Re: [CODE4LIB] UNIX/LINUX noob looking for UWIN help

2009-12-14 Thread Cloutman, David
Cygwin++ / Wubi++ / Virtual box - heard good things from people who know

Those three solutions give you respectively the choice between partial 
emulation / dual boot / and virtualization. Like others have, or are likely to 
say, it depends on what you're trying to do (and why you're trying to do it 
that way).

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of Matt 
Amory
Sent: Sunday, December 13, 2009 8:20 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] UNIX/LINUX noob looking for UWIN help

I'm trying to get UNIX/LINUX to run on my Windows laptop.  Is UWIN the best
and easiest option?

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[CODE4LIB] svn repos for CONTENTdm configurable files

2009-10-29 Thread Cloutman, David
Hi Everyone,

I have recently taken over the administration of my library's CONTENTdm
installation, and am currently completing the upgrade to the 5.x
version. (This upgrade also involves a migration to Linux.) I have a
question that may be best answered by the more technical audience on
this list rather than through the product's listserv.

In CONTENTdm 4.x, it seems that a number of configurations could only be
accomplished by directly modifying PHP scripts that contained
significant amounts of logic. As I will be making customizations on this
system soon, I want to create a system that will allow me to rollback
files when I inevitably make a serious mistake, as we have no formal
testing server. I have decided to try loading key application files into
a svn repository to accomplish this. (I'm sure there are some adamant
CVS or Git users out there who will have strong opinions about my choice
of software.) However, because of the way the application is
architected, there are some key parts of the application that I do not
want loaded into the repository, such as temporary files that store a
PID.

Because I cannot simply load the whole application into a single
repository and call it a day, I am looking to make some top level
directories separate repositories. However, I want to skip top level
directories that will never, or only very rarely be modified and focus
on building repositories for directories that will benefit from change
control. I am currently looking at creating repositories for docs and
conf. Does anyone out there who administers a CONTENTdm installation
have any thoughts about this?

Thanks,

- David



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David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] svn repos for CONTENTdm configurable files

2009-10-29 Thread Cloutman, David
No, that's good. I am a Subversion beginner, so any tips are helpful.

Thanks!



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Jonathan Rochkind
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 9:35 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] svn repos for CONTENTdm configurable files


Cloutman, David wrote:
 of software.) However, because of the way the application is
 architected, there are some key parts of the application that I do not
 want loaded into the repository, such as temporary files that store a
 PID.
   

You may be able to simply use svn-ignore settings to accomplish instead 
of your more complicated design; but you may have other reasons for 
preferring your more complicated design, just wanted to draw your 
attention to svn ignore.

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Re: [CODE4LIB] AquaBrowser Libraries Group

2009-10-23 Thread Cloutman, David
Interesting. Our catalog consortium just bought Aquabrowser. Is there
some sort of NDA that you know of that would limit the discussion to
private forums? I hadn't heard of such a thing, but then maybe no one
thought to tell me. 



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Gabriel Farrell
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 3:02 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] AquaBrowser Libraries Group


While the Interesting difference... bit may be read as snarky, I
appreciated Jeffrey's post for pointing out that most discussions about
AquaBrowser can't take place on this list due to its lack of membership
restrictions.


On Thu, Oct 22, 2009 at 10:45:24AM -0400, Edward M. Corrado wrote:
 I don't see this as an interesting difference at all. Almost all
 [larger] vendor-supplied products in the library world have their
 own discussion lists that are limited to people that use/license
 their products. We even see this with Open Source products such as
 Koha. Although I do not use AquaBrowser, unlike almost all other
 library specific-software of this magnitude I understand that
 AquaBrowser does not have a user group (formal or informal). There
 currently is very few ways (no way?) for users of this product to
 converse with each other and share ideas.
 
 There are numerous reasons for wanting to share information on a
 closed list that can range from not wanting to spam a larger
 community with a how do activate a widget in product A to asking
 questions/sharing information that for whatever reason you don't
 want to or can't share with the whole world (e.g. non-disclosure
 agreements, public relations concerns, privacy concerns, not wanting
 your name in open archives attached to something, etc.).  In fact,
 in some cases you may not even want the vendor on the list the way
 some Voyager systems administrators created a list that excluded
 Endeavor (and now Ex Libris) and non-systems people at Voyager
 sites. This made people feel much more comfortable asking questions
 that maybe they would otherwise be embarrassed or reluctant to ask.
 
 I applaud Kathryn for taking the initiative to organize the
 AquaBrowser community by creating the AquaBrowser Libraries Group.
 From what I understand from people that use the product this is
 something that is overdue for the community.
 
 What the library technology world needs is more people like Kathryn
 that try to build community to help each other with whatever
 software product they are using. Sure, in a perfect world maybe
 everything would be completely Open but that is not reality. People
 that take initiative should be praised. They should not be met with
 snarky comments.
 
 Edward
 
 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
 Barnett, Jeffrey
 Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 9:05 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] AquaBrowser Libraries Group
 
 Good point Ed, but I think by the phrase Licensed sites only the
 intent of the AquaBrowser discussion _is_ to exclude open source.
 Interesting difference...
 
 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
 Ed Summers
 Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 9:19 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] AquaBrowser Libraries Group
 
 You should also feel free to discuss AquaBrowser on here too ... the
 code4lib discussion isn't limited to opensource software.
 
 //Ed
 - Hide quoted text -
 
 On Wed, Oct 21, 2009 at 4:32 PM, Kathryn Frederick
 kfred...@skidmore.edu mailto:kfred...@skidmore.edu wrote:
  Please excuse cross-posting.
 
  I've set up an AquaBrowser Google Group to share tips and post
  questions. If your library uses AquaBrowser, please consider
joining.
  This group is restricted, email me at kfred...@skidmore.edu
 mailto:kfred...@skidmore.edu and I'll
  send you an invite.
 
  Licensed sites only, please.
 
  Thanks,
  Kathryn
 
 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] R?

2009-09-09 Thread Cloutman, David
Ironically, the first, and only other time, I heard of R was in a job
description for the Democratic National Committee. 

I wonder if the Republicans will need D programmers.

---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
William Denton
Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2009 3:24 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] R?


Are any of you using R?

http://www.r-project.org/

Blog about R, info viz, etc.:
http://blog.revolution-computing.com/

I have something in mind I'm going to try fooling around with in R, but
I 
wondered if anyone was using it for visualizing searches, usage,
networks 
of information, that kind of thing.

Bill
-- 
William Denton, Toronto : miskatonic.org www.frbr.org openfrbr.org

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Long way to be a good coder in library

2009-07-22 Thread Cloutman, David
Most of the responses I've seen have focused on the raw technology. For
a different perspective, I'm going to assume that you know how to
program, and do it well, and that you are looking for advise with
regards to working in a library. Here's my take:

1. Learn about your organization. Figure out what makes it tick. Every
library is unique, and libraries are a unique type of organization. Make
an effort to understand the values and theory of librarianship.
Librarians love to talk about this, so don't be afraid to ask. 

2. Don't forget to look at trends outside of Libraryland. A lot of
professional library discussion takes place in an echo chamber, and bad
ideas often get repeated and gain credibility as a result. Librarians
usually overstate the uniqueness of their organizations and professions.
When the question, What are other libraries doing? arises in
addressing a technical problem, don't be afraid to generalize the
question to other types of organizations. Too often, the answer to the
question, What are other libraries doing? is Failing. Emulate for
the sake of success, not conformity.

3. Do your best to control your situation. Most likely, you will be
managed by committee. Most likely, you will not have a competent project
manager. Learn to gather your own requirements, develop your own project
plans, set reasonable expectations with your users, set and meet
obtainable deadlines, and stop scope creep dead in its tracks. Once
you've mastered that, tell us how you did it. Most of us work under very
difficult organizational pressures.

4. Be suspicious of extraordinary claims by library vendors. More often
than not they will cluck defiance.

5. Follow standards to the best of your ability.

6. Innovate. Be creative. Find new solutions to old problems. Remember
why you became a programmer. Expect resistance. Ignore bad advice.


Best of luck in your endeavors.

- David

---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Wayne Lam
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2009 8:15 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Long way to be a good coder in library


Hi all,

  I am new in here and i am currently worked in the library too.
I am always confused that when i read the post in here, there are always
something i don't understand
and there are so much to learn.
  So, the question is, hows everybody learns to be a good coder for
libraries, what s the secret and what
kind of technology are most important to learn?

thanks

Wayne

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Re: [CODE4LIB] HTML mark-up in MARC records

2009-06-22 Thread Cloutman, David
From the perspective of a programmer, rather than a cataloguer, my opinion is 
firmly no, HTML does not belong in your MARC records. 

In application development, general best practice is to separate information 
systems into layers, splitting data from business logic and presentation 
logic. MARC stores data, and HTML belongs to presentation. Though it may sound 
like a good idea today to put HTML into a MARC record, that tag may be 
meaningless down the road when some other technology is used to present your 
record data. If you wish to present data in HTML, you are much better off 
leaving the HTML out of your MARC, and allowing the application to generate 
tags.


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries on behalf of Doran, Michael D
Sent: Sun 6/21/2009 1:12 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] HTML mark-up in MARC records
 
Is anybody else embedding HTML mark-up code in MARC records [1]?  We're 
currently including an img tag in some MARC Holdings records in the 856z 
[2].   I'm inclined to think that HTML mark-up does not belong anywhere in MARC 
records, but am looking for other opinions (preferably with the reasoning 
behind the opinions), both pro and con.  

I'm asking on code4lib as well as the voyager-l list in order to get a mix of 
ILS-specific and ILS-agnostic opinions (I'm not on any cataloging lists, or 
would probably ask there, too).  I tried googling this topic, but couldn't find 
anything of consequence; so if I've missed something there, and you could point 
me to it, I'd be obliged.

-- Michael

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML

[2] http://www.loc.gov/marc/holdings/hd856.html
  
# Michael Doran, Systems Librarian
# University of Texas at Arlington
# 817-272-5326 office
# 817-688-1926 mobile
# do...@uta.edu
# http://rocky.uta.edu/doran/


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[CODE4LIB] MySQL Stop Words

2009-05-29 Thread Cloutman, David
In building a search function for some of our internal documents in PHP
/ MySQL, I took a look at the default list of MySQL English language
stop words used in the natural language searching feature. The list is
actually quite extensive, and goes well beyond the typical list of to
be cognates, common prepositions, conjunctions, etc. It also includes a
large number of keywords that librarians or academic users might want to
search for. Here are a few examples:

available
appropriate
course
follow
former
novel

There are quite a number of other stop words that I think are suspect.
The full list of stop words is located here:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/fulltext-stopwords.html

I guess the point is that if you're building a library application that
takes advantage of MySQL's fulltext searching features, you might want
to customize you stop words list on your MySQL installation if you think
your library users might want to search the word novel.

