Re: An attack on paypal -- secure UI for browsers

2003-06-10 Thread Sunder
Yes, NOW if you can load yourself into kernel space, you can do anything
and everything - Thou Art God to quote Heinlein.  This is true of every
OS.  Except if you add that nice little TCPA bugger which can verify the
kernel image you're running is the right and approved one. Q.E.D.

Look at the XBox hacks for ideas as to why it's not a trival issue, but
even so, one James Bond like buffer overflow in something everyone will
have marked as trusted (say IE 8.0, or a specially crafted Word 2005
macro), and the 3v1l h4x0r party is back on and you iz ownz0red once more.

It's not enough to fear Microsoft, you must learn to love it.  Give us 2
minutes of hate for Linux now brother!


--Kaos-Keraunos-Kybernetos---
 + ^ + :25Kliters anthrax, 38K liters botulinum toxin, 500 tons of   /|\
  \|/  :sarin, mustard and VX gas, mobile bio-weapons labs, nukular /\|/\
--*--:weapons.. Reasons for war on Iraq - GWB 2003-01-28 speech.  \/|\/
  /|\  :Found to date: 0.  Cost of war: $800,000,000,000 USD.\|/
 + v + :   The look on Sadam's face - priceless!   
[EMAIL PROTECTED] http://www.sunder.net 

On Tue, 10 Jun 2003, Rich Salz wrote:

 But if the system is rooted, then the attacker merely has to find the
 today's secret word entry in the registry and do the same thing.
 Unless Windows is planning on getting real kernel-level kinds of protection.
 
  It was none other than Microsoft's NGSCB, nee Palladium.  See
  http://news.com.com/2100-1012_3-1000584.html?tag=fd_top:
 
 See previous sentence. :)



Re: Johns Hopkins Physics Lab System Detects Digital Video Tampering

2003-09-30 Thread Sunder

And what stops an attacker from taking that digital video, stripping off
the RSA(?) signatures (I'll assume it's just signed), editing it, creating
another, random, one time private key, destroying that private key after
resigning it, and offering it up as unedited?!?!?!?!

They've either obviously not relesed all the details about this method,
since you have no way to validate that the presented public key was
created by their camcorder.  So how would you prove that something came
from a particular camera?  Do you cripple the private key somehow to be
able to identify it?  Do you sign it twice? If you do, then a more
permanent private key lives in the camcorder and can be extracted to also
produce fake keys, etc...

Either that, or this gets a nice wonderful SNAKE OIL INSIDE sticker
slapped on it. :)



Even more obvious: What stops an attacker from taking the camcorder apart,
disconnecting the CCD output, then hooking up an unsigned edited video
signal to it, and recording as a signed video?


IMHO, it has an aroma rich with viperidae lipids.


--Kaos-Keraunos-Kybernetos---
 + ^ + :25Kliters anthrax, 38K liters botulinum toxin, 500 tons of   /|\
  \|/  :sarin, mustard and VX gas, mobile bio-weapons labs, nukular /\|/\
--*--:weapons.. Reasons for war on Iraq - GWB 2003-01-28 speech.  \/|\/
  /|\  :Found to date: 0.  Cost of war: $800,000,000,000 USD.\|/
 + v + :   The look on Sadam's face - priceless!   
[EMAIL PROTECTED] http://www.sunder.net 

On Mon, 29 Sep 2003, R. A. Hettinga wrote:

 Of course, if it's is just signed-frame video, prior art doesn't begin to describe 
 this.
 
 Cheers,
 RAH
 --
 
 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/09/030929054614.htm
 
 Science Daily
 
 Source : 
 Johns Hopkins University 
 
 Date : 
 2003-09-29 
 

SNIP
 
 One key, called a private key, is used to generate the signatures and is destroyed 
 when the recording is complete. The second, a public key, is used for 
 verification. To provide additional accountability, a second set of keys is 
 generated that identifies the postal inspector who made the recording. This set of 
 keys is embedded in a secure physical token that the inspector inserts into the 
 system to activate the taping session. The token also signs the Digital Video 
 Authenticator's public key, ensuring that the public key released with the video 
 signatures was created by the inspector and can be trusted. 

SNIP
 

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Re: Software protection scheme may boost new game sales

2003-10-11 Thread Sunder

Yawn...  This is no different than any of the copy protection schemes
employed in the 1980's on then popular home computers such as the
commodore 64.  

Hindsight is 20/20 and recalls, all of these were broken within weeks if
not months.  Nibbler copiers and other programs were quickly built that
allowed the breaking of all of these systems.  All sorts of error
sectors, duplicate tracks, half tracks, extra tracks, extra sectors,
non-standard sized sectors, tracks written at different speeds, erroneous
checksums, hidden data, and other sorts of weird bits were employed.  All
were broken.  None survived the ages.

In the end, the companies that employed copy protection only managed to
piss off customers who lost their only copy of the software, and created a
market for the copiers and crackers.  The crackers won, the software
companies lost.  

