Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread IceNature via Digitalmars-d-learn
Thank you for your help. But if I change the default console encoding,will it 
affect other programs,making other console program show messy code?

On 2014年5月11日 格林尼治标准时间+0800下午1时18分42秒, FrankLike via Digitalmars-d-learn 
digitalmars-d-learn@puremagic.com wrote:
On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 02:38:44 UTC, IceNature via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
 When there are Chinese characters in the output, the console 
 will   display messy code.I change the encoding of the 
 source file into   UTF-8 or UTF-16,but the messy code is 
 still there...
I use the dmd 2.065,Visual Studio 2013 with VisualD.
How to solve this problem?
Thank you
You can get answer from here:
http://forum.dlang.org/thread/ucfpqgzzxcacqxkdr...@forum.dlang.org

.


Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread IceNature via Digitalmars-d-learn
Thank you for your help. But if I change the default setting,will it affect 
other programs,making other console program show messy code?

On 2014年5月11日 格林尼治标准时间+0800下午12时30分40秒, Ali Çehreli via Digitalmars-d-learn 
digitalmars-d-learn@puremagic.com wrote:
On 05/10/2014 07:19 PM, IceNature via Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
 When there are Chinese characters in the output, the console will
display messy code.I change the encoding of the source file into  
UTF-8 or UTF-16,but the messy code is still there...
 I use the dmd 2.065,Visual Studio 2013 with VisualD.
 How to solve this problem?
 Thank you!


If this is on Windows, you must

1) Set the console code page to 65001 e.g. by the command

   chcp 65001

(It is possible to make it the default through a Windows registry
setting.)

2) Set the font to a unicode one e.g. Lucida

Ali

.


Re: Configuring Phobos from the 1-click installer

2014-05-11 Thread Jack via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 05:34:38 UTC, Moses wrote:



Thanks, I also found that I need to include the flag 
-I/usr/include/dmd/phobos to get it to compile. I tried doing:


export PATH=$PATH:/usr/include/dmd/phobos

but apparently I still need the -I flag. Is there another way 
to get around this?


You can use an IDE, that's what I did anyway


Re: why can't I call const methods on shared objects?

2014-05-11 Thread FreeSlave via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 07:31:10 UTC, FreeSlave wrote:

On Friday, 9 May 2014 at 21:42:14 UTC, Vlad Levenfeld wrote:

Is this still the case if the method is const or pure?


Const methods still require synchronization, because other 
threads may change some data, needed by const method while 
method is executed, and then you may get wrong results.


Consider:

class Point
{
public:
float x;
float y;


}


I send before I end(

class Point
{
public:
float x;
float y;

Tuple!(float, float) getLengthAndAngle() const
{
float l = sqrt(x*x+y*y);
//other thread change x or y
float a = atan2(x, y);
return tuple(l, a);
}
}



Re: why can't I call const methods on shared objects?

2014-05-11 Thread FreeSlave via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 9 May 2014 at 21:42:14 UTC, Vlad Levenfeld wrote:

Is this still the case if the method is const or pure?


Const methods still require synchronization, because other 
threads may change some data, needed by const method while method 
is executed, and then you may get wrong results.


Consider:

class Point
{
public:
float x;
float y;


}


Re: Configuring Phobos from the 1-click installer

2014-05-11 Thread FreeSlave via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 05:34:38 UTC, Moses wrote:

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 04:33:24 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:

On 05/10/2014 07:12 PM, Moses wrote:
After using the 1-click Ubuntu installer, I'm having trouble 
figuring
out how to import standard library functions for Phobos. I 
get the message:


Error: module io is in file 'std/std/io.d' which cannot be 
read


Judging from the repeated stds up there I think you put a dot 
before io:


import std.std.io;  // -- WRONG

The second dot should not be there. Do this instead:

import std.stdio;  // -- correct

Ali



Thanks, I also found that I need to include the flag 
-I/usr/include/dmd/phobos to get it to compile. I tried doing:


export PATH=$PATH:/usr/include/dmd/phobos

but apparently I still need the -I flag. Is there another way 
to get around this?


