Re: Best practices of using const

2019-02-19 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 13 February 2019 at 16:40:18 UTC, H. S. Teoh wrote:
On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 11:32:46AM +, envoid via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:

[...]


Const in D is very restrictive because it's supposed to provide 
real compiler guarantees, i.e., it's statically verifiable that 
the data cannot be changed.


[...]


I keep hearing how const is nigh unusable in D, and except for 
ranges I litter my code with const everywhere, pretty much just 
as often as I used in C++. I normally only use `auto` for return 
types and input ranges, and nearly all of my function parameters 
are `in`.


It's true that a lot of people don't use `const` because I keep 
finding and filing bugs in dub libraries as soon as I try using 
them, but other than that: const is fine.


Re: How do I use libraries manually?

2019-02-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 5 February 2019 at 20:39:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:

On Tuesday, 5 February 2019 at 19:46:32 UTC, H. S. Teoh wrote:


Thank you very much, I will try what you just explained. And 
yes I would really appreciate it if people would make single 
file libraries that I can just import as if it were any other 
.d file.


That doesn't work in the aggregate.

Any non-trivial library will need to be split up into packages 
and modules. There might be tasks to be performed before or after 
the build. There might be different build configurations. There 
might be external C library dependencies. The library might have 
dependencies of its own, so the possible complications are 
recursive.


Just use dub, it's easier. I don't think there's any good reason 
to not use it.


Re: How can I express the type of a function in D?

2019-02-01 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 30 January 2019 at 05:14:20 UTC, Sobaya wrote:
I want to get a mangled name of a D function by 
`core.demangle.mangle`, but I'm in trouble because there are no 
ways to express a type of a function, which is used for a 
template argument of `mangle`.


There's a way:

int add(int i, int j);
static assert(is(typeof(add) == typeof(*(int function(int, 
int)).init)));


Unfortunately there's no dedicated syntax for it, unlike C++. 
Weirdly enough, if you pragma(msg) a function type it prints it 
out in C++ syntax (e.g. `int(int, int)`), but if you type it 
yourself it won't compile.


Then there's this oddity:

https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=19270



Re: using dub to compile plugins

2018-12-21 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 19 December 2018 at 12:57:14 UTC, Codifies wrote:

I am currently using this dub.sdl

name"runz80"
targetType  "executable"
lflags  "libz80/libz80.a"

however I will be creating a number of plugins, each plugin 
will consist of a single source file, I'd like the plugin 
source directory to be separate from main source directory and 
compile the plugins (.so) to a (binary) plugins directory


(the plugins will be dynamically loaded at runtime - I've 
previously done this in C so I don't anticipate any particular 
issues - famous last words!)


I could do this with a few simple rules in a Makefile, but I 
have no clue how to achieve this using dub.


can someone show me a concrete example of doing this ? Ideally 
just dropping a new source file into the plugins source folder 
should produce a new .so the next time dub is run, without 
having to explicitly add each plugin to the dub file...


Unless the plugins have dub dependencies, don't use dub for it. 
Plugins that do can have their own dub.sdl/json with targetType 
"dynamicLibrary".


Ideally just dropping a new source file into the plugins source 
folder should produce a new .so the next time dub is run, 
without having to explicitly add each plugin to the dub file...


I don't see how you can do this with dub, and I wouldn't attempt 
it either. Just use make, and have make call dub for the main 
project (and potentially any plugins that need it). Remember to 
make the dub targets `.PHONY` since you don't want to be managing 
the D dependencies by hand.


Re: Why does nobody seem to think that `null` is a serious problem in D?

2018-11-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Thursday, 29 November 2018 at 18:31:41 UTC, SimonN wrote:
On Monday, 19 November 2018 at 21:23:31 UTC, Jordi Gutiérrez 
Hermoso wrote:

When I was first playing with D, I managed to create a segfault



What's the reasoning for allowing this?


100 % agree that there should be non-nullable class references, 
they're my main missing feature in D. Likewise, I'm astonished 
that only few D users wish for them.


https://github.com/aliak00/optional/blob/master/source/optional/notnull.d

"But I don't like the verbosity!"

alias MyClass = NotNullable!MyClassImpl;



Re: Why does nobody seem to think that `null` is a serious problem in D?

2018-11-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 30 November 2018 at 06:15:29 UTC, O-N-S (ozan) wrote:

On Monday, 19 November 2018 at 21:23:31
On Monday, 19 November 2018 at 21:23:31 UTC, Jordi Gutiérrez 
Hermoso wrote:


I'm not the only one who has done this. I can't find it right 
now, but I've seen at least one person open a bug report 
because they misunderstood this as a bug in dmd.


