[CODE4LIB] Notifications for short term loans

2016-03-31 Thread Emily Lynema
We are a SirsiDynix Symphony library that loans a lot of equipment on short
terms loans (usually 4 hours). We charge relatively a relatively high
overdue fee each hour the item is late in order to encourage students to
return high dollar equipment like MacBook Pros. However, the notification
functionality in Symphony is not good at sending users timely notices that
an item is coming due so that they can renew it before being charged a fee.
Generally users get a notice within the first hour after checkout providing
the due date/time and an overdue the following morning if they haven't
returned it.

We're wondering if anyone has developed a creative solution to this problem
of timely notifications. We'd be interested in solutions that alerted a
user to an upcoming due date, say maybe 15 - 30 minutes in advance, whether
it be email, text message, or an app-based mobile notification. We've
looked a bit at vendor provided mobile applications, but haven't found much
yet in this area.

Let me know if you've developed a creative solution in-house or found a
vendor that provides a relevant service. We could do this from scratch, but
would love to build off some prior work or take advantage of other elegant
solutions.

thanks!

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] state of the art in virtual shelf browse?

2015-01-27 Thread Emily Lynema
Not state of the art anymore, but we still use a cover-based browse at NCSU:

http://catalog.lib.ncsu.edu/record/NCSU1855526
http://catalog.lib.ncsu.edu/browse?callNumber=SD418.3+.A53+C26+2005format=covers

We have work underway to add a horizontal cover-based widget to the full
record to allow browsing directly there a la Amazon recommendations. We are
actually planning to offer both call number browse and a subject-based
browse.

-emily



Date:Mon, 26 Jan 2015 14:23:11 -0700
From:todd.d.robb...@gmail.com todd.d.robb...@gmail.com
Subject: Re: state of the art in virtual shelf browse?

BYU has a neat alphabetical browser by title, subject, and call number via
autocomplete:

https://search.lib.byu.edu/byu/browse


–Tod



On Sun, Jan 25, 2015 at 9:20 PM, Benjamin Armintor armin...@gmail.com
wrote:

 Jenn,

 To pitch another example in with Tom's:

 CLIO at Columbia http://clio.columbia.edu/catalog/9399500

 Our layout is different, and (as you can see) it's collapsed by default.

 - Ben

 On Sun, Jan 25, 2015 at 10:54 PM, Tom Cramer tcra...@stanford.edu wrote:

  Jenn,
 
  You can make your own conclusions about state of the art, but here is
  Stanford's virtual shelf browse integrated into SearchWorks:
 
  - embedded in a record view as a film strip (see the browse related
  items section of the page)
  - a full page, gallery view of related items, grouped together by call
  number
 
  By design, this virtual shelf browse is across Stanford's entire
 holdings,
  regardless of physical location of the books.
 
  Another implementation to look at is Harvard's Stacklife:
  http://stacklife.harvard.edu/
 
  - Tom
 
 
 
 
  On Jan 25, 2015, at 4:30 PM, Jenn Riley wrote:
 
   At my library, we're starting to think about virtual shelf browsing
  options. Who's doing a really good job with this now? What organizations
  can I look to for state of the art implementations for inspiration?
  
   Thanks for any suggestions.
  
   Jenn
  
  
   ---
   Jenn Riley
   Associate Dean, Digital Initiatives | Vice Doyenne, Initiatives
  numériques
  
   McGill University Library | Bibliothèque Université McGill
   3459 McTavish Street | 3459, rue McTavish
   Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0C9 | Montréal (QC) Canada  H3A 0C9
  
   (514) 398-3642
   jenn.ri...@mcgill.ca
 



-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Registration for Code4Lib 2015 in Portland Oregon is NOW OPEN!

2014-12-08 Thread Emily Lynema
Anyone know if internet is included? I mean, it would be crazy if it's not,
but just to make sure somebody thought about it...

On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 3:35 PM, Mark A. Matienzo mark.matie...@gmail.com
wrote:

 I made my reservation on Sunday, and I ran into the same snag. They
 suggested I wait an hour or so for the change to propagate throughout the
 system.

 Mark

 On Dec 8, 2014, at 2:22 PM, Mark Mounts mark.mou...@dartmouth.edu wrote:

  I just tried to check my hotel reservation that I made through the link
 on
  the registration page with the hotel directly and they couldn’t find my
  reservation - and now they claim to be out of rooms.
 
  Best to check yours!
 
  On 12/8/14, 1:46 PM, Tom Johnson johnson.tom+code4...@gmail.com
 wrote:
 
  I'm also being told that you will likely get the block rate for the
  weekend
  if you call and ask.
 
  Again, we're working to make sure the edge dates stay available and
 ready
  to ask the hotel to expand any dates that fill up.
 
  We are closing in on sold out for Thursday, but trying to expand that
 day,
  Monday-Wednesday nights are still very available.
 
  On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 10:39 AM, Tom Johnson
  johnson.tom+code4...@gmail.com
  wrote:
 
  I'm told we're not currently out of block space for any of
  Sunday-Thursday
  nights.
 
  If you're having trouble, calling the hotel directly is probably the
  best
  solution.
 
  We'll do our best to stay on top of the block status and expand it
 where
  needed.  The hotel has been very flexible thus far, and I get the
  impression they would be glad if we booked them solid.
 
  On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 10:22 AM, Tom Johnson 
  johnson.tom+code4...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  Any chance we could get in touch with the hotel? It might not be that
  the hotel is booked up, but rather that it won't allow us to order
 that
  night on the block.
 
  That seems to be the case (i.e. the block for Thursday night is sold
  out). We're working on getting info and expanding the block as needed.
 
  On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 10:15 AM, Andreas Orphanides 
 akorp...@ncsu.edu
  wrote:
 
  Lack of Thursday overnight is going to be a big deal, especially with
  the
  west coast location. Any chance we could get in touch with the hotel?
  It
  might not be that the hotel is booked up, but rather that it won't
  allow
  us
  to order that night on the block.
 
  On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 1:11 PM, Collier, Aaron 
 acoll...@calstate.edu
  wrote:
 
  This is the problem I had. Tried to book through the weekend and it
  apparently wasn't available.
 
 
 
 
 ---
  ---
  Aaron Collier
  Digital Repository Services Manager
  Systemwide Digital Library Services, California State University
  
  From: Code for Libraries [CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
  Joshua
  Gomez [jgo...@getty.edu]
  Sent: Monday, December 08, 2014 10:10 AM
  To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
  Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Registration for Code4Lib 2015 in Portland
  Oregon
  is NOW OPEN!
 
  I had trouble as well, but when I restricted my reservation to only
  Sunday-Wed nights, it then allowed me to reserve rooms. It appears
  that
  there are no rooms available for Thursday or Friday after the
  conference.
 
  -Josh
 
 
  Joshua Gomez | Sr. Software Engineer
  Getty Research Institute | Los Angeles, CA
  310-440-7421
 
  Louisa Kwasigroch lkwasigr...@clir.org 12/08/14 10:07 AM 
  I just tried the link from the registration page:
 
 
 
 https://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb.do?mode=welcome_ei_neweventID=117148
  45
  ,
  and then clicked on łmake a reservation˛, and it allowed me to
  select
  dates and get a room.
 
  On 12/8/14, 1:00 PM, Andreas Orphanides akorp...@ncsu.edu
 wrote:
 
  Can someone from the conference check with the hotel about our room
  block?
  It seems weird that we've got a link to a special event page but
  that
  it's
  returning no results on the day of registration
 
  On Mon, Dec 8, 2014 at 12:57 PM, Dana Jemison
  dana.jemi...@ucop.edu
  wrote:
 
  Looks like the recommended hotel is already filled up.  Are there
  any
  other options close by?
 
  Thanks!
 
  Dana
 
  Dana Jemison
  Principal Metadata Analyst
  California Digital Library
  University of California, Office of the President
  415 20th Street, 4th Floor, Office 424B
  Oakland, CA 94612-2901
  Tel: 510.987.0832
  Email: dana.jemi...@ucop.edu
 
  -Original Message-
  From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On
  Behalf
  Of
  Wick, Ryan
  Sent: Monday, December 08, 2014 9:00 AM
  To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
  Subject: [CODE4LIB] Registration for Code4Lib 2015 in Portland
  Oregon
  is
  NOW OPEN!
 
  Registration for Code4Lib 2015 in Portland Oregon is now open!
 
  To register for Code4Lib 2015, please visit:
  http://c4l2015.eventbrite.com
 
  Code4Lib will be held at the Hilton Portland  Executive Tower
  located
  in
  downtown Portland. Rooms are 

Re: [CODE4LIB] [code4libcon] Code4Lib 2014 Reminder: Hotel Reservation

2014-02-04 Thread Emily Lynema
Also a reminder for those on the waitlist:

If you have been contacted about registering and have not yet responded,
your position will be forfeited if you do not respond by the end of this
week. We need to get people registered, but there are a few we have not
heard back from in the last week. You should be receiving another reminder
email from CONCENTRA today.

Questions about registration or the waitlist or cancellations should be
directed to CONCENTRA: code4...@concentra-cms.com

thanks!
-emily


On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 2:29 PM, Tim McGeary timmcge...@gmail.com wrote:

 This is a reminder to please make your hotel reservations for Code4Lib
 2014.  As of Friday, only 73% of the room block had been reserved.  The
 conference needs to reserve 80% of the room block or there will be
 financial consequences that will impact Code4Lib 2014.

 If you haven't made your reservations, yet, please take a few moments to
 reserve your room today.  Here is the hotel reservation information for
 your convenience:

 The Sheraton Raleigh special conference rate of US $159 per night
 (exluding taxes, currently 12.75%) includes in-room internet at no extra
 charge. The conference rate is only available until February 24, 2014, or
 until the group block sells out, whichever comes first.

 To complete your reservation, you may call 1-800-325-3535 (and request
 the code4lib group rate) or use the following link:

 https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/StarGroupsWeb/res?id=1308017755key=6A16E

 *Note that a deposit* in the amount of one-night's stay plus tax is
 required at the time of reservation ($179.27 total.)

 Thank you,
 Tim McGeary
 Code4Lib 2014 Conference Co-Chair

 --
 Tim McGeary
 timmcge...@gmail.com
 GTalk/Yahoo/Skype/Twitter: timmcgeary
 484-294-7660 (cell)

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[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014 registration update

2014-01-17 Thread Emily Lynema
Just a quick note - we are up to 317 registrants for Code4Lib 2014. This is
pretty amazing turnaround this year.

We will be capping our registration system at 325 for the moment to ensure
that all of our priority registrations can get in. We'll put a simple
waitlist form (posted to this list and up on the website) once we hit 325.
We will likely be able to pull in some people from the waitlist, so please
don't hesitate to add your name to the form.

Thanks for all your great participation!

-emily

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014 registration update

2014-01-17 Thread Emily Lynema
And with that, registration is now closed! If you haven't made it in yet,
hustle on over to our waitlist form and get yourself signed up there, as we
will almost certainly be bringing over a few people first come, first
served from the waitlist.

Waitlist:
https://docs.google.com/a/ncsu.edu/forms/d/1Vuo7g7xbNeGCQywwngkAt4OMdX0k3wsoiwCrxJtdx6k/viewform

If you are trying to register for a reserved priority reservation slot
(presenter, pre-conf organizer, scholarship recipient, platinum/gold
sponsor, or table sponsor), please contact CONCENTRA directly for details
on registering: code4...@concentra-cms.com or (303) 254-6600.

thanks all!
-emily



On Fri, Jan 17, 2014 at 1:51 PM, Emily Lynema emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu wrote:

 Just a quick note - we are up to 317 registrants for Code4Lib 2014. This is
 pretty amazing turnaround this year.

 We will be capping our registration system at 325 for the moment to ensure
 that all of our priority registrations can get in. We'll put a simple
 waitlist form (posted to this list and up on the website) once we hit 325.
 We will likely be able to pull in some people from the waitlist, so please
 don't hesitate to add your name to the form.

 Thanks for all your great participation!

 -emily

 --
 Emily Lynema
 Associate Department Head
 Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
 919-513-8031
 emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu



Re: [CODE4LIB] [code4libcon] Code4Lib 2014 Registration is now open!

2014-01-16 Thread Emily Lynema
Becky,

Thought folks on both lists might be interested in a numbers update. We had
286 registrations as of yesterday. Pretty amazing how quickly that came in!
Don't have numbers for today yet, but I assume the rate will drop off
quickly.

Emily

On Thursday, January 16, 2014, Becky Yoose b.yo...@gmail.com wrote:

 It looks like the system didn't crash, so congratulations to all on
 surviving the rush!

 What's the count so far?

 On Wednesday, January 15, 2014 11:00:03 AM UTC-6, Tim McGeary wrote:

 Colleagues,

 I am happy announce that the Code4Lib 2014 General Registration is now
 open:
 https://www.concentra-cms.com/c/c4l2014

 As a reminder, the cost of registration is $165, and registration for
 pre-conferences is also available.  Half-day pre-conferences are $5 each
 and full day pre-conferences are $10.

