RE: [dcc-associates] DPC / Nestor sign co-operation agreement on digital preservation

2013-02-20 Thread Simon Fenton-Jones
This is an interesting one William.

 

Seems like we are beginning to see the beginnings of some collaboration
between people who are members of task forces/working groups in so many samo
samo institutions; no matter what the subject matter. e.g.
http://www.ifla.org/publications/statement-of-principles-on-global-cross-sec
toral-digitisation-initiatives 

 

I thought we would have had some more systematic development coming from the
National libraries/archives by now, especially coming out of this approach =
Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation. 

Especially when we all appreciate that one has to be schizophrenic. i.e.
Consider both this http://www.naa.gov.au/records-management/agency/
(Nationally) and this (Globally)
http://www.naa.gov.au/records-management/agency/ ; all within one little
brain cell. 

 

In the world of network managers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_research_and_education_network there's
a similar problem. One profession concerns itself with infrastructure, the
other with the content passing, and occasionally curated, within it. That's
hard enough. But it's complicated even further because they often use the
same word to refer to different things.
http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/networking/19/314 And
inter-network stuff, like Federated Identity Management, is not a thing with
which curators will concern themselves.

 

Regardless, it's good to see we've got some bilingualism starting to happen
in the support of global, Inter-institutional, working groups. 

I suppose you wouldn't have a way to classify their 'endpoints' in
cyberspace would you?

 

Regards, si  

 

 

 

 

 

From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of William Kilbride
Sent: Wednesday, 20 February 2013 7:43 PM
To: digital-preservat...@jiscmail.ac.uk; dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: [dcc-associates] DPC / Nestor sign co-operation agreement on
digital preservation

 

Digital Preservation Coalition and Nestor sign landmark co-operation
agreement

 

The Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and nestor, the German competence
centre in long-term archiving, are delighted to announce a new alliance
which allows them to share resources and enables their members to work
together for the preservation of digital objects.

 

'Nestor is a coalition of institutions in Germany, facilitated by the
Deutsche Nationalbibliothek, with the goal of encouraging knowledge exchange
and co-operation in of digital preservation,' explained Sabine Schrimpf of
nestor.. 'Our work is not restricted to the national level. The partners
maintain close links with corresponding initiatives in other countries and
are actively involved in European and international initiatives and
projects.  We've always understood that collaboration is important for
digital preservation, and because it is an international challenge it makes
sense to work with partners around the world.  We have a lot in common with
DPC and we recognise that we can be more effective when we work together.'

 

'We've been very impressed by the range and depth of work which nestor has
undertaken over the years' said William Kilbride of the DPC, 'and we've
collaborated in a variety of ways in the past.  But up till now this has
tended to be on an ad hoc basis and it's really only been possible for our
officers to work together.  The real strength of nestor and DPC are our
members so this new alliance is designed so that our members can work
together on a regular basis.  DPC members will be invited to join nestor
activities, while nestor members can participate in DPC briefings and have
priority access to DPC reports and publications.'

 

('The DPC is a catalyst and advocate for digital preservation in the UK and
Ireland', explained William Kilbride of the DPC. 'We exist to support our
members in their shared goal of ensuring that our digital memory is
accessible tomorrow.  This is a complicated mission which involves lots of
sectors, so our 40 members come from quite a diverse mix of sectors and
interests. Our member-only briefing days are very popular and our technology
watch reports are widely cited: but members also get a great deal out of the
sorts of conversations and connections we are able to provide for them.')

 

By this new agreement, DPC members will be able to: 

.access to details of nestor's annual program plans and receive
regular updates on nestor activities 

.access English language abstracts and summaries of nestor
publications and nestor events

.observe and contribute to nestor planning activities and
consultation on nestor's functional focus areas 

.participate in nestor standards development and working groups 

 

While nestor members will be able to:

.get priority access to reports commissioned by the DPC as well as
papers from DPC Working Parties and Task Forces

.access the private DPC-DISCUSSION list which provides 

RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining tool

2011-11-22 Thread Simon Fenton-Jones
Well, it is nice to see that some still keep the D with the R. 

It just strikes me as strange, at a time when we can tag and monitor a
species right up until its precise point of extinction, (which will be well
documented of course) that we continue to favour the R without an interest
in the D. I suppose the problem is that we have so few visionaries, who can
point at problem and describe an improvement, and so many “professionals”
who can even consider a broader application, as they have been so well
taught to think inside a square.

 

I’m with you on the “impact”. It’s a bit like convincing an advertiser their
money is well spent. 

(You know the George Patterson argument. “Half your advertising budget is
wasted. If we knew which half we could save a fortune. In the meantime
you’ll just have to double your budget”.)