I have been told a couple of times that this isn't something 
that needs to be patched in the language, but I don't 
understand. It seems like a very easy way to generate a 
segfault (and not a NullPointerException or whatever).




I love Null in an empty class variable and I use it very often 
in my code. It simplifies a lot.


What would be a better way? (practical not theoretical)

Regards Ozan


A better way is to always initialise.

Invalid states should be unrepresentable.


Re: Can I create static c callable library?

2018-09-28 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Thursday, 27 September 2018 at 23:53:50 UTC, Steven 
Schveighoffer wrote:

On 9/27/18 8:16 AM, Atila Neves wrote:
On Tuesday, 25 September 2018 at 14:13:50 UTC, Jacob Carlborg 
wrote:
On Tuesday, 25 September 2018 at 12:05:21 UTC, Jonathan M 
Davis wrote:


If you use -betterC, then it's trivial, because your D 
program is restricted to extern(C) functions and features 
which don't require druntime. It can also be done without 
-betterC (and thus with druntime), but it gets to be _way_ 
more of a pain, because it requires that you manually 
initialize druntime - either by forcing whatever is using 
your "C" library to call a specific function to initialize 
druntime before using any of its normal functions or by 
having every function in the library check whether druntime 
has been initialized yet and initialize it if it hasn't been 
before it does whatever it's supposed to do.


Shouldn't it be possible to use a C initialization function, 
i.e. pragma(crt_constructor) to initialize druntime? Then it 
only needs to be initialized once and it's not required to 
check if it's initialized all the time.


--
/Jacob Carlborg


Even easier, compile this C file and add the resulting object 
file to your (now mostly) D static library:


---
extern int rt_init(void);
extern int rt_term(void);

__attribute__((__constructor__)) void dinit(void) {
     rt_init();
}
__attribute__((__destructor__)) void dterm(void) {
     rt_term();
}
---

The C runtime will initialise the D runtime for you.



I will point out that this is EXACTLY what 
pragma(crt_constructor) does.


Really? Huh. You live, you learn. I didn't even know that pragma 
existed - it's not listed here at all:


https://dlang.org/spec/pragma.html



And my comments still aren't answered -- I'm not sure whether 
this works correctly or not, as we don't test initializing 
druntime before C main runs.


It's worked for me in practice.

Since C initialization functions have no order to them, it's 
possible that some  initialization functions in the D runtime 
are using uninitialized pieces of the C runtime


No, that can't happen. The C runtime is initialised no matter 
what you do (unless you write `_start` yourself), _then_ the 
global constructors are run. The code I wrote isn't standard C - 
it's just that gcc/clang/cl are all also C++ compilers so they 
chose to extend the already existing functionality to C.






Re: Can I create static c callable library?

2018-09-27 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Tuesday, 25 September 2018 at 14:13:50 UTC, Jacob Carlborg 
wrote:
On Tuesday, 25 September 2018 at 12:05:21 UTC, Jonathan M Davis 
wrote:


If you use -betterC, then it's trivial, because your D program 
is restricted to extern(C) functions and features which don't 
require druntime. It can also be done without -betterC (and 
thus with druntime), but it gets to be _way_ more of a pain, 
because it requires that you manually initialize druntime - 
either by forcing whatever is using your "C" library to call a 
specific function to initialize druntime before using any of 
its normal functions or by having every function in the 
library check whether druntime has been initialized yet and 
initialize it if it hasn't been before it does whatever it's 
supposed to do.


Shouldn't it be possible to use a C initialization function, 
i.e. pragma(crt_constructor) to initialize druntime? Then it 
only needs to be initialized once and it's not required to 
check if it's initialized all the time.


--
/Jacob Carlborg


Even easier, compile this C file and add the resulting object 
file to your (now mostly) D static library:


---
extern int rt_init(void);
extern int rt_term(void);

__attribute__((__constructor__)) void dinit(void) {
rt_init();
}
__attribute__((__destructor__)) void dterm(void) {
rt_term();
}
---

The C runtime will initialise the D runtime for you.