- David

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Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] MySQL Stop Words

2009-05-29 Thread Cloutman, David
It seems like there are a number of eccentricities like that. I saw
somewhere in the documentation that if a word appears in more than half
the rows, it isn't searched. Because of that, I'm only using MATCH to
generate relevancy numbers. I'm doing boolean in the search terms. My
queries are like:

SELECT `path`, `mdate` FROM `rawtext` WHERE `rawText` LIKE '%book%' AND
`rawText` LIKE '%lists%' ORDER BY MATCH (`rawText`) AGAINST ('book
lists') DESC, `mdate` DESC

(Yes, I have a table named rawtext with a column named rawText. Shoot
me.)

It's far from perfect, but I just need to index a few hundred documents,
and it's for staff consumption. I would be curious to know how Postgres
compares to MySQL in this area. I'm looking towards finding a long-term
alternative to MySQL due to the Sun / Oracle merger, which I don't think
will end well for MySQL.

- David

---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Genny Engel
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2009 12:41 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] MySQL Stop Words


Once I read a study where the document collection to be indexed was in a
narrow technical field, and the goal was to present a search that
quickly isolated ONLY the most relevant documents.  To this end, they
stopworded everything that didn't sufficiently distinguish one document
from another.   Their stopword list comprised some 30,000 terms!
 
If your goal, on the other hand, is to maximize recall at some expense
of precision, beware of MySQL full-text MATCH because it dynamically
computes new stopwords.  Note this little side note in section 11.8.1 of
the manual:
 
For very small tables, word distribution does not adequately reflect
their semantic value, and this model may sometimes produce bizarre
results. For example, although the word MySQL is present in every row
of the articles table shown earlier, a search for the word produces no
results [ ... ] The search result is empty because the word MySQL is
present in at least 50% of the rows. As such, it is effectively treated
as a stopword. For large data sets, this is the most desirable behavior:
A natural language query should not return every second row from a 1GB
table. For small data sets, it may be less desirable. 
 
 
 
 
Genny Engel
Sonoma County Library
gen...@sonoma.lib.ca.us
707 545-0831 x581
www.sonomalibrary.org
 


 dclout...@co.marin.ca.us 05/29/09 11:26AM 
In building a search function for some of our internal documents in PHP
/ MySQL, I took a look at the default list of MySQL English language
stop words used in the natural language searching feature. The list is
actually quite extensive, and goes well beyond the typical list of to
be cognates, common prepositions, conjunctions, etc. It also includes a
large number of keywords that librarians or academic users might want to
search for. Here are a few examples:

available
appropriate
course
follow
former
novel

There are quite a number of other stop words that I think are suspect.
The full list of stop words is located here:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/fulltext-stopwords.html 

I guess the point is that if you're building a library application that
takes advantage of MySQL's fulltext searching features, you might want
to customize you stop words list on your MySQL installation if you think
your library users might want to search the word novel.

- David

---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] can code4lib survive Oracle's takeover of Sun?

2009-04-20 Thread Cloutman, David
I don't know if there is anything that can be done about it, but if
anyone is interested, I've set up a Facebook group opposing the merger. 

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=91044005659



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Barnett, Jeffrey
Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 7:13 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] can code4lib survive Oracle's takeover of Sun?


I know the answer is yes, but does anyone care to speculate on the
impact of Oracle's takeover of Sun, which controls in addition to open
source workhorse JAVA, MySQL, OpenOffice, and Netbeans (all of which
complete with proprietary products from Oracle).  I haven't heard
anything quotable recently from Larry Ellison, but he has in the pass
been an ardent opponent of OSS and I find it hard to imagine him not
taking advantage of this opportunity to place roadblocks and/or booby
traps in the way of the OSS community.

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Something completely different

2009-04-06 Thread Cloutman, David
I'm open to seeing new approaches to the ILS in general. A related
question I had the other day, speaking of MARC, is what would an
alternative bibliographic data format look like if it was designed with
the intent for opening access to the data our ILS systems to developers
in a more informal manner? I was thinking of an XML format that a
developer could work with without formal training, the basics of which
could be learned in an hour, and could reasonably represent the
essential fields of the 90% of records that are most likely to be viewed
by a public library patron. In my mind, such a format would allow
creators of community-based web sites to pull data from their local
library, and repurpose it without having to learn a lot of arcane
formats (e.g. MARC) or esoteric protocols (e.g. Z39.50). The sacrifice,
of course, would be loosing some of the richness MARC allows, but I
think in many common situations the really complex records are not what
patrons are interested in. You may want to consider prototyping this in
your application. I see such an effort to be vital in making our systems
relevant in future computing environments, and I am skeptical that a
simple, workable solution would come out the initial efforts of a
standardization committee.

Just my 2 cents.

- David

---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Peter Schlumpf
Sent: Sunday, April 05, 2009 8:40 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Something completely different


Greetings!

I have been lurking on (or ignoring) this forum for years.  And
libraries too.  Some of you may know me.  I am the Avanti guy.  I am,
perhaps, the first person to try to produce an open source ILS back in
1999, though there is a David Duncan out there who tried before I did. I
was there when all this stuff was coming together.

Since then I have seen a lot of good things happen.  There's Koha.
There's Evergreen.  They are good things.  I have also seen first hand
how libraries get screwed over and over by commercial vendors with their
crappy software.  I believe free software is the answer to that.  I have
neglected Avanti for years, but now I am ready to return to it.

I want to get back to simple things.  Imagine if there were no Marc
records.  Minimal layers of abstraction.  No politics.  No vendors.  No
SQL straightjacket.  What would an ILS look like without those things?
Sometimes the biggest prison is between the ears.

I am in a position to do this now, and that's what I have decided to do.
I am getting busy.

Peter Schlumpf

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Re: [CODE4LIB] APIs that an OPAC should provide ...

2009-02-19 Thread Cloutman, David
From my perspective, as someone working in a public library, I really
want to be able to hit our OPAC with marketing type queries to provide
promotion of library materials using real-time, or near real-real time
data. Fundamentally, the Holy Grail of API queries for me is as follows:

For a given time period, what titles circulated the most, and which are
currently in stock.

Secondarily, I would like to know:

For a given item, what is its set of bibliographic data.

My reasons for wanting this are basically to I can create pages on our
public Web site that promote items that are in the catalog, likely to be
in stock, and can deliver our patrons an immediate and satisfactory
result. Further, the information on the page and in the catalog should
match. I think this is a big deal, because regardless of what we like to
think, public libraries are largely in the business of lending books and
other popular materials. Building web presences that actually accomplish
this, and are not tied to a vendor specific solution would be a _huge_
deal. Currently, I am stuck with an III catalog, and both of my rather
modest requests are not possible (at least according to the
documentation I have available) through programmatic methods. I can
accomplish such things by manually running reports, and then somehow
importing the data into pages, but that in and of itself would consume
all my time, and is not what I want to do with my career.

Anyhow, I hope that helps.

- David



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Matthias Einbrodt
Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2009 1:09 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] APIs that an OPAC should provide ...


Hello,

I'm interested in your opinion regarding the question which (kind of)
APIs an OPAC should provide nowadays and in the near or maybe not so
near future!

Thanks in advance and best regards

Matthias Einbrodt
 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] PHP Frameworks: An informal survey.

2009-02-12 Thread Cloutman, David
Interesting link.

I've played with Symfony, and like what I see. I even own the Apress
book. I'm certainly not saying Zend is better than framework X. My
question is, will knowing it give you an edge in an interview for a PHP
job v. something else? That I'm not so certain about. What is pretty
clear is the PHP developers will use frameworks more extensively in the
future to stay competitive with other languages used in Web development.
What they use will is unknown. What they are using is observable. I
would be happy, though, to see the market pick a definitive winner.



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Yitzchak Schaffer
Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2009 1:49 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] PHP Frameworks: An informal survey.


Cloutman, David wrote:
 This morning I was curious to see how the battle for domination
between
 PHP frameworks was shaping up, and which one was most economically
 sensible for a developer with limited time to learn. I thought I'd
share
 my results with the list, as this may be of interest to some of you.

I found this post and comments to be of value:

http://www.plentyofcode.com/2008/04/symfony-vs-zend-framework-vs-cakephp
-vs.html

FWIW I have been working with symfony (to the exclusion of other 
framewords) for... about a year now, I think?  I'm very pleased, 
particularly with the amount of new functionality that's come with each 
of the major new releases (1.1 and 1.2)

Cheers,

-- 
Yitzchak Schaffer
Systems Librarian
Touro College Libraries
33 West 23rd Street
New York, NY 10010
Tel (212) 463-0400 x5230
Fax (212) 627-3197
yitzc...@touro.edu

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Re: [CODE4LIB] hotel for conf?

2009-01-12 Thread Cloutman, David
I had the same issue when I booked a couple of weeks ago. Maybe we
should offer to rewrite their reservation system. ;)



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Schneider, Wayne
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 2:42 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] hotel for conf?


Hey, Jonathan.  That's weird - the hotel told me (well, the web site
told me) that 1 king bed was not available at this time.  I placed the
reservation Wednesday.  Have you called?  I wouldn't mind swapping,
since I'm not sharing the room with anyone, but I begin to suspect that
the guest block may simply be overbooked.

wayne

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Jonathan Rochkind
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 4:15 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] hotel for conf?


So the Marriott for the conference hotel is telling me there are no 
rooms with two queen beds available. That's kind of a problem, since I 
was planning on sharing a room with a colleague.

Anyone know if there's any way around that?

Jonathan

-- 
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886 
rochkind (at) jhu.edu

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[CODE4LIB] Mime type for PHP serialized objects

2008-12-30 Thread Cloutman, David
I have a quick question for any PHP developers out there. 

I am writing a SOA application to manage my library's events calendar.
The basic idea is to create a public API that our web site or other
community organizations can use to query and consume information. I am
using JSON as the default output for information, but would like to add
the option of outputting native serialized PHP data structures as
created by the serialized() function.

My question is, what mime type should I use for serialized PHP data? The
best suggestion I saw through Google was application/vnd.php.serialized,
which was posted as a proposal. I don't know if any standard was adopted
though. Has anyone else thought about this issue?

