably have to do with the nature of your
 local (mostly cataloging) metadata, and the use cases you are supporting.
 
 Really, I'm not sure I have faith in our existing vendors to be able to
 do a good job with it -- this is a really complicated thing that Umlaut
 is trying to do, in the end. (from my experience; it didn't sound that
 complicated at first, but it ends up so. Trouble-shooting problems ends
 up being incredibly complex, because there are so many different systems
 involved, and a bug or bad metadata on any one can mess things up).
 
 So I guess what I'm saying is, if you're talking about Umlaut's approach
 -- it is a technically hard problem in our existing environment.
 (existing environment means our really bad local cataloging metadata,
 our multiple silo's of local metadata, and our pretty awful 'link
 resolver' products with poor API's, etc -- also the third party content
 host's poor metadata, lack of API's, etc.  None of these things are
 changing anytime soon). So if you're talking about this approach in
 particular, when Erik asks is it technical or is political -- my
 experience with Umlaut definitely definitely says 'technical', not
 'political'. I've gotten no opposition to what Umlaut's trying to do,
 once people understand it, only dissatisfaction with how well it does it
 (a technical issue).
 
 Jonathan


Re: [CODE4LIB] JHU integration of PD works

2011-06-15 Thread Jonathan Rochkind

On 6/15/2011 5:43 PM, Peter Noerr wrote:

And it is available - in our commercial software (not a plug - we don't sell 
it, just noting that it is not the sort of thing to try yourself on any scale - 
it takes a lot of resources).


I wouldn't go that far -- I _have_ done it myself, at the examples we're 
talking about in this thread! My implementation certainly isn't perfect, 
but it's 'good enough' that we're getting lots of value added from using 
it. (My implementation is software originally written by Ross Singer, 
5 years ago or more. It hasn't received 5 years worth of development, it 
hasn't gotten much development in the past 2-3 years, it's mostly just 
been continuing to work--although I've got plenty of ideas for 
improvements I haven't had time to do. But yes, it took a couple smart 
people a buncha time to implement, but we did it.)


But I agree it's tricky, because the devil is in the details, having 
done it myself too.


The Umlaut software is designed as a 'just in time'/'last mile' service 
provider, providing access points and services from local and remote 
platforms, for known items. You find an item of interest in some other 
interface, that has structured citation metadata, this is passed to 
Umlaut to provide those just-in-time last-mile services.


Umlaut is intentionally designed to make it as easy as possible to embed 
Umlaut discovered services on local interfaces, like the catalog for 
instance.  If you can add javascript to your catalog, you can figure out 
how to make the javascript obtain structured citation data from the 
current page (esp ISBN/ISSN/LCCN/OCLCnum), and you can write JQuery 
selectors to describe where each section of Umlaut content should be 
placed on the page (and maybe some CSS to style it appropriately) -- 
then you can have Umlaut content added via Javascript to your catalog 
item detail pages.


Umlaut is open source.  But Umlaut isn't as easy to install/configure as 
I'd like it to be and know it can be.  It is nevertheless currently in 
use not only at JHU (where I, the lead developer reside), but to one 
extent or another also at NYU and Vanderbilt.  But I've got plans to 
make it a lot easier, hopefully sometime in the next 6 months.  If this 
interests you, keep an eye out.  No matter how easy I make it, it'll 
probably never be Just Works Out of the Box, it's going to require a bit 
of local technical development to integrate it with all your local 
systems in the way you want.


So anyway, it's very tricky -- but I've got open source software that's 
_doing_ it, which while not perfect works well enough to provide 
significant improvement to your library offerings.  I've been frustrated 
at not being able to explain to people why what Umlaut does is exciting 
and important in the first place, perhaps this thread will help.  (Or 
perhaps I am under-estimating people's interest, maybe they are 
interested, but Umlaut is currently just too hard to to install and 
setup. I've got plans!).


Jonathan


[CODE4LIB] Institutional Repository Bibliography, Version 4

2011-06-15 Thread Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
Version four of the Institutional Repository Bibliography is
now available from Digital Scholarship. This selective
bibliography presents over 500 articles, books, technical
reports, and other scholarly textual sources that are useful
in understanding institutional repositories (see the scope
note for details). All included works are in English. It is
available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial
3.0 United States License.

http://digital-scholarship.org/irb/irb.html

The bibliography has the following sections (all sections
have been updated except 3 Multiple-Institution
Repositories):

1 General
2 Country and Regional Surveys
3 Multiple-Institution Repositories
4 Specific Institutional Repositories
5 Digital Preservation
6 Library Issues
7 Metadata
8 Institutional Open Access Mandates and Policies
9 RD Projects
10 Research Studies
11 Software
12 Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies
Appendix B. About the Author

Translate (oversatta, oversette, prelozit, traducir,
traduire, tradurre, traduzir, or ubersetzen):

http://digital-scholarship.org/announce/irb_en_4.htm

-- 

Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
Publisher, Digital Scholarship
http://digital-scholarship.org/

A Look Back at 22 Years as an Open Access Publisher
http://digital-scholarship.org/cwb/22/22years.htm


[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2012 Volunteers

2011-06-15 Thread Ranti Junus
On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 2:35 PM, todd.d.robb...@gmail.com
todd.d.robb...@gmail.com wrote:
 Just a heads up: I and about 5 other MLIS/MSIM students at the UW iSchool
 are very interested in helping. Looking forward to the event!

Todd.D.Robbins_and_about_5_other_MLIS/MSIM_students_at_the_UW_iSchool++

Feel free to put your name here:
http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/2012_committees_sign-up_page


:-)
thanks,
ranti.

-- 
Bulk mail.  Postage paid.


[CODE4LIB] LITA ALA Session: Identity Management (IdM) and Libraries - Monday, June 27, 2011 - 10:30am

2011-06-15 Thread Stu Baker
*** With apologies for cross-posting ***

http://connect.ala.org/node/137557

LITA ALA Session: Identity Management (IdM) and Libraries: What You Need
to Know‹Why You Need to Care

When: Monday, June 27, 2011 - 10:30am - 12:00pm

Location: Convention Center - Rm 288-290

Presenters: 
Don Hamparian, OCLC
Frances McNamara, University of Chicago
Monique Sendze, Douglas County Libraries

Description: In this panel session you will learn how libraries are
developing Identity Management (IdM) strategies utilizing Shibboleth and
other federated authentication and authorization systems. IdM allows for
seamless and secure collaboration and resource sharing among institutions,
scholars, publishers, and electronic resource vendors. Topics will
include: Concepts of Identity Management; Benefits of having an IdM
strategy; Components of an IdM system, Overview of the InCommon
Federation, Examples of IdM systems in action.

---
Stu Baker
Northwestern University Library
mailto:stuba...@northwestern.edu