Re: Access to structures defined in C

2018-09-19 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 19 September 2018 at 00:46:54 UTC, Joe wrote:
On Tuesday, 18 September 2018 at 13:47:50 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:
Sorry, Atila, I got confused looking at my two cases. I should 
have said "an array of ints", e.g.,


int yp[] = {2, 4, 0};
int yq[] = {10, 12, 0};


That makes more sense.


int *ys[] = {yp, yq, 0};


This isn't even valid C code.


It is, because C treats 'yp' as a pointer.


It wasn't with the definition of `yp` and `yq` you posted.




In D, I first declared these as

int[] yp = [2, 4];
int[] yq = [10, 12];
__gshared int*[] ys = [ ,  ];


D dynamic arrays are not equivalent to C arrays.

It's hard to see what you're trying to do with the code you 
posted. Have you tried instead to use a tool to translate the 
C headers?


At this point, I've translated everything, even the code above. 
I had to use 'immutable(int [])' in the second and higher level 
arrays like 'ys' so that they could refer to 'yp' and 'yq' 
(without the address operators).


This would be the literal translation:

int[3] yp = [2, 4, 0];
int[3] yq = [10, 12, 0];
int*[3] ys;

shared static this() {
ys = [yp.ptr, yq.ptr, null];
}


However, I still would like to have a deeper understanding of 
the "static variable yp cannot be read at compile time" error 
messages which went away when I declared yp immutable.


I guess immutable makes everything known at compile-time? I 
didn't even know that was a thing. In any case, the reason why 
you got those error messages is because initialisation of global 
variables in D happens at compile-time. If you want runtime 
initialisation like in C++, you have to use static constructors 
like in my code above.





Re: Access to structures defined in C

2018-09-18 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 18 September 2018 at 02:39:39 UTC, Joe wrote:

On Sunday, 10 June 2018 at 17:59:12 UTC, Joe wrote:
That worked but now I have a more convoluted case: a C array 
of pointers to int pointers, e.g.,


int **xs[] = {x1, x2, 0};
int *x1[] = {x1a, 0};
int *x2[] = {x2a, x2b, 0};
...
int x2a[] = { 1, 3, 5, 0};

Only the first line is exposed (and without the 
initialization). So I tried:


extern(C) __gshared extern int**[1] xs;


After a long hiatus, I'm back to working on something related 
to the above, but now that various other C pieces have been 
converted to D I'm down to converting these static arrays to D. 
There are two arrays that are giving me trouble. The second 
type is like that shown above. The first is a simpler array of 
pointers to int, e.g.,


int *yp = {2, 4, 0};
int *yq = {10, 12, 0};


This is valid C in the sense that it compiles, but I doubt it 
does what you think it does. This is equivalent code:


int *yp = 2;
int *yq = 10;


int *ys[] = {yp, yq, 0};


This isn't even valid C code.


In D, I first declared these as

int[] yp = [2, 4];
int[] yq = [10, 12];
__gshared int*[] ys = [ ,  ];


D dynamic arrays are not equivalent to C arrays.


It's hard to see what you're trying to do with the code you 
posted. Have you tried instead to use a tool to translate the C 
headers?


Re: Is it possible to translate this API's C headers?

2018-09-18 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Monday, 17 September 2018 at 19:13:06 UTC, Jonathan M Davis 
wrote:
On Monday, September 17, 2018 7:43:21 AM MDT Kagamin via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:

try dpp https://github.com/atilaneves/dpp


Since according to Mike's post, it's C++ code, dpp wouldn't 
help, because it currently only supports C and not C++.


- Jonathan M Davis


It does C++ as well, just not all (or even close at this point) 
of it. I doubt it'd work on any real C++ codebase right now, but 
who knows. It definitely won't if any of the headers use the 
standard library, which is likely to happen.


It turns out that parsing C++ is a lot of work. Who knew? :P


Re: Temporary file creation for unittests

2018-05-21 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 21 May 2018 at 15:20:14 UTC, Dr.No wrote:

On Monday, 21 May 2018 at 15:16:11 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

On Friday, 18 May 2018 at 15:16:52 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:

Hi,

What's the current official position on how to create 
temporary files for use during a unittest. I found


Not official, but...

import unit_threaded;

with(const Sandbox()) {
writeFile("myfile.txt", "contents");
shouldExist("myfile.txt");
shouldEqualContent("myfile.txt", "contents");
fileShouldContain("myfile.txt", "cont");
}

Atila


I've never seen "should" being in used in function names 
before...