 Payment will be required for registration and can be made by credit card.
  Information will be available for attendees that require alternative means
 of payment, but registration will not guaranteed or saved until payment is
 made.  Registration for Code4Lib 2014 will be closed on Friday February
 14, 2014 or when we reach a cap of 350 registrations.

 Priority registration has been given to Presenters, Pre-conference
 organizers, Scholarship awardees, Table sponsors, and Platinum and Gold
 sponsors.  If you received information on Priority Registration and you
 have not registered yet, please do so as soon as possible.

 The Conference Hotel discount at the Raleigh Sheraton will be provided
 upon registration.  We encourage you to book your hotel room immediately
 following your registration being confirmed to lock in your space in the
 hotel.

 We are looking forward to hosting you in North Carolina!

 Tim McGeary
 Director of Library  Information Technology
 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
 919.962.3981
 tim.m...@unc.edu
 Twitter/Google/Skype/Yahoo: timmcgeary

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[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014 Registration is now open!

2014-01-15 Thread Emily Lynema
Just a quick note that if you need any more info about the area or
transportation, please see the website:
http://code4lib.org/conference/2014.

-emily

---

Colleagues,

I am happy announce that the Code4Lib 2014 General Registration is now open:
https://www.concentra-cms.com/c/c4l2014

As a reminder, the cost of registration is $165, and registration for
pre-conferences is also available.  Half-day pre-conferences are $5
each and full day pre-conferences are $10.

Payment will be required for registration and can be made by credit
card.  Information will be available for attendees that require
alternative means of payment, but registration will not guaranteed or
saved until payment is made.  Registration for Code4Lib 2014 will be
closed on Friday February 14, 2014 or when we reach a cap of 350
registrations.

Priority registration has been given to Presenters, Pre-conference
organizers, Scholarship awardees, Table sponsors, and Platinum and
Gold sponsors.  If you received information on Priority Registration
and you have not registered yet, please do so as soon as possible.

The Conference Hotel discount at the Raleigh Sheraton will be provided
upon registration.  We encourage you to book your hotel room
immediately following your registration being confirmed to lock in
your space in the hotel.

We are looking forward to hosting you in North Carolina!


Tim McGeary
Director of Library  Information Technology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
919.962.3981[log in to unmask]
https://listserv.nd.edu/cgi-bin/wa?LOGON=A2%3DCODE4LIB%3B44bc5cc8.1401
Twitter/Google/Skype/Yahoo: timmcgeary


-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014 pre-conferences: please indicate interest on wiki

2013-12-09 Thread Emily Lynema
Hi folks,

We have [possibly?] a record number of pre-conference proposals up on the
wiki -- 19 by my count. Yay for the awesomeness of you all!

We haven't crunched the numbers on morning vs. afternoon scheduling and the
number of rooms available quite yet, but it would be really, super duper
helpful if folks who think they might want to attend a pre-conference could
take a quick look in the next couple of days and indicate interest. This is
by no means a binding signup (that will happen at time of registration),
but it will help us make sure that all pre-conferences with interest find a
room somewhere.

Sign up here!
http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/2014_preconference_proposals

thanks!
-emily

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4lib 2014 Diversity Scholarships: Call for Applications

2013-12-03 Thread Emily Lynema
Just a note that yes, the hosting committee was a bit surprised by the
number of scholarships that came in this year! We realized at the last
minute that perhaps we should have discussed a scholarship based SOLELY on
economic need, but there just wasn't the opportunity to thoughtfully
consider changing course for this year at a late date.

It's an idea we put a pin in to suggest to next year's hosts to consider if
a large number of scholarships are available again next year.

And yes, at least one scholarship has been provided in past years through a
collection of small donations from the community itself. So anyone could
organize an additional scholarship. If there is an organization we could
invoice, scholarships could STILL be added to the roster for this year and
handled by the local hosts, as well.

-emily

-

Date:Mon, 25 Nov 2013 16:28:14 -0500
From:Sarah Shealy sarah.she...@outlook.com
Subject: Re: Code4lib 2014 Diversity Scholarships: Call for Applications

It's honestly too late this year to change the entire scholarship system. I
don't disagree that it would be awesome to have scholarships for everyone
who has some sort of economic need, and this is a conversation that should
be had. But there's a lot that goes into opening something up based on
economic status, and while that work would be valuable and awesome, it's a
little late in the game for 2014. There's also the consideration of when to
offer both gender and need-based scholarships, since the number of
scholarships are variable and if there are only two to be awarded then the
historic trend of ethnic/gender based awards should probably be carried
forward. Or not.

I would like to point out that for a lot of white men working in the tech
field, going to a local user group or conference is an easy thing and you
get to see people like you who do the things you do. I had to go to Chicago
last year (I live in SC - and I was a scholarship recipient) in order to
see women doing the same thing that I do. And it was pretty awesome. So I
would vote for always having the ethnic/gender based scholarship simply for
the connection it can give people - it honestly isn't something that be
described. I went from having no cultural touchstones in this area of my
life to having several.

Hopefully this will help turn the tide from rabble rabble rabble to
thinking about ways to add to the system - not just overhaul the whole
shebang. I would suggest that some of you who are upset about how things
are run sign up for the Scholarship Committee next year and do some work
from the inside. Because, again, you should have raised your concerns
before we sent out the call. The scholarships happen every year.

Sarah
-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] REMINDER: code4lib 2014 talk proposals due TODAY

2013-11-08 Thread Emily Lynema
This is your final reminder to submit proposals for Code4Lib 2014 in
Raleigh, NC. Talk proposals are due TODAY by 5pm PST.

We've got some great proposals in so far, but we still have room for more
this year.

For details about the conference, see http://code4lib.org/conference/2014.
For details about submitting a proposal (it's super easy), see the full
call for proposals below.

-- Forwarded message --
From: Ranti Junus ranti.ju...@gmail.com
Date: Thu, Oct 17, 2013 at 7:14 PM
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014 Call for Proposals
To: CODE4LIB@listserv.nd.edu


Code4lib 2014 is a loosely-structured conference that provides people
working at the intersection of libraries/archives/museums and technology
with a chance to share ideas, be inspired, and forge collaborations.

The conference will be held at the *Sheraton Raleigh Hotel in downtown
Raleigh, NC from March 24 - 27, 2014*.  For more information about the
hotel, visit http://www.sheratonraleigh.com/

We are currently accepting proposals for prepared talks and
pre-conferences. While only a limited number of these can be selected,
multiple lightning talk and breakout sessions will provide additional
opportunities for you to make your voice heard at the conference.


*Proposals for Prepared Talks:*

Prepared talks are 20 minutes (including setup and questions), and should
focus on one or more of the following areas:

- Projects you've worked on which incorporate innovative implementation of
existing technologies and/or development of new software

- Tools and technologies – How to get the most out of existing tools,
standards and protocols (and ideas on how to make them better)

- Technical issues – Big issues in library technology that should be
addressed or better understood

- Relevant non-technical issues – Concerns of interest to the Code4Lib
community which are not strictly technical in nature, e.g. collaboration,
diversity, organizational challenges, etc.

*To submit a proposal:*

- Go to http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/2014_Prepared_Talk_Proposals

- Log in to the wiki in order to submit a proposal. If you are not already
registered, follow the instructions to do so.

- Provide a title and brief (500 words or fewer) description of your
proposed talk.

- If you so choose, you may also indicate when, if ever, you have presented
at a prior Code4Lib conference. This information is completely optional,
but it may assist us in opening the conference to new presenters.

As in past years, the Code4Lib community will vote on proposals that they
would like to see included in the program. This year, however, only the top
10 proposals will be guaranteed a slot at the conference. Additional
presentations will be selected by the Program Committee in an effort to
ensure diversity in program content. Community votes will, of course, still
weigh heavily in these decisions.

Presenters whose proposals are selected for inclusion in the program will
be guaranteed an opportunity to register for the conference. The standard
conference registration fee will still apply.

Proposals can be submitted through Friday, November 8, 2013, at 5pm PST.
Voting will commence on November 18, 2013 and continue through December 6,
2013. The final line-up of presentations will be announced in early
January, 2014.


*Pre-Conference Proposals:*

Pre-conferences are full- or half-day sessions that will be held on Monday,
March 24th, 2014 and can cover just about any topic you can think of [1].

If you are interested in hosting a pre-conference session, please create a
pitch at http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/2014_preconference_proposals.
Pitches should be added to the wiki by December 6.

Please indicate the topic of your session and your preference for full-day
or half-day.  This is expected to be a fluid process, as our venue provides
some flexibility in determining space.

*Pre-Conference Attendance:*

If you are interested in attending a pre-conference, please list your name
underneath the pre-conference description on the wiki; this does not incur
any obligation on your part, but will help planners. You might want to
visit the page occasionally as new session pitches are added.  Actual,
less-revocable registration for pre-conferences will be handled as part of
the overall conference registration, and will involve a very small fee.


We look forward to reading your proposals, and seeing you at the conference!

Code4Lib 2014 Program Committee

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] 2014 Conference

2013-10-07 Thread Emily Lynema
John,

We are still working on pricing, as we are negotiating with the hotel for
food and beverage and are still working on an A/V RFP. And we are still
actively working on sponsorship for the conference. The conference normally
runs less than $200 registration. Based on our current budget estimates,
the same will be true this year, although like I said, we don't have A/V
quotes yet, so we can't promise anything yet.

Currently, we anticipate that registration will open mid-January. It is on
our calendar to announce a firm registration date by the beginning of
December; we'll do it earlier if we can get the registration amount nailed
down earlier.

If you are interested in asking more about the conference, you can always
utilize this list, or you can join the open 'code4libcon' google group and
ask there.

Also: note to all that the CFP for the conference will be going out VERY
SOON. So it's not too early to start thinking about what kind of proposal
you might want to put in. :) And a gentle reminder to those who have not
presented at Code4Lib before - it's ok to submit a proposal for work you
haven't finished yet. It'll be a great motivator for you to get it done in
the upcoming months!

-emily

--

Date:Fri, 4 Oct 2013 19:29:37 +
From:John Blair john.bl...@usm.edu
Subject: 2014 Conference

Hello-

I'm looking to attend the 2014 conference, and am having a hard time
finding information regarding registration, pricing, and contact
information. Perhaps, I'm too early to the party?

Please advise.

-John Blair


-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014 volunteers needed

2013-08-05 Thread Emily Lynema
Hey folks,

Now that we have a location and a date, the local 2014 planning committee
has been working hard on an overall timeline for conference stuff. It's
only August but we're excited!

But we still need MORE HELP!

We have a great big local planning group between our 4 TRLN institutions
and other NC people, but we really want to include non-NC folks in the
planning process. We want this to be a community event with diverse
participation in the planning process, just like always.

Would you be willing to consider signing up to help with a committee? In
particular, we really need folks who have served previously to help guide
local newbies on the committees. Our biggest areas of need right now are
the Program Committee, the Scholarships Committee, and the Pre-Conference
Committee. But in reality, we are looking pretty learn everywhere (except
the Sponsorships Committee, which is already working hard).

Check out our volunteers page [1]. Sign up. I've included a list of goal
deadlines for each committee on the wiki now, so you can pick the one that
fits your schedule.

thanks!

-emily

[1]
http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/Code4Lib_2014_Conference_Planning_Volunteers#Code4Lib_2014_Committees

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] call numbers for e-books

2013-07-19 Thread Emily Lynema
Hey folks,

I know there are others out there doing neat things with shelf browsing
online around a certain book. I'm looking for best practices for call
numbers for e-books. Anyone else made good traction on this problem?

We seem to do ok with pulling call numbers from the MARC record from our
OCLC-sourced records. But we are now loading big e-book files from Serials
Solutions, which are not sourced from OCLC to my knowledge and which do not
have call numbers in the MARC records.

I know about OCLC's Classify service, which sounds good. Just wondering if
anyone has actually done anything with it, or tackled this issue via other
techniques. I know that MarcEdit is using Classify, but we've had trouble
getting it to use the right ID number in our MARC records as a match point,
so we are looking for other alternatives, too.

thanks!
-emily

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] MarcEdit question

2013-07-08 Thread Emily Lynema
We have been trying to use the Generate call numbers feature built into
MarcEdit (uses OCLC's Classify service [1]) to automatically assign call
numbers to our e-book loads for the purposes of shelf browsing. However, we
have found a large number of incorrectly assigned call numbers result
(often with no apparent reason for why a call number seemed to be getting
matched to a record).

Has anyone else tried to work with this tool? No one else on the MarcEdit
email list seemed to have any experience, so I thought I'd try one last
ditch here.

Obviously, we could build our own script to enhance records with call
numbers based on OCLC's service. But it would nice to be able to use prior
art, especially when our cataloging staff are already using MarcEdit to
modify these records prior to loading.

-emily

[1] http://oclc.org/developer/services/classify

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2014: Save the dates!