- David



---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Mime type for PHP serialized objects

2008-12-30 Thread Cloutman, David
This does not appear to be the case. To the best of my knowledge, PHP's
serialization behaves much like Java's. If you serialize an object, the
data gets serialized, not the code. In fact, if you unserialize an
object without a matching class in the namespace, the resulting instance
in PHP is the class __PHP_Incomplete_Class Object. The __wake() method
that is called on unserialization is not defined in the serialized data,
but rather in the class definition in the code itself. If one can really
inject executable code into a serialized PHP object that easily, then
PHP itself has a big problem. However, I do not believe that the
serialization routines are designed to permit this. If they are, I'd
like to see an example of the exploit.

My attempt to write an exploit of the type you describe fails. Here is
the code:

Malicious.class.php:

?php

class Malicious {
public $data = 'default';

public function __wakeup() {
header('Content-type: text/plain');
echo Hello world, I'm Evil!\n;
exit;
}
}

---

out.php

?php
require_once('Malicious.class.php');

$output = new Malicious();

$output-data = 'changed';

header('Content-type: text/plain');
echo serialize($output);


Outputs:
O:9:Malicious:1:{s:4:data;s:7:changed;}

---

in_withmalice.php

?php
require_once('Malicious.class.php');

$output =
unserialize(file_get_contents('http://localhost/pstest/out.php'));

header('Content-type: text/plain');
print_r($output);


Outputs:
Hello world, I'm Evil!

---

in_withoutmalice.php
?php
$output =
unserialize(file_get_contents('http://localhost/pstest/out.php'));

header('Content-type: text/plain');
print_r($output);


Outputs:
__PHP_Incomplete_Class Object
(
[__PHP_Incomplete_Class_Name] = Malicious
[data] = changed
)



Now I agree with your basic intuition. Any data that gets passed to an
application from an external source should never be completely trusted,
whether it's a Web service, a form, or something else. Still, I doubt
that consuming PHP serializations is fundamentally unsafe.

- David

---
David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
Tim Spalding
Sent: Tuesday, December 30, 2008 11:05 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Mime type for PHP serialized objects


Don't you think that's rather dangerous? PHP serialization can include
objects, and it calls wakeup() on the object if that exists after
unserialization. In theory that could do almost anything, right?

Tim

On Tue, Dec 30, 2008 at 1:55 PM, Cloutman, David
dclout...@co.marin.ca.us wrote:
 I have a quick question for any PHP developers out there.

 I am writing a SOA application to manage my library's events calendar.
 The basic idea is to create a public API that our web site or other
 community organizations can use to query and consume information. I am
 using JSON as the default output for information, but would like to
add
 the option of outputting native serialized PHP data structures as
 created by the serialized() function.

 My question is, what mime type should I use for serialized PHP data?
The
 best suggestion I saw through Google was
application/vnd.php.serialized,
 which was posted as a proposal. I don't know if any standard was
adopted
 though. Has anyone else thought about this issue?

 - David



 ---
 David Cloutman dclout...@co.marin.ca.us
 Electronic Services Librarian
 Marin County Free Library

 Email Disclaimer:
http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm




-- 
Check out my library at http://www.librarything.com/profile/timspalding


Re: [CODE4LIB] Logo next step

2008-11-21 Thread Cloutman, David
Roy,

I'd be happy to look at your drafts and offer feedback. I've worked a
lot with designers in the past, so I can help steer the document so that
it is helpful to the designer, and insure the process goes smoothly. I
wish I could take on a more active role, but I'm already involved in a
pro-bono Web site project that is taking up my volunteer time.

- David


---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Roy Tennant
Sent: Thursday, November 20, 2008 6:46 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Logo next step


Having brought up the question of a Code4Lib logo, and then forcing not
one,
but two, votes on you all I realize I have been remiss in not taking the
next step. If I didn't know any better, I would think that I've been
distracted recently by, uh, some sort of public relations disaster or
something. But anyway, I digress.

A month ago, at the end of the second vote[1] that determined we would
work
with Stephanie Brinley, I called for volunteers to work on an ad hoc
task
force to shepherd the process. As Leslie Johnston said at one point The
key
to working with a professional is in identifying the design program 
what
the organization's story is, who its community is, and who you want to
get
your message to with the branding, as well as identifying what uses the
logo
will be used for  print, promotional items (t-shirts, hats, temporary
tatoos, whatever), online  which has on effect on the deliverables,
e.g.
file sizes and formats. David Cloutman also talked about developing a
requirements document that could be vetted on the list.

I suggest drafting something of no more than one page in length to
provide
such background and guidance. I and whomever wishes to join me will
draft
it, post it to the list for wider feedback, revise it based on that
feedback, and contact Stephanie. I will begin this now, so if you want
to be
involved please let me know. Thanks,
Roy


[1] http://dilettantes.code4lib.org/voting_booth/election/results/6

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Re: [CODE4LIB] PHP Frameworks

2008-10-27 Thread Cloutman, David
I interviewed at a company a while back that had four developers on
staff that was using the Zend Framework coupled with the Yahoo! UI
library. They seemed happy with their technology stack. I think their
choice was driven mostly by corporate backing and name recognition of
these two platforms. I have not used either personally.

Also take a look at Symfony. I went to a meetup a while back, and was
impressed by how this framework offered a complete technology stack
while retaining modularity, so if you didn't like the default
components, you could easily swap them for something else. This sort of
framework modularization seems to work in the Java world, where a single
application might integrate bits and pieces of Spring, Hibernate,
Struts, etc. Personally, I prefer this paradigm to something like Rails
(or Cake PHP, to put it in a PHP context), where you pretty have to do
it one way - or else. At least that's been my perception playing with
Rails and Cake PHP. Your mileage may vary, however. I don't know where
Zend falls into this spectrum.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Susan Teague Rector
Sent: Monday, October 27, 2008 1:51 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] PHP Frameworks


Hi All,

We're exploring Zend as a framework for php based Web applications. I'm 
curious to see if anyone out there is using this framework (or another 
MVC framework). Also, I wondering how many full-time developers you have

on staff programming.

Thanks in advance!

-- 
Susan Teague Rector
Web Applications Manager
Library Information Systems, VCU Libraries
804.827.3554 | [EMAIL PROTECTED]

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Re: [CODE4LIB] eXtensible Catalog - New Website

2008-10-17 Thread Cloutman, David
Same for me on FF3. Also, the same error on IE 7 and Safari 3 for
Windows. All browsers are identified as IE 6.

Windows XP SP 2.





---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Mark A. Matienzo
Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 1:11 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] eXtensible Catalog - New Website


I'm using Firefox 3 on OS X and the project's website is claiming I'm
using IE 6 on Windows XP and thus not letting me access the site. Fix
this, please?

Mark Matienzo
Applications Developer, Digital Experience Group
The New York Public Library

On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 10:31 AM, Dibelius, Steven
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 ***Cross-posted; apologies for duplication***



 The eXtensible Catalog Project is pleased to announce that we have
 launched our new website at http://www.extensiblecatalog.org/.  This
new
 website will be the main vehicle for distributing our open-source
 software once it is released in 2009.  In the mean time, the website
 contains a wealth of information regarding the project, including
 publications, an overview of the software we are developing and the
 technologies that software will use, and a blog that has already been
in
 use.



 The eXtensible Catalog (XC) Project is working to design and develop a
 set of open-source applications that will provide libraries with an
 alternative way to reveal their collections to library users. XC will
 provide easy access to all resources (both digital and physical
 collections) across a variety of databases, metadata schemas and
 standards, and will enable library content to be revealed through
other
 services that libraries may already be using, such as content
management
 systems and learning management systems. XC will also make library
 collections more web-accessible by revealing them through web search
 engines.



 Since XC software will be open source, it will be available for
download
 at no cost. Libraries will be able to adopt, customize and extend the
 software to meet local needs. In addition, a not-for-profit
organization
 will be formed to provide the infrastructure to incorporate community
 contributions to the code base, encourage collaboration, and provide
 maintenance and upgrades.



 The project is hosted at the University of Rochester and funded
through
 a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholarly
 Communications Program as well as through significant contributions
from
 and in collaboration with XC partner institutions.  The project is in
a
 design and development phase until July 2009, at which point the
 software will be released under an open-source license.





 Steven Dibelius

 Deployment Engineer, eXtensible Catalog Project

 University of Rochester

 [EMAIL PROTECTED]


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Re: [CODE4LIB] NAF notification service from OCLC

2008-10-13 Thread Cloutman, David
There is a surprisingly high correlation, when I look at job listings,
between companies that describe themselves as Web 2.0 and job
descriptions demanding that candidates bring experience scaling
applications to the table. My suspicion is that Web 2.0 has become a
euphemism for haphazard design processes, and now all these
organizations who threw together these applications and freaking out.
Not that I am bashing agile development, or promoting a particular
development process such as the rather clunky unified model, but when I
read move in a Web 2.0 speed, I get nervous about how unrealistic
expectations are being set in the software industry, and what sort of
problems we may be looking at in the future due to a lack of planning
systems that are actually scalable and maintainable.

Sorry for the rant, but this just pushes my curmudgeon button.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Ziso, Ya'aqov
Sent: Monday, October 13, 2008 7:44 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] NAF notification service from OCLC


Roy, 

OCLC gets the weekly NAF updates, can simply run a grep command to
extract the 010 fields to a new file, and put the new file in a place
available for OCLC members' retrieval. Explaining why OCLC needs to take
2 years for considering their competing priorities with those of their
partners doesn't help much as we move in a Web 2.0 speed. Unless this
proposal can be fulfilled, respectfully, let's agree to disagree on
this, and move on.

Ya'aqov



-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries on behalf of Roy Tennant
Sent: Mon 10/13/2008 10:13 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] NAF notification service from OCLC
 
Ya'aqov, 
The answer is not no, it is exactly as Karen described. Since you
interpret this as no, I wonder if you have a less than complete grasp
on
what it takes to develop an ongoing production service upon which you
can
rely. Also, I hope you can appreciate that we have many competing
priorities
that we cannot simply ignore in order to respond to a new service idea.
As
most institutions do, we have a procedure for weighing development
priorities and making strategic decisions that we cannot simply throw
aside
upon a whim. Lastly, part of what we would be required to do is to work
with
the Library of Congress as the producer of the data before we could
create
such a service. Thank you for allowing me to further explain why we
cannot
simply implement your proposal.
Roy 


On 10/12/08 10/12/08 . 11:39 AM, Ya'aqov Ziso [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 suggestion to our list of potential new services and enhancements
for
 consideration in our next round of planning for development in fiscal
year
 2010.
 
