workshop on unwanted Internet traffic

2004-12-09 Thread Steve Bellovin
Readers of this list may be interesting the the SRUTI -- Steps Towards 
Reducing Unwanted Traffic on the Internet -- workshop.  See
http://www.research.att.com/~bala/srut for details.


--Steve Bellovin, http://www.research.att.com/~smb



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Re: 3DES performance

2004-12-09 Thread Joseph Ashwood
- Original Message - 
From: Lee Parkes [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: 3DES performance


I'm working on a project for a company that involves the use of 3DES. They 
have
asked me to find out what the overheads are for encrypting a binary file. 
There
will be quite a lot of traffic coming in (in the region of hundreds of
thousands of files per hour). Has anyone got any figures for 3DES 
performance?
I've tried bdes on OpenBSD which has given me some useful results.
Good estimates for the speed of many algorithms can be found at 
http://www.eskimo.com/~weidai/benchmarks.html , while the system is a bit 
old, the numbers are still relatively valid, considering that you will have 
other overheads involved. Just to save you a trip 3DES comes in around 
10MByte/second, and AES up to 6 times that speed.
   Joe

Trust Laboratories
Changing Software Development
http://www.trustlaboratories.com 

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Re: 3DES performance

2004-12-09 Thread Sandy Harris
Lee Parkes wrote:
Hi,
I'm working on a project for a company that involves the use of 3DES. They have
asked me to find out what the overheads are ...
 

Some info at:
http://www.freeswan.org/freeswan_trees/freeswan-2.06/doc/performance.html
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export regulations updated

2004-12-09 Thread Perry E. Metzger

Cryptome just published some updates to the crypto export regulations:

http://cryptome.org/bis120904.txt

Perry

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Re: workshop on unwanted Internet traffic

2004-12-09 Thread Steven M. Bellovin
In message [EMAIL PROTECTED], Steve Bellov
in writes:
Readers of this list may be interesting the the SRUTI -- Steps Towards 
Reducing Unwanted Traffic on the Internet -- workshop.  See
http://www.research.att.com/~bala/srut for details.


CORRECTION: it's http://www.research.att.com/~bala/sruti

--Steve Bellovin, http://www.research.att.com/~smb



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3DES performance - Thanks!

2004-12-09 Thread Lee Parkes
Hi,
Many thanks for all of the information regarding performance of the various
algorithms!

Cheers,
Lee

-- 
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[EMAIL PROTECTED] DOC #25 GLASS #136
You can never break the chain
There is never love without pain - Secret Touch, Rush

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Australian snooping laws pass lower house

2004-12-09 Thread R.A. Hettinga
http://australianit.news.com.au/common/print/0,7208,11636719%5E15319%5E%5Enbv%5E15306,00.html

Australian IT

Snooping laws pass lower house

DECEMBER 09, 2004

POLICE will be able to access stored voice mail, email and mobile phone
text messages under new laws passed by federal parliament today.

The laws recognise voice mail, email and SMS messages should fall outside
telecommunication interception laws originally designed to stop law
enforcement agencies from intercepting phone calls.

 Police and other law enforcement officers will still need a search warrant
or a right of access to communications or storage equipment to access voice
mail, email and SMS under the changes.

 These amendments make it easier for our law enforcement and regulatory
agencies to access stored communications that could provide evidence of
criminal activity, Attorney-General Philip Ruddock said.

 They will also assist in securing information systems by allowing network
administrators to review stored communications for viruses and other
inappropriate content.

 Labor referred the proposed law to a Senate committee three times before
agreeing to it today.

 Opposition homeland security spokesman Robert McClelland said there needed
to be a distinction between stored messages and live telephone
conversations.

 There have been concerns expressed about privacy and there always has
been a distinction between an eavesdropper and the reader of other people's
correspondence, he said.

 But written documents have always been susceptible to legal process, to
warrants.

 Everyone that creates a document does so knowing that that document can
be read by others and can be subject to legal process.

 I don't think anything turns on the fact the document is written on a
computer and sent by email as opposed to being written in long hand and
popped in the letter box.

 The laws are a temporary measure and will cease to have effect after 12
months when a review of the measures will be undertaken.

-- 
-
R. A. Hettinga mailto: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
The Internet Bearer Underwriting Corporation http://www.ibuc.com/
44 Farquhar Street, Boston, MA 02131 USA
... however it may deserve respect for its usefulness and antiquity,
[predicting the end of the world] has not been found agreeable to
experience. -- Edward Gibbon, 'Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'

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New Global Directory of OpenPGP Keys

2004-12-09 Thread R.A. Hettinga

--- begin forwarded text


Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2004 18:48:09 +0100
From: Eugen Leitl [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: New Global Directory of OpenPGP Keys
User-Agent: Mutt/1.4i
Sender: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

Link: http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/12/09/1446203
Posted by: michael, on 2004-12-09 15:50:00

   from the how-may-i-direct-your-call dept.
   Gemini writes The [1]PGP company just announced a new type of
   [2]keyserver for all your OpenPGP keys. This server verifies (via
   mailback verification, like mailing lists) that the email address on
   the key actually reaches someone. Dead keys age off the server, and
   you can even remove keys if you forget the passphrase. In a classy
   move, they've included support for those parts of the OpenPGP standard
   that PGP doesn't use, but [3]GnuPG does.

   [4]Click Here

References

   1. http://www.pgp.com/downloads/beta/globaldirectory/index.html
   2. http://keyserver-beta.pgp.com/
   3. http://www.gnupg.org/
   4.
http://ads.osdn.com/?ad_id=5671alloc_id=12342site_id=1request_id=2385427o
p=clickpage=%2farticle%2epl

- End forwarded message -
--
Eugen* Leitl a href=http://leitl.org;leitl/a
__
ICBM: 48.07078, 11.61144http://www.leitl.org
8B29F6BE: 099D 78BA 2FD3 B014 B08A  7779 75B0 2443 8B29 F6BE
http://moleculardevices.org http://nanomachines.net

[demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature]

--- end forwarded text


-- 
-
R. A. Hettinga mailto: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
The Internet Bearer Underwriting Corporation http://www.ibuc.com/
44 Farquhar Street, Boston, MA 02131 USA
... however it may deserve respect for its usefulness and antiquity,
[predicting the end of the world] has not been found agreeable to
experience. -- Edward Gibbon, 'Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'

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