2013-07-01 Thread Emily Lynema
Early signs point to attendees who register under government rates being
able to count toward our room block. We'll have for sure info on that at
time of registration. But it sounds like y'all can go for the government
rate if it's available to you; this hotel does have an amazing government
rate.

And yes, this price is a significant reduction over the standard nightly
rate for this hotel. And it does include wireless, which otherwise would be
$10/day, I believe.

As has been pointed out already, this location is primo downtown location,
which we chose for its walkability to restaurants and pubs. The Hilton on
the north side of town is not walkable to similar food / entertainment, nor
is there public transportation to make up the difference, which impacts the
room cost.

There are indeed cheaper hotels in the area, and we do assume that some
folks will book those cheaper hotels, as always happens. We encourage those
who can pay this reasonable rate to do so as we need to meet a certain
minimum requirement toward rooms as part of our agreement, otherwise we
begin to be charged extra for our meeting space.

We can always approach the hotel about the pricing, but the contract has
been signed so we really don't have any additional leverage at this point.


On Mon, Jul 1, 2013 at 9:53 AM, Tim McGeary timmcge...@gmail.com wrote:

 A few more factual follow-ups for reference:

 - The negotiation process was NOT easy and we explored many different
 venues.  We are not getting a raw deal.  Trust me, we had some raw deals
 offered.  This contract has a lot of things that help us keep our
 collective costs down and protect the conference.

 - The Hilton in Raleigh is not competitor geographically to the downtown
 hotels, which have their own conference spaces but also serve the Raleigh
 Convention Center across the street from both.

 - I am checking with CONCENTRA and the Sheraton about whether those booking
 with government rates can count toward our block.  The Sheraton conference
 manager is on vacation this week so it will be at least a week before I
 have an answer.  However, I do expect we have more government rate eligible
 attendees than hotels typically allocate for in any given situation.

 As Francis said, it is hard to convince hotels to trust a non-organization
 like Code4Lib.  But that's why we hired CONCENTRA for this year.  They do
 this all year long, for conferences big and small, and they know how to
 negotiate (as I saw and heard firsthand the past couple months).  And
 they'll be continuing to work with us through the end of the conference and
 all the bill paying that happens after the conference.

 We are in good hands, but as Roy said, please join the planning committee.
  There is plenty of room!

 Tim


 On Mon, Jul 1, 2013 at 9:46 AM, Francis Kayiwa kay...@uic.edu wrote:

  On Mon, Jul 01, 2013 at 05:00:42AM -0700, BWS Johnson wrote:
  
   ??? Chicago is not Raleigh. I would expect to pay more in a major
  metropolis than in the Southeast University market. Further, ALA's
  continued to mystify me in the conference department, too. We are
 terrible
  negotiators.
 
  Dunno about that. Given that we the Code4lib we do not exist as a
  real (as in Taxman) organization. I suspect this years planners ran
  into the same problems we did. This was articulated to us really well.
  Our request for rooms compares to.
 
  We are having a wedding in Chicago in February and we promise 400 of our
  family will be coming. It is hard to convince them otherwise. Now the
  delicious irony was after the Conference they were wondering if we would
  be returning to Chicago again in 2014.
 
  You can keep conference costs down in other ways by helping raise money
  for sponsorships.
 
  http://code4lib.org/node/487
 
  regards,
  ./fxk
 
  
   Cheers,
   Brooke
  
 
  --
  No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
  -- Eleanor Roosevelt
 



 --
 Tim McGeary
 timmcge...@gmail.com
 GTalk/Yahoo/Skype/Twitter: timmcgeary
 484-294-7660 (cell)



Re: [CODE4LIB] Why we need multiple discovery services engine?

2013-02-04 Thread Emily Lynema
Here at NCSU, we use our locally-hosted Endeca service for our catalog
and Serials
Solutions Summon as an article search solution. Why do this?

1. Our next-gen library catalog (Endeca) came first. This was before Solr hit
the library world, and before library vendors started working on
improving their bundled catalog apps. Our bundled catalog was terrible, and we
wanted something better. This was back in the day when everyone was doing
federated search for articles (think MetaLib).

2. 4-5 years down the road, a number of vendors (Ebsco, Serials
Solutions, etc.)
were getting into the web scale discovery business. Aka, one big index that
includes everything, in particular the citation content that libraries have
historically not had local access to index / search. We bought Summon to
solve the article search problem that federated searching never resolved
for us. We wanted one access point for less experienced users who needed to
find articles. Since we had backed away from federated search for articles,
this was our big pain point; we already had a catalog we liked.

We've actually loaded our catalog content into Summon, as well. So why
keep both?
We've done a LOT of work adding functionality into our local catalog, including
enhanced title searching,lots of supplemental content, a quite complex
local requesting system. So we can't just switch to the Summon interface
without some effort.

In addition, we have found that we prefer the bento box approach to
searching across formats, as opposed to the integrated index approach
of Summon.
At least at this moment. We use this in the search across our library
website [1]. It's just really, really hard to always surface the
right kind of thing the user is looking for when the things you're indexing are
different in nature (ex: bibliographic record vs. full-text of
newspaper article). With the bento box approach, you have better
opportunities to surface the different types of content available, while
still having local systems optimized for specific content types.

Maybe that's a long-winded excuse for not pushing to break down silos
more. Time
will probably tell.

-emily

[1] http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/search/?q=java


-

Date:Fri, 1 Feb 2013 04:21:01 +
From:Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu
Subject: Re: Why we need multiple discovery services engine?

So, there are two categories of solutions here -- 1) local indexes, where
you create the index yourself, like blacklight or vufind (both based on a
local Solr).  2) vendor-hosted indexes, where the vendor includes all sorts
of things in their index that you the customer don't have local metadata
for, mostly including lots and lots of scholarly article citations.

If you want to include scholarly article citations, you probably can't do
that with a local index solution. Although some consortiums have done some
interesting stuff in that area, let's just say it takes a lot of resources
to do. For most people, if you want to include article search in your
index, it's not feasilbe to do so with a local index. So only
VuFind/Blacklight with a local Solr is out, if you want article search.

You _can_ load local content in a vendor-hosted index like
EDS/Primo/Summon. So plenty of people do choose a vendor-hosted index
product as their only discovery tool, including both local metadata and
vendor-provided metadata. As you suggest.

But some people want the increased control that a locally controlled Solr
index gives you, for the local metadata where it's feasible. So use a local
index product. But still want the article search you can get with a
vendor-hosted index product. So they use both.

There is also at least some reasons to believe that our users don't mind
and may even prefer having local results and hosted metadata results
presented seperately (although probably preferably in a consistent UI),
rather than merged.

A bunch more discussion of these issues is included in my blog post at:
http://bibwild.wordpress.com/2012/10/02/article-search-improvement-strategy/

From: Code for Libraries [CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] on behalf of Wayne Lam [
wing...@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2013 9:31 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Why we need multiple discovery services engine?

Hi all,

I saw in numerous of library website, many of them would have their own
based discovery services (e.g. blacklight / vufind) and at the same time
they will have vendor based discovery services (e.g. EDS / Primo / Summon).
Instead of having to maintain 2 separate system, why not put everything
into just one? Any special reason or concern?

Best

Wayne

--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] U of Baltimore, Final Usability Report, link resolvers -- MIA?

2012-09-05 Thread Emily Lynema
Yes, there were (we used 360 Link during the testing). This is one of the
reasons we turned on 1-Click about 6 months ago and have been fairly
pleased with the results.

-emily

--

Date:Tue, 4 Sep 2012 10:58:28 -0400
From:Jimmy Ghaphery jghap...@vcu.edu
Subject: Re: U of Baltimore, Final Usability Report, link resolvers -- MIA?

Also the NC State study on Summon is worth mentioning. If memory serves
there was consistent issues with the last mile in getting to the resource.
http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/userstudies/studies/2010summon

On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 10:48 AM, Matthew LeVan levan.matt...@gmail.com
wrote:

 It's like a google search challenge!  Looks like they changed their
student
 home link patterns...

 http://home.ubalt.edu/nicole.kerber/idia642/Final_Usability_Report.pdf

 Thanks,

 matt



 On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 10:44 AM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu
 wrote:

  Hi helpful code4lib community, at one point there was a report online
at:
 
  http://student-iat.ubalt.edu/**students/kerber_n/idia642/**
  Final_Usability_Report.pdf

http://student-iat.ubalt.edu/students/kerber_n/idia642/Final_Usability_Report.pdf
 
 
  David Walker tells me the report at that location included findings
about
  SFX and/or other link resolvers.
 
  I'm really interested in reading it. But it's gone from that location,
 and
  I'm not sure if it's somewhere else (I don't have a title/author to
 search
  for other than that URL, which is not in google cache or internet
 archive).
 
  Is anyone reading this familiar with the report? Perhaps one of the
  authors is reading this, or someone reading it knows one of the authors
 and
  can be put me in touch?  Or knows someone likely in the relevant dept at
  ubalt and can be put me in touch? Or has any other information about
this
  report or ways to get it?
 
  Thanks!
 
  Jonathan
 




--
Jimmy Ghaphery
Head, Library Information Systems
VCU Libraries
804-827-3551


-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] U of Baltimore, Final Usability Report, link resolvers -- MIA?

2012-09-05 Thread Emily Lynema
1-Click doesn't really have anything to do with Summon. But it has to do
with the link resolver. The thing about Summon (as opposed to other tools
sometimes used as a starting point for users) is that it does not locally
provide any access to full-text.

When we first implemented Summon back in early 2010, it *always* sent users
through the link resolver for access to any full-text. The first thing we
noticed was just how many problems there still were with link resolution,
especially when harvesting metadata from publishers instead of directly fro
the other database providers being linked to (a lot of that has now been
improved, but problems do remain). Simultaneously, we found that users
familiar with databases like Academic Search Premier were used to getting
full-text with one click; they were thrown off when they landed on a link
resolver service window after clicking on a citation.

There are a couple of things that improve this user experience. For
starters, we bit the bullet and turned on 360 Link's 1-click tool which
forwards users directly through to article content whenever possible,
bypassing the link resolver service window. Simultaneously, Serials
Solutions / Summon has also begun to work with what they call index
enhanced direct linking in lieu of OpenURL linking to do a better job of
sending users directly through to content without passing through the link
resolver.

With the 1-Click in place, users only see our 360 Link service window if
there's no index-enhanced direct link and 360 Link doesn't know how to link
down to the article level for a database (or we don't have access to the
content). So it's a lot less frequent. Users and staff are both happy about
this change.

If you are thinking of using Summon with a different link resolver, you'd
have to see if they provide a similar pass-through type service. I *think*
that SFX does.

-emily

On Wed, Sep 5, 2012 at 10:01 AM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:

 On 9/5/2012 9:04 AM, Emily Lynema wrote:

 Yes, there were (we used 360 Link during the testing). This is one of the
 reasons we turned on 1-Click about 6 months ago and have been fairly
 pleased with the results.


 What does turn on 1-Click mean with regard to Summon?

 This has turned into a somewhat interesting conversation. We all need to
 talk about this stuff more!




-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Maker Spaces and Academic Libraries

2012-08-28 Thread Emily Lynema
 are the same existing staff that were here previously. No one is
specially trained- everyone has printed on the 3D printer- including all
of our student workers. It's fun, so it hasn't been a hard sell to anyone
to make something and learn...which is pretty cool. We set up the 3D Touch
printer ourselves- in fact the students busted open the box the second it
arrived, set it up and started printing. I wasn't even in the building
when that all happened- they took it on and I'm happy about that.

The production machine we have - the Uprint SE needed setup from the
vendor. He did a fairly quick rundown of how it all works and did the
machine setup for us. Since then it's been going non-stop without much
maintenance.

Out of both of the machines, the hobbyist machine has needed more
maintenance from us in terms of keeping it going well. The higher end
machine has been invaluable in that it runs without lots of care and
feeding.

We have a couple of different options available for 3D software and we
have a number of students and student workers who are already well-versed
in creating with these tools. We are asking them to teach others and give
workshops- this works well as most of our students prefer to learn from
other students in a casual way. Our staff may not be 3D experts but we are
a learning organization and everyone jumps in when help is needed- we do
our best and work through the problems- then share with each other when we
learn something new. Most seem to learn best by doing and we do a lot. :)

--Lisa


Lisa Kurt
Engineering + Emerging Technologies Librarian
DeLaMare Science and Engineering Library
University of Nevada, Reno
phone: 775.682.5706

--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Reservesdirect.org

2012-03-21 Thread Emily Lynema
Thanks Steven. Ross Singer also passed on a contact for me at Emory; I'll
try to inquire about getting a wiki dump.

