Re: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Bill Stewart
At 06:06 PM 03/28/2003 -0500, Steven M. Bellovin wrote: What's unclear to me is who is behind this. Felten thinks it's content providers trying for state-level DMCA; I think it's broadband ISPs who are afraid of 802.11 hotspots. It looked to me like it was the cable TV industry trying to ban

Re: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Ed Gerck
It would also outlaw pre-paid cell phones, that are anonymous if you pay in cash and can be untraceable after a call. Not to mention proxy servers. On the upside, it would ban spam ;-) Cheers, Ed Gerck Perry E. Metzger wrote: http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/archives/000336.html Quoting:

RE: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Trei, Peter
Sidney Markowitz writes: They both require that the use of such technologies be for the purpose of committing a crime. The Massachusetts law defines as a crime: (b) Offense defined.--Any person commits an offense if he knowingly (1) possesses, uses, manufactures, develops, assembles,

How useful is www.crypto.com/exports/mail.txt?

2003-03-31 Thread Matt Blaze
For the last three years, I've operated a mail alias, [EMAIL PROTECTED], that publicly archives and forwards to the government authorities announcements of the public availability of cryptographic software. The idea was that since current US export regulations require notifying the government any

Re: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread William Allen Simpson
I've just read Declan's politech article sent out this morning, referencing his full report at: http://news.com.com/2100-1028-994667.html I was shocked to see that Michigan has *already* passed such a law! I've found the new law(s), and they basically outlaw my living in Michigan starting

Re: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Jurgen Botz
[Moderator's note: is using a NAT box intent to defraud a cable modem provider? --Perry] The cable modem provider and the DSL provider at their consumer service level in my area both have explicit clauses in their AUP prohibiting sharing of the connection by multiple machines (I've seen various

Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread reusch
Via the Cryptome, http://www.cryptome.org/, RU sure, look at http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news082.htm. I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would expect that all US military communications, even trivial ones, are strongly encrypted, given the ease of doing this.

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Adam Shostack
On Sun, Mar 30, 2003 at 07:38:29PM -0500, reusch wrote: | Via the Cryptome, http://www.cryptome.org/, RU sure, look | at http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news082.htm. | | I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would | expect that all US military communications, even trivial

Fw:Fraud voting machines

2003-03-31 Thread Richard Guy Briggs
On the thread of voting machines, matters of trust and fraud come up, never mind bugs and other errors... There are other references on the web which I am sure some of our viewers have seen... http://www.blackboxvoting.com/ http://www.ecotalk.org/VotingSecurity.htm

RE: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Trei, Peter
reusch[SMTP:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: Via the Cryptome, http://www.cryptome.org/, RU sure, look at http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news082.htm. I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would expect that all US military communications, even trivial ones, are

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Eugen Leitl
On Sun, 30 Mar 2003, reusch wrote: I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would expect that all US military communications, even trivial ones, Trivial ones are voice radio. Nontrivially to encrypt (mil people tend to be conservative), unlike teletype (I've used NEMP-proof

Re: How useful is www.crypto.com/exports/mail.txt?

2003-03-31 Thread Rich Salz
For the last three years, I've operated a mail alias, [EMAIL PROTECTED] ... It was started on a whim, at the suggestion of someone on this list, if I recall correctly. That was me. I think the openssl folks mention it and use it, so sending your posting there is good idea. Thanks for all the

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Peter Wayner
At 7:38 PM -0500 3/30/03, reusch wrote: Via the Cryptome, http://www.cryptome.org/, RU sure, look at http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news082.htm. I showed this link to a friend who fixes helicopters for the Army/Marines. He was incredulous at first, but then said, Oh, they probably just

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread (Mr) Lyn R. Kennedy
On Sun, Mar 30, 2003 at 07:38:29PM -0500, reusch wrote: I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would expect that all US military communications, even trivial ones, are strongly encrypted, given the ease of doing this. Someone, more well informed, please reassure me that

Re: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Ben Cox
On Sun, 2003-03-30 at 17:33, Jurgen Botz wrote: [Moderator's note: is using a NAT box intent to defraud a cable modem provider? --Perry] The cable modem provider and the DSL provider at their consumer service level in my area both have explicit clauses in their AUP prohibiting sharing of

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread John Gilmore
I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. 1. Look for plaintext. This was rule #1 stated by Robert Morris Sr. in his lecture to the annual Crypto conference after retiring as NSA's chief scientist. You'd be amazed how much of it is floating around out there, even in military