 

I’m not sure when we entered this era of modern scholasticism. Any idea?

I suppose when Google took over the role of librarians. And curators started
looking at the research and not the researchers, or developers.

 

Si.

 

 

From: John Milner [mailto:john.mil...@btinternet.com] 
Sent: Friday, 18 November 2011 3:07 PM
To: 'Simon Fenton-Jones'; 'Peter Murray-Rust'
Cc: 'Joy Davidson'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

Actually some of us still talk about RD but we can tell the difference
between the two and understand the important relationship between them. The
idea of “impact” of research has confused things IMHO. If we know the impact
it ain’t research it’s development, the whole point of research is to create
knowledge and understanding, development can apply that knowledge in a range
of contexts and ultimately drive products and services.

 

Research created knowledge about what content indexing algorithms on the
Internet might look like, development created Google J

 

John K. Milner 

 

mailto: john.mil...@btinternet.com  or john.mil...@ja.net

 

 

From: Simon Fenton-Jones [mailto:simo...@cols.com.au] 
Sent: 18 November 2011 02:40
To: 'John Milner'; 'Peter Murray-Rust'
Cc: 'Joy Davidson'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

Hi John, 

 

I’ll admit it’s a problem for people devoid of imagination that they will
inflict an old (physical) paradigm on a new (virtual) one. But it’s what
seems to happen when you employ robots to shuffle. I believe the program
this list’s particular species are programmed to respond to is a thing
called LIS. Library and Information Services. That’s the case isn’t it? And
ignore all other aspects of human relations of course. They’re far to
professional to imagine information may have a social need. 

 

Frankly the last thing I’d want now is another geek to come up with a
programme which tells me “this” is related to “this”. Perception is not a
thing which a dumb machine recognises better than a dumb human, regardless
of how stupid. And I do know quite a few geeks, who are no slouches when it
comes to using bandwidth. 

 

Yeah, they’d even translate “useful but incomplete” into “constant beta”.
But no difference. The question is “what is the point of Research?” Sorry,
“to produce another paper”. Stupid me.

 

I do have a reasonable memory though. Do you remember when we used to talk
about Research ... and Development? 

Thank god those days are gone. si

 

From: John Milner [mailto:john.mil...@btinternet.com] 
Sent: Friday, 11 November 2011 3:19 PM
To: 'Simon Fenton-Jones'; 'Peter Murray-Rust'
Cc: 'Joy Davidson'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

I like it! I have often asked the question. “What is different in principle
between paper data and publications and digital data and publications?”
I’ve yet to get an answer. My own answer is “Nothing”. Which implies that
Librarians, archivists and curators need to work out systems along the lines
you describe to deal with digital material alongside paper material.

 

If those methods initially turn out to be fairly crude, then as long as they
are CONSISTENTLY crude we have the computer power and network bandwidth and
intelligent software writers to develop tools to  trawl digital material
much more easily than trawling the shelves of the planet for books,
journals, logs and lab  note books.

 

Google wasn’t exactly sophisticated when it took over the world and seemed
to be useful, purely because it was better than the alternative.

 

We should not be striving for perfection we should be starting a journey.
Remember that “useful but incomplete” is a worthwhile benchmark of new tools
and methods!

 

John K. Milner 

 

mailto: john.mil...@btinternet.com  or john.mil...@ja.net

 

 

From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk

RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining tool

2011-11-17 Thread Simon Fenton-Jones
Hi John, 

 

I’ll admit it’s a problem for people devoid of imagination that they will
inflict an old (physical) paradigm on a new (virtual) one. But it’s what
seems to happen when you employ robots to shuffle. I believe the program
this list’s particular species are programmed to respond to is a thing
called LIS. Library and Information Services. That’s the case isn’t it? And
ignore all other aspects of human relations of course. They’re far to
professional to imagine information may have a social need. 

 

Frankly the last thing I’d want now is another geek to come up with a
programme which tells me “this” is related to “this”. Perception is not a
thing which a dumb machine recognises better than a dumb human, regardless
of how stupid. And I do know quite a few geeks, who are no slouches when it
comes to using bandwidth. 

 

Yeah, they’d even translate “useful but incomplete” into “constant beta”.
But no difference. The question is “what is the point of Research?” Sorry,
“to produce another paper”. Stupid me.

 

I do have a reasonable memory though. Do you remember when we used to talk
about Research ... and Development? 