-emily


 Date:Tue, 20 Mar 2012 16:30:53 -0400
 From:Steven Anderson stevencander...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: Reservesdirect.org

 Emily=2C
 I know some of the developers at Emory Universities Libraries (I worked
 the=
 re before). I'll pass this along to them directly just in case they have
 no=
 t seen it and hopefully theycan provide the wiki content.
 Take care.
 Sincerely=2CSteven Anderson
  Date: Tue=2C 20 Mar 2012 15:30:13 -0400
  From: emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu
  Subject: [CODE4LIB] Reservesdirect.org
  To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 =20
  Does anyone here know the disposition of reservesdirect.org? NCSU
 release=
 d
  an updated version of the ReservesDirect code last year on Google=2C but
 =
 we
  had linked directly to the reservesdirect.org (used to be powered by
 Emor=
 y
  University) for the installation guide. I can pull the installation
guide
  directly from the Wayback Machine and host it on Google code=2C but it
 wo=
 uld
  be nice to get the content off the old wiki in a more generic fashion.
 =20
  I didn't receive any warning that this domain was going to be pulled=2C
 b=
 ut
  I'm also not on the old RD community or developer lists that used to be
  maintained by Emory. Anyone here at Code4Lib have any more information?
 =20
  thanks!
  -emily
 =20
  --=20
  Emily Lynema
  Associate Department Head
  Information Technology=2C NCSU Libraries
  919-513-8031
  emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu   =

 --





--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu





-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Reservesdirect.org

2012-03-20 Thread Emily Lynema
Does anyone here know the disposition of reservesdirect.org? NCSU released
an updated version of the ReservesDirect code last year on Google, but we
had linked directly to the reservesdirect.org (used to be powered by Emory
University) for the installation guide. I can pull the installation guide
directly from the Wayback Machine and host it on Google code, but it would
be nice to get the content off the old wiki in a more generic fashion.

I didn't receive any warning that this domain was going to be pulled, but
I'm also not on the old RD community or developer lists that used to be
maintained by Emory. Anyone here at Code4Lib have any more information?

thanks!
-emily

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Online course reserve systems

2012-01-30 Thread Emily Lynema
Jean,

We are actively using and developing ReservesDirect here at NCSU Libraries.
I'd be happy to share our experiences with you (privately or publicly). We
released a slightly updated version of the code in early 2011, since it's
no longer being actively developed by Emory University. You can see more on
Google code, in case you hadn't seen this yet.

http://code.google.com/p/reservesdirect-ncsu/

Do you have any specific questions?

-emily

--

Date:Fri, 27 Jan 2012 06:14:38 -0500
From:Rainwater, Jean jean_rainwa...@brown.edu
Subject: Online course reserve systems

We've used a home-grown course reserves system for text, audio, and video
since 2003.  That system is showing its age and we're exploring whether to
replace or completely overhaul it.  We know of ReservesDirect - are there
other open source applications out there?  If folks have experience with
ReservesDirect and are willing to share that would be useful too.

Thanks!
Jean

--
Jean Rainwater
Head, Integrated Technology Services
Brown University Library
10 Prospect Street / Box A
Providence, Rhode Island 02912
401.863.9031
jean_rainwa...@brown.edu

-- 
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] generating and parsing NCIP with PHP

2012-01-02 Thread Emily Lynema
Hi folks,

We are working with Lehigh University on building out a more full-fledged
SirsiDynix Symphony adapter to work with the XC NCIP toolkit. We will
hopefully building our new Patron Account interface on top of the
eXtensible Catalog NCIP toolkit.

Obviously, to build our new interface on top of the NCIP toolkit, we need
to generate NCIP XML requests and parse NCIP XML responses. These things
are a bit gnarly to work with, and I'm not sure that PHP is exactly known
for excellence in working with XML. Has anyone ever dabbled in this area
before? Created an awesome PHP library we could just pick up and use? Have
any particular pointers?

We have Zend framework at our disposal in terms of PHP frameworks, and will
likely be using that for this project. I don't know in particular if it has
good XML parsing tools (my staff probably would), but even if it does, we
still have to sort through the NCIP verbosity.

Just thought I'd check.

-emily


Re: [CODE4LIB] Patents and open source projects

2011-12-06 Thread Emily Lynema
Just wanted to say thanks for the many responses. You all are right that
this issue is not specific to library software in specific. It's not often
that I hear such a resounding agreement from all responders!!

-emily

On Mon, Dec 5, 2011 at 12:53 PM, Erik Hetzner erik.hetz...@ucop.edu wrote:

 At Mon, 5 Dec 2011 08:17:26 -0500,
 Emily Lynema wrote:
 
  A colleague approached me this morning with an interesting question that
 I
  realized I didn't know how to answer. How are open source projects in the
  library community dancing around technologies that may have been patented
  by vendors? We were particularly wondering about this in light of open
  source ILS projects, like Kuali OLE, Koha, and Evergreen. I know OLE is
  still in the early stages, but did the folks who created Koha and
 Evergreen
  ever run into any problems in this area? Have library vendors
 historically
  pursued patents for their systems and solutions?

 I don’t think libraries have a particularly unique perspective on
 this: most free/open source software projects have the same issues
 with patents.

 The Software Freedom Law Center has some basic information about these
 issues. As I recall, the “Legal basics for developers” edition of
 their podcasts is useful [1], but other editions may be helpful as
 well.

 Basically, the standard advice for patents is what Mike Taylor gave:
 ignore them. Pay attention to copyright and trademark issues (as the
 Koha problem shows), but patents really don’t need to be on your
 radar.

 best, Erik

 1.
 http://www.softwarefreedom.org/podcast/2011/aug/16/Episode-0x16-Legal-Basics-for-Developers/

 Sent from my free software system http://fsf.org/.




[CODE4LIB] Patents and open source projects

2011-12-05 Thread Emily Lynema
A colleague approached me this morning with an interesting question that I
realized I didn't know how to answer. How are open source projects in the
library community dancing around technologies that may have been patented
by vendors? We were particularly wondering about this in light of open
source ILS projects, like Kuali OLE, Koha, and Evergreen. I know OLE is
still in the early stages, but did the folks who created Koha and Evergreen
ever run into any problems in this area? Have library vendors historically
pursued patents for their systems and solutions?


Re: [CODE4LIB] Examples of Web Service APIs in Academic Public Libraries

2011-10-12 Thread Emily Lynema
Some folks have mentioned library-created APIs in this thread. 

A couple of staff here at NCSU Libraries wrote up a piece in the Code4Lib 
Journal (wow! back in 2007!) about the API we created for our catalog years ago 
and still use very heavily (for several apps not even developed yet when that 
article was written).

http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/10

Our locally developed ERM also provides a set of web services we use to 
populate our journal list and database finder on our public website.

Externally, we use the standard set of freebies: Google Books, HathiTrust, Open 
Library, OCLC WorldCat API. We subscribe to Syndetics and use APIs (sort of) to 
pull in covers, contents, previews, etc. We also subscribe to Summon and use 
their API. Tempted to use Serials Solutions' 360 Link API to create our own 
version of the service window interface, but we've managed not to do that yet!

-emily lynema
NCSU Libraries

--

Date:Sat, 8 Oct 2011 13:33:52 -0400
From:Michel, Jason Paul 
Subject: Examples of Web Service APIs in Academic  Public Libraries

Hello all,

I'm a lurker on this listserv and am interested in gaining some insight int=
o your experiences of utilizing web service APIs in either an academic libr=
ary or public library setting.

I'm writing a book for ALA Editions on the use of Web Service APIs in libra=
ries.  Each chapter covers a specific API by delineating the technicalities=
 of the API, discussing potential uses of the API in library settings, and =
step-by-step tutorials.

I'm already including examples of how my library (Miami University in Oxfor=
d, Ohio) are utilizing these APIs but would like to give the reader more ex=
amples from a variety of settings.

APIs covered in the book: Flickr, Vimeo, Google Charts, Twitter, Open Libra=
ry, LibraryThing, Goodreads, OCLC.

So, what are you folks doing with APIs?

Thanks for any insight!

Kind regards,

Jason

--
Jason Paul Michel
User Experience Librarian
Miami University Libraries
Oxford, Ohio 45044
twitter:jpmichel

 


Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with DLF-ILS GetAvailability

2010-10-25 Thread Emily Lynema
 can tell) only
 allows availabitlity to be specified at the level of items


 Owen Stephens
 Owen Stephens Consulting
 Web: http://www.ostephens.com
 Email: o...@ostephens.com
 Telephone: 0121 288 6936

 





   
  


--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] automated access verification for electronic content

2010-07-02 Thread Emily Lynema
Our technical services staff have put together a proposal for a new 
workflow tool to help them with semi-comprehensive access verification 
for our electronic collection. The problem, apparently, is that while 
many libraries have used print serial check-in for years to ensure that 
print issues are received, similar workflows have never been put in 
place to verify that we have access to the electronic collections that 
we have purchased. And we spend more money on these collections than we 
do on print. Currently, there is a tool called SEESAU that was developed 
at Georgia and is used by staff to queue up resources for access 
verification on a regular basis and also provides a kind of integrated 
ticketing / bug tracking when problems are identified.


Our staff is interested in doing something similar here at NCSU so that 
they have a mechanism (better than a spreadsheet) for proactively 
verifying that we still have access to the journals and years that we 
have subscribed to. It is apparently not uncommon for vendors to drop 
journals or date ranges from journals so that our patrons cannot access 
them even when we have paid for access. In addition, there are sometimes 
problems in our local systems that prevent access, like EZProxy 
configurations.


While we could certainly build a workflow tool for our staff to do this, 
we wondered if there wasn't a clever, more automated solution that 
wouldn't require so much manual labor by techincal services staff. We 
are just bringing Nagios up for local system monitoring purposes, and 
while it could certainly be used for at least a small portion of this, 
the problem is that we would have to configure each journal manually in 
Nagios for it to check that the proper coverage years were provided (and 
this would break if the vendor re-designed its website). That would be a 
ton of manual work for the IT office when we subscribe to tens of 
thousands of journals. In addition, users can get authentication 
problems at MANY steps in the processeverywhere from the journal 
page in a vendor site down to when they click on the pdf for a single 
article itself. It seems like it would be very difficult to account for 
all of these possible problems within Nagios.


Has anyone come up with a clever way to do this type of access 
verification that goes beyond just whether or not the vendor's site is 
responsive?


thanks!
-emily

--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] ILS short list

2010-04-09 Thread Emily Lynema

SirsiDynix Symphony has a new Web Services platform that is being released in 
beta at this point. Full documentation is supposed to be available in 2010. It 
was used to enable the SirsiDynix iPhone app. I think it was built as a wrapper 
on top of their long-existing command line API tools.

Feature set is supposed to include:
* authenticated access to user account info and ability to place holds / renew 
items
* new / popular title lists
* bibliographic searching and display
* item availability information

I don't think this package requires additional $$, but I bet you do have to 
have already paid for API training. We haven't investigated that deeply with 
Sirsi yet.

-emily

--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu



--

Date:Thu, 8 Apr 2010 14:32:57 -0400
From:Ryan Eby ryan...@gmail.com
Subject: Re: ILS short list

It would probably be worth putting your findings on the code4lib wiki
if you end up getting very far.

I had started a list awhile ago but never got around to getting more
info/completing it. Here's what I have so far based on talking with
people. The information may be out of date:

Evergreen and Koha both have database access and various API's. Not
sure on the hosted liblime koha.

Voyager
*Export
Built in. Can export Marc with bib, holdings and authorities records,
though marc is often mangled (from person i talked to).
*Database Access
Built in. Uses Oracle and also provides entity-relationship diagrams
and some pre-build views to help in development. Believe the oracle
license is also included in the base price. Access is read-only.
*API's and Web Services
Built in. z39 access, however with SQL access you could likely build
the API you need.

Unicorn
* Export
Built in. MARC21 or flat file formats. Unicode support is available as an extra.
* Database Access
Mixed. No access to the embedded Informix database by default; API
training is necessary for read-only access. Oracle is an extra option,
but that only gives you a read-only license. For write access, you
need a full Oracle license. SQL schema is supplied if you purchase API
training.
* API's and Web Services
Mixed. Z39.50 is offered (not sure if it's an extra). API access is
an extra - basically you pay for docs of Unix-like commands and the
ability to pay for API support if you screw up. API training also
gives you some access to the client/server wire protocol so you can
roll your own. No Web services. Utterly unusable XML API (it basically
wraps the wire protocol with no abstraction).

Innovative
* Export
Built In. Can dump Marc or CSV files of specific field data
* Database Access
Extra. There is a Oracle option with an additional cost with the
default being a proprietary database without access. From what I've
heard the Oracle tables are not documented overly well. There also
appears to be mysql used for some data as well.
*API's and Web Services
Extra. Z39 is offered as a product. There used to be an XML server but
this appears to have been discontinued. There appears to be more web
services in the works though they also appear to be additional
products. XRecord is built in but doesn't easily allow access to
attached items given a bib

eby



 Anna Headley wrote:
  


 I am looking to find or create a shortlist of ILSes, open or proprietary,
 that provide API access to bibliographic and item-level data. �I am really
 only looking for ILSes that are used by academic libraries.

