Re: [CODE4LIB] Hours on Library Websites?

2016-07-07 Thread Tom Keays
We use LibCal's hours module to create calendars for our locations (just
the one actually, but we use a sub-location to track when patrons need to
swipe their card for evening entry). LibCal hours has a module that can be
embedded to display a rolling monthly calendar.

http://resources.library.lemoyne.edu/about/hours

Because there isn't a similar module to display a weekly calendar, I had to
roll my own using the JSONP output from the LibCal API. Here's a version of
the code I wrote.

http://codepen.io/tomkeays/pen/MYewYN?editors=001



On Thu, Jul 7, 2016 at 10:33 AM, Matt Sherman 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> We are working on a website migration/redesign into WordPress and I am
> trying to figure out an automated solution for posting and keeping up
> to date the hours on the home page.  I am wondering, how do other
> institutions manage this?  Are there any good tools I should be
> looking into?  Any insights or suggestions are appreciated.
>
> Matt Sherman
>


Re: [CODE4LIB] Help me build a QA dataset for a Wayback search engine

2016-04-21 Thread Tom Keays
I am almost always looking for a known website to find some lost piece of
information, so I'll be interested in how a topic search interface would
actually work.

Of no utility to your question, but fun: the wayback_exe project, where a
bot runs against the Wayback Machine API and makes a screen grab of a
vintage website which it then frames inside the context of a vintage
browser. It's really quite a fascinating look back in time. The bot posts
results to Twitter every couple of hours. I'm unclear how the target pages
are seeded.

https://twitter.com/wayback_exe

On Thu, Apr 21, 2016 at 4:59 PM, Greg Lindahl  wrote:

> I'm working on a search engine for the Internet Archive's Wayback
> Machine web archive, and we're at the stage where we could use a
> diverse set of web search queries for quality assessment. If you have
> a few spare minutes, please fill out the form at:
>
> http://goo.gl/forms/HThG6R9Pp0
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> -- greg
>


Re: [CODE4LIB] Interim data storage for researchers

2016-04-12 Thread Tom Keays
Nature magazine recommends figshare or the Dryad Digital Repository. They
also list others by subject.

http://www.figshare.com/
http://www.datadryad.org/
http://www.nature.com/sdata/data-policies/repositories

On Tue, Apr 12, 2016 at 8:25 AM, K. Godfrey 
wrote:

> Hi all
>
> We've been approached by a researcher who would like our assistance in
> storing data (various file types) on an on-going project (not at a data
> preservation stage yet). The researcher wants to be able to access, add and
> change this data from their project site and allow her fellow research
> partners (not necessarily at our institution) access as well. Are any other
> folks offering this kind of service? Have you partnered with campus IT to
> make this happen? Are you using particular software, such as DataVerse or
> Pydio to facilitate such a service? Thanks!
>
> Krista
>
> K r i s t a G o d f r e y
>
> 
>
>
> Interim Head, Library Information Technology Services/
> Web Services Librarian
> Library IT Services
> Queen Elizabeth II Library
> Memorial University of Newfoundland
> St. John's, NL
> A1B 3Y1
> t:709-864-3753
>
>
> 
>
> "He's like Super Librarian, y'know?
> Everyone forgets, Willow, that knowledge is the ultimate weapon."
> -  Buffy the Vampire Slayer
>


Re: [CODE4LIB] looking for free hosting for html code

2015-05-22 Thread Tom Keays
GitHub Pages is one way. You can even use CNAME to wrap them within another
domain.

https://pages.github.com/
https://help.github.com/articles/tips-for-configuring-a-cname-record-with-your-dns-provider/

On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 8:40 AM, Sarles Patricia (18K500) 
psar...@schools.nyc.gov wrote:

 Thank you to everyone for pointing me to free HTML editors.

 I've been using this one successfully:

 http://editra.org/download

 on my Mac at work running OS 10.5.8.

 I plan to teach coding to my 6th and 12th grade students next school year
 and our lab has a mixture of old (2008) and new Macs (2015) so I want to
 make all the Macs functional for writing code in an editor.

 My next question is this:

 I am familiar with free Web creation and hosting sites like Weebly, Wix,
 Google sites, Wikispaces, WordPress, and Blogger, but do you know of any
 free hosting sites that will allow you to plug in your own code. i.e. host
 your own html files?

 I had my students create wikis and blogs this year as a place for them to
 put their projects and writing.

 I linked to all my students' work from my own blog:

 http://pascrs2014.blogspot.com

 and you will see if you click on one of them, for example this one:

 http://ajb96crs.wikispaces.com/New+TChart

 from my blog, I can link to all of my students' work.

 For next year, I want my students to create original sites for their
 original content that I can link to from a single location, e.g. a blog I
 create.

 If all students are creating files with code with no place to host their
 files, then I wouldn't be able to do this.

 So I am looking for a site that will host html files for free.

 I hope this is clear.

 Many thanks for your input!

 Patricia


 
 Patricia Sarles, MA (Anthropology), MLS
 Librarian
 Jerome Parker Campus Library
 100 Essex Drive
 Staten Island, NY 10314
 718-370-6900 x1322
 psar...@schools.nyc.gov
 http://jeromeparkercampus.libguides.com/home

 You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You can tell whether
 a man is wise by his questions. - Naguib Mahfouz

 As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the
 best information. - Benjamin Disraeli



Re: [CODE4LIB] Library Hours

2015-05-06 Thread Tom Keays
I'd like to find out how and why Google is parsing this information. If you
go to the the SFPL hours page (first link in the Google results), and look
at the source code, this is all you find.
http://sfpl.org/index.php?pg=010101
Is the ID in the DIV sufficient?  It would be nice to have a set of use
cases to work from.

Currently, I'm generating a weekly hours box by pulling JSONP from the
hours API of LibCal. I could easily output this in schema.org format (and
probably will now), but can Google pick up the information from the DOM if
it is delivered as JSON and transformed into HTML?

div id=library-hours
  h2Hours/h2
  table class=hours cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0
tr
  thSun/th
  thMon/th
  thTue/th
  th class=todayWed/th
  thThu/th
  thFri/th
  thSat/th
/tr
tr
  td12-5/td
  td10-6/td
  td9-8/td
  td class=today9-8/td
  td9-8/td
  td12-6/td
  td10-6/td
/tr
  /table
/div


On Wed, May 6, 2015 at 9:47 AM, Karen Coyle li...@kcoyle.net wrote:

 Charlie, I don't know of any libraries that have used schema.org for
 their web site - perhaps others do. If it is used, it should be picked up
 the next time the search engines index the site. What the search engines do
 with schema.org is not guaranteed, but can be observed. It is not
 guaranteed because none of the search engines will say what they do, as
 that is considered a trade secret (especially from each other).

 However, as locations and hours are important for their commercial
 customers (stores, restaurants, etc.) I would expect that to be picked up
 as a matter of course. Note that already locations and hours for some
 businesses do show in the search engines, and that is for sites that are
 not yet using schema.org, so the engines have some way of picking that up
 from the HTML. The Google side-bar knowledge graph for my local libraries
 shows  Hours 
 https://www.google.com/search?sa=Xbiw=1299bih=561q=san+francisco+public+library+larkin+street+hoursstick=H4sIAGOovnz8BQMDgzYHnxCXfq6-gVlZhbF5sZZ0drKVfk5-cmJJZn4enGGVkV9aVBzLKeznIsHxlTMy2S10V0iJwvZlMgBPWBDOSAei=qhlKVcKWJ8b7oQS65oCQCAved=0CJgBEOgTMBA:

 Open today · 9:00 am – 8:00 pm javascript:void(0)
  but I have no idea where that comes from.

 kc


 On 5/6/15 5:22 AM, Charlie Morris wrote:

 I'm curious, Karen, Ethan or anyone else, do you know of any examples of
 libraries that have implemented schema.org or RDFa for hours data and
 have
 noticed that Google or some other search engine has picked it up (i.e.,
 correctly displaying that data as part of the search results)?  And if so,
 how quickly will Google or the like pickup on changes to hours (i.e.,
 shifting between semesters or unplanned changes)?

 On Wed, May 6, 2015 at 8:15 AM, Ethan Gruber ewg4x...@gmail.com wrote:

  +1 on the RDFa and schema.org. For those that don't know the library URL
 off-hand, it is much easier to find a library website by Googling than it
 is to go through the central university portal, and the hours will show
 up
 at the top of the page after having been harvested by search engines.

 On Tue, May 5, 2015 at 6:54 PM, Karen Coyle li...@kcoyle.net wrote:

  Note that library hours is one of the possible bits of information that
 could be encoded as RDFa in the library web site, thus making it
 possible
 to derive library hours directly from the listing of hours on the web

 site

 rather than keeping a separate list. Schema.org does have the elements

 such

 that hours can be encoded. This would mean that hours could show in the
 display of the library's catalog entry on Google, Yahoo and Bing. Being
 available directly through the search engines might be sufficient, not
 necessitating creating yet-another-database for that data.

 Schema.org uses a restaurant as its opening hours example, but much of

 the

 data would be the same for a library:

 div vocab=http://schema.org/; typeof=Restaurant
span property=nameGreatFood/span
div property=aggregateRating  typeof=AggregateRating
  span property=ratingValue4/span stars -
  based on span property=reviewCount250/span reviews
/div
div property=address  typeof=PostalAddress
  span property=streetAddress1901 Lemur Ave/span
  span property=addressLocalitySunnyvale/span,
  span property=addressRegionCA/span span
 property=postalCode94086/span
/div
span property=telephone(408) 714-1489/span
a property=url href=http://www.dishdash.com;www.greatfood.com
 /a
Hours:
meta property=openingHours content=Mo-Sa 11:00-14:30Mon-Sat
 11am

 -

 2:30pm
meta property=openingHours content=Mo-Th 17:00-21:30Mon-Thu
 5pm -
 9:30pm
meta property=openingHours content=Fr-Sa 17:00-22:00Fri-Sat
 5pm -
 10:00pm
Categories:
span property=servesCuisine
  Middle Eastern
/span,
span property=servesCuisine
  Mediterranean
/span
Price Range: span property=priceRange$$/span
Takes Reservations: Yes
 /div

 It seems to me 

Re: [CODE4LIB] Library Hours Fail

2015-01-13 Thread Tom Keays
Here's a status update on how I am using the LibCal Hours API to display
hours on my library's homepage.  For MPOW, the API gave me a URL for JSON
as:

https://api3.libcal.com/api_hours_grid.php?iid=567format=jsonweeks=1

The problem I had was that the LibCal v2 documentation didn't say how to
obtain JSONP rather than JSON in order to avoid the CORS problem. I
resigned myself to writing my own custom PHP script to turn the LibCal JSON
into JSONP, but Emily King pointed me in the right direction and a
programmer at SpringShare advised me that all I had to do was to add the
string callback=? at the end of the URL to generate JSONP directly.
E.G.,

https://api3.libcal.com/api_hours_grid.php?iid=567format=jsonweeks=1callback=
?

After playing around with several other APIs to gain experience working
with JSON, I have come to realize this is a common practice (adding the
callback attribute) and that it is often undocumented. I guess you are just
supposed to know.

Here's a codepen displaying the current week's hours. If the currently_open
attribute for a given day is set to true -- i.e., is it today and are we
currently open -- a CSS class is added to highlight that day in the list.

http://codepen.io/tomkeays/pen/MYewYN?editors=001

Our situation is that we have extended hours from 9 pm - 2 am from Sunday -
Thursday, when patrons have to use their ID cards as keycards to swipe and
gain entrance to the building. LibCal let me set this up quite easily. In
the pen, if you change the offset from 0 to 1 (from current week to next
week), you can see what that looks like.

Tom



On Mon, Dec 15, 2014 at 4:11 PM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 I've been playing with the hours options in LibCal. I especially like
 being able to pull out today's hours so easily. LibCal gives you options to
 do this using HTML (iframe), JavaScript, JSON, or RSS.

 HTML and JavaScript both format the output in a table, which is probably
 desirable if you have multiple locations, but maybe less good if you have
 one location only. That made me want to look into rolling my own solution
 using the JSON option.

 The problem is that to avoid XSS vulnerabilities, you can't use plain
 JSON, but must instead use JSONP, which is NOT an option being offered by
 LibCal (if anybody knows otherwise, I'd appreciate the information).

 So, my solution was to write a meatball PHP script that wraps the JSON in
 a JSONP callback. I wish I didn't have to do the extra server hop, but it
 works. Here's my demo.

 http://codepen.io/tomkeays/pen/EaKrgg/?editors=101

 Now, I wish there was a JSON option to display a week's worth of hours for
 a given location instead of just the one day's worth.


 On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 4:17 PM, Heidi Steiner Burkhardt 
 hmstei...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hi Mary,

 You mentioned LibCal and I do not think anyone else has addressed this
 yet...you can use the Hours module for one location with the free version
 http://www.springshare.com/free.html. The one location piece is the
 only
 limitation...so it should work for you if you just need it for one
 library's hours. It is what we use on our website
 http://academics.norwich.edu/library/about/hours/. You can set the
 hours
 for the whole year (using templates and exceptions) and then do not have
 to
 worry about it. There are a few different widget/API options
 http://help.springshare.com/usinghourslc/widgetapi.

 All best,
 Heidi

 --
 Heidi Steiner Burkhardt
 Head of Digital Services
 Kreitzberg Library, Norwich University
 158 Harmon Dr. Northfield, Vermont
 802.485.2171




 On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 9:18 AM, Mary E. Hanlin mhan...@reynolds.edu
 wrote:

  Hi All,
 
  I know this has been covered a bit here, but I have a rather exigent
  conundrum, and I'm hoping to figure out the best/easiest solution.
  Yesterday, the script to hour library hours (on our front page) which
 pulls
  from Google calendar stopped working (Error at line undefined in
  undefined[!] - the exclamation point is mine; it seemed like it needed
  one.)
 
  Basically, the code came from a site that walked one through how to call
  daily hours (javascript) using Google's V2 API, but the V2 is fully
  deprecated (as I abruptly discovered), and I need to figure out another
  solution.  (I haven't been able to find similar documentation for V3's
 API.)
 
  Some constraints: 1. Our IT will not support php.We are an .NET shop
  with IIS servers.  2. We may not have the dough to pay for something
 like
  LibCal which seems to me the easiest solution.  3.  I'm semi-new to this
  Internets/webmaster thing, and really only know front-end coding, so a
  solution involving something like .NET, Python, etc. would have to have,
  How to make a peanut butter sandwich, kind of documentation.
 
  Right now, I've just manually coded our hours, which is fine until
  Saturday when our hours change, and I'm not here (hopefully).  I will be
  super grateful for insight or knowledge.
 
  Mary.
 
  Mary Hanlin

Re: [CODE4LIB] Library Hours Fail

2014-12-15 Thread Tom Keays
I've been playing with the hours options in LibCal. I especially like being
able to pull out today's hours so easily. LibCal gives you options to do
this using HTML (iframe), JavaScript, JSON, or RSS.

HTML and JavaScript both format the output in a table, which is probably
desirable if you have multiple locations, but maybe less good if you have
one location only. That made me want to look into rolling my own solution
using the JSON option.

The problem is that to avoid XSS vulnerabilities, you can't use plain JSON,
but must instead use JSONP, which is NOT an option being offered by LibCal
(if anybody knows otherwise, I'd appreciate the information).

So, my solution was to write a meatball PHP script that wraps the JSON in a
JSONP callback. I wish I didn't have to do the extra server hop, but it
works. Here's my demo.

http://codepen.io/tomkeays/pen/EaKrgg/?editors=101

Now, I wish there was a JSON option to display a week's worth of hours for
a given location instead of just the one day's worth.


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 4:17 PM, Heidi Steiner Burkhardt 
hmstei...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hi Mary,

 You mentioned LibCal and I do not think anyone else has addressed this
 yet...you can use the Hours module for one location with the free version
 http://www.springshare.com/free.html. The one location piece is the only
 limitation...so it should work for you if you just need it for one
 library's hours. It is what we use on our website
 http://academics.norwich.edu/library/about/hours/. You can set the hours
 for the whole year (using templates and exceptions) and then do not have to
 worry about it. There are a few different widget/API options
 http://help.springshare.com/usinghourslc/widgetapi.

 All best,
 Heidi

 --
 Heidi Steiner Burkhardt
 Head of Digital Services
 Kreitzberg Library, Norwich University
 158 Harmon Dr. Northfield, Vermont
 802.485.2171




 On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 9:18 AM, Mary E. Hanlin mhan...@reynolds.edu
 wrote:

  Hi All,
 
  I know this has been covered a bit here, but I have a rather exigent
  conundrum, and I'm hoping to figure out the best/easiest solution.
  Yesterday, the script to hour library hours (on our front page) which
 pulls
  from Google calendar stopped working (Error at line undefined in
  undefined[!] - the exclamation point is mine; it seemed like it needed
  one.)
 
  Basically, the code came from a site that walked one through how to call
  daily hours (javascript) using Google's V2 API, but the V2 is fully
  deprecated (as I abruptly discovered), and I need to figure out another
  solution.  (I haven't been able to find similar documentation for V3's
 API.)
 
  Some constraints: 1. Our IT will not support php.We are an .NET shop
  with IIS servers.  2. We may not have the dough to pay for something like
  LibCal which seems to me the easiest solution.  3.  I'm semi-new to this
  Internets/webmaster thing, and really only know front-end coding, so a
  solution involving something like .NET, Python, etc. would have to have,
  How to make a peanut butter sandwich, kind of documentation.
 
  Right now, I've just manually coded our hours, which is fine until
  Saturday when our hours change, and I'm not here (hopefully).  I will be
  super grateful for insight or knowledge.
 
  Mary.
 
  Mary Hanlin
  Electronic Resources and Web Librarian
  J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College
  Phone:804.523.5323
  Email: mhan...@reynolds.edu
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] looking for a good PHP table-manipulating class

2014-12-11 Thread Tom Keays
Ken: are you looking for pivot table functions?  I thought you were
describing something more akin to the Excel TRANSPOSE function.

If you are looking for a pivot table library, ADO is a good abstraction
library and has it built in.
http://phplens.com/adodb/pivot.tables.html

If you want to transpose a table, then look for 'php array transposing'. I
don't know of a specific library, but you can find examples in
stackoverflow, etc.



On Thu, Dec 11, 2014 at 7:28 PM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:

 Of course, the easiest thing to do is search for “php pivot tables”. There
 are many libraries for this, although I don’t recall any that output “plain
 text”. There are some ultra-slick ones that you can buy if you want the
 output to look like something from Excel in 1998.

 Cary


  On Dec 11, 2014, at 4:15 PM, Cary Gordon listu...@chillco.com wrote:
 
  Where do the data come from? An array?
 
  Cary
 
  On Dec 11, 2014, at 1:32 PM, Ken Irwin kir...@wittenberg.edu wrote:
 
  Hi folks,
 
  I'm hoping to find a PHP class that designed to display data in tables,
 preferably able to do two things:
  1. Swap the x- and y-axis, so you could arbitrarily show the table with
 y=Puppies, x=Kittens or y=Kittens,x=Puppies
  2. Display the table either using plain text columns or formatted html
 
  I feel confident that in a world of 7 billion people, someone must have
 wanted this before.
 
  Any ideas?
 
  Thanks
  Ken
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] what good books did you read in 2014?

2014-12-10 Thread Tom Keays
Thanks for all the good additions to my own reading list. Here are some of
mine.

Fiction Books - I tend to read urban fantasy and sci-fi, with other stuff
thrown in. I tend to graze tech books, so I won't record them.

The Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch - I'm currently reading book #4 in
the series and #5 just came out. I'm reading the UK editions, so I've been
looking up a lot of Britishisms.
Clariel by Garth Nix (book 4 in the Abhorsen series) - Nix is mostly a
young adult fantasy author, but this series is a cut above.
Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett (Discworld #40) - I re-read all of the
previous books in the series this year.
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce - I kept thinking
what would Forrest Gump have done, but it was actually a pretty good
read.
The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon by Brad Stone - I
finished it in June, just as the fight with Hachette was brewing.

Graphic Novels/Comics - I've been reading more of them this year than I
have for a long time. Guilty pleasure? I guess so. Image Comics is a nice
alternative to Marvel and DC in that the authors retain copyright and
artistic control.

Alex + Ada - about the relationship between artificial intelligence and
humans in a world where androids exist and have the potential to become
sentient. Covers some of the same ground as the movie Her, but with the
luxury of diving deeper as the series goes on.
The Walking Dead - how have I never read these? I binged on borrowed copies
over the long Labor Day weekend and have been buying new issues since.
Still haven't seen the TV series.
Fables - I'm just getting started with this series (and its spin-offs), but
I agree with Paula that this is better than Once Upon A Time.
Velvet - a British spy thriller.