Does your /etc directory contain dmd.conf file? You can add 
standard flags there


Example of dmd.conf:

[Environment]
DFLAGS=-I/usr/include/dmd/phobos 
-I/usr/include/dmd/druntime/import


Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread Kagamin via Digitalmars-d-learn

Known bug https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2742


Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread FrankLike via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 06:35:26 UTC, IceNature via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
Thank you for your help. But if I change the default console 
encoding,will it affect other programs,making other console 
program show messy code?


Don't  affect,and you must set the font to  a  unicode font ,such 
as Lucida.





Re: Temporary silence output (stdout)

2014-05-11 Thread FreeSlave via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 10 May 2014 at 20:24:50 UTC, MarisaLovesUsAll wrote:

Hi!
I sometimes got a useless messages in stdout from SDL_Image
library, and I want to temporary silence it. How do I do?


You can temporary redirect output to file. Example (on C):

#include stdio.h
#include unistd.h
#include fcntl.h

int main ()
{
int stdout_copy = dup(STDOUT_FILENO);

close (STDOUT_FILENO);

int stdout_file = creat(myfile.txt, O_RDWR); //it obtains 
the lowest free descriptor - 1, i.e. stdout.

printf(Hello file\n);
fflush(stdout); //don't forget to flush
close(stdout_file);

dup2(stdout_copy, STDOUT_FILENO);
printf(Hello console\n);
return 0;
}

But it's not very portable, you probably will need to write 
something other for Windows system. And there are no checks for 
errors in this example.


Also in SDL specific case it seems like it should redirect by 
default - http://sdl.beuc.net/sdl.wiki/FAQ_Console but I don't 
know whether it's true or not for SDL_Image.


Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread IceNature via Digitalmars-d-learn
The problem has been solved with your help. Thank you very much.

On 2014年5月11日 格林尼治标准时间+0800下午3时43分41秒, FrankLike via Digitalmars-d-learn 
digitalmars-d-learn@puremagic.com wrote:
On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 06:35:26 UTC, IceNature via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
 Thank you for your help. But if I change the default console 
 encoding,will it affect other programs,making other console 
 program show messy code?

Don't  affect,and you must set the font to  a  unicode font ,such 
as Lucida.


.


Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread FreeSlave via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 07:43:07 UTC, Kagamin wrote:

Known bug https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2742


It's not bug. Write-functions are designed to output text to 
stdout, and it's issue of programmer to make sure that expected 
acceptor can interpret them properly. Note that stdout may be 
redirected to file or be part of pipe, that does nothing with cmd 
console.


Re: Temporary silence output (stdout)

2014-05-11 Thread via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 10 May 2014 at 20:24:50 UTC, MarisaLovesUsAll wrote:

Hi!
I sometimes got a useless messages in stdout from SDL_Image
library, and I want to temporary silence it. How do I do?


Are you sure it's stdout, not stderr? For the latter, you would 
need to redirect FD 2, not FD 1:


...
auto ex = PushFD!2(/dev/null.ptr);
...


Re: Messy code in console

2014-05-11 Thread Kagamin via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 08:48:43 UTC, FreeSlave wrote:

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 07:43:07 UTC, Kagamin wrote:

Known bug https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2742


It's not bug. Write-functions are designed to output text to 
stdout, and it's issue of programmer to make sure that expected 
acceptor can interpret them properly. Note that stdout may be 
redirected to file or be part of pipe, that does nothing with 
cmd console.


OK, just tested it: after a program calls 
SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8); it's able to print utf-8 text 
correctly, but if it fails to reset the codepage back, the 
console remains in utf-8, so other programs will fail to print 
text in oem encoding in such console. If this program runs other 
programs, they fail to print oem text to this console, because 
the console expects utf-8.


Re: why can't I call const methods on shared objects?