Thank god those days are gone. si

 

From: John Milner [mailto:john.mil...@btinternet.com] 
Sent: Friday, 11 November 2011 3:19 PM
To: 'Simon Fenton-Jones'; 'Peter Murray-Rust'
Cc: 'Joy Davidson'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

I like it! I have often asked the question. “What is different in principle
between paper data and publications and digital data and publications?”
I’ve yet to get an answer. My own answer is “Nothing”. Which implies that
Librarians, archivists and curators need to work out systems along the lines
you describe to deal with digital material alongside paper material.

 

If those methods initially turn out to be fairly crude, then as long as they
are CONSISTENTLY crude we have the computer power and network bandwidth and
intelligent software writers to develop tools to  trawl digital material
much more easily than trawling the shelves of the planet for books,
journals, logs and lab  note books.

 

Google wasn’t exactly sophisticated when it took over the world and seemed
to be useful, purely because it was better than the alternative.

 

We should not be striving for perfection we should be starting a journey.
Remember that “useful but incomplete” is a worthwhile benchmark of new tools
and methods!

 

John K. Milner 

 

mailto: john.mil...@btinternet.com  or john.mil...@ja.net

 

 

From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Simon Fenton-Jones
Sent: 11 November 2011 05:45
To: 'John Milner'; 'Peter Murray-Rust'
Cc: 'Joy Davidson'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

Thanks John, Peter,

 

Well, let me play devil’s advocate. Curators are very nice people, sorry
“public servants”, who might say to their institutional researchers. “OK,
you’re paid by the public purse to do a job. Part of that job is to put your
papers, or audios, or videos into a repository which is open to everyone.
I’m a busy person, so put it in our institution’s database. Someone is
probably going to trawl our open space and the suck it up into some huge
repository in the sky. Then you’ll have the pleasure of sifting through
haystacks to find something useful. Hey it’s better than nothing. As for
translations, forget it. OK, we’d better make some noise about the massive
amount of money we have to pay to take a copy of the rapacious publisher’s
database/platform. But what more can we do?

 

So now we have public money being spent on enhancing private publisher’s
(these days) platforms, and in my world, the functionality of private
platforms like Adobe Connect. Thank you very much Mr. Taxpayer. 

 

Now no  one could ever accuse curators of original thoughts. They look at
the back end in much the same way as many of my correspondents look at the
front = lecture/event/conference capture. They also make sure that they look
only at information, (sometimes) in all its formats, in the same way my
mates look at the real time communications. Professional courtesy appears to
discourage interest.

 

So I have to ask. Do remember an old saying “Libraries are not made, they
grow.” The idea it seems was that one needed to a community to build a
library around/on behalf of. These days our communities are global. The web
has made that perfectly obvious. Our curators, meantime, are
institutionalized. So what is there to stop librarians agreeing on a DNS
system, based (perhaps) on a bibliographic classification system, so when a
researcher says, “where do i put my paper?” or “where do I find my peers?”
Curators could say “stick it up on that domain number” like they would

RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining tool

2011-11-10 Thread Simon Fenton-Jones
Thanks John, Peter,

 

Well, let me play devil’s advocate. Curators are very nice people, sorry
“public servants”, who might say to their institutional researchers. “OK,
you’re paid by the public purse to do a job. Part of that job is to put your
papers, or audios, or videos into a repository which is open to everyone.
I’m a busy person, so put it in our institution’s database. Someone is
probably going to trawl our open space and the suck it up into some huge
repository in the sky. Then you’ll have the pleasure of sifting through
haystacks to find something useful. Hey it’s better than nothing. As for
translations, forget it. OK, we’d better make some noise about the massive
amount of money we have to pay to take a copy of the rapacious publisher’s
database/platform. But what more can we do?

 

So now we have public money being spent on enhancing private publisher’s
(these days) platforms, and in my world, the functionality of private
platforms like Adobe Connect. Thank you very much Mr. Taxpayer. 

 

Now no  one could ever accuse curators of original thoughts. They look at
the back end in much the same way as many of my correspondents look at the
front = lecture/event/conference capture. They also make sure that they look
only at information, (sometimes) in all its formats, in the same way my
mates look at the real time communications. Professional courtesy appears to
discourage interest.

 

So I have to ask. Do remember an old saying “Libraries are not made, they
grow.” The idea it seems was that one needed to a community to build a
library around/on behalf of. These days our communities are global. The web
has made that perfectly obvious. Our curators, meantime, are
institutionalized. So what is there to stop librarians agreeing on a DNS
system, based (perhaps) on a bibliographic classification system, so when a
researcher says, “where do i put my paper?” or “where do I find my peers?”
Curators could say “stick it up on that domain number” like they would if a
researcher had a physical book to put on a shelf. And just like an a
Wikipedia article, when one reads its history, peers could discover one
another.