On Wed, Dec 10, 2014 at 11:13 AM, Sarah Walden swal...@amherst.edu wrote:

 My library hold list has already doubled in size - thanks for all the
 great recommendations!

 I will second the plug for _The Martian_ by Andy Weir. Very gripping, and
 the science felt believable and realistic. John Scalzi's latest, _Lock In_,
 was also a blast to read, and raises some really thought-provoking
 questions about disability, race, and gender, all wrapped up in a
 near-future SF murder mystery.

 ---
 Sarah Walden
 Digital Projects Librarian
 Robert Frost Library
 Amherst College
 PO Box 2256
 Amherst, MA 01002-5000
 Tel: (413) 542-2960
 Fax: (413) 542-2662
 E-mail: swal...@amherst.edu



 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
 Andromeda Yelton
 Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2014 9:47 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] what good books did you read in 2014?

 Hey, code4lib! I bet you consume fascinating media. What good books did
 you read in 2014 that you think your colleagues would like, too?  (And hey,
 we're all digital, so feel free to include movies and video games and so
 forth.)

 Mine:
 http://www.obeythetestinggoat.com/ (O'Reilly book, plus read free online)
 - a book on testing from a Django-centric, front end perspective. *Finally*
 I get how testing works. This book rewrote my brain.

 _The Warmth of Other Suns_ - finally got around to reading this magnum
 opus history of the Great Migration, am halfway through, it's amazing. If
 you're looking for some historical context on how we got to Ferguson,
 Isabel Wilkerson has you covered.

 _Her_ - Imma let you finish, Citzenfour and Big Hero 6 and LEGO movie and
 Guardians of the Galaxy - you were all good - but I walked out of the
 theater and literally couldn't speak after this one. Plus, funniest
 throwaway scene ever. Almost fell out of my chair.

 _Tim's Vermeer_ - wait, no, watch that one too. Weird tinkering genius who
 can't paint obsesses over recreating a Vermeer with startling,
 physics-driven results. Also, Penn Jillette.

 --
 Andromeda Yelton
 Board of Directors, Library  Information Technology Association:
 http://www.lita.org
 Advisor, Ada Initiative: http://adainitiative.org
 http://andromedayelton.com @ThatAndromeda 
 http://twitter.com/ThatAndromeda



Re: [CODE4LIB] code4lib stickers

2014-11-08 Thread Tom Keays
I might place an order if you provided a mockup of what they would look
like.
Tom

On Wed, Nov 5, 2014 at 2:58 PM, Karen Coyle li...@kcoyle.net wrote:

 and for those of us with mushy brains who can't remember if they responded
 previously? ... kc


 On 11/4/14 4:29 PM, Riley Childs wrote:

 This is a reminder to fill out the code4lib stickers response form if you
 are interested (yeah, I haven't given up yet...), I am waiting to order
 until I have 50 people on the list (or enough where I can be sure I won't
 be left with leftovers). The google form is here:
 https://docs.google.com/a/tfsgeo.com/forms/d/1k-bQVSduKyOVMkXpJ_
 xOwk9SDjjEoX7QnQ4JTyp2BqI/viewform
 I am leaning towards a diecut sticker depending on further response.
 Filling out this form is not a commitment to purchase. Stickers will be
 printed by StickerMule and will be on demand following the initial batch.
 Those who purchase from the first batch will receive a 30% or more
 (depending on number of people who order) discount over the standard price.

 Thanks
 //Riley

 --
 Riley Childs
 Senior
 Charlotte United Christian Academy
 IT Services Administrator
 Library Services Administrator
 https://rileychilds.net
 cell: +1 (704) 497-2086
 office: +1 (704) 537-0331x101
 twitter: @rowdychildren
 Checkout our new Online Library Catalog: https://catalog.cucawarriors.com

 Proudly sent in plain text


 --
 Karen Coyle
 kco...@kcoyle.net http://kcoyle.net
 m: +1-510-435-8234
 skype: kcoylenet/+1-510-984-3600



Re: [CODE4LIB] Stickers

2014-08-15 Thread Tom Keays
I was interested in the idea but I *still *need to see a mock-up of the
design before I commit to making a purchase.


On Fri, Aug 15, 2014 at 11:36 AM, Riley Childs ri...@tfsgeo.com wrote:

 So far I have 14 people that have indicated interest in stickers, for this
 to be economically viable I need at least 50 people to indicate interest
 that would like to purchase from the initial run, this will be slightly
 cheaper than when they go for general sale on sticker mule. The google form
 is here:

 https://docs.google.com/a/tfsgeo.com/forms/d/1k-bQVSduKyOVMkXpJ_xOwk9SDjjEoX
 7QnQ4JTyp2BqI/viewform.



 //Riley



 Riley Childs

 Senior

 Charlotte United Christian Academy

 IT Services Admin

 Library Services Admin

 web: rileychilds.net

 twitter: @RowdyChildren

 Checkout our new library catalog: catalog.cucawarriors.com





Re: [CODE4LIB] software for a glossary

2014-06-20 Thread Tom Keays
The Web Ahead podcast had an episode that covered the current state of
web annotation. Something there might work.
http://5by5.tv/webahead/60

Crossing the thread over to linked author data, this item made me laugh.
http://w3cmemes.tumblr.com/post/76273506486/dave-started-reviewing-open-annotations-today

On Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 2:28 PM, Eric Lease Morgan emor...@nd.edu wrote:
 Do you know of a Web-based tool or piece of desktop software that would let a 
 professor post a text in a frame, then highlight words or phrases and link 
 them to a glossary? A quick-and-dirty web page (possibly attached) and link 
 below illustrates the idea:

   http://dh.crc.nd.edu/tmp/glossary.html

 —
 Eric Morgan


Re: [CODE4LIB] 15% off of all tshirts on the code4lib store (MYSHIRT2014

2014-05-26 Thread Tom Keays
Probably a good time to flog the store URL then.

http://code4lib.spreadshirt.com/


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 10:46 AM, Riley Childs rchi...@cucawarriors.comwrote:

 Spreadshirt is offering 15% off of all tshirts on our store this week with
 coupon code MYSHIRT2014




 Riley Childs
 Junior
 IT Admin
 email: rchi...@cucawarriors.com
 office: +1 (704) 537-0031 x101
 cell: +1 (704) 497-2086

 Please Think Before Hitting Reply All
 I Do Web Design! RileyChilds.net/services



Re: [CODE4LIB] jobs digest for 2014-05-16

2014-05-23 Thread Tom Keays
I want the t-shirt too. Somebody should make it so!

(To be fair, I might occasionally velcro other other listserv names over
the code{4}lib logo.)


On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 10:10 AM, Doran, Michael D do...@uta.edu wrote:

  I honestly have no opinion as to whether we have full job postings, a

  digest, a separate mailing list, or whatever. I just want this

  conversation to be over.



 Perhaps you want to buy the t-shirt:

 [cid:image001.png@01CF7666.DEF677F0]



 -- Michael



  -Original Message-

  From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of

  Joshua Welker

  Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 8:55 AM

  To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU

  Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] jobs digest for 2014-05-16

 

  I honestly have no opinion as to whether we have full job postings, a

  digest, a separate mailing list, or whatever. I just want this

  conversation

  to be over.

 

  http://youtu.be/ju4-bw3a48E

  http://impossiblehq.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Final-Form.jpg

 

 

  Josh Welker

 

  -Original Message-

  From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of

  Riley Childs

  Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 5:49 AM

  To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDUmailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU

  Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] jobs digest for 2014-05-16

 

  Should we put this to a vote?

 

  Riley Childs

  Student

  Asst. Head of IT Services

  Charlotte United Christian Academy

  (704) 497-2086

  RileyChilds.net

  Sent from my Windows Phone, please excuse mistakes

  

  From: Chris Fitzpatrickmailto:chrisfitz...@gmail.com

  Sent: ‎5/‎23/‎2014 5:51 AM

  To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDUmailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDUmailto:
 CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU%3cmailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU

  Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] jobs digest for 2014-05-16

 

  more cowbell

 

 

  On Thu, May 22, 2014 at 9:05 PM, Wilhelmina Randtke

  rand...@gmail.commailto:rand...@gmail.comwrote:

 

   I prefer full ads also.

  

   -Wilhelmina Randtke

  

  

   On Wed, May 21, 2014 at 7:53 AM, Dunn, Katie dun...@rpi.edumailto:
 dun...@rpi.edu wrote:

  

On Fri, May 16, 2014 at 10:06 PM, Joe Hourcle wrote:

 It looks to me like it's a change in the messages that '

jobs.code4lib.org'

 generates and sends to the list ...

   

I much preferred receiving the full ads in separate messages,

because

   they

were easy to archive and search in my email without having to

copy/paste from the website, but I can just subscribe to the Atom

  feed

instead.

   

Katie

   

  



Re: [CODE4LIB] SubjectsPlus themes

2014-04-29 Thread Tom Keays
I searched briefly in the SubjectsPlus group archive but found no mention
of themes.

https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!forum/subjectsplus




On Tue, Apr 29, 2014 at 11:54 AM, Wilhelmina Randtke rand...@gmail.comwrote:

 Does anyone have a theme for SubjectsPlus up on github?

 I'm playing around with the CMS, and I can't find themes.  Surely they
 must exist.

 -Wilhelmina Randtke



Re: [CODE4LIB] Jobs Digest

2014-02-25 Thread Tom Keays
filters++

I do like to receive them here, but filtering removes them from my inbox
until I'm ready to go through a batch of them.


On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 7:39 PM, Nick Ruest rue...@gmail.com wrote:

 Email filters ;-)


 On 14-02-24 07:32 PM, Riley Childs wrote:

 I just got like 25 Jobs emails, anyone ever think about doing a digest?
 Just a suggestion.

 Riley Childs
 Student
 Asst. Head of IT Services
 Charlotte United Christian Academy
 (704) 497-2086
 RileyChilds.net
 Sent from my Windows Phone, please excuse mistakes




Re: [CODE4LIB] code4lib.org down

2014-02-21 Thread Tom Keays
Interesting. The Journal was also down last night with a mysql database
error. Pure coincidence since they are not served at uoregon.

Tom


On Fri, Feb 21, 2014 at 4:19 PM, Rosalyn Metz rosalynm...@gmail.com wrote:

 :(



Re: [CODE4LIB] Python CMSs

2014-02-14 Thread Tom Keays
Here's a little digression, getting away from talk about the underlying
technology...

Most CMSes, rather than being *content *management systems, are actually *page
*management systems. They provide a few different page templates -- blog
posts, about pages, product descriptions, etc. -- but when you get to the
point of creating of creating or editing content, you are asked to fill in
a form that, other than requiring a title, author, date, and simple tags or
categories, is mainly just a big-old-chunk-o-unstructured-text.

Read the following post by Christopher Butler, a web developer, that
describes this problem and proposes a new way of thinking about content
management.

http://www.newfangled.com/the_way_you_design_web_content_is_about_to_change

AFAIK, none of the CMSes mentioned in this thread so far do anything that
approaches what this article is talking about. Drupal is constantly
restructuring itself to be more modular. I keep having hope. But it remains
cumbersome to reuse content in Drupal or any other CMS I've looked at.
Ultimately, CMS modularity is still tied to page templates.

The one exception seems to be LibGuides. I think the reason that librarians
and libraries like LibGuides is the ease of creating modules of content
that it offers. In the process of building a guide (a suite of pages on a
topic), you are largely creating boxes of structured content. In those
boxes, you can create links that can be shared and reused in other guides;
you can have a user profile that can be slotted into any page; and even the
most unstructured content, the rich text box, can be cloned into other
pages or guides. Entire pages or guides can also be cloned and reused. With
the forthcoming LibGuides 2, which offers even more structured and reusable
content -- e.g., assets in the form of links, RSS feeds, documents/files,
book entries, media widgets, database listings, and icons -- it looks even
more modular. Their new approach to building boxes by assembling them from
reusable components is also a step forward.

You can't do everything with LibGuides that you can with real CMS
systems; some content types are purposely withheld -- e.g., event and
calendar entries, blog/news posts, image galleries, etc. -- but does any
real CMS even come close in terms of modularity?

What I'd like to see is a modular CMS, with reusable components and,
ideally, some sort of API to further extend reuse.

Tom

On Fri, Feb 14, 2014 at 11:39 AM, Sarah Thorngate scthorng...@northpark.edu
 wrote:

 I second Jason's approach. Even though I'd have more fun using a framework,
 I'm currently implementing a CMS (Drupal) for our main site content. If
 your non-technical library colleagues are anything like mine, they will
 want LibGuides-level simplicity for editing content. My thinking is that
 it's worth a little extra pain now to make sure I'm not the only one who
 can make changes to our content in the future; that can be a huge time
 suck, and prevent you from moving on to other projects.

 Sarah


 On Fri, Feb 14, 2014 at 10:08 AM, Scott Turnbull 
 scott.turnb...@aptrust.org
  wrote:

  We used Django and Python extensively while I was at Emory.
 
  First let me answer your question.  If Django interests you then
  DjangoCMS is a pretty good choice https://www.django-cms.org/en/
 
  I know a few folks who use it and like it quiet a bit.  That said I
  know a lot of the community is trending toward Flask for simple apps
  in python so it depends on how deep you want to go with what you need
  to develop.
 
  In terms of what I'd add, I would reflect what a lot of people have
  already said here.  My own philosophy is that the CMS problem has
  already been solved and it's not a great fit for a custom framework
  unless you have very strong use cases that prove it isn't.   I suggest
  you consider taking care of straight up content with whatever CMS you
  want to use (Drupal, Wordpress, etc) and reserve Django and python for
  custom apps that need to sit under it.
 
  You can theme the sites so they look the same, leave the CMS to the
  CMS and put your django apps under an app. subdomain to make the
  experience more ore less seamless.
 
  Just my thoughts, I hope that helps some.
 
  Good luck and let us know what you end up doing,
 
  - Scott
 
  On Fri, Feb 14, 2014 at 10:35 AM, Jason Bengtson
  j.bengtson...@gmail.com wrote:
   I agree with Josh. In the end it's really going to come down to
  balancing priorities. On my personal site I don't use any kind of content
  management system and have no interest in adopting one. This has left me
  free to do as I please without jumping through hoops to try and get
 things
  work with an often intentionally limiting CMS. At my last University we
  started with nothing but moved institutionally to Cascade Server (a
  horrible mistake if ever there was one). Still, as rotten as CS is, I was
  able to shoehorn a lot of web code through various mechanisms and the
  campus web team simply 

Re: [CODE4LIB] Faculty publication database

2013-10-25 Thread Tom Keays
Correct that. 1.1.2 was Sept 2011 [1] and the developer release on the
GitHub repo [2] has activity as of 6 months ago.

[1] http://bibapp.org/download/
[2] https://github.com/BibApp/BibApp


On Fri, Oct 25, 2013 at 2:21 PM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 At one point BibApp looked like it was going to be a good alternative to
 #3 on Bohyun's hierarchy  Release 1.0 was made in July 2010, so I don't
 know if it is still being worked on.

 http://bibapp.org/



 On Fri, Oct 25, 2013 at 12:08 PM, Bohyun Kim k...@fiu.edu wrote:

 Hi Allie,

 (With the caveat that compiling the comprehensive faculty publication db
 is not a walk in the park at all particularly if you want to include the
 publications from when the faculty were working at other institutions and
 also by all types of faculty- not just full-time or tenured.)

 You can do any of these:

 1. RefShare list through Refworks
 2. RSS feeds from databases (by looking up the institution of the author)
 3. Build Custom database  (Ours beta site is at:
 http://bayonet.fiu.edu/library/facpub/  if you want to take a look)
 4. Use IR
 5. License proprietary products (e.g. Digital Measures or Sedona)

 At MPOW, we tried 1 and 2 but switched to 3 recently. We have IR but do
 not use it for faculty publication database purposes But we are thinking
 about using it in conjunction with 3 so that 3 would link to the full-text
 if there exists any pre/post print articles in the IR.

 My college (medical school) is also considering 5. I was in the meeting
 with the vendors for these products and they do much more than keeping
 track of publications and do keep track of all faculty activities -
 publication, services, committees, courses, teachings, conference
 presentations, etc. for statistical purposes. But faculty members are asked
 to enter the items themselves (or find the department staff who will do it
 for them).

 ~Bohyun

 ---
 Bohyun Kim, MA, MSLIS
 Digital Access Librarian
 bohyun@fiu.edu
 305-348-1471
 Medical Library, College of Medicine
 Florida International University
 http://medlib.fiu.edu
 http://medlib.fiu.edu/m (Mobile)

 
 From: Code for Libraries [CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] on behalf of
 Alevtina Verbovetskaya [alevtina.verbovetsk...@mail.cuny.edu]
 Sent: Friday, October 25, 2013 11:35 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] Faculty publication database

 Hi guys,

 Does your library maintain a database of faculty publications? How do you
 do it?

 Some things I've come across in my (admittedly brief) research:
 - RSS feeds from the major databases
 - RefWorks citation lists

 These options do not necessarily work for my university, made up of 24
 colleges/institutions, 6,700+ FT faculty, and 270,000+ degree-seeking
 students.

 Does anyone have a better solution? It need not be searchable: we are
 just interested in pulling a periodical report of articles written by our
 faculty/students without relying on them self-reporting
 days/weeks/months/years after the fact.

 Thanks!
 Allie

 --
 Alevtina (Allie) Verbovetskaya
 Web and Mobile Systems Librarian
 Office of Library Services
 City University of New York
 555 W 57th St, Ste. 1325
 New York, NY 10019
 1-646-313-8158
 alevtina.verbovetsk...@cuny.edumailto:alevtina.verbovetsk...@cuny.edu





[CODE4LIB] Looking for an Announcements system

2013-10-23 Thread Tom Keays
Our campus uses DotNetNuke as the backend for its website. Opinions aside
about the wisdom of that particular CMS choice, one DNN module that has
proven to be extremely useful at MPOW is the DotNetNuke Announcements
module.

  http://dnnannouncements.codeplex.com/documentation

We are currently using it for all of our announcements, but I find I keep
looking for an alternative that I might use as a replacement. I'm worried
about what I would do if the campus ever were to switch away from DNN.

Here are several essential functionality requirements that I am looking for
in a replacement.

Publication and Expiration Dates -- Posts in DNN Announcements have both
publication and expiration date and time fields. This means you can write
an announcement in advance and it won't appear in public current events
listing until the specified date and time. If the optional expiration date
and time is set, the post will drop out of the current list of events once
that date is passed, but will continue to appear in the Monthly and
Category archives. The RSS feed for the current events listing therefore
only includes items that have not expired. This functionaliity, especially
the expiration feature, is not found in the same form in any of the common
blogging platforms I've looked at. In WordPress, the CMS I'm most familiar
with, I've found plugins that expire a post by assigning it to a
different category or deleting it. However, neither of those approaches are
satisfactory. Are there any CMSes or blogging platforms that have true
expiration date functionality, either natively or via plugins?

Featured Posts -- Posts can be easily tagged to be featured which means
they float to the top, regardless of default sort order (DNN Announcements
lets you choose to sort lists of posts by either publication or expiration
date). I believe there are ways to pull the featured post content to
display on other pages, although that is something I have not explored. I
think there are ways to achieve this in WordPress using plugins.

Publication and Expiration Date functionality is the biggie. Most of the
other key functionality in DNN Announcements can be found in other systems
-- i.e., use of author, title, summary, hierarchical categories, tags,
thumbnail image, summary image, and other similar metadata fields -- so I'm
less worried about being able to replicate that functionality in a
replacement system.

I would not rule out calendar systems per se, but what separates that use
case from the announcements use case is that most of my announcements are
either not tied to a particular date and time (i.e., announcements about a
new service) or span a block of time (i.e., a show in the art gallery).
Calendar systems don't really handle those sorts of announcements well or
at all.

Any suggestions? I'm looking for either a standalone announcements system
or a module in a more general CMS. It would be nice if it installed on a
vanilla LAMP stack.

Thanks,
Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] What can be done to stop deleting of records belonging to users of our Minuteman Library Network in Massachusetts?

2013-10-10 Thread Tom Keays
Innovative Users Group has a listserv.

http://www.innovativeusers.org/iug-discussion-list


On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 8:45 PM, don warner saklad
warnersak...@gmail.comwrote:

 Any other online forums, groups, email lists about difficulties with
 Innovative Interfaces software?...