2014-05-11 Thread John Colvin via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 9 May 2014 at 21:37:37 UTC, Vlad Levenfeld wrote:
Error: non-shared const method is not callable using a shared 
mutable object


Why not? If the method is const, it can't modify the object 
anyway.


Because thread-safety isn't only a problem when writing to 
memory, reads must also be carefully dealt with.


Re: why can't I call const methods on shared objects?

2014-05-11 Thread monarch_dodra via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 9 May 2014 at 21:58:41 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer wrote:
On Fri, 09 May 2014 17:45:37 -0400, Vlad Levenfeld 
vlevenf...@gmail.com wrote:


Is there any way to declare a method as safe regardless of 
shared/mutability/etc (or some other way to avoid 
cast(Type)object.property every time I want to check a 
property which won't affect any state)?


Not really for shared. For everything else, there's const for 
value properties, and inout for reference properties.


Shared is quite different, because the method has to be 
cognizant of race conditions. It has to be implemented 
differently.


Casting away shared is somewhat dangerous, but OK if you 
logically know there is no race condition.


-Steve


You could just declare the function as immutable.

But then, it'll only work on immutable types.

But then again, that would be the only way to actually statically 
and safely guarantee there are no race conditions.


question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread rbutler via Digitalmars-d-learn
I have searched and can not understand something about passing 
AAs to a function.

I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program below.
If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
ref int[int] aa
My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs 
anyway, so I do

not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.

Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;

Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
--rbutler

import std.stdio;

void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
aa[x] = x;
aa[8] = 8;
}

void main() {
int[int] d;
writeln(d.length);
// d[9] = 9;
test(d, 0);
writeln(d);
}


Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread John Colvin via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 14:46:35 UTC, rbutler wrote:
I have searched and can not understand something about passing 
AAs to a function.

I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program below.
If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
ref int[int] aa
My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs 
anyway, so I do

not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.

Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;

Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
--rbutler

import std.stdio;

void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
aa[x] = x;
aa[8] = 8;
}

void main() {
int[int] d;
writeln(d.length);
// d[9] = 9;
test(d, 0);
writeln(d);
}


There are problems with the implementation of associative arrays. 
What you are seeing above is a consequence of the associative 
array not being correctly initialised (I think...).


I often create my associative arrays with the following function 
to avoid the problem you're having:


/// Hack to properly initialise an empty AA
auto initAA(T)()
{
T t = [typeof(T.keys[0]).init : typeof(T.values[0]).init];
t.remove(typeof(T.keys[0]).init);
return t;
}

import std.stdio;

void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
aa[x] = x;
aa[8] = 8;
}

void main() {
int[int] d = initAA!(int[int]);
test(d, 0);
writeln(d);
}


Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread rbutler via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 15:22:29 UTC, John Colvin wrote:

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 14:46:35 UTC, rbutler wrote:
I have searched and can not understand something about passing 
AAs to a function.
I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program 
below.

If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
   ref int[int] aa
My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs 
anyway, so I do

not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.

Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;

Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
--rbutler

import std.stdio;

void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
   aa[x] = x;
   aa[8] = 8;
}

void main() {
   int[int] d;
   writeln(d.length);
   // d[9] = 9;
   test(d, 0);
   writeln(d);
}


There are problems with the implementation of associative 
arrays. What you are seeing above is a consequence of the 
associative array not being correctly initialised (I think...).


I often create my associative arrays with the following 
function to avoid the problem you're having:


/// Hack to properly initialise an empty AA
auto initAA(T)()
{
T t = [typeof(T.keys[0]).init : typeof(T.values[0]).init];
t.remove(typeof(T.keys[0]).init);
return t;
}

import std.stdio;

void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
aa[x] = x;
aa[8] = 8;
}

void main() {
int[int] d = initAA!(int[int]);
test(d, 0);
writeln(d);
}


OK. :-)
That makes it difficult to talk about in a classroom, especially 
when trying to stress

adherence to the principle of least surprise.
Thanks very much for the quick reply.