 

I know that people who are interested in just classifying ‘things’ would
just laugh. “Classify social media? You’re daft”.
http://www.semantico.com/2011/11/a-taxonomy-of-social-media-forget-it/?mid=5
1 

But I’m not suggesting that they just classify things. I’m suggesting that
they curate on behalf of a global community. 

 

Or is it more to do with the idea that building a public platform on a
global basis is all a bit too hard. 

Hmm. Doesn’t seem like that’s an excuse either.
http://www.geant.net/service/edugain/about_edugain/how_eduGAIN_works/Pages/h
ome.aspx

Just a lack of perspective, imagination and collaboration.

Sounds like it’s time for another conference where, just for a change, peers
do more than invite the usual suspects. 

Hasta Luego, si

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: John Milner [mailto:john.mil...@btinternet.com] 
Sent: Thursday, 10 November 2011 2:33 PM
To: 'Peter Murray-Rust'; 'Simon Fenton-Jones'
Cc: 'Joy Davidson'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

Hmmm so it’s not your money. If you are paid from the public purse too, then
it may not be, but it might be mine and I don’t like it much either!

I thought public policy was all about open access these days.

 

Moreover I think Elsevier are not even acting in their own best interests.
In my experience defending IPR in that way is always doomed to failure, they
need to start looking at new business models not try to defend a doomed one.

 

John K. Milner 

 

 

From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Peter Murray-Rust
Sent: 10 November 2011 02:25
To: Simon Fenton-Jones
Cc: Joy Davidson; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: Re: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

 

 

On Thu, Nov 10, 2011 at 2:50 AM, Simon Fenton-Jones simo...@cols.com.au
wrote:

Let me see if I got this right.

Elsevier, a leading provider of scientific, technical and medical

information products and services, at a cost which increases much faster
than inflation, to libraries who can't organize their researchers to back up
a copy of their journal articles so they can be aggregated, is to have their
platform, Sciverse, made more attractive, by the public purse by a simple
text mining tool which they could build on a shoestring.

Sciverse Applications, in return, will take advantage of this public
largesse to charge more for the journals which should/could have been
compiled by public digital curators in the first instance.

Hmmm. So this is progress.

Hey. It's not my money!

Thanks very much Simon 


No - it's worse. I have been expressly and consistently asking Elsevier for
permission to text-mine factual data form

RE: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining tool

2011-11-09 Thread Simon Fenton-Jones
Let me see if I got this right.
Elsevier, a leading provider of scientific, technical and medical
information products and services, at a cost which increases much faster
than inflation, to libraries who can't organize their researchers to back up
a copy of their journal articles so they can be aggregated, is to have their
platform, Sciverse, made more attractive, by the public purse by a simple
text mining tool which they could build on a shoestring. 

Sciverse Applications, in return, will take advantage of this public
largesse to charge more for the journals which should/could have been
compiled by public digital curators in the first instance. 

Hmmm. So this is progress.

Hey. It's not my money!  

-Original Message-
From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Joy Davidson
Sent: Monday, 7 November 2011 11:59 PM
To: research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk; dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: [dcc-associates] Manchester and Elsevier team up on text-mining
tool

This press release may be of interest to list members. 

University enters collaboration to develop text mining applications
07 Nov 2011
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/news/display/?id=7627

The University of Manchester has joined forces with Elsevier, a leading
provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and
services, to develop new applications for text mining, a crucial research
tool.

The primary goal of text mining is to extract new information such as named
entities, relations hidden in text and to enable scientists to
systematically and efficiently discover, collect, interpret and curate
knowledge required for research.

The collaborative team will develop applications for SciVerse Applications,
which provides opportunities for researchers to collaborate with developers
in creating and promoting new applications that improve research workflows.

The University's National Centre for Text Mining (NaCTeM), the first
publicly-funded text mining centre in the world, will work with Elsevier's
Application Marketplace and Developer Network team on the project. 

Text mining extracts semantic metadata such as terms, relationships and
events, which enable more pertinent search. NaCTeM provides a number of text
mining services, tools and resources for leading corporations and government
agencies that enhance search and discovery.

Sophia Ananiadou, Professor in the University's School of Computer Science
and Director of the National Centre for Text Mining, said: Text mining
supports new knowledge discovery and hypothesis generation. 

Elsevier's SciVerse platform will enable access to sophisticated text
mining techniques and content that can deliver more pertinent, focused
search results.

NaCTeM has developed a number of innovative, semantic-based and time-saving
text mining tools for various organizations, said Rafael Sidi, Vice
President Product Management, Applications Marketplace and Developer
Network, Elsevier. 