 Innovative Interfaces Incorporated http://www.iii.com/ is the Integrated
 Library System
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_library_systemprovider
 for Minuteman Library Network
 http://www.mln.lib.ma.us/about/about.htm Webmaster scripted replies to
 concerns fail, aren't responsive. Libraries' attempts fail, give up
 attempting to resolve concerns about software.

 Users' records get deleted. No notification before some entries get deleted
 at My Lists  http://www.mln.lib.ma.us/catalog/faq_account.htm#ma50


 On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 7:49 PM, Kyle Banerjee kyle.baner...@gmail.com
 wrote:

  I thought you guys have Millennium.
 
  If that is correct, you won't be able to change the behavior of the
 system
  and the only thing you can do is revoke delete permissions for whoever is
  doing it.
 
  kyle
 




 |  What can be done to stop deleting of records belonging to users of our
 Minuteman Library Network in Massachusetts? Or at least notification needs
 to be made before deleting.



Re: [CODE4LIB] LibGuides: I don't get it

2013-08-13 Thread Tom Keays
I'm not sure I understand the more-heat-than-light criticisms of LibGuides.
It perfectly fits the needs of many libraries.

The most valid criticism that has been lodged -- that the CMS is so easy to
use that librarians create content which they then don't maintain -- could
be said of any website or CMS (except for the so easy part). The
counter-argument might be that library content is better maintained in
LibGuides than in other systems because librarians are not buffaloed by the
underlying technology and willingly (happily) use them as part of their
everyday workflow. Has anybody done that research?

There were also several comments that Springshare support is not
responsive. That has never been my experience. Some things might take
longer to implement because programming is involved, but the support staff
have been exemplary and every feature request I've made has been
implemented or explained (in no b.s. terms) why they were unable to fulfill
it.

And, yeah, what Wilhelmina said.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] EAD vs. HTML for finding aids

2013-05-11 Thread Tom Keays
The advice to transform EAD to HTML using an xsl transform stylesheet seems
to still be the best practice.

http://saa-ead-roundtable.github.io/

If you want an example of what the HTML looks like, here's one from
Syracuse University

http://library.syr.edu/digital/guides/a/aaace.htm


On Fri, May 10, 2013 at 4:39 PM, Rachel Shaevel rshae...@chipublib.orgwrote:

 Hello friendly Borg,

 Does anyone have anything thoughts about using EAD for finding aids vs.
 HTML?  Or are both going the way of the dinosaurs?

 Thanks!
 Rachel

 Rachel Shaevel
 Electronic Resources Cataloger
 Technical Services/Catalog Department
 Chicago Public Library
 Harold Washington Library Center
 400 S. State St.
 Chicago, IL 60605
 P: (312) 747-4660
 rshae...@chipublib.orgmailto:rshae...@chipublib.org



Re: [CODE4LIB] EAD vs. HTML for finding aids

2013-05-11 Thread Tom Keays
I also found this

http://www.cdlib.org/services/dsc/tools/ead_toolkit.html


On Sat, May 11, 2013 at 8:22 AM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 The advice to transform EAD to HTML using an xsl transform stylesheet
 seems to still be the best practice.

 http://saa-ead-roundtable.github.io/

 If you want an example of what the HTML looks like, here's one from
 Syracuse University

 http://library.syr.edu/digital/guides/a/aaace.htm


 On Fri, May 10, 2013 at 4:39 PM, Rachel Shaevel rshae...@chipublib.orgwrote:

 Hello friendly Borg,

 Does anyone have anything thoughts about using EAD for finding aids vs.
 HTML?  Or are both going the way of the dinosaurs?

 Thanks!
 Rachel

 Rachel Shaevel
 Electronic Resources Cataloger
 Technical Services/Catalog Department
 Chicago Public Library
 Harold Washington Library Center
 400 S. State St.
 Chicago, IL 60605
 P: (312) 747-4660
 rshae...@chipublib.orgmailto:rshae...@chipublib.org





Re: [CODE4LIB] File based CMSes

2013-04-29 Thread Tom Keays
I've used DokuWiki as a CMS for several website projects. The default theme
is no great shakes, but you can theme it to look like anything and there
are hundreds of plugins. I think the syntax it uses is much friendlier than
that used by Mediapress.

http://dokuwiki.org/

I've also been curious about Octopress. Nominally a blogging layer for
Jekyll, with the new version I think it can probably work as a CMS. It uses
Markdown as the syntax.

http://octopress.org/


On Mon, Apr 29, 2013 at 11:22 AM, Wilhelmina Randtke rand...@gmail.comwrote:

 Has anyone worked with file based CMSes,and do you have a recommendation
 for one with simple backend?

 One of the issues with the CMS is that databases don't make sense to people
 without background in them.  I want to look at static file based CMSes with
 the goal of finding something that is easier to write instructions on doing
 maintenance and backups for than is a database based CMS.

 -Wilhelmina Randtke



Re: [CODE4LIB] Library CDNs

2013-03-30 Thread Tom Keays
Here's a link to the thread from January
  https://listserv.nd.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A1=ind1301L=CODE4LIB#220
and here's a brief summary I made when I decided on Rackspace
  https://listserv.nd.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1301L=CODE4LIBF=S=P=52081

One thing I didn't mention was that Cloud Files doesn't have any version
control or any way to roll back files. To compensate for that I am using
Git on a local repo (not uploaded to GitHub, etc). It is a bit clunky, but
for the small number of changes I need to make, it suffices.

Tom

On Thu, Mar 28, 2013 at 12:09 PM, Josh Wilson joshwilso...@gmail.comwrote:

 Would you mind sharing what CDNs you seriously considered as alternatives,
 and what led you to go with Rackspace?


 On Thu, Mar 28, 2013 at 11:35 AM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

  A couple of months ago I asked for suggestions for a CDN that a library
  without its own web server (other than our OPAC) might use to deploy
 image,
  javascript and css resources for use on third-party systems such as
  LibGuides, Serials Solutions A-Z journal lists, etc.
 
  We're a small institution and I have just a handful of files I needed to
  deploy, so I figured that using a CDN could be much less expensive than
  contracting for a full-fledged web hosting solution. I weighed several
 good
  suggestions sent to this list and decided to give Rackspace Cloud Files
 [1]
  a try. Pricing is 10 cents/Gigabyte/month.
 
  It doesn't have a true nest folder file structure, but if you use
  Cyberduck, which supports the Rackspace API [2], it represents the
  directory structure of your original local repo in the URL -- e.g.,
 
 
 http://6423ab35994a822f653e-1cba4c36ec78f50a350878d40a7c96c2.r6.cf1.rackcdn.com/assets/js/jquery.cookie.js
 
  I didn't purchase anything but Cloud Files, so I don't have access to
  Rackspace CNAMES to give my URLs more friendly names (and campus IT isn't
  interested in providing that service for us). I decided this was not a
  problem on the whole.
 
  The system has been very fast and stable, with none of the intermittent
  outages I experienced when I was testing the idea by hosting some of
 these
  files on my hobby website on Bluehost.
 
  The only gotcha is that if you need to upload a file, there is some
 latency
  for changes to propagate across the CDN. The Rackspace technician I
 talked
  too was surprised how long an old copy was hanging around after one of my
  updates, but we concluded that, ultimately, that's the proper function of
  the service (at least on this CDN). You can speed things up by deleting
 the
  original and re-upping it, but changes are not instantaneous.
 
  After 2 complete billing cycles, we've yet to have enough traffic to
  generate a charge. This surprised me, since I thought there might be a
  minimum usage charge hidden somewhere, but we've not seen any to date.
 I'm
  not anticipating this situation will change drastically. It will take
 quite
  a bit of traffic for us to hit the 10 cent mark.
 
  I'm pretty happy so far.
 
  Tom
 
  [1]: http://www.rackspace.com/cloud/public/files/technology/
  [2]: http://trac.cyberduck.ch/wiki/help/en/howto/cloudfiles
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] Library CDNs

2013-03-28 Thread Tom Keays
A couple of months ago I asked for suggestions for a CDN that a library
without its own web server (other than our OPAC) might use to deploy image,
javascript and css resources for use on third-party systems such as
LibGuides, Serials Solutions A-Z journal lists, etc.

We're a small institution and I have just a handful of files I needed to
deploy, so I figured that using a CDN could be much less expensive than
contracting for a full-fledged web hosting solution. I weighed several good
suggestions sent to this list and decided to give Rackspace Cloud Files [1]
a try. Pricing is 10 cents/Gigabyte/month.

It doesn't have a true nest folder file structure, but if you use
Cyberduck, which supports the Rackspace API [2], it represents the
directory structure of your original local repo in the URL -- e.g.,
http://6423ab35994a822f653e-1cba4c36ec78f50a350878d40a7c96c2.r6.cf1.rackcdn.com/assets/js/jquery.cookie.js

I didn't purchase anything but Cloud Files, so I don't have access to
Rackspace CNAMES to give my URLs more friendly names (and campus IT isn't
interested in providing that service for us). I decided this was not a
problem on the whole.

The system has been very fast and stable, with none of the intermittent
outages I experienced when I was testing the idea by hosting some of these
files on my hobby website on Bluehost.

The only gotcha is that if you need to upload a file, there is some latency
for changes to propagate across the CDN. The Rackspace technician I talked
too was surprised how long an old copy was hanging around after one of my
updates, but we concluded that, ultimately, that's the proper function of
the service (at least on this CDN). You can speed things up by deleting the
original and re-upping it, but changes are not instantaneous.

After 2 complete billing cycles, we've yet to have enough traffic to
generate a charge. This surprised me, since I thought there might be a
minimum usage charge hidden somewhere, but we've not seen any to date. I'm
not anticipating this situation will change drastically. It will take quite
a bit of traffic for us to hit the 10 cent mark.

I'm pretty happy so far.

Tom

[1]: http://www.rackspace.com/cloud/public/files/technology/
[2]: http://trac.cyberduck.ch/wiki/help/en/howto/cloudfiles


Re: [CODE4LIB] A Responsibility to Encourage Better Browsers ( ? )

2013-02-19 Thread Tom Keays
jQuery 2.x will support IE 9+ . Jonathan is correct that 1.x will continue
to support IE 6+ and there are techniques to deliver the older version of
jQuery to older browsers if the developer deems it necessary.

http://jquery.com/browser-support/

However, I think Michael is in good company in thinking the time has come
to cut (or at least reduce) support for older versions of IE. I've heard
several top notch web developers talking on various podcasts (no, I'm not
going to cite them) about starting with responsive web approach that that
delivers what would essentially be the mobile view of the page, albeit with
less functionality, to these browsers. The full desktop view goes only to
modern browsers. It doesn't cut off those communities that are bound for
whatever reason to use IE 6 or 7. It just gives them a different
experience.

My 2c.
Tom

On Tue, Feb 19, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.eduwrote:

 On 2/19/2013 10:22 AM, Michael Schofield wrote:

 Now that Google, jQuery, and others will soon drop support for IE8 -
 its time to politely join-in and make luddite patrons aware. IMHO,
 anyway.


 I would like a cite for this. I think you are mis-informed. It is a
 misconception that JQuery is dropping support for IE8 anytime soon. And I'm
 not sure what you mean about 'Google' dropping support for IE8.


Re: [CODE4LIB] You *are* a coder. So what am I?

2013-02-15 Thread Tom Keays
Nice start on a list. I added the directory links to the wiki page for new
coders. I bet there are more that could be added.

http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/One_recommended_tool/resource_for_n00bs#Meetups_and_User_Groups

On Fri, Feb 15, 2013 at 9:30 AM, Joe Hourcle
onei...@grace.nascom.nasa.govwrote:

 On Feb 15, 2013, at 9:00 AM, Lin, Kun wrote:

  Wow, Interesting. But I am not fun of Perl. Is there other workshop?

 I don't know of any full workshops in the area, but there are plenty
 of monthly or semi-monthly meetings of different groups:

 Python: http://dcpython.org/

 R : http://www.meetup.com/R-users-DC/

 Groovy: http://www.dcgroovy.org/

 Drupal: http://groups.drupal.org/washington-dc-drupalers

 Hadoop: http://www.meetup.com/Hadoop-DC/

 Ruby:   http://www.dcrug.org/

 ColdFusion: http://www.cfug-md.org/


 For those not in this area, see:

 http://www.pm.org/groups/
 http://wiki.python.org/moin/LocalUserGroups
 http://r-users-group.meetup.com/
 http://groups.drupal.org/
 http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/community/user-groups/
 http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/User_groups
 http://coldfusion.meetup.com/

 -Joe



[CODE4LIB] Streaming URL

2013-02-12 Thread Tom Keays
The URL for streaming was given in the IRC channel

http://new.livestream.com/accounts/2768983/events/1865025?device_panel=true

You apparently need to register for an account to avoid ads.


Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Conference streaming?

2013-02-11 Thread Tom Keays
I was wondering if a link for streaming will be available in advance of the
programs tomorrow?  I poked around a bit on the LETS page,
http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/accc/lets/uicast.html , but could not find
information that would let me test out compatibility of the stream format
with local equipment, etc. Enjoy the preconferences today!

Tom

On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 9:41 PM, Margaret Heller mhell...@luc.edu wrote:

 Yes, thanks to the people at UIC Learning Environments  Technology
 Services the conference will be streamed and archived. We are awaiting
 details, but certainly will publicize it widely when we have them.

 Margaret Heller

 Margaret Heller
 Digital Services Librarian
 Loyola University Chicago
 773.508.2686

  Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com 01/29/13 20:36 PM 
 I was wondering if talks from the conference would be streamed this year?
 It was really great to have it the last time I was unable to attend.

 Tom



Re: [CODE4LIB] Editing Code4lib Wiki

2013-02-11 Thread Tom Keays
There's a timely article on the subject in SitePoint,
http://www.sitepoint.com/captcha-inaccessible-to-everyone/

The article concludes:

 There is a fundamental disconnect in intent that means it is highly
 unlikely that a universally accessible CAPTCHA, or even a set of different
 CAPTCHAs will ever be devised.

 CAPTCHAs are, by definition, exclusive: they are are there to keep baddies
 out. Their way of testing “badness” does not allow for the legitimate use
 of machines. So they will tend to be inaccessible.

FWIW, the Code4Lib Journal had some reports of inaccessibility in the
captcha we were using (reCaptcha) and we eventually decided to jettison it.
It wasn't slowing down the spammers much anyway, as shown by our Akismet
stats.

Tom


On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 4:58 PM, Kyle Banerjee kyle.baner...@gmail.comwrote:

 On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 1:02 PM, MJ Ray m...@phonecoop.coop wrote:

  It would also be very nice to replace the reCaptcha with something
  that allowed people who can't pass audio-visual tests to take part!
 

 I've always wondered what percentage of the population has trouble with
 reCaptcha challenges. I know I do.



Re: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

2013-02-04 Thread Tom Keays
Hi Joshua,

I was mainly looking at your program, not for the code, but as a way to
bring myself up to speed about current practices in modeling the COUNTER
data. I'm trying to avoid reinventing something that has already been well
thought through. I apologize for calling out your model. You have gotten
much further than I have. Some of the other respondents in this thread have
set me straight on some things I was very fuzzy on going in.

How go about I collecting and storing the data is still something I haven't
resolved yet. I personally would prefer a Python solution, but there forces
here at MPOW that suggest I should build a data repository in SharePoint.
Assuming that is the case, Serial Solution's open source SUSHI harvester
written in .NET might actually be the way for me to go. So, my next step is
to look at their data model and see what reports they collect and store.

As an aside, I'm also now wondering if de-duping is strictly necessary as
long as there is a field to record the date the report was generated.
 De-duping (or maybe just deprecating duplicate data) could be separate
from the collection process.

Best,
Tom

On Mon, Feb 4, 2013 at 10:07 AM, Joshua Welker jwel...@sbuniv.edu wrote:

 Tom,

 I am the guy who wrote sushi.py around this time last year. My apologies
 for the shabbiness of the code. It was meant to be primarily a proof of
 concept. It's definitely incomplete. I only completed the DB3 and JR1
 report logic up to this point, but it would be easy enough to add other
 report types. You're also right that sushi.py doesn't do anything to dedupe
 data, but it would be very simple to write a script that reads through the
 SQL records and deletes dupes. You could also use the built-in UNIQUE flag
 in MySQL when creating your table so that duplicate records just don't get
 saved. If you use the CSV export functionality of sushi.py, Excel has some
 built-in dedupe features that would help as well.

 Let me know if you'd like some help modifying sushi.py. I sort of gave up
 on it last spring. SUSHI implementation among vendors is still pretty
 shabby, and there are still some weaknesses in the SUSHI standard (I wrote
 about them in the Nov 2012 issue of Computers in Libraries). The
 productivity gains I was seeing from using SUSHI ended up being pretty low.

 Josh Welker


 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
 Tom Keays
 Sent: Friday, January 25, 2013 8:40 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

 I've been looking briefly at sushi.py, as a way to orient myself to
 collecting stats this way. I'm not intending to single out sushi.py, but
 looking at it (mainly the data structure at this point, and not the code
 itself), raises some questions about the best approach for collecting SUSHI
 data.

 sushi.py seems to have a small number of routines; mainly to retrieve the
 XML file from a vendor and ingest the data in that file into a MySQL
 database. There are only MySQL tables for COUNTER JR1, DR1, DR2, and DR2
 reports and they mirror, to a degree, the structure of the item records
 returned in the SUSHI xml. Here are the skeletons of 2 of the sushi.py SQL
 tables:

 counter_jr1
   id int,
   print_issn varchar,
   online_issn varchar,
   platform varchar,
   item_name text,
   data_type varchar,
   date_begin datetime,
   date_end datetime,
   ft_pdf int,
   ft_html int,
   ft_total varchar

 counter_db3
   id int,
   platform varchar,
   item_name text,
   data_type varchar,
   date_begin datetime,
   date_end datetime,
   searches int,
   sessions int

 On the face of it, this seems like a pretty good data structure (although
 I have a couple of concerns, that I will get to) but my main question is
 whether there is any agreement about how to collect this data? If I were to
 dig into some of the other SUSHI packages mentioned in this thread, what
 would I find there? Excel-formatted COUNTER reports are simply a table of
 columns, representing various fields, such as title (for JR1), platform,
 publisher (for JR1), ISSN (for JR1), etc., followed by columns for up to 12
 months of the collected year, and then summary data.  JR1 reports have
 fulltext HTML, PDF, and Total columns. DR1 has two rows, one for searches
 and one for sesssions, with YTD totals in the final column. Similar data
 structures exist for other COUNTER reports. They rely on the user to
 interpret them and probably ought not to inform a decision for structuring
 the data in a database. Is there been any best practice for how COUNTER
 data is modeled in a database?

 There are other COUNTER reports besides those four. For instance, some
 journal vendors do indeed report searches and sessions using the DR3
 report, but others use the equivalent JR4 report, so I would have expected
 sushi.py to have a mechanism to collect these. Does SUSHI only deliver JR1,
 DR1, DR2, and DR2 reports, or is this a problem

Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Conference streaming?

2013-01-30 Thread Tom Keays
UIC++

On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 9:22 AM, Jon Gorman jonathan.gor...@gmail.comwrote:

 Three cheers for UIC folks!

 Jon Gorman



Re: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

2013-01-25 Thread Tom Keays
I've been looking briefly at sushi.py, as a way to orient myself to
collecting stats this way. I'm not intending to single out sushi.py, but
looking at it (mainly the data structure at this point, and not the code
itself), raises some questions about the best approach for collecting SUSHI
data.

sushi.py seems to have a small number of routines; mainly to retrieve the
XML file from a vendor and ingest the data in that file into a MySQL
database. There are only MySQL tables for COUNTER JR1, DR1, DR2, and DR2
reports and they mirror, to a degree, the structure of the item records
returned in the SUSHI xml. Here are the skeletons of 2 of the sushi.py SQL
tables:

counter_jr1
  id int,
  print_issn varchar,
  online_issn varchar,
  platform varchar,
  item_name text,
  data_type varchar,
  date_begin datetime,
  date_end datetime,
  ft_pdf int,
  ft_html int,
  ft_total varchar

counter_db3
  id int,
  platform varchar,
  item_name text,
  data_type varchar,
  date_begin datetime,
  date_end datetime,
  searches int,
  sessions int

On the face of it, this seems like a pretty good data structure (although I
have a couple of concerns, that I will get to) but my main question is
whether there is any agreement about how to collect this data? If I were to
dig into some of the other SUSHI packages mentioned in this thread, what
would I find there? Excel-formatted COUNTER reports are simply a table of
columns, representing various fields, such as title (for JR1), platform,
publisher (for JR1), ISSN (for JR1), etc., followed by columns for up to 12
months of the collected year, and then summary data.  JR1 reports have
fulltext HTML, PDF, and Total columns. DR1 has two rows, one for searches
and one for sesssions, with YTD totals in the final column. Similar data
structures exist for other COUNTER reports. They rely on the user to
interpret them and probably ought not to inform a decision for structuring
the data in a database. Is there been any best practice for how COUNTER
data is modeled in a database?