 Do you know of any resources that might be helpful? �I started with
 Marshall Breeding's 2009 Perceptions report, but it doesn't include much
 information about a given ILS.

 Or, do you use such an ILS in your library?

 So far my list is: Evergreen

 Thank you!!
 Anna





  


Re: [CODE4LIB] CODE4LIB Digest - 29 Mar 2010 to 30 Mar 2010 (#2010-78)

2010-03-31 Thread Emily Lynema

Karen,

This doesn't relate to the API specifically, but I'm very interested in 
the statement, Open Library now has Works defined.


We've just recently encountered issues loading OCA records for journals 
we've scanned back into our local ILS, because we have to add an 856 for 
each journal volume that was scanned to the parent bibliographic record 
(in the most recent case, we had something like 160 856 fields in the 
record, which our ILS objected to). As in institution, we're not 
particularly interested in creating locally hosted splash pages for this 
digitized content.


What seems like would make more sense for us is to link to a Work record 
in Open Library or Internet Archive which can then direct users to all 
volumes digitized for that Work. I searched this title in Open Library 
and found individual results for the various years of the journal, so it 
didn't seem like that kind of aggregated record was being exposed to 
users at this point.


See here for an example: 
http://openlibrary.org/search?q=polytechnisches+Journal


Do you think a Work record page in Open Library that we could link to 
from our local systems would be an effective solution to this problem? 
Anybody have other ideas?


-emiliy

CODE4LIB automatic digest system wrote:

--

Date:Tue, 30 Mar 2010 10:22:41 -0700
From:Karen Coyle li...@kcoyle.net
Subject: Works API

Open Library now has Works defined, and is looking to develop an API  
for their retrieval. It makes obvious sense that when a Work is  
retrieved via the API, that the data output would include links to the  
Editions that link to that Work. Here are a few possible options:


1) Retrieve Work information (author, title, subjects, possibly  
reviews, descriptions, first lines) alone

2) Retrieve Work information + OL identifiers for all related Editions
3) Retrieve Work information + OL identifiers + any other identifiers  
related to the Edition (ISBN, OCLC#, LCCN)

4) Retrieve Work information and links to Editions with full text / scans

Well, you can see where I'm going with this. What would be useful?

kc

  


--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] custom interface to SirsiDynix user account features

2010-01-29 Thread Emily Lynema
I have vague dusty memories of someone saying (perhaps at a Code4Lib 
conference) that they had built a custom PHP (?) interface to the user 
account features for SirsiDynix Unicorn. Sirsi provides an API that I 
think could be used to do this, so that doesn't seem like a completely 
impossible thing to remember.


We have finally 'turned off' our legacy OPAC here at NCSU Libraries 
(after almost 4 years of using Endeca) and would be interested in being 
able to turn off the legacy 'My Account' features as well, in particular 
if someone had already built an application we could borrow from.


Thought I'd throw this out to see if anyone else remembers the same 
conversation.


-emily

--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Position available: Lead Developer - NCSU Libraries, IT Department – Raleigh, NC

2010-01-28 Thread Emily Lynema
Note: Feel free to contact me with any questions about this position 
(emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu). We intend to move quickly and are already 
reviewing resumes, so please send me an email if you think you might 
apply. We would love to bring in someone with previous library experience!


-emily lynema



Working Title: Lead Developer
Position Title: Business  Technology Applications Specialist

The NC State University Libraries seeks an experienced developer to help 
lead development efforts within the IT department. This development unit 
is responsible for supporting the core information systems in the 
library, from building and maintaining enterprise-level applications to 
implementing and supporting open source and vendor solutions. The lead 
developer will serve as the technical backbone of a unit with 3 
developers. He or she will have primary oversight over E-Matrix, an 
electronic resources and serials management system built in-house at 
NCSU Libraries, and will also be a key participant in design, testing, 
and implementation for the Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE) project 
(NCSU Libraries is a partner in this Mellon-funded project). In 
addition, he or she will have the opportunity to work on a variety of 
other projects such as the ReservesDirect open source course reserves 
system, a new administrative information system being built in-house, 
and new/evolving discovery layer tools and mobile applications.


Responsibilities include designing and developing applications, helping 
manage projects and deadlines, providing technical leadership for junior 
developers, serving as technical lead on business-focused product 
management teams, and investigating new technologies. As lead developer, 
this position is responsible for helping architect, design, and plan for 
all new development within the unit.


We are looking for someone who would be able to jump right into learning 
a complex enterprise-level application built using Java (Hibernate and 
Spring) and PostgreSQL. Other supported tools within this unit utilize 
MySQL, PHP, and Python, so our preferred candidate would be someone 
excited about working across a variety of technologies. Experience with 
application and database design is a must. Knowledge of code management 
repositories (Subversion) is a plus. Must have good communication 
skills, the ability to participate in a team development environment, 
and a willingness to learn about library metadata and business processes.


Salary is based on experience and qualifications, but expected hiring 
range is $75,000 – 80,000.


NCSU Libraries is a fast-paced, innovative environment with no shortage 
of interesting problems to solve. For a detailed list of required and 
preferred skills or to apply, visit http://jobs.ncsu.edu and search for 
position #40024.


Position is currently available, and will remain open until filled. 
Review of applications is ongoing.


--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


Re: [CODE4LIB] Choosing development platforms and/or tools, how'd you do it?

2010-01-06 Thread Emily Lynema
If you are looking for abstract reasons to determine which programming tool
to use for a library project, it's worth considering long term support for
your institution. If the future technical support at your institution is 1
librarian-turned-coder (and you don't have strong personal preferences), you
might want to think about which languages/tools/frameworks are commonly
available amongst this pool (I think you'll find PHP/Ruby much more often
than Java, for example). That way your institution isn't up-a-creek when you
leave and they hire your replacement.

-emily lynema
NCSU Libraries

2010/1/6 Alejandro Garza Gonzalez alejandro.ga...@itesm.mx

 Well, I'll quickly run down why we chose Drupal (hence, PHP). I mention
 Drupal because to me it's more of a framework which just happens to have a
 CMS built on top of it =)

 Before Drupal, my team knew PHP. We had PHP books in the library, students
 were learning some PHP in classes, etc.

 We were lured to Drupal because other libraries were using it (AADL at the
 time). It seemed to have good code, good security, and could be hacked
 politely (or extended) and securely (if you follow the rules). Most of
 all, Drupal has good people behind it =)

 Now, even though Drupal is PHP (and, as some say, PHP lets you be as
 insecure and as bad a coder you want...) the code that goes into its core
 has pretty strict coding standards. Of course you can find lots of modules
 which are not up to par, but you can depend on core to be tight.

 _alejandro

 marijane white said the following on 05/01/2010 05:04 p.m.:

  Greetings Code4Lib,

 Long time lurker, first time poster here.

 I've been turning over this question in my mind for a few weeks now, and
 Joe
 Hourcle's postscript in the Online PHP Course thread has prompted me to
 finally try to ask it. =)

 I'm interested in hearing how the members of this list have gone about
 choosing development platforms for their library coding projects and/or
 existing open source projects (ie like VuFind vs Blacklight).  For
 example,
 did you choose a language you already were familiar with?  One you wanted
 to
 learn more about?  Does your workplace have a standard enterprise
 architecture/platform that you are required to use?  If you have chosen to
 implement an existing open source project, did you choose based on the
 development platform or project maturity and features or something else?

 Some background -- thanks to my undergraduate computer engineering
 studies,
 I have a pretty solid understanding of programming fundamentals, but most
 of
 my pre-LIS work experience was in software testing and did not require me
 to
 employ much of what I learned programming-wise, so I've mostly dabbled
 over
 the last decade or so.  I've got a bit of experience with a bunch of
 languages and I'm not married to any of them.   I also kind of like having
 excuses to learn new ones.

 My situation is this: I would like to eventually implement a discovery
 tool
 at MPOW, but I am having a hell of a time choosing one.  I'm a solo
 librarian on a content team at a software and information services
 company,
 so I'm not really tied to the platforms used by the software engineering
 teams here.  I know a bit of Ruby, so I've played with Blacklight some,
 got
 it to install on Windows and managed to import a really rough Solr index.
 I'm more attracted to the features in VuFind, but I don't know much PHP
 yet
 and I haven't gotten it installed successfully yet.  My collection's
 metadata is not in an ILS (yet) and not in MARC, so I've also considered
 trying out more generic approaches like ajax-solr (though I don't know a
 lot
 of javascript yet, either).  I've also given a cursory look at SOPAC and
 Scriblio.  My options are wide open, and I'm having a rough time deciding
 what direction to go in.  I guess it's kind of similar to someone who is
 new
 to programming and attempting to choose their first language to learn.

 I will attempt to head off a programming language religious war =) by
 stating that I'm not really interested in the virtues of one platform over
 another, moreso the abstract reasons one might have for selecting one.
 Have any of you ever been in a similar situation?  How'd you get yourself
 unstuck?  If you haven't, what do you think you might do in a situation
 like
 mine?


 -marijane





 --
 _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
 *Ing. Alejandro Garza González*
 Coordinación de proyectos y desarrollo de sistemas
 Centro in...@te, Centro para la Innovación en Tecnología y Educación
 Tecnológico de Monterrey

 Tel. +52 [81] 8358.2000, Ext. 6751
 Enlace intercampus: 80.689.6751, 80.788.6106
 http://www.itesm.mx/innovate/

 El contenido de este mensaje de datos no se considera oferta, propuesta o
 acuerdo, sino hasta que sea confirmado en documento por escrito que contenga
 la firma autógrafa del apoderado legal del ITESM. El contenido de este
 mensaje de datos es confidencial y se entiende dirigido y para uso exclusivo

[CODE4LIB] Blacklight + Summon at UVA

2009-10-07 Thread Emily Lynema
In a recent Chronicle article about next generation catalogs, which also 
talks about Summon, [1] I saw a comment about the University of Virginia 
developing a mobile service which presents integrated results from 
Serials Solutions Summon and Blacklight. That comment has been removed 
from the article (weird!), but I also see a note about this on the UVA 
mobile site [2].


I am curious about how this will be accomplished, and figuring there are 
at least a couple of representatives on this from Virginia. Is this 
problem being solved by adding catalog records to Summon, or is there 
something more complicated happening? It initially sounded to me like 
there was integration of results across Summon and Blacklight happening, 
but it looks like perhaps I misread?


Regardless, any clues on when the new mobile site will be available?

thanks!
-emily


[1] http://chronicle.com/article/After-Losing-Users-in/48588/
[2] http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/mobile/

--
Emily Lynema
Associate Department Head
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Position available: Lead Developer - NCSU Libraries – Raleigh, NC

2009-01-28 Thread Emily Lynema
Note: Feel free to contact me with any questions about this position 
(emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu). We intend to move quickly and are already 
reviewing resumes, so please send me an email if you think you might apply.


-emily lynema



Working Title: Lead Developer
Position Title: Business  Technology Applications Specialist

The NC State University Libraries seeks an experienced developer to help 
lead development efforts within the IT department. This development unit 
is responsible for supporting the core information systems in the 
library, from building and maintaining enterprise-level applications to 
implementing and supporting open source and vendor solutions. The lead 
developer will serve as the technical backbone of a unit with 3 
developers. He or she will have primary oversight over E-Matrix, an 
electronic resources and serials management system built in-house at 
NCSU Libraries and will play a key role in efforts to make E-Matrix 
available as an open source project in the future. In addition, this 
position will have the opportunity to work on a variety of other 
projects including an open source course reserves system created at 
Emory University (ReservesDirect) and a new administrative information 
system being designed from the ground up.


Responsibilities include designing and developing applications, managing 
projects and deadlines, providing technical mentoring for 2 junior 
developers, serving as technical lead on business-focused product 
management teams, and investigating new technologies. As lead developer, 
this position is responsible for helping architect, design, and plan for 
all new development within the unit.


We are looking for someone who would be able to jump right into learning 
a complex enterprise-level application built on top of PostgreSQL, Java 
(Hibernate and Spring), XML/JSON web services, and ExtJS. Other 
supported tools within this unit also utilize MySQL and PHP. Experience 
with application and database design is a must. Knowledge of code 
management repositories (Subversion) is a plus. Must have good 
communication skills, the ability to participate in a team development 
environment, and a willingness to learn about library metadata and 
business processes.


Salary is based on experience and qualifications, but expected hiring 
range is $75,000 – 80,000.


NCSU Libraries is a fast-paced, innovative environment with no shortage 
of interesting problems to solve. For a detailed list of required and 
preferred skills or to apply, visit http://jobs.ncsu.edu and search for 
position #40024.


Position is currently available, and will remain open until filled. 
Review of applications is ongoing.


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
emily_lyn...@ncsu.edu


[CODE4LIB] Call for participation in National Libraries testing of RDA

2008-12-25 Thread Emily Lynema

Hi folks,

I'm passing this on for Dianne McCutcheon at the National Library of 
Medicine. They're looking for technical folks to help dig into testing 
RDA to determine whether it'll really enable library metadata to be used 
across systems more effectively, and better support discovery.