Re: Curl Exception

2014-05-11 Thread Nick Sabalausky via Digitalmars-d-learn

On 5/10/2014 9:02 AM, Jack wrote:

First off a rant:

I use the Code::Blocks IDE and at times it has been proven to a
double-edged source because of various issueslike this one:

http://forum.dlang.org/thread/ndeyzrifseipuebvy...@forum.dlang.org)

and am now itching to search for other IDEs to suit my needs.



I switched from C::B to Programmer's Notepad 2 several years ago, and 
I've been happy with it:


http://www.pnotepad.org/

It's good if you're looking for a light editor rather than a heavy-duty 
IDE. Otherwise, there's VisualD and Mono-D which I hear are good.



Now on to the question:
Anyway, I was using std.net.curl to implement an auto updater for my
program.



Sorry, I haven't really used the curl stuff yet, so I can't be a bigger 
help, but a couple notes below:



Function code is this: http://pastebin.com/i6WnwJF5(links removed due to
it having private content. Original host is https://dropbox.com)

And the overall function was working fine in the IDE except for an
Access Violation that I thought would work itself out when it's (run by
administrator).



Access Violation, despite its wording, isn't usually about user 
permissions. It's the Windows version of a segfault. Usually means a 
null pointer was dereferenced, or a freed pointer was used, or an 
otherwise bad pointer or buffer overflow, etc. If you're really unlucky 
those can be a result of memory corruption, but that's usually not the case.




So I Exported it to a folder with all necessary files, including the
cacert.pem file and run it.

Well this little error popped out : http://pastebin.com/8MmPLg2Q



If you recompile with -g (enable debugging symbols), then those 
annoyingly meaningless addresses will change into a proper stack trace. 
(Or try -gc if -g doesn't work.)


Is that the same error you get if you try to give it a pem file you 
*know* doesn't exist? If so, then maybe it's not looking in the 
directory you expect. Try giving it a full absolute path to the pem 
file. If that works, then it's probably looking in the directory you're 
running from instead of the directory where it actually exists. If so, 
you can use std.file.thisExePath() and build your path relative to that 
(or just stick with an absolute path).


You can also try opening your pem file directly:

auto pemFile = File(cacert.pem);

See what happens if you do that. It won't fix the problem, but seeing 
what it does it should help give you a better idea of what's going on.



Though in the Code:: Blocks IDE there was the object.Error Access
Violation error
And in the actual program(.exe) this : http://pastebin.com/8MmPLg2Q

Though I'm also up for not verifying the link but I still can't figure
out how.

Anyway, can anyone give me an idea what went wrong?




Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread Ali Çehreli via Digitalmars-d-learn

On 05/11/2014 07:46 AM, rbutler wrote:

 I have searched and can not understand something about passing AAs to a
 function.
 I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program below.
 If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
  ref int[int] aa
 My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs anyway, so 
I do

 not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.

 Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;

 Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
 --rbutler

 import std.stdio;

 void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
  aa[x] = x;
  aa[8] = 8;
 }

 void main() {
  int[int] d;
  writeln(d.length);
  // d[9] = 9;
  test(d, 0);
  writeln(d);
 }

The problem is with the initial state of associative arrays, which 
happens to be null. When AAs are copied when null, both copies are null, 
not being associated with anything, not even an initial table to store 
the hash buckets in. As a result, null AAs cannot be references to each 
other's (non existent) data.


When a null AA starts receiving data, it first creates its own data 
memory but the other one cannot know about that data.


ref parameter works because then there is only one AA to speak of.

d[9] entry works as well because then the first AA is not null.

Ali



Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread John Colvin via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 16:54:18 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:

On 05/11/2014 07:46 AM, rbutler wrote:

 I have searched and can not understand something about
passing AAs to a
 function.
 I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program
below.
 If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
  ref int[int] aa
 My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs
anyway, so I do
 not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.

 Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;

 Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
 --rbutler

 import std.stdio;

 void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
  aa[x] = x;
  aa[8] = 8;
 }

 void main() {
  int[int] d;
  writeln(d.length);
  // d[9] = 9;
  test(d, 0);
  writeln(d);
 }

The problem is with the initial state of associative arrays, 
which happens to be null. When AAs are copied when null, both 
copies are null, not being associated with anything, not even 
an initial table to store the hash buckets in. As a result, 
null AAs cannot be references to each other's (non existent) 
data.


When a null AA starts receiving data, it first creates its own 
data memory but the other one cannot know about that data.


ref parameter works because then there is only one AA to speak 
of.


d[9] entry works as well because then the first AA is not null.

Ali


Remind me again why we can't just change this to a sensible 
initial state? Or at least add a .initialize()?


Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread Ali Çehreli via Digitalmars-d-learn

On 05/11/2014 10:00 AM, John Colvin wrote:
 On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 16:54:18 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:
 On 05/11/2014 07:46 AM, rbutler wrote:

  I have searched and can not understand something about
 passing AAs to a
  function.
  I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program
 below.
  If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
   ref int[int] aa
  My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs
 anyway, so I do
  not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.
 
  Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;
 
  Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
  --rbutler
 
  import std.stdio;
 
  void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
   aa[x] = x;
   aa[8] = 8;
  }
 
  void main() {
   int[int] d;
   writeln(d.length);
   // d[9] = 9;
   test(d, 0);
   writeln(d);
  }

 The problem is with the initial state of associative arrays, which
 happens to be null. When AAs are copied when null, both copies are
 null, not being associated with anything, not even an initial table to
 store the hash buckets in. As a result, null AAs cannot be references
 to each other's (non existent) data.

 When a null AA starts receiving data, it first creates its own data
 memory but the other one cannot know about that data.

 ref parameter works because then there is only one AA to speak of.

 d[9] entry works as well because then the first AA is not null.

 Ali

 Remind me again why we can't just change this to a sensible initial
 state?

First, I am not familiar with the current implementation of AAs and I 
deduced what I've written just from the behavior.


I think it is this way primarily for lazy initialization so that nothing 
is done until there is at least one element. It could still work as 
expected though if there were another level of indirection, which would 
naturally add some cost. (Although, lazy initialization brings a 
constant cost as well, right? In the form of has this been initialized 
yet; but that cost is as cheap as checking the value of a local 
variable. On the other hand, an indirection would be cache-unfriendly. 
And this is pure speculation... :p)


 Or at least add a .initialize()?

Your initAA() function seems to be the only way that a user can manage 
to do that. Although, it would help if we renamed it as initialize() and 
added a template constraint so that it is called only for AAs.


Ali



Re: Configuring Phobos from the 1-click installer

2014-05-11 Thread Moses via Digitalmars-d-learn


Thanks, I also found that I need to include the flag 
-I/usr/include/dmd/phobos to get it to compile. I tried doing:


export PATH=$PATH:/usr/include/dmd/phobos

but apparently I still need the -I flag. Is there another way 
to get around this?


Does your /etc directory contain dmd.conf file? You can add 
standard flags there


Example of dmd.conf:

[Environment]
DFLAGS=-I/usr/include/dmd/phobos 
-I/usr/include/dmd/druntime/import


Yes, my dmd.conf file already has those paths.


Re: Down the VisualD0.3.38-1.exe ,found virus!

2014-05-11 Thread Rainer Schuetze via Digitalmars-d-learn



On 10.05.2014 10:42, FrankLike wrote:



I've been using VisualD for a long time without problems. If it makes
you nervous, you can get the source from Github and compile it yourself.


Hello,Meta

When I compile the Visual D projects:

at first,I compile the 'build' project,then get some error:


--START ALL BUILD: PROJECT: c2d,  Debug Win32 --
Building ..\bin\Debug\c2d.lib...
Build time: 1 s
-- START ALL BUILD: PROJECT: vsi2d,  Debug Win32 --
Building ..\bin\Debug\vsi2d.exe...
Converting debug information...
Build time: 1 s
-- START ALL BUILD: PROJECT: build, Debug Win32 --
Building ..\bin\Debug\build.sdk...
'C:\Program' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
Building ..\bin\Debug\dte_idl.success failed!