There's a whole lot of them here:

https://github.com/atilaneves/unit-threaded/blob/master/source/unit_threaded/should.d


Re: Temporary file creation for unittests

2018-05-21 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 21 May 2018 at 17:03:40 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
On Mon, 2018-05-21 at 15:16 +, Atila Neves via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:

On Friday, 18 May 2018 at 15:16:52 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
> Hi,
> 
> What's the current official position on how to create 
> temporary files for use during a unittest. I found


Not official, but...

 import unit_threaded;

 with(const Sandbox()) {
 writeFile("myfile.txt", "contents");
 shouldExist("myfile.txt");
 shouldEqualContent("myfile.txt", "contents");
 fileShouldContain("myfile.txt", "cont");
 }

Atila


OK, we like this. A lot.


:)

Given I use Unit-Threaded, why did I not know this. Ah, OK, 
RTFM. :-)


It's got so many features that I don't know how to document 
everything and make it accessible at the same time.



Did I mention how much I like this RAII approach?


Me too - RAII is definitely C++'s gift to the world. I've been 
abusing `with` lately quite a bit. I think it's underused.





Re: Temporary file creation for unittests

2018-05-21 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 18 May 2018 at 15:16:52 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:

Hi,

What's the current official position on how to create temporary 
files for use during a unittest. I found


Not official, but...

import unit_threaded;

with(const Sandbox()) {
writeFile("myfile.txt", "contents");
shouldExist("myfile.txt");
shouldEqualContent("myfile.txt", "contents");
fileShouldContain("myfile.txt", "cont");
}

Atila


Re: howto run unittest of a single module in dub driven project?

2018-03-05 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 4 March 2018 at 10:43:06 UTC, Arjan wrote:
Is it somehow possible to only run the unittests of a single d 
file within a dub project? Of course without resorting to 
typing the complete commandline with all versions includes 
switches etc.


You could use unit-threaded:

http://code.dlang.org/packages/unit-threaded

You'd still need to build everything, but `dub test` would take 
care of that. I started working on, and need to get back to, a 
way of only building one module and needed dependencies.


Atila


Re: What is "stringImportPaths"

2017-12-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 20:17:55 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:

On 12/06/2017 11:05 AM, mrphobby wrote:

> importing is a construct used for importing symbols, right?

That's the import statement. -J compiler switch is about the 
import expression:


  https://dlang.org/spec/expression.html#import_expressions

Ali


I went looking for that and didn't find it! I searched for 
"string imports" but apparently that doesn't quite work.


Re: What is "stringImportPaths"

2017-12-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 19:05:24 UTC, mrphobby wrote:
Can anyone explain what "stringImportPaths" is? I have seen 
this being used in dub.json files and I think I kind of know 
what it does, but I haven't been able to find a clear 
explanation in any documentation of what it does. It does not 
look like anything I'm familiar with from other languages.


I understand it can be used for resources but I have seen it 
being used with both text files and binary files so I'm a bit 
confused. The documentation says I can import "whatever", but 
that feels a bit weird since importing is a construct used for 
importing symbols, right?


stringImportPaths are to -J what importPaths are to -I. In D you 
can import a string directly into your program, similarly to 
#include in C and C++. Imagine it as kind of a 
mixin(read("filename")) (which you can't do). For security 
concerns, dmd only looks for "filename" in directories passed in 
with -J.



A silly example:

foo.d:
import std.stdio;
void main() {
mixin(`auto values = [` ~ import("foo.txt") ~ `];`);
writeln(values);
}


foo.txt:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5

$ dmd -J. foo.d
$ ./foo
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]


Atila


Re: Does dmd not always compile all of the source code?

2017-12-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 19:40:49 UTC, A Guy With a 
Question wrote:
On Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 19:19:09 UTC, A Guy With a 
Question wrote:
It seems D's fast compile times are achieved by skipping 
semantic checking and even parsing when it doesn't feel it's 
needed. I strongly disagree with this decision. This could 
leave complex dormant time bombs that break builds 
unexpectedly and even accidentally. It's understandable in 
certain situations where there is enough information, but the 
first step to testing code, is first making sure it 
compiles...I don't want the compiler making decisions on what 
is worthy to compile. If I pass a d source file into it, I 
want to know if it's valid. This is unfortunate. This might be 
a deal breaker for me.


I'm very concerned of working with a language that, at minimum, 
doesn't let me know if a file I passed in even contains valid 
code.


It does let you know if it contains valid code - if you're 
actually building it.