I hope there are some folks who'd be interested in participating!

-emily lynema

---

The Library of Congress, the National Agricultural Library and the 
National Library of Medicine have jointly decided to test Resource 
Description and Access (RDA), the proposed new cataloging code, before 
making a decision on whether or not to implement this new standard.  See 
the joint statement and accompanying letter from Deanna Marcum, 
Associate Librarian for Library Services, Library of Congress for more 
details:   http://www.nlm.nih.gov/tsd/cataloging/RDA_Letter_050108.pdf


We plan to include members of the U.S. library community as well as ILS 
vendors and OCLC, in the testing. We are also interested in including 
developers from the code4lib and NGC4Lib communities who could help 
evaluate the assertion that RDA will allow the data produced to function 
within a wide range of technological environments and better support 
resource discovery.


The test period will begin after RDA is released, currently targeted for 
July 2009.  We are in the process of developing the methodology for 
testing and would welcome input from testing partners.
If you are interested in participating, or have a suggestion of someone 
we should contact, please e-mail one of the national library contacts: 
Dianne McCutcheon (NLM) mccu...@nlm.nih.gov, Christopher Cole (NAL) 
christopher.c...@ars.usda.gov or Beacher Wiggins (LC) b...@loc.gov.


Regards,
Dianne McCutcheon
Chief, Technical Services Division
National Library of Medicine
Bethesda MD 20894
(301) 496-6134
(301) 402-1211 (fax)
 mccu...@mail.nlm.nih.gov


Re: [CODE4LIB] creating call number browse

2008-09-21 Thread Emily Lynema
Well, we're using LC and SUDOC here. What I really want is something 
that is both searchable and browsable, so that users can type in a call 
number and then browse backward and forward as much as they want in call 
number order.


We have Endeca here, so my patrons can browse into the LC scheme and 
then sort the results in call number order, but I don't have a way to 
browse forward and backward starting with a specific call number (like 
you would if you were browsing the shelves physically).


-emily

Keith Jenkins wrote:

Emily,

Are you using LC or Dewey?

A while back, I wanted to generate browsable lists of new books,
organized by topic.  I ended up using the LC call number to group the
titles into manageable groups.  Here's an example:
http://supportingcast.mannlib.cornell.edu/newbooks/?loc=mann

Titles are sorted by call number, and also grouped by the initial
letters of the LC classification, such as Q or QL.  For monthly
lists of new books, most groupings usually have less than 20 titles,
which makes for easy browsing of titles within someone's general
subject of interest.  The Table of Contents at the top of the page
only lists those classifications that are present in the set of titles
currently being viewed.  (In an earlier version, Q would only be split
into QA, QB, etc. if there were more than 20 items with Q call
numbers.)

Things do tend to get a bit out of control in some of the
classifications for literature... no one wants to scan through a list
of 452 titles:
http://supportingcast.mannlib.cornell.edu/newbooks/?class=PL

So for entire collections, a lot more work would be needed to create
finer subgroups, since each classification is uniquely complex.  For
example:
  PL1-8844 : Languages of Eastern Asia, Africa, Oceania
  PL1-481 : Ural-Altaic languages
  PL21-396 : Turkic languages
  PL400-431 : Mongolian languages
  PL450-481 : Tungus Manchu languages

(An idea... maybe it would work to simply forget about pre-determined,
named call number ranges and look for natural breaks in the call
numbers, rather than trying to model the intricate details of each
individual classification schedule.)

The site runs on a set of MARC records extracted from the catalog.
Users can also subscribe to RSS feeds for any combination of location,
language, or classification group.

I did some early experimentation to include cover images, but never
seemed to get enough matches to make that worthwhile.

Keith

Keith Jenkins
GIS/Geospatial Applications Librarian
Mann Library, Cornell University
Ithaca, New York 14853


On Wed, Sep 17, 2008 at 11:46 AM, Emily Lynema [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Hey all,

I would love to tackle the issue of creating a really cool call number
browse tool that utilizes book covers, etc. However, I'd like to do this
outside of my ILS/OPAC. What I don't know is whether there are any indexing
/ SQL / query techniques that could be used to browse forward and backword
in an index like this.

Has anyone else worked on developing a tool like this outside of the OPAC? I
guess I would be perfectly happy even if it was something I could build
directly on top of the ILS database and its indexes (we use SirsiDynix
Unicorn).

I wanted to throw a feeler out there before trying to dream up some wild
scheme on my own.

-emily

P.S. The version of BiblioCommons released at Oakville Public Library has a
sweet call number browse function accessible from the full record page. I
would love to know know how that was accomplished.

http://opl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1413841_mars

--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]



--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] creating call number browse

2008-09-21 Thread Emily Lynema
Well, in this case one of the major goals of this project would be to 
remove the dependency on the OPAC for providing a call number browse. We 
would like to be able to turn off support for our OPAC here at some 
point, since we're not using any longer for keyword searching.


-emily

William C Kurt wrote:

Why not just build a decent cover flow UI over the existing call number
browse in the catalog with Javascript?  Just grab the cover images and
display them using something like http://www.deensoft.com/lab/protoflow/
That way you could recreate the  'browsing' experience, not have to have
the user learn a new tool and not have to worry about how you're going
to implement browsing the call numbers (similar to what the Oakville
Public Library is doing on that page).  


In the past I put together a quick demo of this (not for call numbers,
just for regular search listings) in an evening:
http://lib-bling.com/unr/unrdemo/unrcoverflowdemo.htm 


That's a very rough demo but implementing something similar using
default call number browse in the catalog would probably be not much
more difficult and would provide roughly the experience it seems you're
looking for without having to worry about overly complex solutions.

--Will

Will Kurt
Applications Development Librarian
University of Nevada, Reno
Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center
phone: 775 682-5679
email: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 





-Original Message-
From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
Emily Lynema
Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2008 8:46 AM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] creating call number browse

Hey all,

I would love to tackle the issue of creating a really cool call number 
browse tool that utilizes book covers, etc. However, I'd like to do this


outside of my ILS/OPAC. What I don't know is whether there are any 
indexing / SQL / query techniques that could be used to browse forward 
and backword in an index like this.


Has anyone else worked on developing a tool like this outside of the 
OPAC? I guess I would be perfectly happy even if it was something I 
could build directly on top of the ILS database and its indexes (we use 
SirsiDynix Unicorn).


I wanted to throw a feeler out there before trying to dream up some wild

scheme on my own.

-emily

P.S. The version of BiblioCommons released at Oakville Public Library 
has a sweet call number browse function accessible from the full record 
page. I would love to know know how that was accomplished.


http://opl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1413841_mars



--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


[CODE4LIB] creating call number browse

2008-09-17 Thread Emily Lynema

Hey all,

I would love to tackle the issue of creating a really cool call number 
browse tool that utilizes book covers, etc. However, I'd like to do this 
outside of my ILS/OPAC. What I don't know is whether there are any 
indexing / SQL / query techniques that could be used to browse forward 
and backword in an index like this.


Has anyone else worked on developing a tool like this outside of the 
OPAC? I guess I would be perfectly happy even if it was something I 
could build directly on top of the ILS database and its indexes (we use 
SirsiDynix Unicorn).


I wanted to throw a feeler out there before trying to dream up some wild 
scheme on my own.


-emily

P.S. The version of BiblioCommons released at Oakville Public Library 
has a sweet call number browse function accessible from the full record 
page. I would love to know know how that was accomplished.


http://opl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1413841_mars

--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


[CODE4LIB] REMINDER: Code4Lib Journal call for proposals, December issue, due 9/12

2008-09-02 Thread Emily Lynema
Just a reminder...proposals for the December 2008 issue of the Code4Lib 
Journal are due September 12, one week from this Friday. A first full 
draft of the article itself will not be due until October 17, so you 
still have some time to work.


Consider yourself encouraged to submit a proposal!

-emily lynema
coordinating editor, issue 5

 Original Message 
Subject: Code4Lib Journal call for proposals, December issue
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 21:35:01 -0400
From: Emily Lynema [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: Code for Libraries CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU

Call for Submissions:

The Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ) exists to foster community and share
information among those interested in the intersection of libraries,
technology, and the future.

The Code4Lib Journal is now accepting proposals for publication in its
5th issue. Don't miss out on this opportunity to share your ideas and
experiences in an issue that marks the first full year of publication
for this new journal. To be included in the 5th issue, scheduled for
publication in December 2008, please submit articles, abstracts, or
proposals to [EMAIL PROTECTED] by Friday, September 12,
2008. When submitting, please include the title or subject of the
proposal in the subject line of the message.

C4LJ encourages creativity and flexibility, and the editors welcome
submissions across a broad variety of topics that support the mission of
the journal. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

 * Practical applications of library technology (both actual and
hypothetical)
 * Technology projects (failed, successful, proposed, or
in-progress), including how they were done and challenges faced
 * Case studies
 * Best practices
 * Reviews
 * Comparisons of third party software or libraries
 * Analyses of library metadata for use with technology
 * Project management and communication within the library environment
 * Assessment and user studies

C4LJ strives to promote professional communication by minimizing the
barriers to publication. While articles should be of a high quality,
they need not follow any formal structure. Writers should aim for the
middle ground between blog posts and articles in traditional refereed
journals. Where appropriate, we encourage authors to submit code
samples, algorithms, and pseudo-code.  For more information, visit
C4LJ's Article Guidelines or browse articles from the first 3 issues
published on our website: http://journal.code4lib.org. The 4th issue
will be available in September.

Remember, for consideration for the 5th issue, please send proposals,
abstracts, or draft articles to [EMAIL PROTECTED] no later
than Friday, September 12, 2008.

Send in a submission. Your peers would like to hear what you are doing.

Code4Lib Journal Editorial Committee


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] Innovative DLF ILS-DI code WAS: [CODE4LIB] Update: DLF ILS-DI Developers' Workshop Aug 7

2008-07-17 Thread Emily Lynema

David,

2 email lists that you can start with, although neither one of them is
truly a place to discuss implementation issues.

1. The ILS-DI discussion list on google. See 
http://groups.google.com/group/ils-di.


I created this group to foment discussion surrounding the technical 
recommendation being developed by DLF's ILS Discovery Interface Task 
Group (now published on the DLF site). We have not had a lot of 
technical discussion on this list in the past, but we certainly could.


2. The jangle-discuss discussion list on google. See 
http://groups.google.com/group/jangle-discuss


There's lots of technical discussion going on on this list. Jangle is 
really not an implementation of ILS-DI, but they are interested in using 
ILS-DI connectors to the local ILSs. It's an interesting conversation, 
regardless. Personally, I'd like to see Jangle *be* an implementation of 
ILS-DI, but I know Ross wants to have a little more freedom to develop a 
uniform interface.


-emily

Walker, David wrote:

Hi all,

I'm working on converting a screen-scraping class, written in PHP, I have for 
looking-up bib and availability information in an Innovative systems to the new 
ILS-DI specification, and had a couple of questions:

1. Is there a place (other than the workshop) to discuss issues or questions I 
might have?  A listserv perhaps?

2. Is anyone else thinking about, or currently working on, an implementation 
for Innovative?

Since the company has not agreed to work with the library community on this, 
we're kind of on our own.  I've got a pretty good scraper that can accommodate 
most of the abstract functions in the spec.  But wanted to see if others did 
too, so we might combine efforts.

Thanks!

--Dave

==
David Walker
Library Web Services Manager
California State University
http://xerxes.calstate.edu

From: Code for Libraries [EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Emily Lynema [EMAIL 
PROTECTED]
Sent: Thursday, July 10, 2008 9:22 PM
To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
Subject: [CODE4LIB] Update: DLF ILS-DI Developers' Workshop Aug 7

Now that the DLF technical recommendation is officially published [1], DLF
is trying to help maintain momentum and build a community of implementation
around this project. Toward that end, an ILS-DI Developers' Workshop has
been organized in August for folks to hash out questions and answers about
implementing the first level of the recommendation, Basic Discovery
Interfaces. While this meeting is invitation only to keep the size down,
feel free to let me know if you are involved in this type of implementation
and think you could contribute to this meeting.

Of course, a summary of the outcome of the meeting will be made available in
its aftermath. It is even possible there may be some suggested revisions or
clarifications to the recommendation as we actually begin to write code.

I've included the text of the original inviitation below for all to see. We
hope to keep this topic of APIs and interoperability for our integrated
library systems fresh on your mind, especially as some many of you are
building these types of APIs literally as we speak

-emily lynema

[1] http://diglib.org/architectures/ilsdi/
-

Greetings -

As you may know, the Digital Library Federation has released
the technical recommendation of its ILS Discovery Interface
(ILS-DI) Task Group.  This document recommends basic, standard
interfaces -- known as the Berkeley Accord -- for integrating
the data and services of integrated library systems (ILS) with
new applications supporting user discovery.  The documentation
is available at : http://diglib.org/architectures/ilsdi/ .