Here is my VSSDK AND WINSDK:
VSSDK100Install = C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 2010
SDK SP1
WindowsSdkDir = C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A

How can I do?

Thank you.


There are some quotes missing when building the Debug configuration. I 
have committed a fix and also added the missing file reported in your 
other message (IIRC it is not needed by every VS SDK).


Re: Configuring Phobos from the 1-click installer

2014-05-11 Thread Jordi Sayol via Digitalmars-d-learn
El 11/05/14 07:34, Moses via Digitalmars-d-learn ha escrit:
 On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 04:33:24 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:
 On 05/10/2014 07:12 PM, Moses wrote:
 After using the 1-click Ubuntu installer, I'm having trouble figuring
 out how to import standard library functions for Phobos. I get the message:

 Error: module io is in file 'std/std/io.d' which cannot be read

 Judging from the repeated stds up there I think you put a dot before io:

 import std.std.io;  // -- WRONG

 The second dot should not be there. Do this instead:

 import std.stdio;  // -- correct

 Ali
 
 
 Thanks, I also found that I need to include the flag 
 -I/usr/include/dmd/phobos to get it to compile. I tried doing:
 
 export PATH=$PATH:/usr/include/dmd/phobos
 
 but apparently I still need the -I flag. Is there another way to get around 
 this?
 

PATH environment variable is not related at all with phobos2 sources paths.

All Linux packages (Ubuntu too) includes -I/usr/include/dmd/phobos on 
/etc/dmd.conf configuration file.
If you need to explicit pass this argument to dmd compiler, may be due to 
several reasons.

- You've edited your /etc/dmd.conf file.

- You've created a new dmd.conf on your current directory, on you home 
directory or on dmd command directory (/usr/bin/).

Any dmd.conf file on these places, overrides /etc/dmd.conf

Take a look at:
$ cat /etc/dmd.conf

Regard,
-- 
Jordi Sayol




Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread Jonathan M Davis via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Sun, 11 May 2014 17:00:13 +
 Remind me again why we can't just change this to a sensible
 initial state? Or at least add a .initialize()?

All reference types have a null init value. Arrays and classes have the exact
same issue as AAs. Anything else would require not only allocating memory but
would require that that state persist from compile time to runtime, because
the init value must be known at compile time, and there are many cases, where
a variable exists at compile time (e.g. a module-level or static variable),
making delayed initialization problematic. Previously, it was impossible to
allocate anything other than arrays at compile time and have it's state
persist through to runtime, though it's not possible to do that with classes
(I don't know about AAs).

So, it _might_ now be possible to make it so that AAs had an init value other
than null, but because there's only one init value per type, even if the init
value for AAs wasn't null, it wouldn't solve the problem. It would just result
in all AAs of the same type sharing the same value unless they were directly
initialized rather than having their init value used.

Essentially, the way that default-initialization works in D makes it so that a
default-initialized AA can't be its own value like you're looking for. For
that, we'd need default construction (like C++ has), but then we'd lose out on
the benefits of having a known init value for all types and would have the
problems that that was meant to solve. It causes us problems with structs too
for similar reasons (the lack of default construction there also gets
complained about fairly frequently).

Ultimately, it's a set of tradeoffs, and you're running into the negative
side of this particular one.

- Jonathan M Davis


Re: question about passing associative array to a function

2014-05-11 Thread ed via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 14:46:35 UTC, rbutler wrote:
I have searched and can not understand something about passing 
AAs to a function.

I have reduced the gist of the question to a tiny program below.
If I put ref  in the function stmt it works, i.e.:
ref int[int] aa
My confusion is that AAs are supposed to be passed as refs 
anyway, so I do

not understand why I should have to use ref to make it work.