There are other COUNTER reports besides those four. For instance, some
journal vendors do indeed report searches and sessions using the DR3
report, but others use the equivalent JR4 report, so I would have expected
sushi.py to have a mechanism to collect these. Does SUSHI only deliver JR1,
DR1, DR2, and DR2 reports, or is this a problem with sushi.py?

Now, one of the selling points for SUSHI is that if a vendor ever advises
that you should re-collect data for a given time period, the xml you
receive is structured such that the act of collecting OUGHT TO update,
rather than duplicate, data previously collected. However in sushi.py's SQL
structure, which gives every row a unique (auto-incremented) ID number,
there would have to be logic applied during the ingest to prevent multiple
instances of data collected from the same vendor for the same time period.
So, that's a concern.

I'm also concerned about what is represented in the ft_pdf, ft_html, and
ft_total fields. In the Excel COUNTER reports, the ft_pdf, ft_html, and
ft_total columns simply tabulate the YTD totals and the only way you would
be able to derive a monthly breakdown would be to collect 12 monthly
reports and analyze the differences from month to month -- something that
most libraries don't do. I have to go back and confirm this, but I don't
think the SUSHI reports are giving a month-only breakdown for those fields,
so I wonder about their inclusion in that table. I guess my question is
what is returned in the SUSHI xml report: monthly or yearly figures for the
ft_pdf, ft_html, and ft_total fields?

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

2013-01-24 Thread Tom Keays
The one I know of is
http://code.google.com/p/sushicounterclient/
which is offered by Serial Solutions. It's a .NET framework.

On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:28 AM, Van Mil, James (vanmiljf) 
vanmi...@ucmail.uc.edu wrote:

 Hi Bill,

 There's a lightweight python client:
 http://sourceforge.net/projects/sushipy/

 (I haven't used it, just know *of* it)

 Thanks,
 James

 James Van Mil
 Collections  Electronic Resources Librarian
 University of Cincinnati Libraries
 Telephone: (513)556-1410
 vanmi...@ucmail.uc.edu



 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
 Bill Dueber
 Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 5:44 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

 [Background: SUSHI
 http://www.niso.org/committees/SUSHI/SUSHI_comm.htmlis a SOAP protocol
 for getting data on use of electronic resources in the COUNTER format]

 I'm just starting to look at trying to get COUNTER data via SUSHI into our
 data warehouse, and I'm discovering that apparently no one has worked on a
 SUSHI client since late 2009.

 UnlessI'm missing one? Anyone out there using SUSHI and have a client
 that works and is up-to-date and has some documentation of some sort? I'd
 prefer ruby or java, but will take anything that'll run under linux (i.e.,
 not C#) at this point.

 I'm desperately trying not to have to deal with the raw SOAP and parsing
 the XML and such, so any help would be appreciated.

 --
 Bill Dueber
 Library Systems Programmer
 University of Michigan Library



Re: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

2013-01-24 Thread Tom Keays
Hey. NISO has a list of SUSHI tools.

http://www.niso.org/workrooms/sushi/tools/

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Anyone have a SUSHI client?

2013-01-24 Thread Tom Keays
From the NISO list, JISC's SUSHI Starter, written in PHP, looks pretty good.

http://cclibweb-4.dmz.cranfield.ac.uk/projects/sushistarters/

On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 9:10 AM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hey. NISO has a list of SUSHI tools.

 http://www.niso.org/workrooms/sushi/tools/

 Tom



Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2013-01-15 Thread Tom Keays
After some discussion on the Code4Lib Journal editors' back-channel, we
decided to move the various WordPress plugins and themes to the Code4Lib
organization site on GitHub. Besides making our process a little more
transparent, we also hope to encourage participation in maintaining and
improving the Journal's WordPress web experience.

The two c4lj repositories that have been ported are:

https://github.com/code4lib/c4lj-issue-manager  (renamed issue-manager
plugin)
https://github.com/code4lib/c4lj (Journal's current WordPress theme -- with
1 open issue)

Tom

On Mon, Jan 14, 2013 at 6:36 PM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 I spent the past week teaching myself how to properly use Git and have
 finally updated the repository with Mark's contribution to the Code4Lib
 Journal Issue Manager plugin.

 https://github.com/tomkeays/issue-manager

 Thanks again for the help.
 Tom


 On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 9:48 AM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 The Code4Lib Journal is now running an up-to-date version of WordPress on
 our server and all of our plugins are similarly updated and operational.
 I'd especially like to acknowledge the contribution of Mark Pernotto, whose
 good knowledge of the WordPress codex allowed him to see the problem that I
 could not, and write a revised Issue Manager plugin. I'll post the revised
 code to GitHub in the next week or so. Thanks again to the other
 code4libbers that also offered to help. This group's generousity and
 expertise is great.

 For the Code4Lib Journal, many thanks!

 Tom





Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2013-01-14 Thread Tom Keays
I spent the past week teaching myself how to properly use Git and have
finally updated the repository with Mark's contribution to the Code4Lib
Journal Issue Manager plugin.

https://github.com/tomkeays/issue-manager

Thanks again for the help.
Tom

On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 9:48 AM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

 The Code4Lib Journal is now running an up-to-date version of WordPress on
 our server and all of our plugins are similarly updated and operational.
 I'd especially like to acknowledge the contribution of Mark Pernotto, whose
 good knowledge of the WordPress codex allowed him to see the problem that I
 could not, and write a revised Issue Manager plugin. I'll post the revised
 code to GitHub in the next week or so. Thanks again to the other
 code4libbers that also offered to help. This group's generousity and
 expertise is great.

 For the Code4Lib Journal, many thanks!

 Tom



[CODE4LIB] Library CDNs

2013-01-04 Thread Tom Keays
Is anybody out there using a CDN[1] that is separate from their website to
host JavaScript, CSS, and image files? I'm looking for a one place where I
can consolidate and organize these files that is reliable (good uptime and
good response time) and affordable (less expensive than hosting a complete
website). In-as non-technical folks may need to access it, the interface
for managing the files and directories needs to be friendly. E.G., AWS's
native interface is too convoluted for newbies, but a program or web app
built as a front-end designed to have simple management functions is the
kind of thing I'm looking for (and something that mirrored AWS's built-in
versioning would be awesome).

Tom

[1] CDN: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_delivery_network


Re: [CODE4LIB] Library CDNs

2013-01-04 Thread Tom Keays
I got 3 suggestions so far, all of them good. Thanks!

I think I'm going to check out Rackspace Cloud Files. Though not free, it
looks like it would fit my need. They seem to have a clearer web interface
and API than other services I've looked at already.  Not requiring a
contract gives me some flexibility to use them on a trial basis and I don't
have that many files at present that setting it up is going to be a hassle.
If I do go with RackSpace, I'll report back what I thought of them.

I had previously looked at Amazon CloudFront, and was initially excited
about it, but finally concluded that it was more cumbersome to manage than
I wanted. I haven't ruled it out though. Some sort of web app front end
might swing me back.

CloudFlare's CDN has the great price of free, but the complication to this
one is that you need to use their DNS server for your site(s), effectively
routing all your website's traffic through them. They provide not just CDN
and unlimited free bandwidth, but website acceleration, server scaling, and
security services (even with the free account). However, for my situation,
where the purpose of the files I want to host (at least right now) are to
overlay my library branding and navigation across several domains,
including 4 vendor-hosted services, this just isn't going to work.
Libraries are a messy use case, and the DNS part is not under my direct
control. I can see it being useful for a single site though.

Thanks,
Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2013-01-03 Thread Tom Keays
The Code4Lib Journal is now running an up-to-date version of WordPress on
our server and all of our plugins are similarly updated and operational.
I'd especially like to acknowledge the contribution of Mark Pernotto, whose
good knowledge of the WordPress codex allowed him to see the problem that I
could not, and write a revised Issue Manager plugin. I'll post the revised
code to GitHub in the next week or so. Thanks again to the other
code4libbers that also offered to help. This group's generousity and
expertise is great.

For the Code4Lib Journal, many thanks!

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Responsive Web Site Live

2013-01-03 Thread Tom Keays
Browserstack and other emulators help quite a bit in testing, and testing
on real devices is always advisable.

But here's a nifty tool I discovered which is really useful if you are just
playing around with breakpoint testing on your desktop browser.

http://lab.maltewassermann.com/viewport-resizer/

Tom

On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 9:15 AM, Keith Jenkins k...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Does anyone here have any experience with browser emulators such as
 BrowserStack?  http://www.browserstack.com/

 If so, have you come across any significant differences between the
 emulators and the real thing?

 Keith


 On Wed, Jan 2, 2013 at 5:34 PM, Ron Gilmour rgilmou...@gmail.com wrote:
  Ideally, of course, one would have a mobile device lab
  
 http://mobile.smashingmagazine.com/2012/09/24/establishing-an-open-device-lab/
 
  where one could test a site on all kinds of devices, but that's not
 likely
  at a small college library.



Re: [CODE4LIB] T-Shirt voting is now open!

2013-01-03 Thread Tom Keays
Link is broken in my email program, so here it is again, further corrected.

http://vote.code4lib.org/election/25

Tom

On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 4:41 PM, Andreas Orphanides akorp...@ncsu.eduwrote:

 Minor correction:

 The correct address for voting is
 http://vote.code4lib.org/**election/25
 http://vote.code4lib.org/election/results/25,
 though the address Shaun provided (http://vote.code4lib.org/**
 election/results/25 http://vote.code4lib.org/election/results/25) will
 let you cheat and sneak a peek at who's winning, if you're into that kind
 of thing.

 -dre.

 On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 4:35 PM, Shaun Ellis sha...@princeton.edu wrote:

  Hi folks,
  The T-shirt committee is pleased to announce that voting is now open at
  the following URL:
 
  http://vote.code4lib.org/**election/results/25
 http://vote.code4lib.org/election/results/25
 
  Voting will close at midnight of January 15th.  Those who are not
  registered for the conference by January 15th are not guaranteed a shirt.
   If you are attending, please fill out the sizing form here so we get you
  the right size and fit:
  https://docs.google.com/**spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=**
  dGoxYmVZaTJrdkVyZF9rWWVYNi1XbV**E6MQ
 https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGoxYmVZaTJrdkVyZF9rWWVYNi1XbVE6MQ
 
 
  A big ++ to Ross Singer for help in setting up the diebold-o-tron...
  thanks, Ross!
 
  Cheers,
  The Code4Lib 2013 T-shirt Committee
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] Request for submissions: Code4Lib 2013 T-Shirt designs!

2012-12-11 Thread Tom Keays
Doubt it was intended as a conference shirt, but, yeah, I'd buy it as
general C4L merch. Cafepress or Zazzle anyone?  Beat it proudly, people.

On Tue, Dec 11, 2012 at 8:29 AM, Mark Sullivan sull...@geneseo.edu wrote:

 I thought we had settled on Michael Doran's design?

 __**__
 Mark Sullivan
 Executive Director
 IDS Project
 Milne Library
 1 College Circle
 SUNY Geneseo
 Geneseo, NY 14454
 (585) 245-5172


 On 12/10/2012 2:57 PM, Andreas Orphanides wrote:

 Hey Code4Libbers,

 The time has come once again to create the official Code4Lib 2013 tee
 shirt! If you're interested in submitting a design, please head over to
 the
 wiki:

 Code4Lib 2013 T-Shirt Design
 Proposalshttp://wiki.**code4lib.org/index.php/2013_t-**
 shirt_design_proposalshttp://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/2013_t-shirt_design_proposals
 

 The basics:

 - One submission per person, please. (But you don't need to be
 attending
 to submit a design!)
 - T-shirt designs should be 1-sided, single color designs suitable for
 screenprinting.
 - You should have a print-ready version of your design available when
 you submit it.
 - If you'd like, you can add a line or two of explanatory text to your
 submission to explain your concept, indicate color specifications,
 etc.
 - All proposals posted to the above wiki page while the calendar year
 is
 still 2012 will be considered.

 Get your submissions in by December 31, 2012! If you've got any questions,
 drop me a line!

 -Dre, on behalf of the C4L 2013 tee shirt committee





Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2012-12-10 Thread Tom Keays
After a bit of dithering on this, I'm pretty sure that Mark's revision of
the plugin is working under the current version of WordPress I'm testing on
(3.4.2). I have a few other things I'm going to need to do before I declare
this solved, upgrade the Journal's instance of WordPress and upload the
updated plugin to GitHub, but I wanted to say thanks in advance. The
Code4Lib community is incredible!

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Choosing fora. was: Proliferation of Code4Lib Channels

2012-12-04 Thread Tom Keays
Or just use Reddit's OS codebase*.
  https://github.com/reddit

Tom

* though I'm personally hoping there won't be another channel to keep track
of.


On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 9:33 AM, Shaun Ellis sha...@princeton.edu wrote:

 On 12/3/12 2:14 PM, MJ Ray wrote:

 This listserv looks threaded to me.  Maybe you need to upgrade
 Thunderbird, although I could have sworn it's done threaded for
 a while now.


 I was thinking of something that has a Vote to Promote feature. I feel
 that it's important to give folks a chance to support ideas even if they
 don't have a lot to add comment-wise.  It's a good way to gauge interest
 among folks who are not top talkers.  The Vote to Promote pattern is
 designed as an unobtrusive, democratic way to show support for ideas and
 focus the discussion toward constructive commentary [1].

 Interestingly enough, the RailsBridge curriculum project implements a
 simple version of this pattern as its core project[2].  I wonder if it
 would be a good starting point for a collaborative project?  Everyone who
 takes the workshop will know how this app works and should be able to add
 to it in the months that follow the conference.

 One of the MIT Mentorship Program tips [3] recommends making sure mentors
 get something in return (that it's not all giving on the part of the
 mentor). Since, according to Jonathan, we have a paucity of volunteer
 coders, perhaps the RailsBridge app could be an ongoing github project and
 a way to enlist more volunteers to give back to Code4Lib. Mentees might be
 expected to contribute something after the workshop and get a feel for
 software collaboration on github with their mentors in a helpful
 environment?

 Whether or not people would use such a tool in addition to the listserv, I
 don't know.  Vote to Promote requires a critical mass to make it
 worthwhile, but it's hard to gauge actual support without testing it.

 [1] 
 http://ui-patterns.com/**patterns/VoteToPromotehttp://ui-patterns.com/patterns/VoteToPromote
 [2] 
 http://docs.railsbridge.org/**curriculum/http://docs.railsbridge.org/curriculum/
 [3] http://mit.edu/uaap/prog_tips.**htmlhttp://mit.edu/uaap/prog_tips.html



 Unless you do something pretty silly - like insisting everyone
 register with github


 Unfortunately, in order to collaborate on the anti-harrassment policy, you
 do need to have a github account, or lobby someone who does to make a
 change for you.  But I think most would agree that's better than hashing
 out such details on this list.


 --
 Shaun D. Ellis
 Digital Library Interface Developer
 Firestone Library, Princeton University
 voice: 609.258.1698 | sha...@princeton.edu



[CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2012-12-04 Thread Tom Keays
On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 9:53 AM, Ross Singer rossfsin...@gmail.com wrote:

 Seriously, folks, if we can't even figure out how to upgrade our Drupal
 instance to a version that was released this decade, we shouldn't be
 discussing *new* implementations of *anything* that we have to host
 ourselves.


Not being one to waste a perfectly good segue...

The Code4Lib Journal runs on WordPress. This was a decision made by the
editorial board at the time (2007) and by and large it was a good one. Over
time, one of the board members offered his technical expertise to build a
few custom plugins that would streamline the workflow for publishing the
journal. Out of the box, WordPress is designed to publish a string of
individual articles, but we wanted to publish issues in a more traditional
model, with all the issues published at one time and arranged in the issue
is a specific order. We could (and have done) all this manually, but having
the plugin has been a real boon for us.

The Issue Manager plugin that he wrote provided the mechanism for:
a) preventing articles from being published prematurely,
b) identifying and arranging a set of final (pending) articles into an
issue, and
c) publishing that issue at the desired time.

That person is no longer on the Journal editorial board and upkeep of the
plugin has not been maintained since he left. We're now several
WordPress releases
behind, mainly because we delayed upgrading until we could test if doing so
would break the plugins. We have now tested, and it did. I won't bore you
with the details, but if we want to continue using the plugin to manage our
workflow, we need help.

Is there anybody out there with experience writing WordPress plugins that
would be willing to work with me to diagnose what has changed in the
WordPress codex that is causing the problems and maybe help me understand
how to prevent this from happening again with future releases?

Thanks,
Tom Keays / tomke...@gmail.com


Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2012-12-04 Thread Tom Keays
Hijacking my thread back. To answer all the questions in one go:

From Chad Nelson:
 What version of WP are you currently on?

Embarrassed, but you just have to do a view source of the Journal to learn
the dirty truth: WordPress 3.0.4

As you can see from the wiki, upgrading is something we want to do:

  http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/Code4Lib_Journal_Tech_Wishlist

 Is the source of the plugin available anywhere?

Version 1.4.3 is the most current version I found. There's an older version
on a Google Code repo, so don't use that.

  http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/issue-manager/

From Jason Stirnaman:
 It might be worth considering the Annotum theme for Wordpress, meant to
do just that.
 http://wordpress.org/extend/themes/annotum-base

Peter Murray suggested Annotum to me last week, but we'd very likely have
to change our workflow to use it and work would have to be done to merge
our template with Annotum's.  I'm not against either, but inertia sets in.

Peter also mentioned SemiotiX New Series, which I have yet to suss out

  http://ideophone.org/semiotix-wordpress-e-journal/

From Shaun Ellis (echoed by Katherine Lynch):
 Tom, can you post the plugin to Code4Lib's github so we can have a crack
at it

I can't, since I do not have a login to that Github account (I didn't even
know about it until last week). I'm not sure what the feeling of the
current Code4Lib owner(s) is regarding this, but if you can push content to
that account, please feel free to start a new plugin repo there.

I've had offers of help from Mark Pernotto and Katherine Lynch, for which I
am thankful. We'll have to figure out how to go forward with this. First
though, Mark and Katherine, can you confirm that you will help? We can
probably do the rest of this off the public channel.

And to anyone else who feels like it: please take a look at the code in the
WordPress Codex and see if anything jumps out at you. All and all, it
seemed to me to conform to the WP documentation I've read, but obviously
something has changed in the codex that I'm missing. Mark suggested that
the way WP handles jQuery  ajax requests might be part of it, and I think
he's on to something. However, there also seems to be a problem with the
way the cat_ID (category ID) search is being executed to build the list of
articles in the target issue. Maybe it is tied to the how the
jquery-ui-sortable-1.5.2.js module is working, but maybe not.

Thanks for the positive response,
Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2012-12-04 Thread Tom Keays
On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 1:01 PM, Shaun Ellis sha...@princeton.edu wrote:

 You can upload it to your account and then someone with admin rights to
 Code4Lib can fork it if they think our Code4Lib Journal custom code should
 be a repo there.  Doesn't really matter if they do actually. I think for
 debugging, it's best to point folks to the actual code the journal is
 running, which was forked from the official one on the Codex, right?


It was written for the Journal and originally kept in a Google Code repo
(this is before Github became the de facto). After the author left the
journal, he did a couple of updates which he uploaded to the WP Codex, but
nothing for a few years.

Anyway, here it is:

https://github.com/tomkeays/issue-manager


Re: [CODE4LIB] Help with WordPress for Code4Lib Journal

2012-12-04 Thread Tom Keays
Let's have mine be the canonical version for now. It will be too confusing
to have two versions that don't have an explicit fork relationship.

https://github.com/tomkeays/issue-manager

Tom

On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 1:56 PM, Chad Nelson chadbnel...@gmail.com wrote:

 Beat me by one minute Tom!

 And here it is in code4lib github

 https://github.com/code4lib/IssueManager


 On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 1:47 PM, Tom Keays tomke...@gmail.com wrote:

  On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 1:01 PM, Shaun Ellis sha...@princeton.edu
 wrote:
 
   You can upload it to your account and then someone with admin rights to
   Code4Lib can fork it if they think our Code4Lib Journal custom code
  should
   be a repo there.  Doesn't really matter if they do actually. I think
 for
   debugging, it's best to point folks to the actual code the journal is
   running, which was forked from the official one on the Codex, right?
 