Few of the companies of that era are still in business today.  CEO's,
Vulture Capitalists, and others who have an interest in such schemes would
do well to invest some time in learning about that time, and the results,
for their investments, and dollars will go the same way... the way of the
brontosaurus, the trilobite, and the dodo.

Let them try, if they wish to burn their money.  As far as I'm concerned,
I'll vote with my wallet as usual and only run open source, free software.  
If the moronic kids at whom these titles are aimed have the $50-$70 per
title to waste on self destructing, flavor of the month games, they are
certainly free to spend that money to their heart's desire.


Not a dime from my wallet will wind up in their pockets - except perhaps
indirectly:  the next time I buy my next burger, no, I don't want fries
with that, no, I don't want to supersize it, my $5 eventually makes a
small contribution to the salary of the burger flipper, which in turn is
applied to the purchase of said game.  :)



I've not read the said article just yet, but from that direct quote as
the copy degrades... I can already see the trouble with this scheme:
their copy protection already fails them.  They allow copies to be made
and rely on the fact that the CDR or whatever media, will eventually
degrade, because their code looks like scratches...  Rggghtt.

If you can make one copy, you can make many, and you can certainly store
the ISO in compressed form on a normal CD to make more copies
later.   CDR's are what? $0.20@ these days?

Hell, you can even get one of those virtual CDROM programs to mount the
CD's as if they were CD's, and store the ISO on a hard drive, or DVD-R
instead. Hard drives are already in the 250-500GB range these days.  So
their scheme is already flawed and doomed from the start.

It seems to me that people that engage in treating their customers like
theives to begin with lack a vital ingredient for making money: common
sense.


--Kaos-Keraunos-Kybernetos---
 + ^ + :25Kliters anthrax, 38K liters botulinum toxin, 500 tons of   /|\
  \|/  :sarin, mustard and VX gas, mobile bio-weapons labs, nukular /\|/\
--*--:weapons.. Reasons for war on Iraq - GWB 2003-01-28 speech.  \/|\/
  /|\  :Found to date: 0.  Cost of war: $800,000,000,000 USD.\|/
 + v + :   The look on Sadam's face - priceless!   
[EMAIL PROTECTED] http://www.sunder.net 

On Sat, 11 Oct 2003, Steve Schear wrote:

 Companies are using a new software protection system, called Fade, to
 protect their intellectual property from software thieves. Fade is being
 introduced by Macrovision, which specializes in digital rights management,
 and the British games developer Codemasters. What the program does is make
 unauthorized copies of games slowly degrade, by exploiting the systems for
 error correction that computers use to cope with CD-ROMs or DVDs that have
 become scratched. Software protected by Fade contains fragments of
 subversive code designed to seem like scratches, which are then arranged
 on the disc in a pattern that will be used to prevent copying. Bruce
 Everiss of Codemasters says, The beauty of this is that the degrading copy
 becomes a sales promotion tool. People go out and buy an original version.
 (New Scientist 10 Oct 2003)
 
 http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns4248

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Re: Paying for drinks with wave br of the hand

2004-04-28 Thread sunder
R. A. Hettinga wrote:
http://worldnetdaily.com/news/printer-friendly.asp?ARTICLE_ID=38038
WorldNetDaily
Wednesday, April 14, 2004
YOUR PAPERS, PLEASE ...
Paying for drinks with wave
 of the hand
Club-goers in Spain get implanted chips for ID, payment purposes
Posted: April 14, 2004
5:00 p.m. Eastern
2004.12.18:
A new crime is sweeping the nation.  Criminals everywhere are now cloning 
implanted chips of passerby well to do rich.  Some have been caught hiding 
outside the bushes of the rich with a high powered RFID transponder, 
waiting for their victims to drive by.  Congress has been presented with a 
bill outlawing all RFID readers, except by store owners.

2005.03.22:
In the news today, actress Jennifer Lopez has been found dead in a 
dumpster near a shady street with her hand severed.  Her American Express 
implant chip records show that unscrupulous fiends have ran up several 
million dollars in bar tabs all over downtown Los Angeles, and several 
large money wire transfers to Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, and Iran.  Ms. 
Lopez apparently instructed AMEX to remove all her daily spending limits on 
her credit chip after her chip refused her intended purchases at her local 
Porsche dealer.  A recorded conversation with AMEX customer support reveals 
she believe it cramped her style.

The FBI is searching for her killers.  Special Agent Tom Jones said that 
no further information will be made available at this time, as that the FBI 
does not wish to comment on an ongoing investigation since it may aid the 
perpetrators, and that citizens should switch to cash immediately.

Random J. Citizen on the street commented: 'Well, what do you expect? 
Congress Outlawed RFID readers, and now the thugs have resorted to chopping 
off hands.'

Meanwhile thousands of implanted citizens are suing American Express for 
refusing to allow removal of their credit card chips, some demanding 
billions of dollars for their severed hands.

2006.03.23:
In an unsurprising move today, CEO Jim Jones of American Express 
Corporation has stepped down after his company recently filed for Chapter 
11 protection after Visa Corporation backed out of purchase negotiations.


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