Related, it also works if I UN-comment the lined[9] = 9;

Thanks for any helpful comments you can make.
--rbutler

import std.stdio;

void test(int[int] aa, int x) {
aa[x] = x;
aa[8] = 8;
}

void main() {
int[int] d;
writeln(d.length);
// d[9] = 9;
test(d, 0);
writeln(d);
}


The AA is passed by value but its underlying data is referenced, 
making the copy cheap. The snippet below also shows the same 
behaviour even when the AA has data in it before calling the 
function.

---
void func(string[int] aa)
{
writefln([FUNC1]aa:%s=%s, aa, aa);

// Reassign the data here in func()'s copy and
// main never sees it
aa = [2:two];
writefln([FUNC2]aa:%s=%s, aa, aa);

}

void main()
{
string[int] aa;
aa[1] = one;
writefln([MAIN1]aa:%s=%s, aa, aa);
func(aa);
writefln([MAIN2]aa:%s=%s, aa, aa);

}
---

It is the same as passing a C++ shared_ptr by value.

Cheers,
ed


Re: Curl Exception

2014-05-11 Thread Jack via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 11 May 2014 at 16:17:20 UTC, Nick Sabalausky wrote:


Sorry, I haven't really used the curl stuff yet, so I can't be 
a bigger help, but a couple notes below:




It's alright. I'm actually up for any information right now.


Access Violation, despite its wording, isn't usually about user 
permissions. It's the Windows version of a segfault. Usually 
means a null pointer was dereferenced, or a freed pointer was 
used, or an otherwise bad pointer or buffer overflow, etc. If 
you're really unlucky those can be a result of memory 
corruption, but that's usually not the case.


If you recompile with -g (enable debugging symbols), then 
those annoyingly meaningless addresses will change into a 
proper stack trace. (Or try -gc if -g doesn't work.)



Weird. I am sure I wasn't dealing with any pointers, and the Curl 
Documentation did say that it was safe.


Though I also tried Updating my compiler and libraries and 
compiling with the -g flag lead me to a errno(STD Exception) 
giving me with the phrase (no error). This only happened in 
C::B(I'm gonna try Programmer's Notebook if this is actually the 
fault of C::B)


Though outside the IDE it's just spewing out the same error over 
and over again. The error in the actual program outside the IDE 
was *bypassed* when inside the IDE, only giving an Access 
Violation error(pre-update) or STD Exception(post-update)


Is that the same error you get if you try to give it a pem file 
you *know* doesn't exist? If so, then maybe it's not looking in 
the directory you expect. Try giving it a full absolute path to 
the pem file. If that works, then it's probably looking in the 
directory you're running from instead of the directory where it 
actually exists. If so, you can use std.file.thisExePath() and 
build your path relative to that (or just stick with an 
absolute path).


The program is pretty much finding the certificate as it's not 
the same error as not finding the file. It's just nagging at the 
fact that there maybe a path mistake(which can't be true since 
it's detecting it) and access rights(now how do I configure them 
access rights?)



You can also try opening your pem file directly:

auto pemFile = File(cacert.pem);


Unfortunately, HTTP.caInfo(); takes in a const char[] so I 
can't try that option.


See what happens if you do that. It won't fix the problem, but 
seeing what it does it should help give you a better idea of 
what's going on.


Though in the Code:: Blocks IDE there was the object.Error 
Access

Violation error
And in the actual program(.exe) this : 
http://pastebin.com/8MmPLg2Q


Though I'm also up for not verifying the link but I still 
can't figure

out how.

Anyway, can anyone give me an idea what went wrong?


Thanks for the information however. :)


Re: Down the VisualD0.3.38-1.exe ,found virus!

2014-05-11 Thread FrankLike via Digitalmars-d-learn
There are some quotes missing when building the Debug 
configuration. I have committed a fix and also added the 
missing file reported in your other message (IIRC it is not 
needed by every VS SDK).


Thank you,I'll try it.

Frank