 Roy, Karen, 
  The deferment suggested by your reply leaves out CODE4LIB's core
offer,
 to engage timely technologies for the libraries available currently,
in the
 pace of Web 2.0. It seems OCLC has yet to find  way to cope with the
pace of
 such offers. If there were two ways of saying No to our NAF update
 notification request from OCLC, I guess you opted for the second.
 Legitimately and respectfully I take this as a No.
 Regards, 
 Ya'aqov Ziso, 
 
  
 
 On 10/11/08 5:48 PM, Roy Tennant [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
 Forwarded by permission.
 Roy
 
 On 10/10/08 10/10/08 . 2:57 PM, Calhoun,Karen [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:
 
 Dear Ya'aqov Ziso,
 
 Your email request/proposal of 4 October 2008 to Roy Tennant (My
proposal
 to
 you is that OCLC will start offering a NEW service to its
 members/subscribers.
 That service will be a simple listing of the 010 fields for Name
authority
 records that have been CHANGED that week in the OCLC NAF, and 010
for the
 new
 Name authority records for that have been ADDED to NAF.) has been
referred
 by
 OCLC Research to the OCLC Metadata Services product group for
consideration.
 
 We are pleased to receive your suggestion for a new service. We will
add
 this
 suggestion to our list of potential new services and enhancements
for
 consideration in our next round of planning for development in
fiscal year
 2010.  
 
 Thank you for sharing your ideas with us.
 
 Karen 
 
 Karen Calhoun 
 Vice President, WorldCat and Metadata Services
 6565 Kilgour Place
 Dublin OH 43017
 800-848-5878 x6441
 614-764-6441 
 FAX: 614-718-7457
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 
 
 
 On 10/4/08 10/4/08 . 2:02 PM, Ya'aqov Ziso [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
 The following message has been posted also in ACAT
 ===
 Roy,

 Kindest thanks for providing language in-between systems
engineers such
 as CODE4LIB and bibliographic control librarians such as ACAT
 ( http://techessence.info/tech/ ). The premise of my appeal to you
was that
 you also represent OCLC Programs  Research when contributing to
CODE4LIB
 and ACAT.
 
 1. CODE4LIB expressed interest in obtaining a copy of 

Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo?

2008-09-29 Thread Cloutman, David
2-3 colors max++



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
[Amanda Hartman]
Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 1:45 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo?


Before hiring a professional, I suggest we tap into our own resources
first. I personally have designed several logos for companies and
websites (in some cases I was even paid!), but am by no means
professionally trained, nor do I consider myself a professional graphic
designer.  I would bet that there are others in this community that are
similarly talented, or have similarly talented students/colleagues. If
one person would be interested in taking submissions and putting them on
a webpage to tally votes, we could all have a say. 

If this route proves unsuccessful, then hiring a professional would
certainly be an option.  

Either way, there should be a few guidelines predetermined (to make
things easier for everyone involved) such as file format and size.  I
typically suggest logos be 2 or 3 colors max, not including negative
space.  Since I'm new to the community, are there any colors/fonts that
are used/preferred, or is this branding a grounds-up sort of operation?
:)

Amanda

__
Amanda Hartman, MLIS, Digital Services Librarian
J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College
1651 East Parham Road
Parham Campus Library, Richmond VA 23228
Phone: (804) 523-5226
Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Website: www.amandahartman.com


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Karen Schneider
Sent: Sunday, September 21, 2008 7:32 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo?

I agree on the need for branding, and on offering the community several
professionally-developed choices.

I worded that carefully. I'd like to see a professionally-designed logo
for
the same reason I like to watch good software developers at work: the
quality of effort doth pleaseth the citizens. I'd like to see Code4Lib
to
have a logo that reflects the quality of the people associated with its
loose sovereignty. Branding means a lot, and it tells many stories.

Without waxing prolix about those stories (though I'll be happy to do
that
if anyone's interested in further justification for my argument), I'll
move
on to say a little room for bubble-up efforts would also be apropos. You
never know who's out there or what they are possible of. (Oh Brad, you
guys
can't write an *ILS.*)

My take would be that if we have the resources, to offer the community
several choices from an entity whose business it is to design logos, yet
encourage write-ins.

-- 
| Karen G. Schneider
| Community Librarian
| Equinox Software Inc. The Evergreen Experts
| Toll-free: 1.877.Open.ILS (1.877.673.6457) x712
| E-Mail/AIM: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
| Web: http://www.esilibrary.com


On Sat, Sep 20, 2008 at 12:04 AM, Edward M. Corrado
[EMAIL PROTECTED]wrote:

 I am all for a logo, but I also agree with Kevin it needs to be a
community
 based decision. I'm also not sold that we need a professional designed
 logo,
 but I'm not against it either. I can understand why a business would
not
 want to leave it to amateurs (although I have seen some great logos
created
 by design school students) but I'm not sure what a professional logo
would
 give us that a community derived one wouldn't. Roy, what do you think
that
 would be that would gain by using a professional logo company?

 Edward - actually wearing a code4lib conference t-shirt right now




 On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 11:48 PM, Carol Bean [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

  Well, looking at Software Freedom Day, which has somehow managed to
get
  itself a logo with virtually no organizational infrastructure, I
don't
 see
  why Code4Lib shouldn't.  I suspect their logo design wasn't done by
  amateurs, however, even if they were volunteers.  Of course they
have a
 much
  larger, global base of  volunteers...
 
  I think it's a cool idea.
 
  Carol
 
 
 
 
  On Sep 19, 2008, at 11:39 PM, Kevin S. Clarke wrote:
 
   I like the idea.  A real logo would be nice.  My one caveat is I'd
  still like everyone who'd like to have a voice to have one (I like
  voting).  I'd be less in favor of a committee of volunteers to make
  the decision.  I don't know how that would work with a professional
  graphic designer though.  Could they give us several options and
open
  it up to a vote?
 
  Kevin
 
 
 
  On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 11:29 PM, Roy Tennant [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 wrote:
 
  I was in the middle of writing a blog post about Code4Lib going
 regional
  when it hit me -- here we have this incredibly successful brand
and yet
  we
  lack a t-shirt. But I guess we lack a t-shirt because we lack a
logo to
  put
  on it. The closest we get are the items that decorate our web
site. Are
  we
  at the point where we're ready to establish an official graphic
 identity,
  

Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo

2008-09-29 Thread Cloutman, David
In my experience, good brands accurately represent the organizational
nature of the entities they represent. IMHO, as disorganized as humanly
possible, isn't such a bad place to start. :)



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Kevin S. Clarke
Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 1:52 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo


On Tue, Sep 23, 2008 at 10:09 AM, Thomas Dowling [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

 How about trademark ownership and permissions for any logo?  I'd hate
to
 see any conflict or misunderstanding down the road about who can put
the
 logo on what, who can sell t-shirts with it, etc.

Good questions.  I might lean towards what Wally said though about
this getting a little too organized/corporate if we go that route.
I'd like a nice logo because... well... oooh shiny!  I'm not that
interested in it for branding purposes though.  I'd like the main body
of code4lib to remain as disorganized as humanly possible (though I
think it's fine for all the code4lib projects (the conference,
journal, planet, etc.) to organize themselves as much as they
like/need).

My 2 cents...

Kevin

-- 
There are two kinds of people in the world: those who believe there
are two kinds of people and those who know better.

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Logo vote

2008-09-26 Thread Cloutman, David
I think we should vote on the options you outlined below. It seems like
a fair and reasonable way for the community to select a process.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Roy Tennant
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2008 10:53 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Logo vote


The logo voting seems to have died down at 109 votes cast, and it breaks
down like this (you can see these results at
http://www.micropoll.com/akira/mpresult/479444-107406):

No logo: 8%
Do it ourselves: 8%
Combo of professional designer and ourselves: 26%
Don't care: 27%
Professional designer: 31%

Since there was no clear majority, I think we should have a run-off
between
the combo option and only a professional designer.

But I think the options should be more clearly stated than they were
before
(sorry!):

Combo Option:
One person would receive all the designs from both internal designers
and
any professional designers willing to submit designs for free, and they
are
put up for a vote without anyone knowing who did which design.

Professional Option 1:
We accept Stephanie Brinley's kind offer, request a few different ideas,
vote on those ideas to settle on one, and the final version is created
from
the winning idea.

Professional Option 2:
Hire a different professional designer (to be determined) from whom we
solicit a few different ideas, vote on the ideas, and the final version
is
created from the winning idea.

Yes, consensus is tedious. Competing ideas, objections, embellishments
welcome. Otherwise, I'll set up another vote on the three options above
and
the one with the most votes takes it.
Roy

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo?

2008-09-22 Thread Cloutman, David
I've done a lot of work with designers over the years, and I wouldn't be
surprised if a number of us work with professional designers from time
to time. It may be possible to get a designer to provide some concepts
as a volunteer, particularly since it might prove to be a great foot in
the door for getting contracts. 

Regardless, logos are tricky things to design, and almost always turn
out better when done by a seasoned pro. I would strongly recommend
finding someone to do it professionally. I certainly have people I could
ask. I don't think we are limited to choosing a single designer to
develop concepts, if we use volunteers.

As for process, we'd probably want a committee to create a requirements
document and sort and compile feedback, but use voting to choose
concepts. This would balance the need for the entire community to have a
voice, with the designer's need to get balanced and consistent feedback
in the revision process.

I think a good process would go something like this:

1. Put out an open invitation for interested list members to serve on a
logo design committee. Committee members can expect to make a 1 year
commitment. 
2. Committee selects a project manager from members. This person serves
as a point of contact for designers, and makes sure other committee
members are on task.
3. Committee develops a brief requirements document for the logo, and
submits it to the list for feedback.
4. Committee takes community feedback and revises requirements document.
5. Committee openly solicits designers to submit concepts and posts
requirements document. Sets a deadline for submission of concept(s).
6. Put all concepts up for an initial vote by the list.
7. Take top three concecepts from initial vote, and have a runoff vote.
The concept with the most votes is selected.
8. List members are given an opportunity to comment on the submitted
design concept.
9. Committee members review comments from community and reconcile
feedback.
10. Project manager develops feedback document for designer.
11. Designer revises concept.
12. Committee reviews revision for conformance to revision documents,
submits new revision document.
13. Deign is revised again.
14. Possibly one more round of review and revision.
15. Design is finalized.
16. Final artwork is delivered in a industry-standard, vector-based
format, such as EPS.

I would suggest that if we spend money on this, that we provide a
stipend to the designer who's design is selected to help cover the
expense and tediousness of the revision process.

