Re: [CODE4LIB] code4lib 2009

2008-06-26 Thread Gabriel Sean Farrell
On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 07:09:25PM -0400, Ed Summers wrote:
 Carl Malamud: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Malamud
 
 Long time advocate for Internet technologies for the public good. Most
 recently involved with making public domain data sets available to the
 public w/ public.resource.org.

I second Malamud.  I also nominate:


Joseph Lucia  http://library.villanova.edu/services/director/index.html

University Librarian at Villanova University who has been active around
the call for developers in libraries [0].  


Adrian Holovaty http://www.holovaty.com/

Co-creator of Django, the Python web framework.  Currently working on
EveryBlock, an ambitious mash-up of data into an attractive interface. 


[0] 
http://acrlog.org/2007/11/27/how-libraries-might-once-again-become-technology-leaders/


Re: [CODE4LIB] free movie cover images?

2008-05-19 Thread Gabriel Sean Farrell
On Mon, May 19, 2008 at 11:39:06AM -0400, Ken Irwin wrote:
 With some limitations, the Google Books API allows folks to access book
 covers for free. (How's that working out? Anyone having luck with it?)
 -- what about movie/DVD/VHS covers? Are there any free sources for those
 images?

 I'd like to work up a virtual-browsing interface for our library's
 pretty small collection of feature films, and I'd love to include
 covers. Any ideas on how I might get them? Anyone else doing this?

I've had some success with UPCs and worldcat.org for the Drexel
Libraries Video Search[1].  A lot of our records lack an 024, though, so
I fall back to ISBNs on Amazon, but the hit rate isn't as good there.

For a collection the size of our video collection, we've considered just
scanning them ourselves.

Neither IMDB nor Netflix have public APIs yet.

Gabriel

[1] http://www.library.drexel.edu/video/


Re: [CODE4LIB] marc records sample set

2008-05-09 Thread Gabriel Sean Farrell
On Fri, May 09, 2008 at 11:58:03AM -0700, Casey Durfee wrote:
 On Fri, May 9, 2008 at 11:14 AM, Bess Sadler [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 
  Casey, you say you're getting indexing times of 1000 records /
  second? That's amazing! I really have to take a closer look at
  MarcThing. Could pymarc really be that much faster than marc4j? Or
  are we comparing apples to oranges since we haven't normalized for
  the kinds of mapping we're doing and the hardware it's running on?
 

 Well, you can't take a closer look at it yet, since I haven't gotten off my
 lazy butt and released it.  We're still using an older version of the
 project in production on LT.  I'm going to cut us over to the latest version
 this weekend.  At this point, being able to say we eat our own dogfood is
 the only barrier to release.

Looking forward to the release.  I'd be interested to see how it
compares to the pymarc-indexer branch in FBO/Helios [1].

 The last indexer I wrote (the one used by fac-back-opac) used marc4j and was
 around 100-150 a second.  Some of the boost was due to better designed code
 on my end, but I can't take too much credit.  Pymarc is much, much faster.
 I never bothered to figure out why.  (That wasn't why I switched, though --
 there are some problems with parsing ANSEL with marc4j (*) which I decided
 I'd rather be mauled by bears than try and fix -- the performance boost was
 just a pleasant surprise). Of course one could use pymarc from java with
 Jython.

On the small set of documents I'm now indexing (3327) I get 141
rec/sec.  This is on my test server, an AMD64 whose processor speed I
can't recall.  That rate includes pymarc processing (~65%) and the
loading of the CSV file into SOLR (~35%).  Surely there's some room
there for optimization, but it's fast enough for my current purposes.
Also, I'm in the camp that would be happy with a ~10,000 record test
set.  There will always be some edge cases that we'll only solve as
they're encountered.  I need rapid iteration!

Gabriel

[1] http://fruct.us/trac/fbo/browser/branches/pymarc-indexer/indexer


Re: [CODE4LIB] Usability evaluation of library online catalogues

2008-02-04 Thread Gabriel Sean Farrell
On Mon, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:36:55PM -0500, David Fiander wrote:
 Markus,

 Thanks. It's also available in the ACM digital library, which is where
 I found it.

Speaking of usability, why is it I can search for the exact title
(usability evaluation of library online catalogues) at the ACM digital
library and the article is the 15th hit in the results?

Gabriel


Re: [CODE4LIB] low-cost software for prison libraries?

2008-02-01 Thread Gabriel Sean Farrell
On Wed, Jan 30, 2008 at 11:54:32PM -0500, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:
 Begin forwarded message:

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Date: January 30, 2008 9:12:19 PM EST
 To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Subject: [prison-l] Library automation software

 Greetings:

 Last month there was some discussion here about cheap/free/
 reasonably priced automation software for correctional libraries.
 I am on a statewide committee which has just been formed to
 research and recommend a software package to replace Athena
 (formerly by Sagebrush, now Follett) in most of the correctional
 libraries in Virginia.  After years in public libraries I am very
 familiar with some of the big vendors, but they are simply
 financially out of the question for our agency, not to mention web-
 based.

I might be misunderstanding here.  Is their a limitation that precludes
web-based systems?  If so, that would cut down your options quite a bit.

 I have looked at the websites for LibraryThing, Auto Librarian, and
 ResourceMate, which were recommended here in the previous
 discussion.  If you know of or have a circ/cat system that is
 reasonably priced (or dirt cheap) and works well for you, please
 share the information with me, with pros and cons if you like.  All
 replies greatly appreciated, and thanks in advance.

I've recommended LibraryThing for similarly small libraries before.  It
handles the cataloging and browsing aspects quite well, but lacks any
kind of circ.  If you're looking for a full system I'd recommend Koha.
It would serve your needs very well, especially if you have any funds at
all to put toward a techie or two.  If you'd rather, you can pay Liblime
to host the system for a lot less than the big vendors charge for
similar services.
(See http://liblime.com/products/koha/koha-zoom/koha-zoom-hosted)

Gabriel