The basic discovery interfaces permit libraries to deploy new
discovery services to meet ever-growing user expectations in
the Web 2.0 era, take full advantage of advanced ILS data
management and services, and encourage a strong, innovative
community and marketplace in next-generation library management
and discovery applications.

DLF is planning a developer's workshop for Thursday, August 7,
at the Berkeley Faculty Club on the UC Berkeley campus, in
which parties supporting the Basic Discovery Interfaces can
learn more about the interfaces and how they should be
implemented, meet with potential development partners, and
begin the formation of a community building effective software
services.  Because of the nature of this meeting, we recommend
that staff with a high degree of technical knowledge of your
platform and bibliographic standards and protocols receive
priority for attendance.

The Berkeley Accord and the DLF ILS-DI recommendation are
important first steps in building advanced, interoperable
architectures for bibliographic discovery and use in the
networked world.


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian

Re: [CODE4LIB] implementing cool uris in java

2008-07-09 Thread Emily Lynema
Thanks for the replies, everybody! I'm going to take a look at the Url 
Rewrite Filter pointed out by Peter Kiraly because it looks like the 
simplest solution at this point. We're currently running under glassfish 
on port 80, so I'm hoping to keep Apache out of the mix unless we 
absolutely need it.


-emily

Emily Lynema wrote:



 Original Message 

--

Date:Thu, 3 Jul 2008 00:22:07 -0400
From:Emily Lynema [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: implementing cool uris in java

I'm looking around for tools to implement cool uris in java. I've been
studying the restlet framework tonight, and while it sounds cool, I
think it would also require a complete re-write of an application that
is currently based on the Servlet API. And, of course, I'm working under
a time crunch.

Is there anything out there to assist me in working with cool uris
besides just using regular expressions when parsing URLs?

For example, I'd like to create URLs like:

http://catalog.lib.ncsu.edu/record/123456

instead of:

http://catalog.lib.ncsu.edu/record?id=1234565

-emily


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] Open Source Course reserves management

2008-03-07 Thread Emily Lynema

NC State Univ. Libraries is also beginning work on implementing
ReservesDirect. I think we hope for a trial with a few courses this
summer, and implementation for fall.

-emily lynema


--

Date:Thu, 6 Mar 2008 18:02:48 -0500
From:Ranti Junus [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: Open Source Course reserves management

We (Michigan State University Libraries) looked into the possibility
of implementing this a few years ago, but the final decision was to
utilize the university's course management system instead.

ranti.


On Thu, Mar 6, 2008 at 3:59 PM, Jeffrey Barnett
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Why am I not surprised to learn that you were the original author ;-)
There is no indication of any use outside of Emory.  Are other sites
using it?



Ross Singer wrote:
 Jeffrey,

 Take a look at Reserves Direct from Emory:
 http://reservesdirect.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

 -Ross.

 On Thu, Mar 6, 2008 at 3:06 PM, Jeffrey Barnett
 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Is anyone aware of a standalone or add-on open source package for
  managing electronic and/or digital course reserves?  A commercial
  offering in this area is Aries, but it is not customizable to our
  needs.  Most useful features are monitoring for multiple use of same
  article or chapter and efficient copyright clearance.





--
Bulk mail.  Postage paid.



--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] musing on oca apiRe: [CODE4LIB] oca api?

2008-03-07 Thread Emily Lynema

Tim,

It sounds like you want to be able to search on standard identifiers and
are frustrated that the Internet Archive's access doesn't allow it
(although it looks like they do have an ISBN search)? And I'm curious,
why would you want or need to pull down only records that have OCLC
numbers of ISBNs in particular? What is it you need to do that makes
only those records useful?

Like Karen and Bess and others have said, I recommend that you
coordinate this with the Open Library project. At the meeting last
Friday, it did sound like they would be interested in providing
identifier disambiguation types of service - give them an ISBN, and
they'll give you the records associated with it.

Also, there was discussion about building an Open Librar yAPI (to enable
some cool integration with wikipedia), and I suggested a that libraries
using an API would want the search results to include information about
whether the title has a digitized copy. So I would hope the service that
you're envisioning is something that would be provided by an Open
Library API (but we don't know when that might come about).

As OCA moves forward, folks may well be digitizing identical books. So
there may not be a one to one relationship between unique catalog
identifier, unique oca identifier, and isbn/lccn/oclc number.

-emily



--

Date:Thu, 6 Mar 2008 08:47:04 -0500
From:Tim Shearer [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: musing on oca apiRe: [CODE4LIB] oca api?

Howdy folks,

I've been playing and thinking.  I'd like to have what amounts to a unique
identifier index to oca digitized texts.  I want to be able to pull all the
records that have oclc numbers, issns, isbns, etc.  I want it to be
lightweight, fast, searchable.

Would anyone else want/use such a thing?

I'm thinking about building something like this.

If I do, it would be ideal if wouldn't be a duplication of effort, so anyone
got this in the works?  And if it would meet the needs of others.

My basic notion is to crawl the site (starting with americana, the American
Libraries.  Pull the oca unique identifier (e.g. northcarolinayea1910rale) and
associate it with

unique identifiers (oclc numbers, issns, isbns, lc numbers)
contributing institution's alias and unique catalog identifier
upload date

That's all I was thinking of.  Then there's what you might be able to do with
it:

Give me all the oca unique identifiers that have oclc numbers
Give me all the oca unique identifiers with isbns that were
uploaded between x and y date
Give me the oca unique identifier for this oclc number

Planning to do:

keep crawling it and keep it up to date.

Things I wasn't planning to do:

worry about other unique ids (you'd have to go to xISBN or
ThingISBN yourself)
worry about storing anything else from oca.

It would be good for being able to add an 856 to matches in your catalog. It
would not be good for grabbing all marc records for all of oca.

Anyhow, is this duplication of effort?  Would you like something like this?
What else would you like it to do (keeping in mind this is an unfunded pet
project)?  How would you want to talk to it?  I was thinking of a web service,
but hadn't thought too much about how to query it or how I'd deliver results.

Of course I'm being an idiot and trying out new tools at the same time (python
to see what the buzz is all about, sqlite just to learn it (it may not work
out)).

Thoughts?  Vicious criticism?

-t


--

Date:Thu, 6 Mar 2008 11:05:41 -0500
From:Jodi Schneider [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: musing on oca apiRe: [CODE4LIB] oca api?

Great idea, Tim!

The open library tech list that Bess mentions is [EMAIL PROTECTED],
described at
http://mail.archive.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/ol-tech

-Jodi

Jodi Schneider
Science Library Specialist
Amherst College
413-542-2076





--

Date:Thu, 6 Mar 2008 08:32:43 -0800
From:Karen Coyle [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: musing on oca apiRe: [CODE4LIB] oca api?

We talked about something like this at the Open Library meeting last
Friday. The ol list is [EMAIL PROTECTED] (join at
http://mail.archive.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/ol-lib). I think of
this as a (or one or more) translate service between IDs. It's a
realization that we will never have a unique ID that everyone agrees on,
that most bibliographic items are really more than one thing, but that
since we have data about the bibliographic item we have many
opportunities to make connections even though people have used different
identifiers. So we could use an ID-switcher to move among data stores
and services. Is that the kind of thing you are thinking of?

kc




--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


[CODE4LIB] CORRECTION: DLF ILS Discovery Interface Task Force API recommendations

2008-02-21 Thread Emily Lynema

Thanks to Godmar Back for letting me know that the email list I alluded
to in my original post below is not actually open to posting by
non-members. Oops!

We have now created a completely open google group to invite public
feedback and participation. Feel free to simply send a message [1] or to
join the list [2] so you can monitor posts by others.

-emily

[1] [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[2] http://groups.google.com/group/ils-di

 Original Message 
Subject: DLF ILS Discovery Interface Task Force API recommendations
Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2008 22:30:04 -0500
From: Emily Lynema [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Reply-To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Organization: NCSU Libraries
To: Code for Libraries CODE4LIB@listserv.nd.edu

Just to keep interested folks up to date, the DLF ILS Discovery
Interface Task Force [1],[2] has released a second draft of an API
recommendation that will hopefully serve as a first step toward more
standardized integration between the ILS and external discovery
applications. (The first draft went out to the DLF community in early
November).

Terry Reese and I (both task force members) will be presenting on this
topic next week at code4lib [3], and hopefully also hosting a breakout
session on Wednesday inviting feedback and comments on the draft. We're
looking forward to insight from the library development community on
workable functions and standards and ideas about how we can actually
create these types of open APIs for our ILSs.

Since we can't really cover the nuances of a 43 page draft in a 20
minute presentation, we invite you to peruse a copy of the draft [4] on
the plane so you can point out all the sections where we didn't get
things quite right (or got them quite wrong). We are also soliciting
feedback from the broader library community [5] , so feel free to post a
comment on our wiki [6] or send an email to us [7] if you won't be at
code4lib this year.

-emily

[1]
http://blogs.lib.berkeley.edu/shimenawa.php/2007/06/26/abstracting_the_ils
[2] https://project.library.upenn.edu/confluence/display/ilsapi/Home
[3] http://code4lib.org/conference/2008/lynema
[4]
http://project.library.upenn.edu/confluence/download/attachments/5963787/ILS-DI-Snapshot-2008-Feb15.doc
[5]
http://everybodyslibraries.com/2008/02/15/and-now-your-turn-to-have-a-say-in-ils-interfaces/
[6]
https://project.library.upenn.edu/confluence/display/ilsapi/Draft+Recommendation
[7] [EMAIL PROTECTED]

--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib 2008: Haunted Tours, Breakout sessions, Signups for dinners, and, reminders

2008-02-13 Thread Emily Lynema

Just to put in a plug for one other non-traditional social activity
we're hoping to pull off. There are plans for a trail run on Wednesday
morning around 7am. It'll be a good break from the beer drinking and
coding, so come to the conference prepared with your running shoes!

Details are listed under Outdoor Activities on the 'things to do, places
to go' page:
http://groups.google.com/group/code4libcon/web/portland-in-late-february

Contact Mark Dahl ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) if you have any questions. I
actually know nothing, other than the fact I'm planning on joining the
group. :)

-emily


--

Date:Tue, 12 Feb 2008 22:34:49 -0600
From:Jonathan Gorman [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Code4Lib 2008: Haunted Tours, Breakout sessions, Signups for dinners, 
and reminders

Hi all,

I thought I would send out another update on some of the social activities.  
Hopefully most people got the email recently about a Haunted Tour.  If you 
didn't,  and are interested I've included the text at the bottom of this email.

We have only had a trickle of signups for the tour so far and if we don't get 
more conference services may end up cancelling it.  So try to sign up in the 
next few days if you're interested.

Some may remember earlier I was talking about the Shanghai Tunnel Tour 
(http://cgsstore.tripod.com/id18.html/index.html) and that this isn't quite the 
same one.  There was a miscommunication somewhere along the process and we 
ended up with this tour.  If anyone feels like they would actually go on that 
one but not the Haunted Tour let me know.

If you prefer eating and drinking to walking though, don't feel obliged to sign 
up ;).

Meanwhile, I'll be compiling a list of dinner places that have been posted at 
various spots and we'll try to start setting up ways for individuals and groups 
to let people know where they are planning on eating dinner.  (It's optional, 
but it could help us from flooding a place or at least not be surprised when 
it's full).  We'll hopefully have those up soon.

I've been asked to remind people about the breakout sessions.  For those who 
haven't attended previous years, breakout sessions are a pretty loose block of 
time where a group may gather for a more involved presentation, a group 
discussion, or create some piece of software.  Want to take on Casey Durfee and 
do a whole ILS in 250 lines or less?  Want to talk about Library 3.2?  See who 
can gather the most MARC records in the shortest amount of time?  Discuss the 
impact of archiving of valuable digital historical materials such as
Breakout (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakout)?  Suggest them on the breakout 
signup sheet at http://code4lib.org/conference/2008/breakout.

As a reminder, we've got some interesting lists for social activities created 
by volunteers:

Things to do, places to go
http://groups.google.com/group/code4libcon/web/portland-in-late-february

Some information gathered about size of certain places
http://groups.google.com/group/code4libcon/web/possible-code4lib-dinner-locations

A map of interesting spots
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=enie=UTF8msa=0msid=107913207927802716313.0004447d18ac57a8c07d8z=12om=0

Till next time,


Jon Gorman




== About Haunted Tour =
 Interested in seeing a different side of Portland!  Let off some
steam after a long day at the conference by going on a spooky walking
tour!  Recognized by USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street
Journal, and Fox TV as the Best City Tour.

Wednesday February 27 at 6:30pm.