- David



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Ed Summers
Sent: Sunday, September 21, 2008 8:41 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo?


How about we allow anyone to submit ideas, and use some of the $$ like
Roy suggested to get a professional one from someone--and then we vote
on all of them? I nominate Roy for coordinating the pro-design, and
the vote :-)

//Ed

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Calendar Data Exchange

2008-09-18 Thread Cloutman, David
Thanks. Again, we're not looking so much for an application, but a
_format_ that we can publish from our existing CMS in such a way that we
could reasonably expect other organizations to import into their
systems. Because it is likely that some of our community partners will
need to create the importing capability, I need the format to be well
documented and easy to build software for. I would prefer something XML
based because one can almost always write some XSLT to turn the data
into something that can work with their system, regardless of target
software or programming language.

What about xCal (iCalendar based XML format)? Does anyone use this
technology? It is possible to do it with Atom Feeds? Other ideas?



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
John Fereira
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2008 4:04 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Calendar Data Exchange


Miriam Goldberg wrote:
 I'd go with icalendar. It plays nicely with most major calendar
applications.
 
 also, at the risk of sounding like a shill, I'm helping develop a web
 app (www.fusecal.com) that'll make it easier for web publishers to get
 their calendar information into users personal calendars and keep the
 information up to date as the calendar changes.

I'd also take a look at Bedework (http://www.bedework.org)

The problem that I have with Calendar systems is not technical but a 
social issue.  We've got several calendar systems at our campus, but 
other than the Oracle Calendar system that is used to schedule meetings 
I don't use them.

The problem is that, in the case of events, while the person responsible

to announcing the event might put it into a calendar, they also try to 
advertise the event as far and wide as possible so they post a notice to

all of the relevant mailing lists that they can think of.  Since I'm on 
a lot of mailing lists, I might get 5-6 copies of an announcement of an 
event I have no desire in attending, then get reminders on those same 
list a few days prior to the event.  Then there may be someone reading a

mailing list, see the announcement and think that it should be forwarded

to another mailing list they read (which I'm also on) so I get more 
copies of the event announcement in my email inbox.   Unless it's 
mandated by an institution that events and other calendar related 
announcements should *only* go on the institutional calendaring system 
and not be distributed on mailing lists there really is no point in 
consuming calendar events from the calendaring system if I'm just going 
to get them pushed into my email inbox anyway.

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[CODE4LIB] Calendar Data Exchange

2008-09-17 Thread Cloutman, David
Does anyone have a recommend standard XML format for the exchange of
calendar information, preferably something with a W3C standard? We want
to be able to publish data from our content management system in a
format that other calendars in our community could scoop up.

Thanks,

- David



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


Re: [CODE4LIB] Solr for Internal Searching

2008-08-06 Thread Cloutman, David
I think for my purposes, which it to index our processes and procedures
manual and eventually our new 100 page web site, a search appliance is
overkill. I'm going to try both Nutch and Swish-e, and see which works
better. They both seem like perfectly suitable options for my needs.
Actually, both programs suggested probably could do our entire County's
intranet to be quite honest. It might be worth setting up an index for
that as well. :)

Anyhow, thanks for the guidance, everyone. 

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Nate Vack
Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2008 8:25 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Solr for Internal Searching


I know this is code4lib, not buystuff4lib, but the Google Mini is
reputed to be rather quick, bulletproof and configurable, and starts
at $3k. For example, it works nicely with lots of file formats
(including Office documents) out of the box. And works with LDAP and
NTLM for authentication and authorization.

I suspect it'll probably be challenging to deliver a quality search
solution for a lower total cost.

Of course, this all depends on what your intranet looks like on the
inside. I've seen 'intranet' mean a things that would call for wildly
different search solutions.

So... solr is great, but this question doesn't contain nearly enough
information to answer whether it's a good fit for your task at hand.

Cheers
-Nate

On Tue, Aug 5, 2008 at 6:03 PM, Cloutman, David
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Today my boss asked me to come up with a solution that would let us
 index and search our intranet. I was already thinking of using Solr on
 our public Web site we are building, and thought this might be a good
 opportunity to knock two items off the to-do list with the same
 technology. I know there was a preconference session on Solr this
year,
 and I have the sense that this is gaining traction in the library
 community. Is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?

 Thanks,

 - David



 ---
 David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Electronic Services Librarian
 Marin County Free Library

 Email Disclaimer:
http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm



[CODE4LIB] Solr for Internal Searching

2008-08-05 Thread Cloutman, David
Today my boss asked me to come up with a solution that would let us
index and search our intranet. I was already thinking of using Solr on
our public Web site we are building, and thought this might be a good
opportunity to knock two items off the to-do list with the same
technology. I know there was a preconference session on Solr this year,
and I have the sense that this is gaining traction in the library
community. Is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?

Thanks,

- David



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


Re: [CODE4LIB] what's friendlier less powerful than phpMyAdmin?

2008-07-30 Thread Cloutman, David
This is why most Web applications have to implement CRUD interfaces. PHP is 
definitely for the uninitiated.

Along the lines of CodeIgnitor, I would suggest using another framework 
Symfony. It's a very powerful, yet easy to learn framework, and it will 
autogenerate the CRUD for you. Really, some framework is probably the way to go 
for this, regardless of which you choose.

- David

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries on behalf of Ken Irwin
Sent: Wed 7/30/2008 6:35 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] what's friendlier  less powerful than phpMyAdmin?
 
Hi folks,

I have some straightforward MySQL data tables that I would like to be 
editable by some of my less-techy colleagues. I tend to think of 
phpMyAdmin as a perfectly serviceable and reasonably interface for 
updating database tables, but I'm told that it's kind of intimidating to 
the uninitiated.

Are there alternatives that are meant for non-admin-types? I'd want 
something with read/write permissions, but that could be targeted at 
just a few tables, wouldn't have any of the more potent tools (drop, 
empty, etc.). In the ideal world, I might like something that would 
prevent users from doing things like accidentally changing primary key 
data and things like that.

I've thought about writing something, but I suspect that would be 
reinventing the wheel. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Ken

-- 
Ken Irwin
Reference Librarian
Thomas Library, Wittenberg University


Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


Re: [CODE4LIB] what's friendlier less powerful than phpMyAdmin?

2008-07-30 Thread Cloutman, David
Perhaps you should put together some MySQL training materials for
librarians. A webinar, perhaps. I'd love it if my colleagues had those
skills. I don't think there is that much interest, but I could be wrong.
There are at least 101 ways enterprise level database skills could be
put to work in my library. I'm pretty sick of our core technical
solutions being Excel spreadsheets and the occasional Access database.
Blech. 

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Tim Spalding
Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2008 8:49 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] what's friendlier  less powerful than
phpMyAdmin?


That reminds me of a better idea. Let's keep a real understanding of
computers from less-techy colleagues at the library. That way no
messy learning or understanding will take place, and we'll always be
needed.

Then we could start wearing white colors...

T

On Wed, Jul 30, 2008 at 11:43 AM, Alex Dolski [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:
 That reminds me of an idea for a photo sharing website I had,
tentatively
 called LeftOutrJoinr. It would be like Flickr, but instead of pictures
 everywhere, visitors would be given a command line into which they
would be
 able to enter their own SQL queries to call up photos to appear on the
page
 via AJAX. I see it becoming quite popular among 3-5 people.

 Alex


 Tim Spalding wrote:

 I'd consider teaching them how to use SQL directly.

 I've done it at LibraryThing. I take employees from the simplest
 SELECTs all the way to a people-who-have-X-also-have-Y self-join in
 one long hands-on lesson. It doubles as a sort of test, and I've even
 used it in hiring. LibraryThing's two full-time librarians got there
 with flying colors; I've had programmers who stumbled. (Not
 surprisingly they didn't work out.) Once someone understands SQL
 itself, you can throw a helper, like PMA, at them too.

 I think there's a real opportunity for empowerment here. Teach a man
 to SELECT and he'll never have to, um, fish again.

 Tim

 On Wed, Jul 30, 2008 at 9:58 AM, Tim McGeary [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I use Webmin.  http://www.webmin.com/
 It gives me a GUI for all of my vital sysadmin needs that I can't
 remember
 how to do at the shell.

 It has a MySQL GUI interface that works very well.  And you can
setup
 user
 accounts to have access to certain parts of Webmin, like just MySQL.

 Easy RPM install, and inside Webmin is an app to upgrade itself.
Can
 also
 install Perl modules, edit your php.ini file, etc.

 Cheers,
 Tim

 Tim McGeary
 Senior Systems Specialist
 Lehigh University
 610-758-4998
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Google Talk: timmcgeary
 Yahoo IM: timmcgeary

 Ken Irwin wrote:

 Hi folks,

 I have some straightforward MySQL data tables that I would like to
be
 editable by some of my less-techy colleagues. I tend to think of
 phpMyAdmin
 as a perfectly serviceable and reasonably interface for updating
 database
 tables, but I'm told that it's kind of intimidating to the
uninitiated.

 Are there alternatives that are meant for non-admin-types? I'd want
 something with read/write permissions, but that could be targeted
at
 just a
 few tables, wouldn't have any of the more potent tools (drop,
empty,
 etc.).
 In the ideal world, I might like something that would prevent users
from
 doing things like accidentally changing primary key data and things
like
 that.

 I've thought about writing something, but I suspect that would be
 reinventing the wheel. Any ideas?

 Thanks,
 Ken






 --
 Alex A. Dolski
 Web  Digitization Application Developer
 Lied Library, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 457041
 Las Vegas, NV 89154-7041
 (702) 895-2225 (phone) / (702) 895-2280 (fax)




-- 
Check out my library at http://www.librarything.com/profile/timspalding

Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


[CODE4LIB]

2008-07-26 Thread Cloutman, David
Thanks for looking at my code and giving some suggestions. I'll try them out on 
Monday.

Thanks again! I really appreciate it.

- David


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries on behalf of Ethan Gruber
Sent: Fri 7/25/2008 7:05 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB]
 
Hi David,

Firstly, it looks fine in Firefox 3 in Linux, but that's to be expected
since Firefox is platform independent.  Unfortunately, I can't view the site
in IE, but I have an idea that *might* work.  I have often had problems with
the placement of a collection of sibling divs that are floating inside of a
div that does not have its display style explicitly declared.  You might try
giving div #contentContainer a style of display:table.  If that doesn't
work, try giving the two divs below #contentContainer and above
.contentColumn display:table.  If that doesn't work, I can't think of
anything else off of the top of my head without seeing a screenshot of the
problem you are describing.