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread reusch
At 12:51 PM 3/31/03 -0500, Adam Shostack wrote: On Sun, Mar 30, 2003 at 07:38:29PM -0500, reusch wrote: | Via the Cryptome, http://www.cryptome.org/, RU sure, look | at http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news082.htm. | | I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would | expect

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Chazzchezz
[EMAIL PROTECTED] writes: The real problem is that flaky encrypted comms are a tactical problem so it is often better to use clear comms when time is the issue. Not too helpful to know what's about to happen if you can't do anything about it anyway. -- This is a

Re: GPS phones confiscated from reporters in Iraq

2003-03-31 Thread John Gilmore
http://www.newscientist.com/news/print.jsp?id=ns3567 It's nice to see that the US military realizes the terrible possibilities from tracking the movements of ordinary people (who happen to be soldiers or with soldiers). When will they get on the bandwagon demanding that person-tracking

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Adam Shostack
On Mon, Mar 31, 2003 at 01:17:43PM -0500, Peter Wayner wrote: | He went on to talk about crypto as if it was something like fuel or | food. He said, They probably loaded up 4 or 5 days of crypto at the | beginning, but then they had to turn it off after the supply lines | got muddled. | | So

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Dave Howe
reusch wrote: Via the Cryptome, http://www.cryptome.org/, RU sure, look at http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news082.htm. I'm amazed at their claims of radio interception. One would expect that all US military communications, even trivial ones, are strongly encrypted, given the ease of

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Eric Rescorla
John Gilmore [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes: Remember, the cypherpunks ... secured any Web traffic Credit where it's due. Netscape was responsible for this. -Ekr -- [Eric Rescorla [EMAIL PROTECTED] http://www.rtfm.com/

Re: Fw:Fraud voting machines

2003-03-31 Thread David Wagner
Richard Guy Briggs wrote: If You Want To Win An Election, Just Control The Voting Machines by Thom Hartmann [...] Six years later Hagel ran again, this time against Democrat Charlie Matulka in 2002, and won in a landslide. As his hagel.senate.gov website says, Hagel was re-elected to his second

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread (Mr) Lyn R. Kennedy
On Mon, Mar 31, 2003 at 02:59:11PM -0500, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: I am much more concerned about the apparent lack of good IFF (missile batteries lighting up the RAF plane that they then shot down; the USAF plane that reacted to being lit up by firing at and destroying the ground radar;

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Arnold G. Reinhold
At 2:10 PM -0500 3/31/03, reusch wrote: ... Nosing around on the same site, one finds How military radio communications are intercepted http://www.aeronautics.ru/news/news002/news071.htm Searching for SINCGARS indicates that all US military radios have encryption capabilities, which can be turned

Kashmir crypto

2003-03-31 Thread Arnold G. Reinhold
While Googling for material on SINCGARS, I found an article about crypto in the India/Pakistan conflict. Old style cryptanalysis isn't dead yet: http://www.tactical-link.com/india_pakistan.htm Arnold Reinhold - The

Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread Lucky Green
Eric Rescorla wrote: Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 23:42 To: John Gilmore Cc: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; [EMAIL PROTECTED] Subject: Re: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications? John Gilmore [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes: Remember, the cypherpunks ... secured any Web traffic Credit where it's due.

RE: Russia Intercepts US Military Communications?

2003-03-31 Thread dave
Well I am sure most of you would be amazed and/or flabbergasted with how the crypto keys are handed out for the different avionics/communication devices on a daily basis. You will know if you forgot one of them like when you pass over a hawk missile sight at the edge of base, and they lock on and

RE: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread dave
to conceal or to assist another to conceal from any communication service provider, or from any lawful authority, the existence or place of origin or destination of any communication. I agree with Peter. Now what are they going to with all that Postal mail without return addresses? Who is

Re: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Dave Emery
On Fri, Mar 28, 2003 at 01:10:56PM -0500, Perry E. Metzger wrote: http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/archives/000336.html Quoting: Here is one example of the far-reaching harmful effects of these bills. Both bills would flatly ban the possession, sale, or use of

RE: Run a remailer, go to jail?

2003-03-31 Thread Bill Frantz
At 6:09 PM -0800 3/31/03, dave wrote: to conceal or to assist another to conceal from any communication service provider, or from any lawful authority, the existence or place of origin or destination of any communication. However, this provision shouldn't interfere with NAT on a home network. All

GPS phones confiscated from reporters in Iraq

2003-03-31 Thread R. A. Hettinga
http://www.newscientist.com/news/print.jsp?id=ns3567 New Scientist GPS phones confiscated from reporters in Iraq 15:26 31 March 03 Will Knight Satellite phones with built-in Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities have been confiscated from journalists travelling with US troops