For a complete description, visit the website at
http://www.portlandwalkingtours.com/tours/bizarre.htm

There are only 25 spots available, cost is $20 per person.  Please
sign up using our registration system, payment will only be accepted
by Visa, MasterCard or Discover.

https://secure.oregonstate.edu/ocs/register.php?event=290



--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


[CODE4LIB] z39.50 holdings schema

2007-12-17 Thread Emily Lynema

Anybody in this group have any experience using / implementing the
z39.50 holdings schema?

http://www.loc.gov/z3950/agency/defns/holdings1-4.html

As part of the DLF ILS Discovery Interface Task Force, we are looking
for a good schema to define holdings and item-related information (such
as circulation status). While MARCXML is always an option for MARC
holdings, I have the sense (aka, I know) that not all institutions /
ILSs create MARC holdings for all records. So it would be nice to have a
schema into which it would be easy to translate either a MARC holdings
record or just local holdings stored in some other way + circulation
information.

The rumor on the street is that z39.50 holdings schema is too complex
and has never really been used. Anyone want to confirm or deny?

I'm also interested in the up and coming ISO Holdings Schema (ISO 20775)
that it sounds like has been motivated along by OCLC-PICA. But I don't
have much information on that, so I'd be interested in hearing from
anyone who knows more about that one, as well.


Thanks,
-emily
--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


[CODE4LIB] [Fwd: z39.50 holdings schema]

2007-12-17 Thread Emily Lynema

Wow, I've never sent a message accidentally when trying to copy-paste
before. It must be a Monday morning.

I meant to include the URL to just about the only (promising-sounding)
snippet of information I've found about the ISO Holdings Schema:

http://www.oclcpica.org/dasat/index.php?cid=100867conid=102196

-emily

 Original Message 
Subject: z39.50 holdings schema
Date: Mon, 17 Dec 2007 09:41:53 -0500
From: Emily Lynema [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Reply-To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Organization: NCSU Libraries
To: Code for Libraries CODE4LIB@listserv.nd.edu

Anybody in this group have any experience using / implementing the
z39.50 holdings schema?

http://www.loc.gov/z3950/agency/defns/holdings1-4.html

As part of the DLF ILS Discovery Interface Task Force, we are looking
for a good schema to define holdings and item-related information (such
as circulation status). While MARCXML is always an option for MARC
holdings, I have the sense (aka, I know) that not all institutions /
ILSs create MARC holdings for all records. So it would be nice to have a
schema into which it would be easy to translate either a MARC holdings
record or just local holdings stored in some other way + circulation
information.

The rumor on the street is that z39.50 holdings schema is too complex
and has never really been used. Anyone want to confirm or deny?

I'm also interested in the up and coming ISO Holdings Schema (ISO 20775)
that it sounds like has been motivated along by OCLC-PICA. But I don't
have much information on that, so I'd be interested in hearing from
anyone who knows more about that one, as well.


Thanks,
-emily
--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] LC class scheme in XML or spreadsheet?

2007-09-27 Thread Emily Lynema

Since Kevin and Tod were interested in the data, I've uploaded to the
web. You can download either the Access database or the tab-delimited
data export from here:

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/staff/ejlynema/lc/

I noted on the page that this data is only available for public domain
use within the US (according to my understanding of the copyright). So I
guess if you wanted to use it outside of the US, you'd need to contact
LC regarding permission. Maybe someone else can correct me if I'm wrong
on that.

I noticed the the tab-delimited export doesn't include the column
headers, so you may need to look at the database to figure out what's
going on. It's pretty self-explanatory, except the last column of data
represents the level within the hierarchy for the call number range.

Let me know if anybody has questions.

-emily

Kevin S. Clarke wrote:

I'd be interested in seeing it.

Thanks,
Kevin


On 9/26/07, Emily Lynema [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


I also have the LC data. Right now it's in an Access database that
includes the start and end of each call number range, and its level in
the hierarchy. Which, of course, can become a number of other data
formats as desired. :) I've exported it as delimited text to parse into
XML via Perl in the past (unfortunately that XML format is proprietary
and not useful to others).

I don't have it posted for download anywhere, but could do if folks are
interested.

-emily



--

Date:Mon, 24 Sep 2007 20:18:40 -0400
From:Ed Summers [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: LC class scheme in XML or spreadsheet?

It's funny this subject just came up on one of the open-library
discussion lists this week [1]. A whiles ago now Rob Sanderson, Brian
Rhea (University of Liverpool) and I pulled down the LC Classification
Outline pdf files, converted them to text, wrote a python munger to
convert the text into what ended up being a SKOS RDF file. We made the
code available [2] and you can see the resulting SKOS (which needs
some URI work) [3].

It's kind of a work in progress (still). I wanted to get to the point
that the rdf file was leveraged in a little python library (possibly
as a pickled data structure) for easily validating LC numbers and
looking them up in the outline.

I'd be interested in any feedback.

//Ed

[1] http://mail.archive.org/pipermail/ol-lib/2007-September/69.html
[2] http://inkdroid.org/svn/lcco-skos/trunk/rdfizer/
[3] http://inkdroid.org/tmp/lcco.rdf

--

End of CODE4LIB Digest - 21 Sep 2007 to 24 Sep 2007 (#2007-184)
***


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]



--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] LC class scheme in XML or spreadsheet?

2007-09-26 Thread Emily Lynema

I also have the LC data. Right now it's in an Access database that
includes the start and end of each call number range, and its level in
the hierarchy. Which, of course, can become a number of other data
formats as desired. :) I've exported it as delimited text to parse into
XML via Perl in the past (unfortunately that XML format is proprietary
and not useful to others).

I don't have it posted for download anywhere, but could do if folks are
interested.

-emily


--

Date:Mon, 24 Sep 2007 20:18:40 -0400
From:Ed Summers [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: LC class scheme in XML or spreadsheet?

It's funny this subject just came up on one of the open-library
discussion lists this week [1]. A whiles ago now Rob Sanderson, Brian
Rhea (University of Liverpool) and I pulled down the LC Classification
Outline pdf files, converted them to text, wrote a python munger to
convert the text into what ended up being a SKOS RDF file. We made the
code available [2] and you can see the resulting SKOS (which needs
some URI work) [3].

It's kind of a work in progress (still). I wanted to get to the point
that the rdf file was leveraged in a little python library (possibly
as a pickled data structure) for easily validating LC numbers and
looking them up in the outline.

I'd be interested in any feedback.

//Ed

[1] http://mail.archive.org/pipermail/ol-lib/2007-September/69.html
[2] http://inkdroid.org/svn/lcco-skos/trunk/rdfizer/
[3] http://inkdroid.org/tmp/lcco.rdf

--

End of CODE4LIB Digest - 21 Sep 2007 to 24 Sep 2007 (#2007-184)
***


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


[CODE4LIB] Position: Endeca Implementation Librarian (Research Triangle Park, NC)

2007-02-22 Thread Emily Lynema

This announcement has been cross-posted to multiple lists. My apologies
for the duplication.

This position will work closely with my position. Please feel free to
contact me directly with any questions.

***

POSITION: TRLN Endeca Implementation Librarian
*12-month Fixed Term Appointment*

AVAILABLE: March 1, 2007

The Triangle Research Libraries Network seeks a motivated, innovative,
collaborative, and knowledgeable individual to work with the member
libraries to develop a next-generation consortial library catalog. The
position offers an excellent opportunity to work with talented staff
across four research institutions. The new catalog will be based on the
award-winning Endeca Information Access Platform and will greatly
enhance access to the combined TRLN resources.

The TRLN Endeca Implementation Librarian will serve as technical lead
for the implementation of a shared library catalog across the
collections of the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill), Duke
University, North Carolina State University, and North Carolina Central
University. The Implementation Librarian will work directly with
cross-institutional teams to identify data and user interface
requirements, and with technical staff at Endeca to implement the
capabilities of the system. The Implementation Librarian will also be
responsible for building back-end server processes and developing the
front-end user interface (Java).

QUALIFICATIONS
Required
• ALA-accredited Masters degree or an equivalent combination of relevant
education and experience
• Experience programming with Java
• Experience developing web sites including XHTML, CSS, and Javascript
• Knowledge of library metadata formats, particularly MARC
• Facility with Unix/Linux operating system in a server environment
• Working knowledge of a scripting language
• Excellent communication skills and ability to work in a collaborative
team environment

Preferred
• Experience creating Java web applications using a JSP/Java
Bean/Servlet framework
• Experience with Perl scripting language
• Demonstrated project management skills
• Familiarity with integrated library systems

TRIANGLE RESEARCH LIBRARIES NETWORK
Founded in 1977 and based on cooperation among academic research
libraries of the Research Triangle dating back to 1933, Triangle
Research Libraries Network is a resource-sharing consortium consisting
of Duke University, North Carolina Central University (NCCU), North
Carolina State University (NCSU), and the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill). The libraries of the four institutions
encompass collections of professional schools in business, law, and
health sciences, in addition to major research resources in the
humanities, social sciences, engineering, sciences, and technology. The
member libraries have combined holdings approaching twelve million
volumes, employ over a thousand staff, and have budgets totaling in
excess of sixty million dollars.


THE UNIVERSITY AND THE LIBRARIES
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill hosts the TRLN offices
and is the country’s oldest state university. UNC Chapel Hill has an
enrollment of approximately 27,000 students, employs more than 3,100
faculty, offers 77 doctoral degrees as well as professional degrees in
dentistry, medicine, pharmacy and law; and the Library collections
include over 5.7 million volumes. The Library is a member of the
Association of Research Libraries, the Center for Research Libraries,
the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) and SOLINET.

The Triangle region is one of the most desirable places to live and work
in North America and offers its residents a wide array of recreational,
cultural and intellectual activities. The mountains and the seashore are
each less than a half-day’s drive from Chapel Hill.

The University of North Carolina is an equal opportunity employer and is
strongly committed to the diversity of our faculty and staff.


SALARY AND BENEFITS
This is a twelve-month fixed term appointment with the possibility of a
one year renewal. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and
experience. Standard state benefits of annual leave, sick leave, and
State or optional retirement plan.


DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION
Review of applications will begin on February 25, 2007. Applications
will be accepted until the position is filled.

TO APPLY
Applications may be submitted electronically or in print. Send a letter
of application, a resume and the names, addresses, and telephone numbers
of three professional references to:
TRLN Endeca Implementation Librarian
c/o Tiffany Allen, Personnel Librarian
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
CB #3900, 213 Davis Library
Chapel Hill, NC 27514-8890
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

-
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] Polls open for Code4Lib 2007 T-Shirt design

2007-01-26 Thread Emily Lynema

Even though I didn't vote for this design, I would vote for the shorter
wording. But I will point out that it seems slightly less than
democratic to have folks choose a design, and then re-do that design w/o
putting it up for another vote on code4lib.

Maybe I'm being too picky?

-emily

Edward Corrado wrote:

I like the wording, providing it isn't too long for artistic purposes.

Edward

Ben Ostrowsky said the following on 1/26/2007 10:45 AM:


Well, if it's open for a rewrite, perhaps something like:

It was hopeless.  Maude and Agnes had cracked top-secret
messages during World War II, but even Bletchley Park's
finest cryptographers were mystified by the enigmatic 008.

At the risk of dissecting frogs, I think it telegraphs the context and
puts the punchline where it belongs: at the end.  It also breaks well
into three lines.

Ben



--
Edward M. Corrado
http://www.tcnj.edu/~corrado/
Systems Librarian
The College of New Jersey
403E TCNJ Library
PO Box 7718 Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
Tel: 609.771.3337  Fax: 609.637.5177
Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


Re: [CODE4LIB] Limiting by availability (was Re: [CODE4LIB] Getting data from Voyager into XML?)

2007-01-19 Thread Emily Lynema

At NCSU, we don't have any survey or focus group data about user
interest in limiting by availability. But we do have an availability
limit on our catalog search results page. It's a link at the top of the
page that says 'limit results to currently available items'.

http://www2.lib.ncsu.edu/catalog/?N=0Nty=1Ntk=Keywordview=fullNtt=deforestation

Thought maybe folks would be interested in our stats. I'm generalizing a
bit with these figures, but I think they give a feel for usage.

For the period July - November 2006, we saw approximately 5,746
uses of the limit to available functionality. If you compare that with
total use of our various facets (including our 'new book' facet), that's
out of 352,292 (about 1.6%). It's actually our least used facet (*gasp*).

In that time period, we also processed about 538,283 search requests.
So maybe just under 1.1% of search requests used an availability limit.

Of course, like any statistic, interpreting it is fraught with danger.
Do people not use it b/c it's too small? Would it be more useful if it
was placed elsewhere on the screen? Would folks use it less if it wasn't
at the top? What if we changed the wording?

The problem we always face with this type of statistics is: what the
heck to do with those numbers?

-emily lynema

Steve Toub wrote:

Jonathan Rochkind wrote:


Patrons definitly want to be able to limit on availability. And I don't
think anyone's figured out a good way to do that in this generation of
export and index search tools we are experimenting with.



Does anyone have hard data (e.g., surveys, focus groups... anything more
than anecdotes) on this?
   --SET


--
Emily Lynema
Systems Librarian for Digital Projects
Information Technology, NCSU Libraries
919-513-8031
[EMAIL PROTECTED]