Hope this helps,
Ethan

On Fri, Jul 25, 2008 at 9:24 PM, Cloutman, David
[EMAIL PROTECTED]wrote:

 I have a classic IE CSS rendering issue. The home page that I am
 building for my library will have a content area that is laid out in
 five columns, each a div tag with another div tag nested inside to
 control spacing (which gets around another IE bug). What I have renders
 fine on Windows XP installations of Firefox 2, Safari 3 and Opera 9.24,
 but IE 7 will not allow these div tags to inherit the background of
 their container, and does something strange with the drop shadow effect
 on the right hand side. (I haven't tested IE6 or non Windows systems
 yet.) Has anyone seen this bug before, and are there workarounds? I
 can't seem to find anything in my research.

 http://frenzy.marinlibrary.org/prototype/

 - David

 ---
 David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Electronic Services Librarian
 Marin County Free Library

 Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm



[CODE4LIB]

2008-07-25 Thread Cloutman, David
I have a classic IE CSS rendering issue. The home page that I am
building for my library will have a content area that is laid out in
five columns, each a div tag with another div tag nested inside to
control spacing (which gets around another IE bug). What I have renders
fine on Windows XP installations of Firefox 2, Safari 3 and Opera 9.24,
but IE 7 will not allow these div tags to inherit the background of
their container, and does something strange with the drop shadow effect
on the right hand side. (I haven't tested IE6 or non Windows systems
yet.) Has anyone seen this bug before, and are there workarounds? I
can't seem to find anything in my research.

http://frenzy.marinlibrary.org/prototype/

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Digital Collections management software

2008-07-17 Thread Cloutman, David
Our public library has a local history archive, and they are using a
Content DM instance to implement their digital collection. They are
happy with it. Currently they're running on a WAMP setup. Though I'd
like that to change to Linux, Windows seems to work as a development
environment, and from lurking on the Content DM listserv for a few
weeks, it seems that it works cross-platform, though some of the Un*x
neophytes seemed to have difficulties configuring the LAMP stack.

- David



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Edward Iglesias
Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2008 9:41 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Digital Collections management software


Hello Harish,

I second Tim's enthusiastic endorsement.  We are very pleased with it.
Support is very good and it runs with no problem on linux.  We got it to
host our veterans history project which is a collection of video
interviews
so it is quite versatile.

http://content.library.ccsu.edu/



~
Edward Iglesias
Systems Librarian
Central Connecticut State University



On Thu, Jul 17, 2008 at 12:25 PM, Tim McGeary [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Hi Harish,

 We use CONTENTdm to manage many of our Digital Library collections.
You
 can see them at http://digital.lib.lehigh.edu/

 The collections we have using CONTENTdm are mostly digitized
 books/monographs, but we also have illuminated manuscripts, hand
written
 letters, and other ephemeral.  We are nearly complete in archiving the
 entire student newspaper collection, which we hope to release late
fall.

 We used Greenstone, which is open source, for our first digital
project
 called Digital Bridges.  But we just re-released the project by
converting
 it to CONTENTdm.  Greenstone required much too much customization and
no
 sustainability, as we wanted to add more to this collection.

 The University of Utah and the Claremont Colleges both recently
developed
 their institution digital repositories with CONTENTdm.  I plan to
follow
 their lead with our IR on CONTENTdm this upcoming academic year.  I
believe
 it was the presenter at Utah that said paraphraseWhy create a
 technological hurdle trying to learn and shape Fedora or DSpace to our
needs
 when we already know CONTENTdm and have an open API that we are
comfortable
 with using./paraphrase

 Though CONTENTdm is proprietary, the cost is well worth it.  The API
is
 very open, the community is among the best user communities out there,
and
 the vendor (DiMeMa via OCLC) is very receptive and responsive to user
 concerns and enhancement suggestions.

 It has a very intuitive metadata interface, and is easy to administer
on
 the server side.  I never have to worry about it.

 I would HIGHLY recommend CONTENTdm.  Well worth the price!

 Cheers,
 Tim


 Tim McGeary
 Senior Systems Specialist
 Lehigh University
 610-758-4998
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Google Talk: timmcgeary
 Yahoo IM: timmcgeary


 Harish Maringanti wrote:

 Hi all,

 I've heard of Contentdm from OCLC that many institutions are using to
 manage
 their digital collections. If you are using Contentdm would you mind
 sharing
 some of the pros  cons of using it (either to the group or off the
list).

 Are there any other viable products either commercial or open source
that
 can be considered to manage digital collections. Particularly in the
open
 source domain are there any good applications to manage image
collections?

 Thanks in advance,
 Harish


 Harish Maringanti
 Systems Analyst
 K-State Libraries
 (785)532-3261




-- 
Edward Iglesias

Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


Re: [CODE4LIB] ssh tunneling through a mysql dsn

2008-06-25 Thread Cloutman, David
There was a quick recipe for doing key based SSH tunneling in the
January 2008 issue of Linux Journal.


---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Nate Vack
Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2008 8:21 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] ssh tunneling through a mysql dsn


On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 7:59 AM, Eric Lease Morgan [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:
 Is there anyway to support SSH tunneling through a MySQL DSN?

 I would like to open a database connection to remote host through
Perl's
 DBI. The remote database is MySQL, but the server hosting the database
does
 not allow outside connections. Instead the systems administrators
suggest
 first setting up a local SSH tunnel, and then making connections to
the
 host. Something this:

  $ ssh -T -L 3306:mysql.example.org:3306 [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  $ mysql -h mysql.example.org

 Alas, this option does not work for two reasons. First, I get prompted
for
 my username after the first command and my shell crashes. Second, and
more
 importantly, port 3306 is already in use on my local machine. The
whole
 thing seems weird anyway.

Yeah -- this is (probably) the way you want to do it, though. You'll
need to:

* Set up SSH keys such that building the tunnel doesn't prompt for a
password
* Run the local end of the tunnel on a free port
* Configure your local client to talk to the local end of the tunnel

Cheers,
-Nate

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Re: [CODE4LIB] ssh tunneling through a mysql dsn

2008-06-25 Thread Cloutman, David
In a Windows environment, SSH tunneling can also be accomplished by
installing OpenSSH via Cygwin. 

http://www.cygwin.com/



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library 

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Steve Oberg
Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2008 10:05 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] ssh tunneling through a mysql dsn


Not sure if I'm understanding Eric's original scenario correctly
but...This
setup of needing to support SSH tunneling through to an Oracle database
is
exactly what we have setup in my library using SecureCRT (
http://www.vandyke.com/products/securecrt/).  I think this software is
quite
useful and supports keys and all the rest ( Set up SSH keys such that
building the tunnel doesn't prompt for a password, * Run the local end
of
the tunnel on a free port, * Configure your local client to talk to the
local end of the tunnel).  This is an essential piece of our
infrastructure
and we have SecureCRT set up on servers as well as individual PCs to
ensure
secure transmission of information to sources outside our firewall.

Steve

On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 11:56 AM, Birkin James Diana
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

 On Jun 25, 2008, at 8:59 AM, Eric Lease Morgan wrote:

  Is there anyway to support SSH tunneling through a MySQL DSN?


 Not sure if this is exactly relevant, but I used to need to access a
remote
 mysql database not open to internet access, and came to love ssh
tunneling.
 Some notes:

 http://bspace.us/notes/entries/ssh-tunneling-notes/

 Also, for a different reason, I needed to handle passwordless logins.
This
 might be of some use:

 http://bspace.us/notes/entries/passwordless-logins/

 ---
 Birkin James Diana
 Programmer, Integrated Technology Services
 Brown University Library
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]


Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


Re: [CODE4LIB] Unix training options?

2008-06-13 Thread Cloutman, David
Hi Cindee,

Having a good understanding of Unix-like systems is a great skill to
have. I don't think that it is the sort of thing that you develop
overnight, or really pick up an a week or two of training.
Fundamentally, this class of operating systems has a pretty steep
learning curve, and there is a lot to know.

Note that I said operating systems. There is such a thing a Unix, but
mostly what we call Unix isn't the real thing, which was developed by
Bell Labs and is sold by SCO. In your case, you're probably running
Solaris, which is Sun's Un*x. There are also the BSD, Linux, OS X,
operating systems, which also fall into the same class.

All of these operating systems fall into the same family, and have
similar design concepts. However, they all have their own
eccentricities. Solaris is probably one of the hardest to work with. If
you are wanting to lean Oracle administration as well, that's a whole
separate topic.

Probably the best thing to do is get a book and play with the system
yourself. I like the Sams Teach Yourself Unix Administration in 24
Hours as a primer. The book is intentionally operating system neutral,
and focuses on teaching the basics. I think O'Reilly books are great,
but usually I read the O'Reilly book after I understand the basics.

You may be better off setting up a Linux machine and playing with that
first. I find the operating system a little more organized, and if you
mess up, you haven't destroyed a production machine at work. You'll find
that many things you learn working with Linux transfer over to Solaris,
though usually they are more difficult.

You may also find that your local community college offers courses on
the topic. Community colleges can be great places to pick up technical
skills if you get a good instructor, and a bargain in terms of training
costs.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Cindee Phillips
Sent: Friday, June 13, 2008 1:46 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Unix training options?


Hello all,

I realize this is a bit off-topic for this list, but I'm hoping someone
might have some advice or recommendations for me concerning Unix
training.

I moved from cataloging to our systems position two years ago. At the
time, we were on a maintenance contract with our ILS vendor, meaning I
only needed to do very basic things with the server (my job primarily
entailed running reports against our data and working with some other
locally developed Access applications.)

Last summer, we joined a consortium and migrated our catalog to their
servers, and would like to do something else now with the server we were
previously using for our ILS, probably along the lines of archiving
locally produced media on it.

But I obviously need more training.  It's a Sun box, running Oracle 9,
and I've looked at several companies that do short term classroom
training (i.e., www.learningtree.com ( http://www.learningtree.com/ )),
but I've also been considering online coursework, either by Sun
(http://www.sun.com/training/) or, perhaps O'Reilly
http://www.oreillyschool.com/.

I learn pretty well on my own (I figured out by myself most of the basic
Unix stuff in respect to copying and moving files, working with vi,
working with the crontab, etc.) but would want any course I sign up for
to have an instructor to ask questions of.

Does anyone have any experience with any of these programs they'd be
willing to share?

I'm sending this to several lists, so apologies for cross-posting.