 
  It was written for the Journal and originally kept in a Google Code repo
  (this is before Github became the de facto). After the author left the
  journal, he did a couple of updates which he uploaded to the WP Codex,
 but
  nothing for a few years.
 
  Anyway, here it is:
 
  https://github.com/tomkeays/issue-manager
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4lib Registration 2013 Redux.

2012-11-27 Thread Tom Keays
Thanks for giving us a week notice. I would be screwed if it was today,
both for schedule reasons and for being given funding (which still isn't).

In the original proposal, http://tigger.uic.edu/~kayiwa/code4lib.html , you
said:

Our plan will include staggered registration divided in 3 equal parts.
Early bird for people on the East Coast and our international friends who
stay up late, another in the middle of the day convenient for the central
time zone, and another late in the day to accommodate the West Coast and
international guests.

I haven't heard anything about this in the recent email flurry, so I'm
assuming there will just be a registration single queue, right?

Thanks,
Tom


On Mon, Nov 26, 2012 at 7:43 PM, Francis Kayiwa kay...@uic.edu wrote:

 To prove that we *do* listen the registration is push a full week from
 the last post.

 Repeat: You will be registering on 12/4 for Code4lib 2013.

 Apologies and thanks for those who beat some sense into us. We *do
 appreciate it*. That said we will not delay this any further. :-)

 ./fxk
 --
 A candidate is a person who gets money from the rich and votes from the
 poor to protect them from each other.



Re: [CODE4LIB] anti-harassment policy for code4lib?

2012-11-27 Thread Tom Keays
I think a good code is Try not to be an asshole.  You can but try.
Never-the-less, I feel it mitigates the need for an angry god and makes the
10 commandments redundant.

Anyway, thanks to Bess for raising the issue. I think all of you have made
a great start. I think there are more than enough volunteers already, but I
would contribute if you need me. Using Github seems like a good way to
garner support and endorsement of the final policy. I've added it to my
starred list to show my support.


On Mon, Nov 26, 2012 at 7:48 PM, Karen Coyle li...@kcoyle.net wrote:

 On 11/26/12 4:37 PM, Joe Hourcle wrote:

 Don't be an asshole.


 Could that become the 11th commandment, and could we get a really really
 angry god to enforce it? Everywhere, all of the time?

 kc


  I think there was a second line of it, about how we had the right to
 remove people who refused to follow that advice and no refunds would be
 given. I might be wrong on the exact language. The e-mail I found
 referenced 'Don't be a dick', in an attempt to paraphrase the legalese of
 the Code of Conduct for our venue ... but the reference to gender-specific
 anatomy would be kinda sexist in itself. -Joe


 --
 Karen Coyle
 kco...@kcoyle.net http://kcoyle.net
 ph: 1-510-540-7596
 m: 1-510-435-8234
 skype: kcoylenet



[CODE4LIB]

2012-11-27 Thread Tom Keays
What makes it work for SXSW is that they have a formal organization -- an
incorporated body, in fact -- that gives them the continuity and structure
to do things that can be highly structured or ad hoc, depending on the need
of the situation. They have to be this way because they are freakin' huge.
It is the fact because they are so huge, and have so many presentation
applications, that the organizers have this sort of latitude to pick and
choose among the best candidates.

Code4Lib is more like a collective: no central organization, only a loose
set of guidelines, and, thankfully, a lot of engaged individuals with a
good institutional memory to keep things on track (where the definition of
on track itself is fairly mutable). We can be this way because we have
intentionally kept the event small. It works, but it can be rocky.

Would I alter my vote for a presentation due to data that indicated gender,
ethnicity, age, whatever? (Probably not.) Might a presenter be a little
weirded out that these variables were being included as part of the voting
process. (Quite possibly.) Is it even legal to do so? (Dunno.)

I don't think we're big enough that the SXSW approach of having a central
organizational body make some discreet discretionary choices among the
presentation finalists would actually work. In our context, who would that
be anyway?  To achieve the gender/ethnicity/age/whatever balance, they
might have to sacrifice quality in the talks. Quota systems don't work when
the pool is small. And given our open voting system, the people being
passed over will not be happy.

To me, the solution is not to winnow at the back end, but encourage
diversity at the front end. I think we, as a group, have tended to do this.
As Bess has said, our community is clearly doing a lot to move in the
direction of inclusiveness.

Tom

On Tue, Nov 27, 2012 at 12:44 PM, danielle plumer dcplu...@gmail.comwrote:

 s


Re: [CODE4LIB] PBCore 2.0 to MARC XML?

2012-11-06 Thread Tom Keays
PBCore lists a bunch of crosswalk mapping schemes that they've identified.

http://www.pbcore.org/PBCore/PBCore_Mappings.html

Some of them are listed but aren't done yet, including a direct mapping to
MARC 21. However, a mapping of PBCore to Dublin Core exists, so you could
probably get there by using DC as an intermediate.

http://www.pbcore.org/PBCore/mappings/PBCore-DublinCore_Mapping.html

They also identify the Metadata Advisory Group of the MIT Libraries as a
source of mapping information, so you could possibly consult them for help
in this project.

http://libraries.mit.edu/guides/subjects/metadata/mappings.html


On Mon, Nov 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM, john passmore jwpassm...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hi,
 Before I start reinventing the wheel, does anyone know of any stylesheets
 out there that convert PBCore 2.0 XML http://pbcore.org to MARC
 XMLhttp://www.loc.gov/standards/marcxml/?

 Thanks!
 John
 WNYC Archives



Re: [CODE4LIB] one tool and/or resource that you recommend to newbie coders in a library?

2012-11-01 Thread Tom Keays
I won't expand on Michael's excellent summary of using SASS, but he did
leave out one crucial bit -- it comes in two formats, which causes some
confusion.  The format that Michael was describing is the second one, SCSS,
which is basically CSS with some fancy nesting patterns that you can't do
natively in CSS, as well as variables and math functions. The original
format, SASS, omitted the {} braces and used a whitespace indenting style,
purposely emulating Ruby and Python in that regard. SCSS has the shorter
learning curve and, in fact, you can just use your usual CSS to get started
go on from there. In SASS, you have to refactor all your old CSS to the new
format, but my understanding is that there may be some things you can do in
SASS that you can't do in SCSS (not sure what, though).

On Thu, Nov 1, 2012 at 5:06 PM, Nate Hill nathanielh...@gmail.com wrote:

 Huh.  Michael, I'd love to know more about why I should care about SASS.
 I kinda like writing CSS.
 I see why LESS http://lesscss.org/ makes sense, but help me under stand
 why
 SASS does?

 On Thu, Nov 1, 2012 at 5:02 PM, Ethan Gruber ewg4x...@gmail.com wrote:

  Google is more useful than any reference book to find answers to
  programming problems.
  On Nov 1, 2012 4:25 PM, Bohyun Kim k...@fiu.edu wrote:
 
   Hi all code4lib-bers,
  
   As coders and coding librarians, what is ONE tool and/or resource that
  you
   recommend to newbie coders in a library (and why)?  I promise I will
  create
   and circulate the list and make it into a Code4Lib wiki page for
  collective
   wisdom.  =)
  
   Thanks in advance!
   Bohyun
  
   ---
   Bohyun Kim, MA, MSLIS
   Digital Access Librarian
   bohyun@fiu.edu
   305-348-1471
   Medical Library, College of Medicine
   Florida International University
   http://medlib.fiu.edu
   http://medlib.fiu.edu/m (Mobile)
  
 



 --
 Nate Hill
 nathanielh...@gmail.com
 http://4thfloor.chattlibrary.org/
 http://www.natehill.net



Re: [CODE4LIB] one tool and/or resource that you recommend to newbie coders in a library?

2012-11-01 Thread Tom Keays
And here's my coding tool, which is supported by most of the common code
editors via plugins: Zen Coding, http://code.google.com/p/zen-coding/

The idea is that it lets you use CSS-like selectors as tags that can be
expanded into full HTML snippets. I'll just use the example from the
project page to describe what I mean.

You type a string like this ...

div#pagediv.logo+ul#navigationli*5a

... and Zen Coding will expand it into:

div id=page
div class=logo/div
ul id=navigation
lia href=/a/li
lia href=/a/li
lia href=/a/li
lia href=/a/li
lia href=/a/li
/ul
/div


Re: [CODE4LIB] archiving a wiki

2012-05-23 Thread Tom Keays
I haven't tried it on a wiki, but the command-line Unix utility wget can be
used to mirror a website.

http://www.gnu.org/software/wget/manual/html_node/Advanced-Usage.html

I usually call it like this:

wget -m -p http://www.site.com/

common flags:
   -m = mirroring on/off
   -p = page_requisites on/off
   -c = continue - when download is interrupted
   -l5 = reclevel - Recursion level (depth) default = 5

On Tue, May 22, 2012 at 5:04 PM, Carol Hassler
carol.hass...@wicourts.govwrote:

 My organization would like to archive/export our internal wiki in some
 kind of end-user friendly format. The concept is to copy the wiki
 contents annually to a format that can be used on any standard computer
 in case of an emergency (i.e. saved as an HTML web-style archive, saved
 as PDF files, saved as Word files).

 Another way to put it is that we are looking for a way to export the
 contents of the wiki into a printer-friendly format - to a document that
 maintains some organization and formatting and can be used on any
 standard computer.

 Is anybody aware of a tool out there that would allow for this sort of
 automated, multi-page export? Our wiki is large and we would prefer not
 to do this type of backup one page at a time. We are using JSPwiki, but
 I'm open to any option you think might work. Could any of the web
 harvesting products be adapted to do the job? Has anyone else backed up
 a wiki to an alternate format?

 Thanks!


 Carol Hassler
 Webmaster / Cataloger
 Wisconsin State Law Library
 (608) 261-7558
 http://wilawlibrary.gov/




Re: [CODE4LIB] Bootstrap vs Foundation

2012-05-11 Thread Tom Keays
I read this awhile back. It's by someone associated with the
Foundation project.
  
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/dive-into-responsive-prototyping-with-foundation/
Both look good. Like you, I looked hard at Bootstrap after the
conference, but haven't really done anything with it. I'd be
interested which framework you settle on.



On Thu, May 10, 2012 at 7:17 PM, Jessie Keck jk...@stanford.edu wrote:
 Hi all,
 We are about to develop a set of style-guids and templates for our locally 
 developed applications that will have a unified look and feel.  One 
 manifestation of this will be a ruby gem that we will use for all of our 
 rails apps (including Blacklight and Hydra applications).

 As we were discussing the approaches we may take for this, the question of 
 basing our designs on a library such as Bootstrap or Foundation came up.  I 
 have heard a lot about Bootstrap in the C4L community, but very little about 
 Foundation.  Does anybody here have extensive experience w/ both libraries 
 and would recommend one over the other?

 We are already leaning towards Bootstrap as many in the Blacklight and Hydra 
 communities have expressed interest or are using it already.  Also, some 
 folks locally who have used or investigated both libraries have had positive 
 experiences in either case.

 Understanding that this may be boil down to a simple matter of taste, I 
 wonder what opinions you all have.

 Thank you,
 - Jessie Keck
 Stanford University


Re: [CODE4LIB] Q.: MARC8 vs. MARC/Unicode and pymarc and misencoded III records

2012-03-09 Thread Tom Keays
I'm out of my depth here, but I'm curious how this all works. Is it true
that, in MARC8 records, there is supposed to be an 066 field included that
defines non-Latin character sets? I'm making this conclusion from some
things I read on the LOC website. ANSEL is mentioned as one of the
instances where this might be necessary.

http://www.loc.gov/marc/specifications/speccharucs.html#field066
http://www.loc.gov/marc/specifications/speccharconversion.html#escape
http://www.loc.gov/marc/bibliographic/bd066.html


On Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 1:02 PM, Godmar Back god...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hi,

 a few days ago, I showed pymarc to a group of technical librarians to
 demonstrate how easily certain tasks can be scripted/automated.

 Unfortunately, it blew up at me when I tried to write a record:

 UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xe8 in position 9:
 ordinal not in range(128)

 Investigation revealed this culprit:

 =LDR  00916nam a2200241I  4500
 =001  ocm10685946
 =005  19880203211447.0
 =007  cr\bn||abp
 =007  cr\bn||cda
 =008  840503s1939gw00010\ger\d
 =040  \\$aMBB$cMBB$dCRL
 =049  \\$aCRLL
 =100  10$aEsser, Hermann,$d1900-
 =245  14$aDie jE8udischer Weltpest ;$bjudendE1ammerung auf dem
 Erdball,$cvon Hermann Esser.
 =260  0\$aME8unchen,$bZentralverlag der N S D A P., F. Eher
 ahchf.,$c1939.
 =300  \\$a243 [1] p.$c23 cm.
 =533  \\$aAlso available as electronic reproduction.$bChicago :$cCenter for
 Research Libraries,$d[2009]
 =650  \0$aJewish question.
 =700  12$aBierbrauer, Johann Jacob,$d1705-1760?
 =710  2\$aCenter for Research Libraries (U.S.)
 =856  41$uhttp://dds.crl.edu/CRLdelivery.asp?tid=10538$zOnline version
 =907  \\$a.b28931622$b08-30-10$c08-30-10
 =998  \\$awww$b08-30-10$cm$dz$e-$fger$ggw $h4$i0

 The leader[9] field is set to 'a', so the record should contain
 UTF8-encoded Unicode [1], but E8 75 in the 245$a appears to be ANSEL where
 'E8' denotes the Umlaut preceding the lowercase 'u' (0x75). [2]

 To me, this record looks misencoded... am I correct here? There are
 thousands of such records in the data set I'm dealing with, which was
 obtained using the 'Data Exchange' feature of III's Millennium system.

 My question is how others, especially pymarc users dealing with III
 records, deal with this issue or whatever other
 experiences/hints/practices/kludges exist in this area.

 Thanks.

  - Godmar

 [1] http://www.loc.gov/marc/bibliographic/bdleader.html
 [2] http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/codetables/45.html



Re: [CODE4LIB] Transcription/dictation software?

2012-02-27 Thread Tom Keays
My wife, for a linguistics research project, recorded the responses of her
subjects to a list of questions, so that she could transcribe them and
analyze them. She got Dragon Dictate with the intention of getting a rough
transcription and then, listening to the tape, correct the errors. With so
many subjects, she found that the software, which was trained to her voice,
never gave good enough results to be faster than transcribing them herself
by hand. So, keep that issue in mind. I would imagine that, if there were
just a few lecturers for the podcast, that a speech transcription solution
might work out, provided you could get the lecturers to spend a little time
helping to train the software. However, you need to find out how many
different voices a given dictation software can be trained to reliably
understand. If it is fewer than the number of lecturers, it probably not be
worth it. If it did work, you could send rough transcriptions and the audio
and have Mechanical Turk do clean up edits rather than the whole
transcription.

Tom

On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 1:52 PM, Suchy, Daniel dsu...@ucsd.edu wrote:

 Hello all,

 At my campus we offer podcasts of course lectures, recorded in class and
 then delivered via iTunes and as a plain Mp3 download (
 http://podcast.ucsd.edu).  I have the new responsibility of figuring out
 how to transcribe text versions of these audio podcasts for folks with
 hearing issues.

 I was wondering if any of you are using or have played with
 dictation/transcription software and can recommend or de-recommend any?
 My first inclination is to go with open-source, but I'm open to anything
 that works well and can scale to handle hundreds of courses.

 Thanks in advance!
 Dan

 *
 Daniel Suchy
 User Services Technology Analyst
 University of California, San Diego Libraries
 858.534.6819
 dsu...@ucsd.edumailto:dsu...@ucsd.edu



Re: [CODE4LIB] Pre confirm when where?

2012-02-05 Thread Tom Keays
I was just downstairs (escalator down out of the bar near the lobby) and
saw that they are start at 9:00 in various rooms.
Tom

On Sun, Feb 5, 2012 at 8:47 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:

 Is there some obvious way I'm not seei g to figure out when and where the
 conf pre conf sessions are tomorrow? I can't seem to find it anywhere. I
 don't even know what time to wake up and go looking for them? Not even
 positive if they are at the conf hotel?



Re: [CODE4LIB] NEcode4lib?

2011-12-19 Thread Tom Keays
Just a reminder that there is a NE Code4Lib space on the wiki --
http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/NEC4L (or http://ne.code4lib.org ) that
was used as part of the planning for a 2008 meeting in Boston.

On Fri, Dec 16, 2011 at 9:42 AM, Joseph Montibello 
joseph.montibe...@dartmouth.edu wrote:

 Hi,

 It looks like there was a New England regional a couple of years ago. Is
 there still any activity/interest in this region? I can imagine that in
 addition to folks who missed the registration power-hour, there might be a
 significant group that can't get their library to support a trip to Seattle.

 Just curious.
 Joe Montibello, MLIS
 Library Systems Manager
 Dartmouth College Library
 603.646.9394
 joseph.montibe...@dartmouth.edumailto:joseph.montibe...@dartmouth.edu



Re: [CODE4LIB] Pandering for votes for code4lib sessions

2011-12-01 Thread Tom Keays
 One thing I would be open to is to put a disclaimer splash page before
 any ballot (only to be seen the first time a person votes) briefly
 explaining how the ballot works and to mention that ballot stuffing is
 unethical, undemocratic and tears at the fabric that is Code4Lib or
 some such.  I would welcome contributions to the wording.

 What would people think about that?

+1 I agree with Ross on all points here.

In this age of blatant viral campaigns -- e.g., a band putting a link on
their homepage asking their fans to vote them up in a best of category -- I
don't feel outrage on this issue ... although I think it coasts along the
edge of ethicality. And I have to ask the question (since I really don't
know): was the amount of ballot stuffing that occurred sufficiently large
that it could actually swamp legitimate votes?

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Voting is open for code4lib 2012 presentations.

2011-11-22 Thread Tom Keays
Mine are being remembered from this morning when I filled it out at home.
I'm now on a different network/OS/browser.

Tom

On Tue, Nov 22, 2011 at 2:22 PM, Andrew Nagy asn...@gmail.com wrote:

 My votes are not showing after returning to the voting page.  I thought I
 remembered being able to modify my votes from previous years.  I went
 through the first 30 or so, and wanted to come back to it to go through
 more, but my votes are not persisting.  Is this a bug, a change, or a
 failure in my memory?

 Andrew

 On Tue, Nov 22, 2011 at 2:14 PM, Michael J. Giarlo 
 leftw...@alumni.rutgers.edu wrote:

  POWERED BY DIEBOLD
 
 
  On Tue, Nov 22, 2011 at 14:08, Michael B. Klein mbkl...@gmail.com
 wrote:
   Hmm. 404'ing for me now.
  
   On Nov 22, 2011, at 4:22 AM, Ross Singer rossfsin...@gmail.com
 wrote:
  
   Ok, the results screen should no longer be throwing an error.
  
   Vote early, vote often,
   -Ross.
  
   On Tue, Nov 22, 2011 at 6:57 AM, Ross Singer rossfsin...@gmail.com
  wrote:
   Mark, I'm only getting that for the results page.  Are you getting
 it
   somewhere else?
  
   I'll fix the results page as soon as I can.
  
   -Ross.
  
   On Monday, November 21, 2011, Mark Diggory mdigg...@atmire.com
  wrote:
   The ever popular...Internal Server Error
   On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 7:34 PM, Anjanette Young
   youn...@u.washington.eduwrote:
  
   Voting for code4lib 2012 talks are now open.
  
   Voting will close at 5pm (PST) on December 9, 2011.
  
   Presentation criteria to keep in mind
  
  
  - Usefulness
  - Newness
  - Geekiness
  - Diversity of topics
  
   http://vote.code4lib.org/election/21 -- You will need your
   code4lib.orglogin in order to vote. If you do not have one you can
  create
   one at
   http://code4lib.org/
  
   Presentation proposal descriptions can be found on the wiki
  
   http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/2012_talks_proposals
  
   Thank you to Ross Singer for keying in all 72 proposals!
  
   --Anjanette
  
--
   You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
  Groups
   code4libcon group.
   To post to this group, send email to code4lib...@googlegroups.com.
   To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
   code4libcon+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
   For more options, visit this group at
   http://groups.google.com/group/code4libcon?hl=en.
  
  
  
  
   --
   [image: @mire Inc.]
   *Mark Diggory*
   *2888 Loker Avenue East, Suite 305, Carlsbad, CA. 92010*
   *Esperantolaan 4, Heverlee 3001, Belgium*
   http://www.atmire.com
  
  
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] _[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib National 2012 Registration is now OPEN!!!!