We are excited to work with the NaCTeM team to bring this expertise to the
research community.

Notes for editors
Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical
information products and services. The company works in partnership with the
global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals,
and close to 20,000 book titles. A global business headquartered in
Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. 

NaCTeM is the first publicly funded, text mining centre in the world
providing resources, tools and services to academia and industry. NaCTeM
collaborates with both academia and industry, nationally and
internationally. 

The University of Manchester

The University of Manchester, a member of the Russell Group, is the most
popular university in the UK. It has 22 academic schools and hundreds of
specialist research groups undertaking pioneering multi-disciplinary
teaching and research of worldwide significance.

According to the results of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, The
University of Manchester is now one of the country's major research
universities, rated third in the UK in terms of 'research power'. The
University had an annual income of £788 million in 2009/10.

For media enquiries please contact:

Daniel Cochlin
Media Relations Officer
The University of Manchester
0161 275 8387
daniel.coch...@manchester.ac.uk

*
Joy Davidson
DCC Associate Director
Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII)
George Service House, 11 University Gardens,
University of Glasgow
Glasgow G12 8QJ
Scotland
Tel: +44(0)141 330 8592
Fax: +44(0)141 330 3788
http://www.dcc.ac.uk




RE: [dcc-associates] Preserving Digital Sound and Vision Briefing Day, 8th April

2011-03-16 Thread simon Fenton- jones
That's interesting William,

Can I ask 2 questions? Taking it that there are (from my perspective);

1. around 30 conferences per month around the world covering portions of
this kind of interest = AV content - its capture, edit, dissemination,
response and long term preservation, and
2. Most are not streamed, broadcast (by a National broadcaster) or captured,
(although this is increasing with ustream and similar) and
3. Most encourage viewers to join them, at different times, in different
places (url),

Do you think there is any hope that one day we might see an approach, which
looks at classifying the node(s) from which similar types of conferences are
streamed, so global communities-of-interest can discover one another 
coordinate their activities? 

If this approach were to gain currency, would it be possible for a curator
to provide, for example, a bibliographic number for this conference's node?
(so the streams could be archived in situ).

Regards,
simon


-Original Message-
From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of William Kilbride
Sent: Tuesday, 15 March 2011 5:28 AM
To: digital-preservat...@jiscmail.ac.uk; dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: [dcc-associates] Preserving Digital Sound and Vision Briefing Day,
8th April

Dear all,

I'm pleased to report that the DPC briefing day on Preserving Digital Sound
and Vision in London on 8th April is now fully booked.  You can follow the
meeting live via the #soundvision hashtag on twitter, and we'll be
publishing a report of the event and also the presentations shortly
afterwards.

We've not advertised it very widely as DPC members have priority access and
it was clear early on that it would fill quickly.  But we've retained a
couple of places in case DPC members may have missed the announcement:

* If you work for DPC member agency but missed the registration window, then
follow this link:
http://www.dpconline.org/events/details/27-SoundAndVision?xref=26
* If you're not a member but would like to join the DPC in order to attend,
then follow this link: http://www.dpconline.org/join-us

Looking forward to a great day!

William

--
Dr William Kilbride FSA
Executive Director
Digital Preservation Coalition



44 (0)141 330 4522
http://www.dpconline.org/
will...@dpconline.org



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RE: [dcc-associates] Global directory of information disciplines

2011-03-08 Thread simon Fenton- jones
Thanks Sue,

 

I wasn’t sure whether  the idea would seem a bit silly. The Network managers
who I talk to in the NRENs around different points of the world don’t really
“get it”, as they tend to think in terms of “services” to National
institutions. But looking at that news which just came though about Surf’s
SURFshare initiative, we don’t seem to be too far apart in getting the
NREN’s Network Managers and curators to firm up on a new
cyber-infrastructure built around Global Groups rather than National
Institutions. Surfnet (the Dutch NREN) and its European peers (and others
including aarnet) work pretty closely.  There’s also a bit of SURF talk
around terena about the Grand Challenge.  

Ø  Need to join forces and aggregate demand (volume) in a monopolistic
market with major software vendors and scientific publishers

 

I guess curators might look at this as “taking third party publishers out of
the (scholarly communications) loop”. NREN Network Managers can provide any
collaborative tool you might want. The trouble is that they think in terms
of Big, medium, small “User Groups”. I’ve been thinking through what might
happen if they used the same kind of directory as curators use already -say
World Cat – for the collaborative tools. (They call them “common services”
at the aaf) Particularly after this latest from Dan Cohen.
http://www.dancohen.org/2011/01/19/video-the-ivory-tower-and-the-open-web/

 

At least that way, when I land on some institution’s ivory tower = web site
= and was looking for (say) a sociable band of curators ( regardless of the
language I spoke), I might find a directory which could point me by using a
number. Say 025.431, which has metadata in 30 languages already attached. Of
course, you’d have to believe that I was looking for a global community and
not a piece of information.