Cindee Phillips
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Library Systems Administrator
Rolfing Library/Trinity International University
Deerfield, IL, 60015 / (847)317-4021

Email Disclaimer: http://www.co.marin.ca.us/nav/misc/EmailDisclaimer.cfm


Re: [CODE4LIB] Open Library API

2008-06-06 Thread Cloutman, David
That may very well have been the problem. Whatever it was, after I had fixed 
some other bugs, the json_encode function produced strings for hashes that 
worked perfectly well with the API. As is often the case, the problem was user 
error.


-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries on behalf of Posthumus, Etienne
Sent: Fri 6/6/2008 12:56 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Open Library API

David wrote:

The problem is that for the two programming languages I use, Java and
 PHP the variable name key~ and $key~ is illegal, and I believe that is
 the case for most programming languages. Thus, in this PHP class (an its
 Java analog) would fail at compile / parse time:
snip
 Note that
 $query = json_encode(array('key~'='\/about\/*'));

 will not be parsed through the API, and results in an error message.


Hi David

In the PHP example that you gave, try changing it to:

$query = json_encode(array('key~'='/about/*'));

The slashes in that string gets escaped by the JSON ecoder. If you already 
escape them before encoding, it gets double-escaped to look like this:
{key~:\\\/about\\\/*}
That is probably why you  got an error message from the API.

I don't think that this is an issue in almost all programming languages.  The 
point is that you don't want to name any variables 'key~' but this is just a 
string key in an associative array (or HashMap or dict whatever your 
programming language calls it).

regards,

Etienne Posthumus
TU Delft Library


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[CODE4LIB] Open Library API

2008-06-05 Thread Cloutman, David
Inspired by a thread on this list yesterday, I started playing with the
Open Library API. In order to query through the API, you must pass a
query as a JSON serialized object. That's good, and it could be great,
given that for Java and PHP (at least) there already exists the ability
to serialize a native data type into and out of JSON. The problem that
I'm noticing is that at least the querying process, the naming
conventions used by the API complicate this.

For instance, in order to do a pattern search of the key field, one
must pass the identifier of that field with a tilde (~) appended to that
field, so that a query would read like this:

{
key~: \/about\/*
}

The problem is that for the two programming languages I use, Java and
PHP the variable name key~ and $key~ is illegal, and I believe that is
the case for most programming languages. Thus, in this PHP class (an its
Java analog) would fail at compile / parse time:

class OpenLibraryQuery {
public $key~;

__construct ($keyValue) {
$this-key~ = $keyValue;
}
}

This is a problem, because ideally, I would like to be able to do
essentially this:

$query = json_encode(new OpenLibraryQuery('\/about\/*');

which, if the above class did parse, would automatically assign $query a
valid JSON string, similar to what is above. Instead, I either have to
rename my variable, or use string manipulation to make the string work.
Note that

$query = json_encode(array('key~'='\/about\/*'));

will not be parsed through the API, and results in an error message.

This leaves me with three questions:

1. Is there an easy way around this, other than string manipulation,
that I am missing? Does the solution work for most or all programming
languages?

2. Does this strike readers as a significant enough issue to raise with
the API developers?

3. Given that Open Library runs on Infogami and has other dependencies,
does this strike readers as something that can be remedied?


- David


---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

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[CODE4LIB] Sorry

2008-06-05 Thread Cloutman, David
Disregard my last post. I replied to the wrong email.



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Jonathan Rochkind
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2008 3:16 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] refworks developer documentation?


Does anyone know where, if anywhere, I find documentation on the ways to
send references to RefWorks for importing?

Not having any luck on their website. I know I've seen it before
though.  I remember there were a variety of formats and methods you
could send things to RefWorks for an import. Must be documentation
somewhere?  I bet some code4libber has done this before.

Jonathan

--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886
rochkind (at) jhu.edu

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Re: [CODE4LIB] planet.code4lib.org -- 3 suggestions

2008-05-28 Thread Cloutman, David
mlsSnobbery--
johnathanRochkind++



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Jonathan Rochkind
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2008 11:14 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] planet.code4lib.org -- 3 suggestions


The Code4Lib community has from the start never ever been concerned
about who has credentials as a librarian, and as far as most of us are
concerned never will be.   We are a community of people who write code
and deal with technology for the library sector, we don't care about
what degrees you have. As far as I'm concerned anyway.

Jonathan

John Fereira wrote:
 Alexander Johannesen wrote:
 On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 5:06 PM, K.G. Schneider
 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I feel self-conscious about seeing posts reflected in the planet
that
 are not related to library technology, only because I'm not willing
to
 break up my blog into sub-blogs and don't know if oysters and pace
 layering really go together for the planet.


 Ouch, I suspect a conversation next about what fits the code4lib
 planet moniker. Does my technology rants that don't bash MARC fit?
 Does Topic Maps fit, even if libraries don't use them but they are a
 perfect fit? Posts about philosophical aspects of the code we make?
Or
 the epistemological musings of workflows? Lest not forget that the
 human aspect of the library profession is what makes librarians so
 great ...

 How about posts from someone that works in and writes code for a
library
 (for the past 11 years) but is not a librarian.


--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886
rochkind (at) jhu.edu

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Re: [CODE4LIB] IM For Reference Desk

2008-04-30 Thread Cloutman, David
I briefly looked into Meebo for our site and decided against it. I
didn't like the idea of our chat sessions being bounced to and possibly
logged on a third party server. At least in our context as a public
library, reference interviews should be treated as confidential by
default, and chat records should be destroyed as regularly as
practicable. I don't feel comfortable trusting a black box service with
our patron's privacy. I know a lot of libraries use this service, but I
don't agree with the practice.

I haven't had an opportunity to finish it, but the solution I am
developing uses an open source AJAX widget called PHPFreeChat. The
current release is 1.1, and it will run off the standard LAMP stack,
without the need for additional server software. I use cron jobs to
clear the chat logs daily. I think this may be a viable, in house
solution. It would specifically solve the security issue raised in the
initial message.

http://www.phpfreechat.net/

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Gavin Spomer
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 10:21 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] IM For Reference Desk


Hello everyone,

Our reference staff has decided that they want to keep up with the
Jones' and enable our university students to contact the reference desk
via a chat interface.

After a bit o research I decided to go with Meebo, specifically MeeboMe.
I've also decided that I want to run it through ezproxy because of two
benefits. First, this will reduce access to MeeboMe to our university
students/staff. Second, if legitimate university students/staff abuse
the service, they can be identified and dealt with by looking them up in
the ezproxy log.

But it's still not air-tight because a legitimate student/staff can just
copy the embedded MeeboMe widget from the html source and put it on
another web page. Chances are small that this would happen, (or are
they?) but like any decent sys admin I don't like to take chances.

Is anyone else on the list implementing some sort of IM at their library
and if so, how are you going about implementing this?

Gavin Spomer
Systems Programmer
Brooks Library
Central Washington University

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Re: [CODE4LIB] Serials Solutions API and NDA

2008-04-23 Thread Cloutman, David
To me, his reply seemed like it contained a lot of verbal gymnastics. I
don't see how you can simultaneously require a client to not disclose
the functionality of an API, yet allow the client to publish code that
utilizes the API. By publishing the code, you are giving examples of the
API's usage and functionality. It also made me wonder to what extent a
developer would be limited in documenting their code. Could they, for
instance, explain their usage of a specific API method call in a
comment, explaining the arguments supplied, the return value, and what
exactly making that call had accomplish?. To me, that would both be an
example of good coding practice, and a violation of what my general
understanding of what a non-disclosure agreement is meant to accomplish.


Maybe there is something that I'm not getting here. Comments? My library
is looking at Serials Solutions' 360 product, so I'm curious as to what
people have to say about this.

- David


---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Casey Durfee
Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2008 9:33 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Serials Solutions API and NDA


My opinion is that this sounds like a very odd or poorly-designed API.
If
some of their APIs are for unreleased or experimental features, I
understand
having NDA's for those.  But for the most part, the API should cover the
core functions of the product.  What those core functions are should be
no
secret, and anything proprietary about how they work should be fully
hidden
from the people using the API.  Otherwise, NDA or no, the API is
worthless.

--Casey

On Wed, Apr 23, 2008 at 7:00 AM, Bill Dueber [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

 Thanks -- this is great news! Is there anyone from Ex Libris (or,
really,
 any other vendor) floating around that would like to comment in
kind???

  -Bill-

 On Tue, Apr 22, 2008 at 1:45 PM, Kaplanian, Harry 
 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

  Hello everyone,
  There was a thread that started April 2nd about the Serials
Solutions
  API and its NDA.
 
  We would like to clarify that the non-disclosure agreement which we
ask
  libraries to sign before receiving the documentation for our APIs
does
  not limit the library IN ANY WAY from contributing their own code to
  other institutions. The posting on code4lib from one of our support
  staff was incorrect.
 
  We ask libraries to sign a non-disclosure agreement before receiving
the
  API's and accompanying documentation because once signed, API users
have
  access to propriety information through communication with our
  development staff.
 
  Obviously, our software is our primary asset.  We ask for the
  non-disclosure so that the technical details of that asset are not
  shared with a potential competitor. However, the code that the
library
  develops using the API belongs to the library.  The library is not
  limited from contributing that code to the community. In fact, we
would
  encourage you to do so.
 
 
  Thanks!
  Harry Kaplanian
  Director of Product Management
  Serials Solutions
 



 --
 Bill Dueber
 Library Systems Programmer
 University of Michigan Library


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Re: [CODE4LIB] Serials Solutions 360 API - PHP classes?

2008-04-03 Thread Cloutman, David
Just as a note, before you write your code- We are in the process of
evaluating federated search tools, and one item we learned that Serials
Solutions and Webfeat are now owned by the same parent company. The
stories we are getting from the two vendors are a little different, but
essitially what we are hearing is that the two federated searching
products will be integrated into a single product within a year, and
that the two development teams will be merged. I do not know how this
will impact the API for 360 Link, since that appears to be a separate
module, but you may want to take this into consideration in planning
your development.

Good luck with your project,

- David


---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Jonathan Rochkind
Sent: Thursday, April 03, 2008 11:14 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Serials Solutions 360 API - PHP classes?


I wouldn't be surprised either. But it's kind of important if they
actually want their APIs to be _used_ by anyone. Even if you can only
share with other SerSol customers. What's the point of having APIs if
the community can't share code they write to use them?

I am interested in incorporating SerSol 360 Link support into Umlaut,
although my institution is not a 360 Link customer. So I'm curious where
you end up with this, and if you can establish some allowed mechanism
for sharing SerSol API-client code, even if only with other SerSol
customers, that would be useful to all of us.  Only SerSol customers
have any _use_ for the code of course, but if a part of Umlaut has to be
downloaded seperately only after you've somehow established yourself as
a SerSol customer--that gets tricky to manage.