2011-11-16 Thread Tom Keays
Non-obvious, then. I always enter my name in the Description field. Since
my name was in the Billing Information, I hope that suffices.

---
Description: Tom Keays

On Wed, Nov 16, 2011 at 11:31 AM, Elizabeth Duell edu...@uoregon.eduwrote:

 The Description field is for the PARTICIPANT'S NAME.

  - E



 Elizabeth Duell
 Orbis Cascade Alliance
 edu...@uoregon.edu
 (541) 346-1883

 On 11/16/2011 8:21 AM, Joshua Gomez wrote:

 Stephen are you sure it is a captcha error? When I first tried to submit
 it complained about the description field being empty (it's at the top
 of the form). I'm not sure what the description field is for, so I just
 typed in code4lib 2012.

 -Josh

  Westman, Stephen  11/16/11 11:12 AM

 For some reason, it is not accepting the captcha information. I'm
 typing in exactly what's showing, but I can't get the payment to submit.

 Stephen Westman
 __**__
 From: Code for Libraries [CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] on behalf of
 Elizabeth Duell [edu...@uoregon.edu]
 Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:59 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: _[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib National 2012 Registration is now OPEN

 Registration is now open for Code4Lib 2012!

 The 2012 conference will be February 6-9 in Seattle, Washington.

 Code4Lib 2012 is a loosely-structured conference for library
 technologists to commune, gather/create/share ideas and software,
 be inspired, and forge collaborations.

 Register here: 
 http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/**Code4LibNational2012http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Code4LibNational2012

 Conference information can be found on the conference web page
 and the code4lib wiki:

 http://code4lib.org/**conference/2012http://code4lib.org/conference/2012
 http://wiki.code4lib.org/

 Registration information as well as Transportation and Things to
 do in Seattle are at:

 http://orbiscascade.org/index/**code4lib-national-2012http://orbiscascade.org/index/code4lib-national-2012

 
 Hoping to give a 20-min talk or lead a pre-conference?

 Spots will be reserved for speakers, so please help us by noting
 that you have submitted a proposal for the conference in the
 “anything else we need to know” section of your registration
 form.  If your registration hinges on delivering a talk, register
 but DO NOT PAY FOR YOUR REGISTRATION AT THAT TIME.  We will
 contact you later for payment.

 *
 Wait, registration has filled up already? I just got this notice.

 Please register for the conference and get on the wait list but
 DO NOT PAY FOR YOUR REGISTRATION AT THAT TIME. Because of the
 large number of spots reserved for speakers, we will most likely
 be opening up more spots after the presentations are chosen on
 December 9th. We will be contacting individuals on the wait list
 and asking for payment at that time.


 --

 Elizabeth Duell
 Orbis Cascade Alliance
 edu...@uoregon.edu
 (541) 346-1883




Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib National 2012 Registration is now OPEN!!!!

2011-11-16 Thread Tom Keays
I got a confirmation email for registration billing. I assume,
therefore, that the delayed confirmation message you refer to below is the
success of completing the SurveyMonkey form.

Is it safe to assume that when the SurveyMonkey registration portion
reaches a threshold, that people won't be taken to the payment site?

Tom

On Wed, Nov 16, 2011 at 11:38 AM, Elizabeth Duell edu...@uoregon.eduwrote:

 Confirmations will be sent out at a later date. We chose not to have
 automatic confirmations because of the possibility of misinformation.

 They will be coming.

  - E



 Elizabeth Duell
 Orbis Cascade Alliance
 edu...@uoregon.edu
 (541) 346-1883

 On 11/16/2011 8:27 AM, Michael North wrote:

 And I assume that our registration is reserved until you get the
 payment, or forfeited on Jan. 6th, correct?
 We need a couple days to cut the checks.
 Also, will there be a confirmation of registration email ... I have not
 received anything, or should I be more patient :-)

 Michael North
 Northwestern University


 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries 
 [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.**EDUCODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU]
 On Behalf Of Elizabeth Duell
 Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:18 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib National 2012 Registration is now
 OPEN

 yes, I will keep this e-mail as a reminder that it should be on its way.
 Do you need more information?

 Thank you for letting me know!

 Elizabeth


 Elizabeth Duell
 Orbis Cascade Alliance
 edu...@uoregon.edu
 (541) 346-1883

 On 11/16/2011 8:11 AM, Mark A. Matienzo wrote:

 Can we pay for registration by check, as suggested by the payment page?

 Mark


 On Wed, Nov 16, 2011 at 10:59 AM, Elizabeth Duelledu...@uoregon.edu
 wrote:

 Registration is now open for Code4Lib 2012!

 The 2012 conference will be February 6-9 in Seattle, Washington.

 Code4Lib 2012 is a loosely-structured conference for library
 technologists to commune, gather/create/share ideas and software, be
 inspired, and forge collaborations.

 Register here: 
 http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/**Code4LibNational2012http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Code4LibNational2012

 Conference information can be found on the conference web page and
 the code4lib wiki:

 http://code4lib.org/**conference/2012http://code4lib.org/conference/2012
 http://wiki.code4lib.org/

 Registration information as well as Transportation and Things to do
 in Seattle are at:

 http://orbiscascade.org/index/**code4lib-national-2012http://orbiscascade.org/index/code4lib-national-2012

 
 Hoping to give a 20-min talk or lead a pre-conference?

 Spots will be reserved for speakers, so please help us by noting that
 you have submitted a proposal for the conference in the anything
 else we need to know section of your registration form.  If your
 registration hinges on delivering a talk, register but DO NOT PAY FOR
 YOUR REGISTRATION AT THAT TIME.  We will contact you later for payment.

 *
 Wait, registration has filled up already? I just got this notice.

 Please register for the conference and get on the wait list but DO
 NOT PAY FOR YOUR REGISTRATION AT THAT TIME. Because of the large
 number of spots reserved for speakers, we will most likely be opening
 up more spots after the presentations are chosen on December 9th. We
 will be contacting individuals on the wait list and asking for
 payment at that time.


 --

 Elizabeth Duell
 Orbis Cascade Alliance
 edu...@uoregon.edu
 (541) 346-1883




Re: [CODE4LIB] opening a pdf file [diva]

2011-10-03 Thread Tom Keays
On Mon, Oct 3, 2011 at 11:57 AM, Andrew Hankinson 
andrew.hankin...@gmail.com wrote:

 I'm one of the developers of Diva. I noticed that you've been getting your
 files from the Internet Archive. They also have the full high-quality JPEG
 and JPEG2000 images available.

 http://ia600209.us.archive.org/6/items/acourseofreligio00gerauoft/

 You could use those for Diva instead of the already-compressed PDF.


While I agree that Diva offers a really good on-screen reading experience
(probably the best I've used so far), Archive.org itself offers a good one
too.

So, for the first book in Eric's list,
http://www.archive.org/details/acourseofreligio00gerauoft
the on-screen reader is at
http://www.archive.org/stream/acourseofreligio00gerauoft

I tried it out in my 3 year old, 2nd generation iPod Touch over the flakey
campus WiFi and found that it displayed quite nicely. You have paging
controls, but can also use touch gestures to scroll and pinch the page
larger. Like Diva, it uses lazy loading techniques, so you don't have to
wait until the whole document is available to start reading.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] opening a pdf file [diva]

2011-10-03 Thread Tom Keays
Another idea, if you are looking for an app-based rather than web-based
reader is VuDroid, which supports both PDF and DjVu formats.
http://code.google.com/p/vudroid/

I suggest it, not because I use it but because, at least in the Open Library
version of the book's record,
http://openlibrary.org/books/OL7169556M/
DjVu is listed as a streaming format. If I had an Android, I would give it a
try.

For iOS, there's DjVu reader that seems pretty decent.
http://xzonesoftware.com/products/xdjvu
I may check it out later tonight.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] code4lib New York one-day minicon, Mon Sept 26

2011-07-07 Thread Tom Keays
Since there is a Code4Lib NYC group but no evidence of a Code4Lib NY State
group, I think it was pretty unabiguously NYC. If you really need to check,
click the link for Yitzchak's organization, http://www.tourolib.org/ and
there is no doubt.

For reference, in the recent past, the closest regional options from central
NY have been Code4Lib North, Code4Lib New England, and (temptingly) Code4Lib
Midwest. See the list on http://wiki.code4lib.org/index.php/Main_Page .

Tom

On Thu, Jul 7, 2011 at 1:44 PM, Wilfred Drew dr...@tc3.edu wrote:

 New York City? Please be more specific than just New York. There is a lot
 of New York State north and west of Manhattan.

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU] On Behalf Of
 Yitzchak Schaffer
 Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 1:40 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] code4lib New York one-day minicon, Mon Sept 26

 Hello everybody,

 Plans are underway for a one-day code4lib [1] mini-conference in New
 York, in conjunction with METRO [2], which has graciously hosted our
 local chapter for several years as a SIG.

 After ruling out large swaths of time this fall for various reasons, we
 arrived at Monday, Sept. 26 as the potential date.

 Kevin Reiss [kevin.re...@gmail.com], Joanna DiPasquale and I are
 co-conveners of the local group. We would like to confirm that the date
 is not evil before concretizing it, so: if you know of some conflict
 that would prevent people attending, please let one of us know.

 More information should be forthcoming.

 [1] http://code4lib.org/
 [2] http://metro.org/

 Many thanks,

 --
 Yitzchak Schaffer
 Systems Manager
 Touro College Libraries
 212.742.8770 ext. 2432
 http://www.tourolib.org/



Re: [CODE4LIB] source of marc geographic code?

2011-06-22 Thread Tom Keays
It can be found at
http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/geographicAreas.html

Look near the bottom of the page for links to the codes as RDF, N-triples,
and JSON.

Tom

On Wed, Jun 22, 2011 at 6:38 PM, Stephen Hearn s-h...@umn.edu wrote:

 Have you looked at id.loc.gov? One of its vocabularies defines URLs
 for each of the MARC geographic area codes.

 Stephen


 On Wed, Jun 22, 2011 at 4:44 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu
 wrote:
  Can anyone remind me if there's a machine readable copy of the MARC
  geographic codes available at any persistent URL?
 
  They're in HTML at http://www.loc.gov/marc/geoareas/gacs_code.html . I
  actually had a script that automatically downloaded from there and
 scraped
  the HTML -- but sometime since I wrote the script, the HTML structure on
 the
  page changed and it broke.
 
  (I kind of thought that was unlikely since that HTML page itself was
 machine
  generated -- but I guess they changed the software that generated it.
  Certainly I knew that scraping HTML was a bad thing to rely on... which
 is
  why I hope LC provides this in some format less likely to change?)
 



 --
 Stephen Hearn, Metadata Strategist
 Technical Services, University Libraries
 University of Minnesota
 160 Wilson Library
 309 19th Avenue South
 Minneapolis, MN 55455
 Ph: 612-625-2328
 Fx: 612-625-3428



Re: [CODE4LIB] RDF for opening times/hours?

2011-06-07 Thread Tom Keays
There was a time, about 5 years ago, when I assumed that microformats
were the way to go and spent a bit of time looking at hCalendar for
representing iCalendar-formatted event information.

http://microformats.org/wiki/hcalendar

Not long after that, there was a lot of talk about RDF and RDFa for
this same purpose. Now I was confused as to whether to change my
strategy or not, but RDF Calendar seemed to be a good idea. The latter
also was nice because it could be used to syndicate event information
via RSS.

http://pemberton-vandf.blogspot.com/2008/06/how-to-do-hcalendar-in-rdfa.html
http://www.w3.org/TR/rdfcal/

These days it seems to be all about HTML5 microdata, especially
because of Rich Snippets and Google's support for this approach.

http://html5doctor.com/microdata/#microdata-action

All three approaches allow you to embed iCalendar formatted event
information on a web page. All three of them do it differently. I'm
even more confused now than I was 5 years ago. This should not be this
hard, yet there is still no definitive way to deploy this information
and preserve the semantics of the event information. Part of this may
be because the iCalendar format, although widely used, is itself
insufficient.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] Seth Godin on The future of the library

2011-06-02 Thread Tom Keays
I wonder if Mr Godin, in articulating his vision of the library as a
place filled with so many web terminals there's always at least one
empty, isn't framing it around the Digital Public Library of America
proposal? He didn't specifically name it but, with all the acclaim for
the idea in the mainstream media, it is difficult to believe he is
unaware of it. In that he is primarily describing a public rather than
an academic library setting in his post, access to books rather than
journals and databases is probably what he had in mind and that aligns
with the goals of the DPLA. In addition, the DPLA conceivably could
satisfy some of the concerns voiced here about how local libraries go
about maintaining links and obtaining cataloging records.

To bring something new to the discussion, take a look at this post to
the PLA Blog, 
http://plablog.org/2011/06/two-more-reasons-for-library-outposts-the-dpla-and-youmedia-learning-labs.html
, describing something similar (or so it seems to me) to what Mr Godin
is describing.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] 2012 Conference Dates

2011-04-21 Thread Tom Keays
Apparently no date set as yet.

http://code4lib.org/node/405
http://sites.google.com/site/code4lib2012seattle/\



On Thu, Apr 21, 2011 at 8:23 AM, Richard, Joel M richar...@si.edu wrote:

 Good morning,

 I know that Seattle has been chosen for the next code4lib conference, but I
 can't find any info on dates. I'm really hoping it doesn't fall on the week
 of Mardi Gras (Feb 21, 2012). Does anyone have info on this?

 Thanks!
 --Joel


 Joel Richard
 IT Specialist, Web Services Department
 Smithsonian Institution Libraries | http://www.sil.si.edu/
 (202) 633-1706 | richar...@si.edu



Re: [CODE4LIB] code hosting / versioning

2011-03-28 Thread Tom Keays
You might also try out jsFiddle http://jsfiddle.net . It can be used to
implement source code snippets either stored directly in your fiddle or
pulled from a gist repository, http://doc.jsfiddle.net/use/gist_read.html .

Tom

On Sun, Mar 27, 2011 at 2:05 PM, Nate Hill nathanielh...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hi all,
 I have some code I'd like to paste out in the open so that folks can play
 with it and sumbit their own versions.
 It is nothing too complicated: just a website template that includes a few
 html files, a css file, and a javascript file.
 I'm not really familiar with versioning systems, and after downloading Git
 and playing around it feels like overkill for what I'm trying to do.
 Does it make sense to just paste the files in code.google.com and go from
 there?
 Would anyone recommend a different approach?
 Thanks!
 Nate

 --
 Nate Hill
 nathanielh...@gmail.com
 http://www.natehill.net



Re: [CODE4LIB] An alternate presentation of Code4Lib Journal

2011-01-04 Thread Tom Keays
As I recall, one of the editors mentioned Anthologize a while back
and, at the time, we decided it wasn't a super good fit. Perhaps we
ought to reconsider. We're running WordPress 3.0.4, so that's not an
issue.

On Tue, Jan 4, 2011 at 11:45 AM, Eric Lease Morgan emor...@nd.edu wrote:
 On Jan 4, 2011, at 11:40 AM, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:

 ...Is there any easy way to get it to, for instance, make an anthology of
 all the posts with a certain WordPress tag or category instead?...

 Based on my (poor) recollection of playing with the Anthologize plug-in, the 
 process is a bit manual. Initialize epub. Drag postings to it. Annotate/tweak 
 titles. Click 'Go'. Get epub file. The process is not laborious, just a bit 
 tedious. I would definitely recommend the Journal Committee experiment with 
 Anthologize.

 --
 Eric Morgan



Re: [CODE4LIB] WorldCat as an OpenURL endpoint ?

2010-06-16 Thread Tom Keays
We have been trying to enumerate serials holdings as explicitly as possible.
E.G., this microfiche supplement to a journal,
http://summit.syr.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=274291 shows apparently
missing issues. However, there are two pieces of inferred information here:

1) every print issue had a corresponding microfiche supplement (they didn't,
so most of these are complete even with the gaps)
2) that volumes, at least up until 1991, had only 26 issues (that is
probably is true, but it is not certain) and there is no way to be certain
how many issues per volume were published with 1992 (28?, 52?)

v.95:no.3 (1973)-v.95:no.8 (1973
v.95:no.10 (1973)-v.95:no.26 (1973)
v.96 (1974)-v.97 (1975)
v.98:no.1 (1976)-v.98:no.14 (1976)
v.98:no.16 (1976)-v.98:no.26 (1976)
v.99:no.1 (1977)-v.99:no.25 (1977)
v.100 (1978)-v.108 (1986)
v.109:no.1 (1987)-v.109:no.19 (1987)
v.109:no.21 (1987)-v.109:no.26 (1987)
v.110 (1988)-v.111 (1989)
v.112:no.1 (1990)-v.112:no.26 (1990)
v.113 (1991)
v.114:no.1 (1992)-v.114:no.21 (1992)
v.114:no.23 (1992)-v.114:no.27 (1992)
v.115 (1993)-v.119 (1997)
v.120:no.2 (1998:Jan.21)-v.120:no.51 (1998:Dec.30)




On Tue, Jun 15, 2010 at 9:56 PM, Bill Dueber b...@dueber.com wrote:

 On Tue, Jun 15, 2010 at 5:49 PM, Kyle Banerjee baner...@uoregon.edu
 wrote:
  No, but parsing holding statements for something that just gets cut off
  early or which starts late should be easy unless entry is insanely
  inconsistent.

 Andthere it is. :-)

 We're really dealing with a few problems here:

  - Inconsistent entry by catalogers (probably the least of our worries)
  - Inconsistent publishing schedules (e.g., the Jan 1942 issue was
 just plain never printed)
  - Inconsistent use of volume/number/year/month/whatever throughout a
 serial's run.

 So, for example, http://mirlyn.lib.umich.edu/Record/45417/Holdings#1

 There are six holdings:

 1919-1920 incompl
 1920 incompl.
 1922
 v.4 no.49
 v.6 1921 jul-dec
 v.6 1921jan-jun

 We have no way of knowing what year volume 4 was printed in, which
 issues are incomplete in the two volumes that cover 1920, whether
 volume number are associated with earlier (or later) issues, etc. We,
 as humans, could try to make some guesses, but they'd just be guesses.

 It's easy to find examples where month ranges overlap (or leave gaps),
 where month names and issue numbers are sometimes used
 interchangeably, where volume numbers suddenly change in the middle of
 a run because of a merge with another serial (or where the first
 volume isn't 1 because the serial broke off from a parent), etc.
 etc. etc.

 I don't mean to overstate the problem. For many (most?) serials whose
 existence only goes back a few decades, a relatively simple approach
 will likely work much of the time -- although even that relatively
 simple approach will have to take into account a solid dozen or so
 different ways that enumcron data may have been entered.

 But to be able to say, with some confidence, that we have the full
 run? Or a particular issue as labeled my a month name? Much, much
 harder in the general case.


  -Bill-


 --
 Bill Dueber
 Library Systems Programmer
 University of Michigan Library



Re: [CODE4LIB] WorldCat as an OpenURL endpoint ?

2010-06-15 Thread Tom Keays
On Mon, Jun 14, 2010 at 3:47 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:

 The trick here is that traditional library metadata practices make it _very
 hard_ to tell if a _specific volume/issue_ is held by a given library.  And
 those are the most common use cases for OpenURL.


Yep. That's true even for individual library's with link resolvers. OCLC is
not going to be able to solve that particular issue until the local
libraries do.


 If you just want to get to the title level (for a journal or a book), you
 can easily write your own thing that takes an OpenURL, and either just
 redirects straight to worldcat.org on isbn/lccn/oclcnum, or actually does
 a WorldCat API lookup to ensure the record exists first and/or looks up on
 author/title/etc too.


I was mainly thinking of sources that use COinS. If you have a rarely held
book, for instance, then OpenURLs resolved against random institutional
endpoints are going to mostly be unproductive. However, a union catalog
such as OCLC already has the information about libraries in the system that
own it. It seems like the more productive path if the goal of a user is
simply to locate a copy, where ever it is held.


 Umlaut already includes the 'naive' just link to worldcat.org based on
 isbn, oclcnum, or lccn approach, functionality that was written before the
 worldcat api exists. That is, Umlaut takes an incoming OpenURL, and provides
 the user with a link to a worldcat record based on isbn, oclcnum, or lccn.


Many institutions have chosen to do this. MPOW, however, represents a
counter-example and do not link out to OCLC.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] WorldCat as an OpenURL endpoint ?

2010-06-15 Thread Tom Keays
I think my perspective of the user's goal is actually the same (or close
enough to the same) as David's, just stated differently. The user wants the
most local copy or, failing that, a way to order it from another source.