Curators would never believe that would theyJ?

All the best, simon

 

 

 

 

From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Sue Myburgh
Sent: Monday, 28 February 2011 6:20 PM
To: Sue Myburgh
Subject: [dcc-associates] Global directory of information disciplines

 

Dear colleagues

An excellent suggestion was made by one of the readers of the digital
collaboration blog (digitalcollaboration.wordpress.com
http://www.digitalcollaboration.wordpress.com  ): that we develop a global
directory of the subject/disciplinary groups that are involved with
digitisation, so that we can progress the notion (and work!) of
collaboration.  The Australian Access Federation enables collaboration
internationally, as well as between disciplinary groups – it sounds ideal.
Internet2 calls global subject/disciplinary groups ‘external’
(http://www.internet2.edu/comanage).  The NREN (National Research and
Education Network – there is one in most countries) can provide a federated
log in to the groups’ members’ space, where a number of ‘common services’
can be integrated.  If we can provide a directory, we can make use of this
facility, which, because it is so safe and secure, may be just the place to
launch international cross-disciplinary exercises and projects.


To this end, I have built a new wall for comments.  If you visit this
website –   http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/globaldirectory
http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/globaldirectory - you you will find that you
can add a virtual ‘post-it’ note which expresses your point of view: you can
also include media files and URLs.  Then, we can easily see and consider –
and comment on – each other’s proposals.


I look forward to working with you on establishing such a directory.

All the best

Sue

 

Dr Susan Myburgh

School of Communication

University of South Australia

St Bernard's Road

Magill SA 5076

ADELAIDE

 

P: 618 8302 4421

F: 618 8302 4745

E:  mailto:sue.mybu...@unisa.edu.au sue.mybu...@unisa.edu.au

Skype: suething

QR:

http://en.gravatar.com/digitalcollaboration.qr

 

CRICOS Provider Number 00121B 

 

The opinions expressed in this email are mine alone.  Only authorised
signatories are competent to enter into agreements on behalf of the
University and recipients are thus advised that the content of this email
may not be legally binding on the University and may contain the personal
views and opinions of the author, which are not necessarily the views and
opinions of the University of South Australia. 

 

This email message is intended only for the addressee(s) and contains
information that may be confidential and/or copyright. If you are not the
intended recipient please notify the sender by reply mail and immediately
delete this email.  Use, disclosure or reproduction of this email by anyone
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viruses. Virus scanning is recommended and is the responsibility of the
recipient. 

Please consider the environment before printing this email 

 

 

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[dcc-associates] RE: I don't know if there is a single organisation that could tackle all........

2010-04-30 Thread Simon Fenton - Jones
Thanks Matti, 

Eloquently put. Replied below.

-Original Message-
From: heikkuri...@gmail.com [mailto:heikkuri...@gmail.com] On Behalf Of
Matti Heikkurinen
Sent: Thursday, 29 April 2010 3:50 PM
To: Simon Fenton - Jones
Cc: Peter Szegedi; Leif Laaksonen; tf-me...@terena.org; john.d...@planet.nl;
d...@terena.org
Subject: Re: I don't know if there is a single organisation that could
tackle all

Dear Simon, All,

Simon, thank you for directing this to a forum that might be more
productive than the under-the-radar one!

Regarding the trinity of technology-policy-sociology: the reason I
have emphasised the policy is mainly because that's the area where I
have (quite minimal) resources to look into issues that might be
relevant for the e-IRG. Policies are indeed fairly weak catalysts for
new action, they're perhaps better viewed as an insurance against
disruptive forces that might negate gains in the other two areas.

Without some policy awareness, I'd imagine a VC-backed walled garden
business model (online conferencing system that is compatible only
with itself) might disrupt both technical interoperability and split
existing communities into islands based on the operating systems,
network vendors and hardware solutions they happen to use.

I think we might be able to progress if we admit this is where we are, from
the start. This is exactly where we are. 
My experience in the Australia was with State funding in this area, where
NSW state schools could VC to one another but not across their borders. It's
much the same throughout Europe. If we wanted proof we only have to
consider that the association of European NRENs must use a proprietary
solution to bring their walled gardens (virtually) together.   
-- 

Thinking about concrete actions that could be taken (and where I could
play a role):

For insurance purposes it probably would be useful to try to ensure
that the e-IRG is aware of existing body of knowledge. Ensuring that
relevant projects, organsiations and data sources are referred to by
the e-IRG Knowledge Base (http://knowledgebase.e-irg.eu/) could be one
easy step where I could help establishing a contact with the Knowledge
Base maintainers.