If you write unit tests but never compile them in, whether or not 
they make any sense is IMHO irrelevant. If you write a template 
and never instantiate it, does it make a sound?*


Imagine this:

version(Windows) int i = 0;
else foobarbaz;

Should it fail to compile on Linux? How is this any different 
from:


#ifdef _WIN32
int i = 0;
#else
ohnoes
#endif

As noted by others, C++ templates work similarly. And for good 
reason!


Atila

* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/If_a_tree_falls_in_a_forest


Re: Does dmd not always compile all of the source code?

2017-12-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 16:07:41 UTC, A Guy With a 
Question wrote:
Noticed several typos that dmd seems to have not picked up 
initially. Does dmd not compile all source code? I obviously 
wouldn't expect it to recompile something unnecessarily, but in 
a few cases I've just seen it not throw errors where it should 
have.


It depends on how you're invoking it.

In all likelihood, you had typos in uninstantiated templates.

Atila


Re: How to specify 64 bit architecture in dub configuration file?

2017-11-10 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Friday, 10 November 2017 at 09:18:34 UTC, Nicholas Wilson 
wrote:

On Friday, 10 November 2017 at 08:30:39 UTC, OlaOst wrote:
Using 'dub --arch=x86_64' will get you a 64 bit build, but is 
it possible to specify 64 bit architecture in the 
configuration file, so one can just type 'dub' and get a 64 
bit build?


"dflags" : "-m64"

will work. You can probably use a less quick and dirty solution 
with a proper configuration.


Or edit your dmd.conf to include -m64 as a default.


It'll work but dub will complain. I really wish it didn't.

Atila


Re: For fun: Expressive C++ 17 Coding Challenge in D

2017-10-04 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 3 October 2017 at 19:25:56 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:

Found on Reddit:


https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/740617/the_expressive_c17_coding_challenge/

How would you do it in D?

Ali

P.S. You can ignore the following note from the challenge text; 
I don't think it applies to D. Honestly, I don't think it 
matters for C++17 either. :)


  "You can assume input files won't be super large and can fit 
fully into memory."


I can't bring myself to code a solution in C++17 or D. In C++17 
it'd be too painful, and in D so trivial it'd probably make me 
sleep out of boredom.


Maybe that should be our new catchphrase:

"D: Making programming boring"

:P

Atila


Re: C++ Interfacing:'static' array function parameter contradiction

2017-04-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 29 April 2017 at 06:22:03 UTC, ParticlePeter wrote:

On Saturday, 29 April 2017 at 01:49:56 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

On Friday, 28 April 2017 at 18:41:22 UTC, kinke wrote:

[...]


The worst part about that is mangling aside, the two 
declarations are identical to the compiler.


Atila


In this context, can anybody explain [1], in particular, in 
this case, one should extern( C++ ) void cppSArray( ref 
float[3] color );


instead of:
extern( C++ ) void cppSArray( float* color );

Others and me in this discussion seem to agree that parameter 
(float color[3]) is equivalent to (float* color) in C++ world.


[1] http://dlang.org/spec/interfaceToC.html#passing_d_array


It's "just" the mangling. If it were `extern(C)` there'd be 
nothing to talk about.


Atila


Re: C++ Interfacing:'static' array function parameter contradiction

2017-04-28 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 28 April 2017 at 18:41:22 UTC, kinke wrote:

On Friday, 28 April 2017 at 18:07:49 UTC, ParticlePeter wrote:
Interesting, your example corresponds to my third case, the 
linker error. I am on Window, building an x64 App, afaik in 
that case the MS Visual Studio linker is used instead of 
optilink. Will add your findings to the bug report.


Apparently Microsoft's C++ compiler doesn't mangle `float 
arg[3]` parameters identically to `float* arg`:


void cppSArray(float color[3]) => ?cppSArray@@YAXQEAM@Z
void cppPtr(float* color) => ?cppPtr@@YAXPEAM@Z


The worst part about that is mangling aside, the two declarations 
are identical to the compiler.


Atila


Re: COM Expertise needed: COM Callbacks

2017-04-25 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 24 April 2017 at 00:55:45 UTC, Nierjerson wrote:
Still trying to get the com automation code working. This is a 
general issue with COM programming as I do not have the 
experience to solve the problem.


[...]


I tried looking at this because I just did some COM work even if 
most of it in C++. There's a _lot_ of code and I was instantly 
lost, even with your explanations.


I'd forget about Photoshop for now, just write a simple COM 
client. That'd also ease in getting other people to help because 
having Photoshop is a high barrier for entry.


Can you get this to work in C++?