However, I have plenty of examples of faculty and occasional grad students
who are willing to make the trek to a nearby library -- even out of town
libraries -- rather than do ILL. This doesn't encompass every use case or
even a typical use case (are there typical cases?), but it does no harm to
have information even if you can't always act on it.

The problem with OpenURL tied to a particular institution is
a) the person may not have (or know they have) an affiliation to a given
institution,
b) may be coming from outside their institution's IP range so that even the
OCLC Registry redirect trick will fail to get them to a (let alone the
correct) link resolver,
c) there may not be any recourse to find an item if the institution does not
own it (MPOW does not provide a link to WorldCat).

Tom

On Tue, Jun 15, 2010 at 12:16 PM, Walker, David dwal...@calstate.eduwrote:

  It seems like the more productive path if the goal of a user is
  simply to locate a copy, where ever it is held.

 But I don't think users have *locating a copy* as their goal.  Rather, I
 think their goal is to *get their hands on the book*.

 If I discover a book via COINs, and you drop me off at Worldcat.org, that
 allows me to see which libraries own the book.  But, unless I happen to be
 affiliated with those institutions, that's kinda useless information.  I
 have no real way of actually getting the book itself.

 If, instead, you drop me off at your institution's link resolver menu, and
 provide me an ILL option in the event you don't have the book, the library
 can get the book for me, which is really my *goal*.

 That seems like the more productive path, IMO.

 --Dave

 ==
 David Walker
 Library Web Services Manager
 California State University
 http://xerxes.calstate.edu
 
 From: Code for Libraries [code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of Tom Keays
 [tomke...@gmail.com]
 Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 8:43 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] WorldCat as an OpenURL endpoint ?

 On Mon, Jun 14, 2010 at 3:47 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu
 wrote:

  The trick here is that traditional library metadata practices make it
 _very
  hard_ to tell if a _specific volume/issue_ is held by a given library.
  And
  those are the most common use cases for OpenURL.
 

 Yep. That's true even for individual library's with link resolvers. OCLC is
 not going to be able to solve that particular issue until the local
 libraries do.


  If you just want to get to the title level (for a journal or a book), you
  can easily write your own thing that takes an OpenURL, and either just
  redirects straight to worldcat.org on isbn/lccn/oclcnum, or actually
 does
  a WorldCat API lookup to ensure the record exists first and/or looks up
 on
  author/title/etc too.
 

 I was mainly thinking of sources that use COinS. If you have a rarely held
 book, for instance, then OpenURLs resolved against random institutional
 endpoints are going to mostly be unproductive. However, a union catalog
 such as OCLC already has the information about libraries in the system that
 own it. It seems like the more productive path if the goal of a user is
 simply to locate a copy, where ever it is held.


  Umlaut already includes the 'naive' just link to worldcat.org based on
  isbn, oclcnum, or lccn approach, functionality that was written before
 the
  worldcat api exists. That is, Umlaut takes an incoming OpenURL, and
 provides
  the user with a link to a worldcat record based on isbn, oclcnum, or
 lccn.
 

 Many institutions have chosen to do this. MPOW, however, represents a
 counter-example and do not link out to OCLC.

 Tom



Re: [CODE4LIB] WorldCat as an OpenURL endpoint ?

2010-06-15 Thread Tom Keays
I do provide the user with the proxied WorldCat URL for just the reasons
Jonathan cites. But, no, being an otherwise open web resource, you can't
force a user to use it.

On Tue, Jun 15, 2010 at 12:22 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.eduwrote:


 I haven't yet found any good way to do this if the user is off-campus
 (ezproxy not a good solution, how do we 'force' the user to use ezproxy for
 worldcat.org anyway?).




Re: [CODE4LIB] Location of Code4Lib 2011

2010-03-23 Thread Tom Keays
I attended IU Bloomington (and was a bike rider) when the movie was
filmed. The dad's car lot was just a few blocks from my house and I
biked a lot of the places that the main character, David, rode in the
movie.Much of the campus, including a scene outside the IUB library
(made of limestone from nearby Oolitic quarries), is featured
prominently. Nostalgia fodder after I graduated.

However, don't look at the TV show for a sense of Bloomington. It was
largely filmed in Athens, Georgia. Didn't the organizers of Code4Lib
2007 mention that? :-)

On Tue, Mar 23, 2010 at 9:43 AM, McDonald, Robert H.
rhmcd...@indiana.edu wrote:
 Thanks everyone - we feel really honored to be hosting next year's event
 here in Bloomington (a classic college town - please see Breaking Away if
 you have never seen it - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078902/) and we look
 forward to making it a wonderful time for everyone.

 Thanks again to our other host proposals from New Haven and Vancouver. Our
 competition made everyone's proposals better.

 Best,

 Robert



 On 3/23/10 9:35 AM, Michael J. Giarlo leftw...@alumni.rutgers.edu wrote:

 Congratulations to Bloomington, Indiana, and our new hosts at Indiana
 University, for being voted as the host city for Code4Lib 2011!

 Thanks to all who voted and all the sites that submitted proposals.

 -Mike

 **
 Robert H. McDonald
 Associate Dean for Library Technologies
 Associate Director, Data to Insight Center-Pervasive Technology Institute
 Executive Director, Kuali OLE
 Frye Leadership Institute Fellow 2009
 Indiana University
 Herman B Wells Library 234
 1320 East 10th Street
 Bloomington, IN 47405
 Phone: 812-856-4834
 Email: rob...@indiana.edu
 Skype/GTalk: rhmcdonald
 AIM/MSN: rhmcdonald1



Re: [CODE4LIB] favorite jQuery plugins for libraries?

2010-02-05 Thread Tom Keays
Since you mentioned that you were modifying your OPAC, you should
check into the Juice Project, a jQuery framework for doing just that.

http://code.google.com/p/juice-project/


On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 11:36 AM, Ken Irwin kir...@wittenberg.edu wrote:
 Hi all,

 I'm on a mission to finally learn some jQuery, and I'm kind of falling in 
 love with it. In particular, I'm finding in it the perfect tool for modifying 
 our OPAC in ways that the catalog vendor never intended, tweaking the DOM to 
 my heart's content.

 Having worked my way through the basics of the language (I'm using the 
 Learning jQuery book, which is a good introduction but has a nearly-useless 
 index) I'm curious about the vast array of jQuery plugins. There are too many 
 to know, and reading the descriptions it is not immediately apparent to me 
 what they do.

 So I ask those of you who use jQuery: Do you have favorites, or ones that you 
 find particularly relevant to the kind of work that we do? (The kind of work 
 that we do varies quite a bit, but still...) The only one I've really 
 explored so far is the dataTables plugin, which I will be keeping in mind for 
 future applications.

 Nicole: your Library Mashups book is next on my list; I'm looking forward 
 to it.

 joys,
 Ken



Re: [CODE4LIB] favorite jQuery plugins for libraries?

2010-02-04 Thread Tom Keays
I have been using a resource that takes advantage of the html5 offline
storage capabilities of the iPod/iPhone version of Safari to install
itself as a standalone jQuery Reference app that is current with
jQuery 1.4. I think it has the capability to update itself after
installation too.

http://www.mrspeaker.net/2010/01/14/jquery-iphone-reference/

I don't know if it works on other smartphones or not but I imagine
that you could reference it online, even if it wasn't possible to
install it.

As far as a favorite, I like the jQuery UI Tab plugin

http://stilbuero.de/jquery/tabs_3/

Tom

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 12:29 PM, Hagedon, Mike
haged...@u.library.arizona.edu wrote:
 This doesn't answer the question; more I just want to point out for anyone 
 else learning jQuery that I've found the API reference at visualjquery.com to 
 be helpful. It's only 1.2.6, but I've used the information with 1.3 
 successfully so far.

 Mike Hagedon

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of Ken 
 Irwin
 Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2010 9:37 AM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] favorite jQuery plugins for libraries?

 Hi all,

 I'm on a mission to finally learn some jQuery, and I'm kind of falling in 
 love with it. In particular, I'm finding in it the perfect tool for modifying 
 our OPAC in ways that the catalog vendor never intended, tweaking the DOM to 
 my heart's content.

 Having worked my way through the basics of the language (I'm using the 
 Learning jQuery book, which is a good introduction but has a nearly-useless 
 index) I'm curious about the vast array of jQuery plugins. There are too many 
 to know, and reading the descriptions it is not immediately apparent to me 
 what they do.

 So I ask those of you who use jQuery: Do you have favorites, or ones that you 
 find particularly relevant to the kind of work that we do? (The kind of work 
 that we do varies quite a bit, but still...) The only one I've really 
 explored so far is the dataTables plugin, which I will be keeping in mind for 
 future applications.

 Nicole: your Library Mashups book is next on my list; I'm looking forward 
 to it.

 joys,
 Ken



Re: [CODE4LIB] Location of the first Code4Lib North meeting?

2010-01-25 Thread Tom Keays
I've been listening to the suggested locations for the past few days
and, with the exception of Sudbury, all the suggestions are doable for
me (a traveler who would be coming from central NY). In order of
distance, and therefore preference, Kingston would be my first choice,
followed by Ottawa, Hamilton, Toronto, and Montreal.

Tom

On Wed, Jan 20, 2010 at 9:44 AM, David Fiander da...@fiander.info wrote:
 So far on the wiki the proposals for the location range from the
 center of known space to let's all visit Dan!:

 - Toronto
 - Kingston
 - Ottawa
 - Sudbury
 - Montreal

 Given some of the far-flung people who have expressed interest in the
 meeting, including some people in Wisconsin (!), it would be
 interesting to figure out the weighted average travel time required
 for all of these locations, but I suspect that that would just mean we
 end up in Toronto, again.

 I just added Montreal to the list, just because, hey, it's Montreal!
 But then, we'd have to find somebody at McGill to act as our host.

 If we're going to be meeting in April/May, then it's probably time to
 start the discussion about site selection so that when the decision is
 made, the hosts will have time to make the arrangements and so that
 people travelling have enough lead time to make cheap travel
 arrangements.

 - David



Re: [CODE4LIB] University of Rochester Releases IR+ Institutional Repository System

2009-12-15 Thread Tom Keays
+1 that suggestion!

On Tue, Dec 15, 2009 at 4:44 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:
 I would appreciate that too. And if you want to write an article for the
 Code4Lib Journal on how it differs from other IR software, why you did it,
 and how you did it, it would be welcome. :)

 Jonathan

 Michael Beccaria wrote:

 Nathan,
 Can you summarize how the IR+ software is different than other major
 institutional repository software? I'm not directly involved with a
 repository and so my understanding of the scope of these products lacks
 detail. Where does IR+ fit into the big picture?
 Thanks,

 Mike Beccaria
 Systems Librarian
 Head of Digital Initiatives
 Paul Smith's College
 518.327.6376

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of
 Sarr, Nathan
 Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 2009 2:57 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] University of Rochester Releases IR+ Institutional
 Repository System

 The University of Rochester is pleased to announce the 1.0 production
 version of its new open source institutional repository software
 platform, IR+.  The University has been running IR+ in production since
 August 2009.
 The download can be found here:


 http://code.google.com/p/irplus/downloads/list
 http://code.google.com/p/irplus/downloads/list   The website for the
 project can be found here:
  http://www.irplus.org http://www.irplus.org   IR+ includes the
 following features:
  -   Repository Wide Statistics: download counts at the repository
 collection and publication level.  The statistics excludes web crawler
 results, and includes the ability to retroactively remove previously
 unknown crawlers or download counts that should not be included, for
 more accurate statistical reporting.
  -   Researcher Pages, to allow users (faculty, graduate students,
 researchers) to highlight their work and post their CV

 o   Example of a current researcher:
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewResearcherPage.action?researcherId=
 30
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewResearcherPage.action?researcherId
 =30

 -   Ability to create Personal publications that allows users to have
 full control over their work and see download counts without publishing
 into the repository.


 -   An online workspace where users can store files they are working on,
 and if needed, share files with colleagues or their thesis advisor.

 -          Contributor pages where users can view download counts for
 all publications that they are associated with in the repository.


 o   Example of a contributor page:
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewContributorPage.action?personNameId
 =20
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewContributorPage.action?personNameI
 d=20

 -          Faceted Searching (example search for: Graduate Student
 Research)


 o
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/searchRepositoryItems.action?query=Medi
 cal+Image
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/searchRepositoryItems.action?query=Med
 ical+Image

 -          Embargos (example below embargoed until 2011-01-01)


 o
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/institutionalPublicationPublicView.acti
 on?institutionalItemId=8057
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/institutionalPublicationPublicView.act
 ion?institutionalItemId=8057


 -          Name Authority Control (Notice changes in last name)

 o
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewContributorPage.action?personNameId
 =209
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewContributorPage.action?personNameI
 d=209


  You can see the IR+ system customized for our university and in action
 here: https://urresearch.rochester.edu
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu   A further explanation of highlights
 can be found on my researcher page
 here:

 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/researcherPublicationView.action?resear
 cherPublicationId=11
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/researcherPublicationView.action?resea
 rcherPublicationId=11

 The documentation for the system (install/user/administration) with lots
 of pictures can be found on my researcher page here:


 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/researcherPublicationView.action?resear
 cherPublicationId=16
 https://urresearch.rochester.edu/researcherPublicationView.action?resea
 rcherPublicationId=16

 We would be happy to give you a personal tour of the system and the
 features it provides.

 Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have.
 -Nate



 Nathan Sarr

 Senior Software Engineer

 River Campus Libraries

 University of Rochester

 Rochester, NY  14627

 (585) 275-0692






Re: [CODE4LIB] Assigning DOI for local content

2009-11-23 Thread Tom Keays
Interesting stuff. I never really thought about it before that DOIs
can be served up by the Handle server. E.G.,

http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M004545200 =
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1074/jbc.M004545200

But, even more surprising to me was realizing that Handles can be
resolved by the DOI server. Or presumably any DOI server.

http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/46087 = http://dx.doi.org/2027.42/46087

I suppose I should have understood this point since the Handle service
does sort of obliquely say this.

http://www.handle.net/factsheet.html

Anyway, good to have it made explicit.

Tom

On Mon, Nov 23, 2009 at 4:03 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu wrote:
 The actual handle is 10.1074/jbc.M004545200 .  If your software wants to
 get a handle to give it to any handle resolver of it's choice, it's going
 to have to parse the doi: or info: versions to get the handle out first.
  The info version is a URI that has a DOI handle embedded in it.  The doi
 version is... um, I dunno, just a convention, I think, that has a DOI handle
 embedded in it.

 Likewise, if your software had a URI, and was smart enough to know that the
 URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M004545200; actually had a handle
 embedded in it, it could strip the handle out, and then resolve it against
 some other handle server that participates in the handle network, like
 hdl.handle.net.  But that would be kind of going against the principle to
 treat URI's as opaque identifiers and not parse them for internal data.

 But me, I end up going against that principle all the time in actual
 practice, actually for scenarios kind of analagous to, but less well-defined
 and spec'd than, getting the actual handle out of the URI and resolving it
 against some other service. For instance, getting an OCLCnum out of an
 http://worldcat.oclc.org/ URI, to resolve against my local catalog that
 knows something about OCLCnums, but doesn't know anything about
 http://worldcat.oclc.org URIs that happen to have an OCLCnum embedded in
 them. Or getting an ASIN out of a http://www.amazon.com/ URI, to resolve
 against Amazon's _own_ web services, which ironically know something about
 ASIN's but don't know anything about www.amazon.com URI's that have an ASIN
 embedded in them.  Actually quite analagous to getting the actual handle out
 of an http://dx.doi.org or http://hdi.handle.net URI, in order to resolve
 against the resolver of choice.

 Jonathan

 Ross Singer wrote:

 On Mon, Nov 23, 2009 at 2:52 PM, Jonathan Rochkind rochk...@jhu.edu
 wrote:



 Well, here's the trick about handles, as I understand it.  A handle, for
 instance, a DOI, is 10.1074/jbc.M004545200.


 Well, actually, it could be:
 10.1074/jbc.M004545200
 doi:10.1074/jbc.M004545200
 info:doi/10.1074/jbc.M004545200

 etc.  But there's still got to be some mechanism to get from there to:
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M004545200
 or
 http://dx.hellman.net/10.1074/jbc.M004545200

 I don't see why it's any different, fundamentally, than:

 http://purl.hellman.net/?purl=http%3A%2F%2Fpurl.org%2FNET%2Fdoi%2F10.1074%2Fjbc.M004545200

 besides being prettier.

 Anyway, my argument wasn't that Purl was technologically more sound
 that handles -- Purl services have a major single-point-of-failure
 problem -- it's just that I don't buy the argument that handles are
 somehow superior because they aren't limited to HTTP.

 What I'm saying is that there plenty of valid reasons to value handles
 more than purls (or any other indirection service), but independence
 to HTTP isn't one of them.

 -Ross.



 While, for DOI handles, normally we resolve that using dx.doi.org, at
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M004545200, that is not actually a
 requirement
 of the handle system. You can resolve it through any handle server, over
 HTTP or otherwise. Even if it's still over HTTP, it doesn't have to be at
 dx.doi.org, it can be via any handle resolver.

 For instance, check this out, it works:

 http://hdl.handle.net/10.1074/jbc.M004545200

 Cause the DOI is really just a subset of Handles, any resolver
 participating
 in the handle network can resolve em.  In Eric's hypothetical use case,
 that
 could be a local enterprise handle resolver of some kind. (Although I'm
 not
 totally sure that would keep your usage data private; the documentation
 I've
 seen compares the handle network to DNS, it's a distributed system, I'm
 not
 sure in what cases handle resolution requests are sent 'upstream' by the
 handle resolver, and if actual individual lookups are revealed by that or
 not. But in any case, when Ross suggests -- Presumably dx.hellman.net
 would
 need to harvest its metadata from somewhere, which seems like it would
 leave
 a footprint. It also needs some mechanism to stay in sync with the master
 index. -- my reading this suggests this is _built into_ the handle
 protocol, it's part of handle from the very start (again, the DNS
 analogy,
 with the emphasis on the distributed resolution aspect), you don't need
 to
 invent 

Re: [CODE4LIB] Assigning DOI for local content

2009-11-19 Thread Tom Keays
On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 6:58 PM, Jodi Schneider
jodi.a.schnei...@gmail.com wrote:
 The first question is: what are they trying to accomplish by having DOIs?

DOIs are just a form of Handle, which is a persistent URL schema. I
don't think I need to explain what PURLs are designed to accomplish.

 If they're looking for persistent identifiers, I don't understand (a
 priori), why DOI is better, as an identifier scheme, than any other
 'persistent identifier scheme' (ARK [1], PURL, Handle, etc[2]). (Though I
 really like CrossRef and the things they're doing.)

The advantage is that DOIs over other PURLs are used only for citation
purposes. As someone who works with a lot of students and faculty, I
have observed that DOIs are becoming familiar to them as a definitive
citation identifier. As more journals, publishing in an online
environment, stop using page numbers in their citations and turn
instead to article identifiers -- e.g., citations like this one:

Neylon C, Wu S (2009) Article-Level Metrics and the Evolution of
Scientific Impact. PLoS Biol 7(11): e1000242.
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000242

then DOIs become the most consistently recognizable identifier for
constructing findable citations. So, you could use a PURL, but they
wouldn't be understood to mean the same thing.

Also, DOIs are not dependent on a single resolver -- i.e., you don't
have to send them through http://dx.doi.org/ although that's largely
been the case up to this point in time. PURLs tend to be
server-specific. We don't have to think too far back to recall an
instance when a PURL server failed, causing some temporary access
problems. Hopefully, DOIs are less vulnerable to this -- although this
certainly hasn't been tested.

And, responding to Jonathan, who said:
investigating whether every cited article has a DOI and then making sure
to include it... is non-trivial labor.

It certainly is if you have to go back and apply them to a backfile of
published articles. However, with the Code4Lib Journal, I've been
doing this all along in the articles I've edited. CrossRef has good
tools for finding this information and when that fails, I go to the
cited article itself. Some work, yes, but I figure that's part of my
job as an editor.

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] preconference proposals

2009-11-10 Thread Tom Keays
Bad URL there. The real one is
http://code4lib.org/files/chicks-lightning.pdf (that's where all the
other lightning talks were stored).

t

On Tue, Nov 10, 2009 at 10:14 AM, Jay Luker jay.lu...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Tue, Nov 10, 2009 at 10:06 AM, Dan Chudnov daniel.chud...@gmail.com 
 wrote:

  - Heckle Me, based on the example/ideas behind Chick's lightning talk
 last year


 The PDF of chick's slides is 404-ing [1]. Can someone remind me what
 this was about?

