Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-26 Thread Sandy Harris
Travis H. [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: On Wed, Feb 07, 2007 at 05:42:49AM -0800, Sandy Harris wrote: He starts from information theory and an assumption that there needs to be some constant upper bound on the receiver's per-symbol processing time. From there, with nothing else, he gets to a

Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Travis H.
that with a human as your probability oracle, it's roughly 1-2 bits per letter. Many of his papers are online last time I looked, but some of his experimental results are harder to locate online. What about other languages? Does anyone know the relative entropy of other alphabetic languages? What about

FW: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Trei, Peter
. What about other languages? Does anyone know the relative entropy of other alphabetic languages? What about the entropy of ideographic languages? Pictographic? Hieroglyphic? It should be pretty easy to do at least some experiments today -- there's a lot of online text in many different

Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Sandy Harris
Allen [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: An idle question. English has a relatively low entropy as a language. Don't recall the exact figure, but if you look at words that start with q it is very low indeed. What about other languages? Does anyone know the relative entropy of other alphabetic languages

Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Nicolas Williams
On Mon, Feb 05, 2007 at 09:08:07PM -0600, Travis H. wrote: IIRC, it turned out that Egyptian heiroglyphs were actually syllabic, like Mesopotamian, so no fun there. Mayan, on the other hand, remains an enigma. I read not long ago that they also had a way of recording stories on bundles of

RE: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Trei, Peter
Travis H. wrote: On Sun, Feb 04, 2007 at 03:46:41PM -0800, Allen wrote: [...] What about other languages? Does anyone know the relative entropy of other alphabetic languages? What about the entropy of ideographic languages? Pictographic? Hieroglyphic? IIRC, it turned out that Egyptian

Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Travis H.
On Wed, Feb 07, 2007 at 05:42:49AM -0800, Sandy Harris wrote: He starts from information theory and an assumption that there needs to be some constant upper bound on the receiver's per-symbol processing time. From there, with nothing else, he gets to a proof that the optimal frequency

Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-07 Thread Travis H.
On Wed, Feb 07, 2007 at 05:53:16PM -0500, Steven M. Bellovin wrote: Speakers of such Native American languages as Navajo, Choctaw and Cheyenne served as radio operators, know as Code Talkers, to keep communications secret during both World Wars. Welsh speakers played a

Entropy of other languages

2007-02-05 Thread Allen
Hi gang, An idle question. English has a relatively low entropy as a language. Don't recall the exact figure, but if you look at words that start with q it is very low indeed. What about other languages? Does anyone know the relative entropy of other alphabetic languages? What about

Re: Entropy of other languages

2007-02-05 Thread Steven M. Bellovin
the relative entropy of other alphabetic languages? What about the entropy of ideographic languages? Pictographic? Hieroglyphic? It should be pretty easy to do at least some experiments today -- there's a lot of online text in many different languages. Have a look at http://www.gutenberg.org