I'm sure you meant to say existing bodies of knowledge where the IRG
domain is one reference repository (to use a librarian's terminology). It's
a laudable thought although it fights against the new media paradigm. Let
me give a concrete example by flagging the compilation of terena's
Compendium. After all the questions have been answered we end up with a
snapshot in time. It's then buried on a small secretariat's domain, which is
outdated on its publication. If an inquirer wanted a place to start
(looking for an NREN aggregation) they would google and find it, so long
as the metadata was good, and enough walled gardens had contributed and
checked it in situ. (you'll understand the google algorithm). Otherwise
they'll get this page (perhaps in their own language if they're really
lucky). http://www.google.com/search?q=NREN 

Establishing contact with Knowledge Base maintainers is the first step.
The next step is aggregating the knowledge base in a place where it might
be recognised as the euro communities hub (in all its diverse languages).
Just look at Europeana, as an example of how National librarian's think.
Excuse my arrogance here, but so our community can better understand the
new media model, let me point you here.
http://wikieducator.org/Practice:Towards_a_new_Institution_of_Learning#Impro
ving_collaboration_and_content_interoperability_between_mainstream_OER_proje
cts

If you believe in this model as I do, a few questions must be answered:
1.  Who can contribute? (who has access to the tools)
2.  What (combination of media) tools do they prefer? 
3.  Where do we put the domain so it can be found (regardless of
language)
4.  The Why? I'll leave to each of the three professions = CPR, TF
media, TF storage (in this domain's terminology).

The problem we have at the moment is that we don't have the where?
discussed first. I'm having a nice discussion about findability with Alan
over at the Wikieducator community. I'm sure the opencast guys, like every
OER manufacturer, must be having (have had) the same questions. It's hard
for people who are paid to think within the walls of a National institution
to conceive a Euro-wide perspective of their communities, much less a Global
one. But we are getting there, even though it must seem like walking
through treacle or herding cats to Peter. Just his response - the virtual
get together on the 27th - shows he is trying so hard with the tools he has
at hand. All I can say is Peter, you're not alone. 

--
On the European level broadening the contact points between e-IRG and
tf-media would probably have more impact. If as many national
delegates

RE: [dcc-associates] Social media for research data management

2010-04-29 Thread Simon Fenton - Jones
John,

 

I'll just make a quick note on this one peter, as this is not a sociable
place. You can get some idea of the usage of social sites by doing a google
on Alexa and going through their list.

It's a very hard world when someone like yourself has done so much work and
then the research gets buried with so many others, in the internet stacks.

 

I'm afraid you won't find any useable social sites in the academic space
because, quite honestly, it's so stuck in the past, and not a terribly
sociable place. It's just a place inhabited by well intentioned people who
only get rewarded for aggregating, publishing or researching data about
their own professional world, which precludes the need (or want) for any
relationships with the outside; most of the time. 

 

So well done on your website. But if you want to check out the social scene,
ask one of your children grandchildren where (with what) they play. You'll
probably find lots of your peers asking many of the same questions, and
having the same discussion.

 

All the best, simon

 

From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of John F Hall
Sent: Monday, 26 April 2010 12:44 PM
To: Simon Fenton - Jones; 'Alex Ball'; research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk;
dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: Re: [dcc-associates] Social media for research data management

 

All this technology is totally new to me.  I'm in one such site that get's
one posting a month if you're lucky.  Does anyone ever check the actual
usage of these things?

 

My answer (make of it what you will) has been to set up my own website and
upload stuff, some 40+ years old and not widely available if at all,  so
it's there for posterity if anyone' s interested

 

See http://surveyresearch.weebly.com/

 

John Hall

- Original Message - 

From: Simon Fenton - Jones mailto:simo...@cols.com.au  

To: 'Alex Ball' mailto:a.b...@ukoln.ac.uk  ;
research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk ; dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk 

Sent: Monday, April 26, 2010 11:58 AM

Subject: RE: [dcc-associates] Social media for research data management

 


Dear Alex,

We're having the same kind of conversation over at three of terena's
taskforces, although it's couched in slightly different terms. As most of
our community are engineers who are focussed on the 'interchange' between
NREN's (National research and education networks), We're inquiring into, not
just the aggregation of information resources, but also into what
combination of 'real time' and 'asynchronous' communications might be
commonly required by global disciplinary groups. I.e. as opposed to (their)
national institutions.