 --jay

 1 http://code4lib.org/conference/2009/chicks-lightning.pdf



Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] [lita-l] Journal Usage Statistical collection software - suggestions?

2009-10-30 Thread Tom Keays
Serials Solutions provides an open source (you host it) client for
harvesting SUSHI stats. It is intended to be used with 360 Counter,
but I don't think that's a requirement. As Aaron said, it is still
early days for SUSHI compliance.

Tom

On Fri, Oct 30, 2009 at 1:05 PM, Dobbs, Aaron awdo...@ship.edu wrote:
 Brandon,
 We went with a vendor-hosted solution, SerialsSolutions 360 Counter.
 We use SerialsSolutions for our A-Z list, cross-database linking, and ERMS - 
 so 360 Counter made the most sense for us.
 SUSHI is coming along, but I haven't been watching to see how many 
 publishers/database vendors are providing SUSHI feeds lately and cannot 
 address this. We do still load delimited COUNTER compliant data (and massage 
 non-compliant data into COUNTER compliant format for loading) into 360 
 Counter.
 Hope this helps...
 -Aaron
 :-)'

 Aaron Dobbs
 Systems  Electronic Resources Librarian
 Ezra Lehman Memorial Library
 Shippensburg Univeristy of Pennsylvania

 -Original Message-
 From: Brandon Dudley [mailto:bran...@discontent.com]
 Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 11:20 AM
 To: lit...@ala.org; CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU; web4...@webjunction.org
 Subject: [lita-l] Journal Usage Statistical collection software -
 suggestions?

 Apologies for cross-posting. My institution is currently evaluating
 methods of collecting COUNTER stats in a comprehensive way. We
 currently
 use Excel spreadsheets to calculate cost-per-use and gather all the
 stats together, but I am hoping that there's a better way. In today's
 climate, justifying our spending decisions grows ever more important.

 I am aware of JURO and JURO4c, and of the Swets Scholarly Stats
 commercial packages - are there any other options worth consideration?
 Anybody devised their own slick homegrown method of collecting such
 stats?

 Many thanks,
 Brandon Dudley


 To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see
 http://www.lita.org/ala/mgrps/divs/lita/litamembership/litaldisclists/l
 italotherdiscussion.cfm


 ___
 Web4lib mailing list
 web4...@webjunction.org
 http://lists.webjunction.org/web4lib/




Re: [CODE4LIB] [Web4lib] [lita-l] Journal Usage Statistical collection software - suggestions?

2009-10-30 Thread Tom Keays
Sorry. Link is:
http://code.google.com/p/sushicounterclient/

On Fri, Oct 30, 2009 at 2:35 PM, Tom Keays tomkeays.li...@gmail.com wrote:
 Serials Solutions provides an open source (you host it) client for
 harvesting SUSHI stats. It is intended to be used with 360 Counter,
 but I don't think that's a requirement. As Aaron said, it is still
 early days for SUSHI compliance.

 Tom

 On Fri, Oct 30, 2009 at 1:05 PM, Dobbs, Aaron awdo...@ship.edu wrote:
 Brandon,
 We went with a vendor-hosted solution, SerialsSolutions 360 Counter.
 We use SerialsSolutions for our A-Z list, cross-database linking, and ERMS - 
 so 360 Counter made the most sense for us.
 SUSHI is coming along, but I haven't been watching to see how many 
 publishers/database vendors are providing SUSHI feeds lately and cannot 
 address this. We do still load delimited COUNTER compliant data (and massage 
 non-compliant data into COUNTER compliant format for loading) into 360 
 Counter.
 Hope this helps...
 -Aaron
 :-)'

 Aaron Dobbs
 Systems  Electronic Resources Librarian
 Ezra Lehman Memorial Library
 Shippensburg Univeristy of Pennsylvania

 -Original Message-
 From: Brandon Dudley [mailto:bran...@discontent.com]
 Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 11:20 AM
 To: lit...@ala.org; CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU; web4...@webjunction.org
 Subject: [lita-l] Journal Usage Statistical collection software -
 suggestions?

 Apologies for cross-posting. My institution is currently evaluating
 methods of collecting COUNTER stats in a comprehensive way. We
 currently
 use Excel spreadsheets to calculate cost-per-use and gather all the
 stats together, but I am hoping that there's a better way. In today's
 climate, justifying our spending decisions grows ever more important.

 I am aware of JURO and JURO4c, and of the Swets Scholarly Stats
 commercial packages - are there any other options worth consideration?
 Anybody devised their own slick homegrown method of collecting such
 stats?

 Many thanks,
 Brandon Dudley


 To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see
 http://www.lita.org/ala/mgrps/divs/lita/litamembership/litaldisclists/l
 italotherdiscussion.cfm


 ___
 Web4lib mailing list
 web4...@webjunction.org
 http://lists.webjunction.org/web4lib/





Re: [CODE4LIB] Something completely different

2009-04-06 Thread Tom Keays
The linked open data crowd might suggest:

Bibliographic Ontology Specification (aka bibo)
http://bibliontology.com/
Abstract: The Bibliographic Ontology Specification provides main
concepts and properties for describing citations and bibliographic
references (i.e. quotes, books, articles, etc) on the Semantic Web.

A lot of work has gone into this to make it work with a wide variety
of possible use cases. It acknowledges FRBR, but doesn't require it.
The Swedish national library uses a tiny fraction of BIBO, along with
DC and other RDF vocabularies. BIBO as a whole is much more granular
than MARC, but whether that makes it more or less suited as a library
format probably depends on who you are.

Tom

On Sun, Apr 5, 2009 at 11:40 AM, Peter Schlumpf pschlu...@earthlink.net wrote:
 Greetings!

 I have been lurking on (or ignoring) this forum for years.  And libraries 
 too.  Some of you may know me.  I am the Avanti guy.  I am, perhaps, the 
 first person to try to produce an open source ILS back in 1999, though there 
 is a David Duncan out there who tried before I did. I was there when all this 
 stuff was coming together.

 Since then I have seen a lot of good things happen.  There's Koha.  There's 
 Evergreen.  They are good things.  I have also seen first hand how libraries 
 get screwed over and over by commercial vendors with their crappy software.  
 I believe free software is the answer to that.  I have neglected Avanti for 
 years, but now I am ready to return to it.

 I want to get back to simple things.  Imagine if there were no Marc records.  
 Minimal layers of abstraction.  No politics.  No vendors.  No SQL 
 straightjacket.  What would an ILS look like without those things?  Sometimes 
 the biggest prison is between the ears.

 I am in a position to do this now, and that's what I have decided to do.  I 
 am getting busy.

 Peter Schlumpf



Re: [CODE4LIB] Something completely different

2009-04-06 Thread Tom Keays
It is designed as a container for citations. Articles are one such
example, but that well-understood format is not BIBO's main focus.
They've been going after the tough ones, including legal cases,
conference presentations, letters, etc. Oh, yeah, books, book
chapters, quotations. For a partial list, see
http://wiki.bibliontology.com/index.php/Examples


On Mon, Apr 6, 2009 at 2:17 PM, Karen Coyle li...@kcoyle.net wrote:
 My problem with bibo is that it's strongly oriented toward academic journal
 articles... I would like to see a comparison to MARC, if anyone has done
 that, which might give us an idea of what isn't there. For example, I don't
 see the various work/work, work/expression relationships. But it has great
 detail in some areas, like time intervals and access rights.

 kc

 Tom Keays wrote:

 The linked open data crowd might suggest:

 Bibliographic Ontology Specification (aka bibo)
 http://bibliontology.com/
 Abstract: The Bibliographic Ontology Specification provides main
 concepts and properties for describing citations and bibliographic
 references (i.e. quotes, books, articles, etc) on the Semantic Web.

 A lot of work has gone into this to make it work with a wide variety
 of possible use cases. It acknowledges FRBR, but doesn't require it.
 The Swedish national library uses a tiny fraction of BIBO, along with
 DC and other RDF vocabularies. BIBO as a whole is much more granular
 than MARC, but whether that makes it more or less suited as a library
 format probably depends on who you are.

 Tom

 On Sun, Apr 5, 2009 at 11:40 AM, Peter Schlumpf pschlu...@earthlink.net
 wrote:


 Greetings!

 I have been lurking on (or ignoring) this forum for years.  And libraries
 too.  Some of you may know me.  I am the Avanti guy.  I am, perhaps, the
 first person to try to produce an open source ILS back in 1999, though there
 is a David Duncan out there who tried before I did. I was there when all
 this stuff was coming together.

 Since then I have seen a lot of good things happen.  There's Koha.
  There's Evergreen.  They are good things.  I have also seen first hand how
 libraries get screwed over and over by commercial vendors with their crappy
 software.  I believe free software is the answer to that.  I have neglected
 Avanti for years, but now I am ready to return to it.

 I want to get back to simple things.  Imagine if there were no Marc
 records.  Minimal layers of abstraction.  No politics.  No vendors.  No SQL
 straightjacket.  What would an ILS look like without those things?
  Sometimes the biggest prison is between the ears.

 I am in a position to do this now, and that's what I have decided to do.
  I am getting busy.

 Peter Schlumpf







 --
 ---
 Karen Coyle / Digital Library Consultant
 kco...@kcoyle.net http://www.kcoyle.net
 ph.: 510-540-7596   skype: kcoylenet
 fx.: 510-848-3913
 mo.: 510-435-8234
 



[CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Journal: Call for Papers, June issue

2009-02-17 Thread Tom Keays
Call for Papers:

The Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ) exists to foster community and share
information among those interested in the intersection of libraries,
technology, and the future.

The Code4Lib Journal is now accepting proposals for publication in its
7th issue. Don't miss out on this opportunity to share your ideas and
experiences. To be included in the 7th issue, which is scheduled for
publication in late June 2009, please submit articles, abstracts, or
proposals to c4lj-artic...@googlegroups.com by Friday, March 20, 2009.
When submitting, please include the title or subject of the proposal
in the subject line of the email message.

C4LJ encourages creativity and flexibility, and the editors welcome
submissions across a broad variety of topics that support the mission
of the journal. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* Practical applications of library technology (both actual and
hypothetical)
* Technology projects (failed, successful, proposed, or
in-progress), including how they were done and challenges faced
* Case studies
* Best practices
* Reviews
* Comparisons of third party software or libraries
* Analyses of library metadata for use with technology
* Project management and communication within the library environment
* Assessment and user studies

C4LJ strives to promote professional communication by minimizing the
barriers to publication. While articles should be of a high quality,
they need not follow any formal structure. Writers should aim for the
middle ground between blog posts and articles in traditional refereed
journals. Where appropriate, we encourage authors to submit code
samples, algorithms, and pseudo-code.  For more information, visit
C4LJ's Article Guidelines or browse articles from the first 5 issues
published on our website: http://journal.code4lib.org.

Remember, for consideration for the 7th issue, please send proposals,
abstracts, or draft articles to c4lj-artic...@googlegroups.com no
later than Friday, March 20, 2009.

Send in a submission. Your peers would like to hear what you are doing.

Code4Lib Journal Editorial Committee


Re: [CODE4LIB] hotel for conf?

2009-01-12 Thread Tom Keays
My experience in calling was that the booking person said (just
minutes ago) that there are rooms available but that rooms set aside
for the conference rate have all been sold out. If I want to pay $219
a night, they'll reserve a room for me. Otherwise, nope. They wouldn't
negotiate the rate with me.

I was going to be sharing the room with someone, so two of us are
currently out of luck. If I need to book with another hotel, I  need
to know pretty soon.

Jean: can you check on this?

Tom Keays


On Sun, Jan 11, 2009 at 7:14 PM, Bess Sadler eo...@virginia.edu wrote:
 Hey, Brian. I ran into the same problem today, but I called on the phone and
 they were able to book me at the conference rate anyway. If anyone else runs
 into this problem do try telephoning.

 Bess

 On 11-Jan-09, at 12:04 AM, Brian Seitz wrote:

 I just tried to book a room using the discount code and the website told
 me there are no rooms available for that code/date.  So it seems it is
 overbooked.  Hopefully the block can be increased.

 Brian

 - jean rainwater jean.rainwa...@gmail.com wrote:

 We're getting very close to filling the guest block. We talked to the
 hotel folks yesterday about the possibility of increasing it but
 don't
 have an answer yet.  Anyone who's registered and has not made a
 reservation yet should do asap. -- Jean

 On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 5:41 PM, Schneider, Wayne
 wschnei...@hclib.org wrote:

 Hey, Jonathan.  That's weird - the hotel told me (well, the web

 site

 told me) that 1 king bed was not available at this time.  I placed

 the

 reservation Wednesday.  Have you called?  I wouldn't mind swapping,
 since I'm not sharing the room with anyone, but I begin to suspect

 that

 the guest block may simply be overbooked.

  wayne

 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:code4...@listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf

 Of

 Jonathan Rochkind
 Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 4:15 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: [CODE4LIB] hotel for conf?


 So the Marriott for the conference hotel is telling me there are no
 rooms with two queen beds available. That's kind of a problem, since

 I

 was planning on sharing a room with a colleague.

 Anyone know if there's any way around that?

 Jonathan

 --
 Jonathan Rochkind
 Digital Services Software Engineer
 The Sheridan Libraries
 Johns Hopkins University
 410.516.8886
 rochkind (at) jhu.edu


 --
 Brian Seitz
 Tri-College Libraries
 Bryn Mawr | Haverford | Swarthmore
 610-526-5294



Re: [CODE4LIB] eXtensible Catalog - New Website

2008-10-21 Thread Tom Keays
Heh. I was using the Chromifox theme for Firefox 3.0.1 (Windows XP) and got
that message too. I changed themes back to Firefox default and all was well.
I'll have to try Firefox on my Mac tonight and see how that behaves.

Is this a Drupal issue or something specific to XC? Either way, regardless
of what you think of IE 6, this is probably a bad thing.

Tom

On Tue, Oct 21, 2008 at 3:43 PM, [Adam Traub] [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Same issue using Google Chrome 0.2.149:   You are using Internet Explorer
 version 6.0 on Windows XP.

 Going to   http://www.extensiblecatalog.org/node/59   does work, however.

 Cheers,
 Adam Traub


 Adam Traub
 Systems Librarian
 St. John Fisher College
 3690 East Avenue
 Rochester, New York 14618
 Phone:  (585)385-8382
 Email:  [EMAIL PROTECTED]


 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
 Custer, Mark
 Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 4:25 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] eXtensible Catalog - New Website

 The site was working fine earlier, as I was able to view it with Opera
 (now, of course, I've the same problems).

 For the time being, this should get you there:
 http://www.extensiblecatalog.org/node/59



 -Original Message-
 From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of
 Chris Alhambra
 Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 4:18 PM
 To: CODE4LIB@LISTSERV.ND.EDU
 Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] eXtensible Catalog - New Website

 I used Internet Explorer 7 to go this website, and I get the message
 You
 are using *Internet Explorer* version *6.0* on *Windows XP*

 -Chris Alhambra


 On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 4:11 PM, Mark A. Matienzo [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 wrote:

  I'm using Firefox 3 on OS X and the project's website is claiming I'm
  using IE 6 on Windows XP and thus not letting me access the site. Fix
  this, please?
 
  Mark Matienzo
  Applications Developer, Digital Experience Group
  The New York Public Library
 
  On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 10:31 AM, Dibelius, Steven
  [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   ***Cross-posted; apologies for duplication***
  
  
  
   The eXtensible Catalog Project is pleased to announce that we have
   launched our new website at http://www.extensiblecatalog.org/.  This
 new
   website will be the main vehicle for distributing our open-source
   software once it is released in 2009.  In the mean time, the website
   contains a wealth of information regarding the project, including
   publications, an overview of the software we are developing and the
   technologies that software will use, and a blog that has already
 been in
   use.
  
  
  
   The eXtensible Catalog (XC) Project is working to design and develop
 a
   set of open-source applications that will provide libraries with an
   alternative way to reveal their collections to library users. XC
 will
   provide easy access to all resources (both digital and physical
   collections) across a variety of databases, metadata schemas and
   standards, and will enable library content to be revealed through
 other
   services that libraries may already be using, such as content
 management
   systems and learning management systems. XC will also make library
   collections more web-accessible by revealing them through web search
   engines.
  
  
  
   Since XC software will be open source, it will be available for
 download
   at no cost. Libraries will be able to adopt, customize and extend
 the
   software to meet local needs. In addition, a not-for-profit
 organization
   will be formed to provide the infrastructure to incorporate
 community
   contributions to the code base, encourage collaboration, and provide
   maintenance and upgrades.
  
  
  
   The project is hosted at the University of Rochester and funded
 through
   a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholarly
   Communications Program as well as through significant contributions
 from
   and in collaboration with XC partner institutions.  The project is
 in a
   design and development phase until July 2009, at which point the
   software will be released under an open-source license.
  
  
  
  
  
   Steven Dibelius
  
   Deployment Engineer, eXtensible Catalog Project
  
   University of Rochester
  
   [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  
 



Re: [CODE4LIB] Code4Lib Logo

2008-09-29 Thread Tom Keays
I submit this for a logo:

http://code4lib.org/themes/panizzi/panizzi-watermark.png

Flogging the I don't give a rat's ass vote since 1 minute ago.

On Tue, Sep 23, 2008 at 11:13 AM, Roy Tennant [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Since we've been getting a variety of responses to my suggestion that now
 may be a good time to establish a graphic identity for Code4Lib, I've set up
 a poll to try to gauge the sense of the community on this issue. Please see
 http://code4lib.org/node/256.
 Roy



Re: [CODE4LIB] New Open Source Citation Parser

2008-09-15 Thread Tom Keays
I might add CrossRef's Simple Text Query for generating article DOIs
from citations. Not open source though.

http://www.crossref.org/SimpleTextQuery/

On Fri, Sep 12, 2008 at 3:50 PM, Jonathan Rochkind [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 This is the third open source citation parser I know of now. A welcome change 
 from a year ago when I needed one and didn't know of any! But I can't help 
 but think maybe people should be cooperating more instead of engineering 
 their own wheels. Also curious if anyone has looked at all three and can 
 compare and contrast and make a reccommendation.

 The other two I know about are:

 ParsCit -- http://wing.comp.nus.edu.sg/parsCit/
 A CDL project I don't have a good home page for, but code is here: 
 http://gales.cdlib.org/~egh/hmm-citation-extractor/

 I've been keeping track because I have a use for this, although haven't had 
 time to make use of any of them yet.

 Anyone want to compare and contrast these three projects?  Might make a good 
 very short article/review for the Code4Lib Journal if you wanted to.

 Jonathan


 jean rainwater [EMAIL PROTECTED] 09/12/08 2:25 PM 
 Please help us beta test FreeCite, a new citation parser for
 non-structured bibliographic data. FreeCite is the result of
 collaboration between the Brown University Library and Public Display,
 a Providence-based software company founded by and employing many
 Brown grads.  Public Display's core business is information
 extraction. Partial funding for this project was provided by the
 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

 FreeCite is implemented in Ruby on Rails and uses the CRF++ library
 implementation of conditional random fields. The model is trained on
 the CORA dataset  with lexical augmentation from the Directory of
 Research and Researchers at Brown (DRR-B). The API and code are
 available at: http://freecite.library.brown.edu.

 Jean Rainwater
 Co-Leader, Integrated Technology Services
 Brown University Library
 Providence, RI 02912
 401.863.9031
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]



Re: [CODE4LIB] place for code examples?

2008-03-31 Thread Tom Keays
On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 11:35 AM, Jonathan Rochkind [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Incidentally, I'm interested in getting a DokuWiki installation going
  for code4lib, which I think will serve our needs somewhat better than
  the current MediaWiki.  But that goes back to the thread I introduced

Dokuwiki is nice (it's the one I use for my own site) and it DOES
support code highlighting.

http://wiki.splitbrain.org/wiki:syntax#syntax_highlighting

There are also plugins that will extend it further

http://wiki.splitbrain.org/plugin:code
http://wiki.splitbrain.org/plugin:code2

Tom


Re: [CODE4LIB] presentation files

2008-03-04 Thread Tom Keays
+1

On Tue, Mar 4, 2008 at 9:44 AM, Dan Scott [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 In IRC a few of us kicked around the idea of uploading the video to the 
 Internet Archive and letting them handle backup / streaming bandwidth / file 
 format conversion (they accept high quality input and make a variety of 
 formats, including the original, available) / etc - the likely destination 
 would be a collection under 
 http://www.archive.org/details/computersandtechvideos - and FAQs about videos 
 are answered at http://www.archive.org/about/faqs.php#Movies


  1   2   >