Re: NSA Suite B Cryptography

2005-10-15 Thread Sidney Markowitz
Joseph Ashwood wrote: U, no. The NSA only licensed the right to use (and sublicense under special circumstances) the patents [...] [snip the rest, it was based on a failed assumption] Poor phrasing on my part. Exactly as you said, the patent sublicense cannot be passed on even if the code

Re: NSA Suite B Cryptography

2005-10-15 Thread Steven M. Bellovin
In message [EMAIL PROTECTED], Sidney Markowitz writes: The possible twist that I see is if the NSA declares that any freely available open source software that interoperates with Suite B is by definition in support of US national security interests and therefore automatically gets one of their

Re: NSA Suite B Cryptography

2005-10-14 Thread Sidney Markowitz
Excerpt from Fact Sheet on NSA Suite B Cryptography http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm NSA has determined that beyond the 1024-bit public key cryptography in common use today, rather than increase key sizes beyond 1024-bits, a switch to elliptic curve technology is warranted. In

Re: NSA Suite B Cryptography

2005-10-14 Thread Ben Laurie
Sidney Markowitz wrote: Excerpt from Fact Sheet on NSA Suite B Cryptography http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm NSA has determined that beyond the 1024-bit public key cryptography in common use today, rather than increase key sizes beyond 1024-bits, a switch to elliptic curve

Re: NSA Suite B Cryptography

2005-10-14 Thread Ian G
Sidney Markowitz wrote: Excerpt from Fact Sheet on NSA Suite B Cryptography http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm NSA has determined that beyond the 1024-bit public key cryptography in common use today, rather than increase key sizes beyond 1024-bits, a switch to elliptic curve

Re: NSA Suite B Cryptography

2005-10-14 Thread Sidney Markowitz
Ian G wrote: Which is to say, NSA solved its problem and it is nothing to do with FOSS. If you wrote a Suite B program and distributed it under a BSD license after getting a sub-license for the patent from the NSA, presumably I could take that code, modify it, and then in order to use or