Perhaps the best way I might describe this development is to look at dante
http://www.dante.net/ as a pan European hub. Our community(ies) are
considering what range of facebook type 'services' might be commonly
required by European and Global group who share a common research interests.
When we talk about 'services' we talk about what combination of wikis,
blogs, video - capture, streaming, storage - skype, AV conferencing, etc
(open source, social) services these groups might find useful, and might be
use to attract and include their globally interested parties. 

It's a bit like taking on the next step after this one.
http://commons.internet2.edu/

Or in your curation communities' case, the next step after this one.
http://europeana.eu/portal/communities.html

You'll have to excuse me if I don't tick your boxes. I'm just not sure just
yet who 'our' communities are comprised of. But that's why we are being
sociable:) 
Regards, simon



-Original Message-
From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Alex Ball
Sent: Wednesday, 21 April 2010 12:07 PM
To: research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk; dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: [dcc-associates] Social media for research data management

Apologies for cross-posting

How do social media platforms help you with research data management issues?
At the Digital Curation Centre we are reviewing how we interact with social
media beyond our own site at www.dcc.ac.uk. For any of the categories below
that you have used, please tell us:
* Which platforms do you find valuable for research data issues?
* In a few words, what do you get out of using this platform?

List of categories
* Blogging/microblogging
* Online discussion/networking
* Sharing (links to) interesting Web resources
* Sharing (references to) interesting research papers, etc.

It would also help us if you could tell us your interest in research data. 
Please put an X against any that apply to you.
* Researcher
* Research Administrator
* Research Funder
* Data Manager/Curator
* Data Centre/Archive/Repository
* Library Service

Please send responses to a.b...@ukoln.ac.uk rather than the list. We will
circulate a summary of the responses ASAP.

Cheers,
Alex.
--
Alex Ball
Research Officer
UKOLN, University of Bath, UK. BA2 7AY
T: +44

RE: [dcc-associates] Social media for research data management

2010-04-26 Thread Simon Fenton - Jones
Dear Alex,

We're having the same kind of conversation over at three of terena's
taskforces, although it's couched in slightly different terms. As most of
our community are engineers who are focussed on the 'interchange' between
NREN's (National research and education networks), We're inquiring into, not
just the aggregation of information resources, but also into what
combination of 'real time' and 'asynchronous' communications might be
commonly required by global disciplinary groups. I.e. as opposed to (their)
national institutions.

Perhaps the best way I might describe this development is to look at dante
http://www.dante.net/ as a pan European hub. Our community(ies) are
considering what range of facebook type 'services' might be commonly
required by European and Global group who share a common research interests.
When we talk about 'services' we talk about what combination of wikis,
blogs, video - capture, streaming, storage - skype, AV conferencing, etc
(open source, social) services these groups might find useful, and might be
use to attract and include their globally interested parties. 

It's a bit like taking on the next step after this one.
http://commons.internet2.edu/

Or in your curation communities' case, the next step after this one.
http://europeana.eu/portal/communities.html

You'll have to excuse me if I don't tick your boxes. I'm just not sure just
yet who 'our' communities are comprised of. But that's why we are being
sociable:) 
Regards, simon



-Original Message-
From: owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk
[mailto:owner-dcc-associa...@lists.ed.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Alex Ball
Sent: Wednesday, 21 April 2010 12:07 PM
To: research-data...@jiscmail.ac.uk; dcc-associates@lists.ed.ac.uk
Subject: [dcc-associates] Social media for research data management

Apologies for cross-posting

How do social media platforms help you with research data management issues?
At the Digital Curation Centre we are reviewing how we interact with social
media beyond our own site at www.dcc.ac.uk. For any of the categories below
that you have used, please tell us:
* Which platforms do you find valuable for research data issues?
* In a few words, what do you get out of using this platform?

List of categories
* Blogging/microblogging
* Online discussion/networking
* Sharing (links to) interesting Web resources
* Sharing (references to) interesting research papers, etc.

It would also help us if you could tell us your interest in research data. 
Please put an X against any that apply to you.
* Researcher
* Research Administrator
* Research Funder
* Data Manager/Curator
* Data Centre/Archive/Repository
* Library Service

Please send responses to a.b...@ukoln.ac.uk rather than the list. We will
circulate a summary of the responses ASAP.

Cheers,
Alex.
--
Alex Ball
Research Officer
UKOLN, University of Bath, UK. BA2 7AY
T: +44 1225 383668  F: +44 1225 386256
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/