Jonathan

Yitzchak Schaffer wrote:
 From: Code for Libraries on behalf of Yitzchak Schaffer
 Sent: Wed 4/2/2008 12:28 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] Serials Solutions 360 API - PHP classes?


 Does anyone have/know of PHP classes for searching the Serials
Solutions
 360 APIs, particularly Search?

 Okay, having not heard any affirmatives, I'm starting work on this.
I'm
 an OOP and PHP noob, so I'm donning my flak jacket/dunce cap in
advance,
 but I'll try to make this as useful to the community and comprehensive
 as time and my ability allow.  Assuming that Serials Solutions will
 allow some kind of sharing for these - they make clients sign a NDA
 before they show you the docs.  I'm waiting to hear their response; I
 would be surprised if they wouldn't allow sharing of something like
this
 among clients.

 --
 Yitzchak Schaffer
 Systems Librarian
 Touro College Libraries
 33 West 23rd Street
 New York, NY 10010
 Tel (212) 463-0400 x230
 Fax (212) 627-3197
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]


--
Jonathan Rochkind
Digital Services Software Engineer
The Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University
410.516.8886
rochkind (at) jhu.edu

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Re: [CODE4LIB] KR (was: Gartner on OSS)

2008-03-31 Thread Cloutman, David
I use nano, which is the same thing as pico, more or less. I wrote my
first web pages using pico in a unix shell. I always thought it was a
great editor. I use nano almost daily, even on my Windows machines.

I just don't see the attaction to vi. I understand the need to know it,
but the fundamentalist furvor that some people have for the program
baffles me.

- David


---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
K.G. Schneider
Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 10:09 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] KR (was: Gartner on OSS)


 I now open up the vi vs. emacs discussion:

 http://xkcd.com/378/

 (personally, I'm a BBEdit user, but fall back to vi as needed ... and
ex
 for those rare times when you have to tip into a Solaris box to fix
the
 vfstab and your TERM is completely hosed)

 -Joe

Back when that was my choice, I used emacs exactly once, during which I
removed every instance of the letter m from a lengthy document. (When
I have to edit a file in my shell account, which is rare, I use pico...
yes, I know that makes me a sissy *and I don't care.*)

K.G. Schneider

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Re: [CODE4LIB] place for code examples?

2008-03-28 Thread Cloutman, David
I've often thought that there should be, if there isn't one already. I
know I have bits here and there that I'd like to share.



---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Keith Jenkins
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2008 2:08 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] place for code examples?


Does there already exist some place to put some code examples to share
with the code4lib community?  (I'm thinking of snippets somewhere on
the order of 10-100 lines, like the definition of a php function.)

Keith

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Re: [CODE4LIB] My code4lib slides

2008-03-19 Thread Cloutman, David
Thanks for posting this. I actually like the wordiness, particularly
since the presentations at the conference whizzed by so quickly. It's
nice to get to spend some time going through this at my own pace. It's a
really interesting topic.

-David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Karen Coyle
Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:50 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] My code4lib slides


I ended up combining text and images and recreated my code4lib talk in a
PDF that is too wordy and not terribly attractive -- however, (;-) the
content is there, and now I should be able to turn it into a real
document with little effort.

http://www.kcoyle.net/code4lib2008_w_text.pdf

If I ever learn to do voice-overs, I will do so with this talk. (I took
a look at the $699 Adobe video package and did the math: $699[hardware]
v. $699[software] and bought a macMini, which is now my livingroom
machine. First Mac in 15 years. The best thing about it is when bash
opens up or I get to solve problems by typing in smb://  ;-) Most of
the time I'm in where the f**k is that mode).

kc

p.s. I'm speaking tomorrow at ERL in Atlanta. Any code4liber's going?
I'll be around during the day before heading back to the coast.
--
-
Karen Coyle / Digital Library Consultant
[EMAIL PROTECTED] / http://www.kcoyle.net
ph: 510-540-7596
fx: 510-848-3913
mo: 510-435-8234
--


Re: [CODE4LIB] New LC Permalink Service

2008-02-15 Thread Cloutman, David
This is a step in the right direction. Another next trick is that you
can do this:

http://lccn.loc.gov/2003556443/marcxml

Neat.

The only problem is that if you pass a bad URL (i.e. for an invalid LC
Card number, the resulting page for either MARC XML or human readable
view gives you a response code of 200 instead of 404. This means that if
you're basing functionality in your application to grab the data from
one of these URLs, you'll have to write a bunch of funky logic rather
than relying on the http standard.

Definitely a step in the right direction, but it needs tweaking.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Ardie Bausenbach
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 2:34 PM
To: CODE4LIB@listserv.nd.edu
Subject: [CODE4LIB] New LC Permalink Service


** Apologies for Cross-Posting **

The Library of Congress is pleased to announce LCCN Permalink -- a new
persistent URL service for creating links to bibliographic records in
the Library of Congress Online Catalog using the Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN).

LCCN Permalink is a convenient way to cite items from the Library's
collection in your bibliographies, reference guides, emails, blogs,
databases, web pages, etc. Not only can you easily construct a permalink
yourself, but we also display them as part of the bibliographic record
in the LC Online Catalog (http://catalog.loc.gov/).


How to create an LCCN Permalink

Simply begin your URL with the LCCN Permalink domain name --
http://lccn.loc.gov/ -- then add an LCCN.*
   Examples:   http://lccn.loc.gov/2003556443or
http://lccn.loc.gov/82643250or   http://lccn.loc.gov/mm78044693

   * LCCNs should be formatted according to the info:lccn URI
specification
(http://info-uri.info/registry/OAIHandler?verb=GetRecordmetadataPrefix=
regidentifier=info:lccn/). Instructions are also available in the LCCN
Permalink FAQ: http://lccn.loc.gov/lccnperm-faq.html#n10


How LCCN Permalink works

An LCCN Permalink retrieves a MARCXML-formatted bibliographic record
using the Z39.50/SRU protocol. Both valid and cancelled LCCNs (MARC 21
fields 010a and 010z) are searched. LCCN Permalink displays are based on
the Full Record display in the LC Online Catalog. Not only can you link
directly into the LC Online Catalog, but you can also view the record in
MARCXML, MODS, and Dublin Core formats.


More Information

The LC Permalink FAQ at http://lccn.loc.gov/lccnperm-faq.html provides
additional information on this new service.  Specific questions can also
be sent to the Library's Ask-A-Librarian service at
http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ask-digital.html.

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Re: [CODE4LIB] low-cost software for prison libraries?

2008-02-01 Thread Cloutman, David
On Wed, Jan 30, 2008 at 11:54:32PM -0500, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:
 Begin forwarded message:

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Date: January 30, 2008 9:12:19 PM EST
 To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Subject: [prison-l] Library automation software

 Greetings:

 Last month there was some discussion here about cheap/free/
 reasonably priced automation software for correctional libraries.
 I am on a statewide committee which has just been formed to
 research and recommend a software package to replace Athena
 (formerly by Sagebrush, now Follett) in most of the correctional
 libraries in Virginia.  After years in public libraries I am very
 familiar with some of the big vendors, but they are simply
 financially out of the question for our agency, not to mention web-
 based.

I might be misunderstanding here.  Is their a limitation that precludes
web-based systems?  If so, that would cut down your options quite a
bit.

I would think that the limitation in most cases would be that the system
could not go outside of the prison's intranet, and probably then would
be behind it's own firewall. Most prisons don't let inmates use any
Internet service for good reason. I don't know if there could even be a
public terminal, but certainly the application could be web based, even
it it was running on the librarian's desktop. In that case, though,
you'd want something pretty lightweight.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Gabriel Sean Farrell
Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 5:17 AM
To: CODE4LIB@listserv.nd.edu
Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] low-cost software for prison libraries?


On Wed, Jan 30, 2008 at 11:54:32PM -0500, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:
 Begin forwarded message:

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Date: January 30, 2008 9:12:19 PM EST
 To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Subject: [prison-l] Library automation software

 Greetings:

 Last month there was some discussion here about cheap/free/
 reasonably priced automation software for correctional libraries.
 I am on a statewide committee which has just been formed to
 research and recommend a software package to replace Athena
 (formerly by Sagebrush, now Follett) in most of the correctional
 libraries in Virginia.  After years in public libraries I am very
 familiar with some of the big vendors, but they are simply
 financially out of the question for our agency, not to mention web-
 based.

I might be misunderstanding here.  Is their a limitation that precludes
web-based systems?  If so, that would cut down your options quite a bit.

 I have looked at the websites for LibraryThing, Auto Librarian, and
 ResourceMate, which were recommended here in the previous
 discussion.  If you know of or have a circ/cat system that is
 reasonably priced (or dirt cheap) and works well for you, please
 share the information with me, with pros and cons if you like.  All
 replies greatly appreciated, and thanks in advance.

I've recommended LibraryThing for similarly small libraries before.  It
handles the cataloging and browsing aspects quite well, but lacks any
kind of circ.  If you're looking for a full system I'd recommend Koha.
It would serve your needs very well, especially if you have any funds at
all to put toward a techie or two.  If you'd rather, you can pay Liblime
to host the system for a lot less than the big vendors charge for
similar services.
(See http://liblime.com/products/koha/koha-zoom/koha-zoom-hosted)

Gabriel

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Re: [CODE4LIB] perl questions

2008-01-23 Thread Cloutman, David
I don't code PERL, but I enjoy reading about languages that aren't in my 
toolkit. Often I find that I can learn something more high-leve from such 
discussion. The PERL 6 thread on Web4lib was particularly interesting this week.

- David

---
David Cloutman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Electronic Services Librarian
Marin County Free Library

-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Doran, Michael D
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2008 12:15 PM
To: CODE4LIB@listserv.nd.edu
Subject: [CODE4LIB] perl questions


 Subject: [CODE4LIB] perl question
 Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2008 1:54 PM

 Subject: [CODE4LIB] perl6
 Sent: Monday, January 21, 2008 7:01 AM

There *is* still a perl4lib list and these would have been relevant postings 
[1].  Do the code connoisseurs on *this* list now consider perl4lib déclassé or 
redundant for perl questions and discussions?  I'm not trying to dictate where 
people post -- I'm just curious.

Always the last one to know...
-- Michael

[1] The perl4lib page
http://perl4lib.perl.org/

# Michael Doran, Systems Librarian
# University of Texas at Arlington
# 817-272-5326 office
# 817-688-1926 mobile
# [EMAIL PROTECTED]
# http://rocky.uta.edu/doran/

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