Re: Stuck with DMD, and Unit-Threaded

2017-04-19 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 18 April 2017 at 07:07:16 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
On Mon, 2017-04-17 at 22:56 +, Atila Neves via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:



[…]

https://github.com/russel/ApproxGC/pull/2

Unfortunately the auto generated integration test main file 
doesn't quite work (feel free to file a bug on unit-threaded) 
so in that PR I disabled auto-generating it and force added my 
edited version.


What I did there in dub.sdl is my current go-to solution for 
also running integration tests with unit-threaded.




Thanks for that, much appreciated. I am hesitant to commit the 
pull request for now in case get_ut_main gets fixed fairly 
quickly. For the moment I am progressing with the SCons build 
since I got it working.


I wouldn't hold my breath - the fix is annoying and non-trivial. 
Basically I special cased "source" since it's the default for dub 
packages but "test-source" gums up the works and I'd have to look 
at it properly.


The real joy is that I have Unit-Threaded working. It's 
extensions of the unittest D language feature make testing D 
codes far more fun than the basic feature. Thanks for putting 
in the effort.


I'm happy the work is appreciated :)

Atila




Re: Stuck with DMD, and Unit-Threaded

2017-04-17 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 16 April 2017 at 08:20:21 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:

There are points when you need to ask someone for help…

I am trying to get Dub to build integration tests from 
test-source as a separate thing from building unit tests from 
source. The latter is easy and works, as does building the 
application. I cannot however get the integration tests to 
build, I always get something along the lines of:


../../../../../../../tmp/dub_test_root-677ee80a-1e29-44c8-b08c-2fe37eb83633.d(10,12):
 Error: function D main conflicts with static import dub_test_root.main at 
../../../../../../../tmp/dub_test_root-677ee80a-1e29-44c8-b08c-2fe37eb83633.d(3,15)

and I haven't a clue. This is almost certainly just a bad 
dub.sdl file, but, if anyone can take a look at tell me what I 
am failing to get right, I'd appreciate it.


https://github.com/russel/ApproxGC


https://github.com/russel/ApproxGC/pull/2

Unfortunately the auto generated integration test main file 
doesn't quite work (feel free to file a bug on unit-threaded) so 
in that PR I disabled auto-generating it and force added my 
edited version.


What I did there in dub.sdl is my current go-to solution for also 
running integration tests with unit-threaded.


Atila


Re: C++ namespace mangling: bug or me being stupid?

2017-03-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 28 March 2017 at 16:30:19 UTC, kinke wrote:
That's a mangling compression scheme (possibly tunable via gcc 
options), from 
https://github.com/gchatelet/gcc_cpp_mangling_documentation:
To save space a compression scheme is used where symbols that 
appears multiple times are then substituted by an item from 
the sequence : S_, S0_, S1_, S2_, etc ...


As to nested C++ namespaces - `extern(C++, ns1) { ... 
extern(C++, ns2) { ... } }` should work in a single D file.


Not only good to know, this... fixed it. So I was being stupid. 
Thanks!


Atila


Re: C++ namespace mangling: bug or me being stupid?

2017-03-28 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 28 March 2017 at 16:30:19 UTC, kinke wrote:
That's a mangling compression scheme (possibly tunable via gcc 
options), from 
https://github.com/gchatelet/gcc_cpp_mangling_documentation:
To save space a compression scheme is used where symbols that 
appears multiple times are then substituted by an item from 
the sequence : S_, S0_, S1_, S2_, etc ...


As to nested C++ namespaces - `extern(C++, ns1) { ... 
extern(C++, ns2) { ... } }` should work in a single D file.


Good to know, thanks!

Atila


C++ namespace mangling: bug or me being stupid?

2017-03-28 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
I'm trying to wrap a C++ library and have reduced my problem case 
to the code below. I get a linker error due to different name 
mangling (this is on Linux):


main.d:(.text._Dmain+0x13): undefined reference to 
`_ZN3ns13ns212createStructERN3ns17OptionsE'


The C++ object file has instead a symbol called 
_ZN3ns13ns212createStructERNS_7OptionsE. To make matters worse 
and me more confused, according to https://demangler.com, they 
both demangle to the same thing: 
`ns1::ns2::createStruct(ns1::Options&)`.


If you're wondering why there's two D files it's because trying 
to do:


extern(C++, ns1) {... }
extern(C++, ns1.ns2) {...}

doesn't compile since there would be two D versions of ns1, which 
is... mildly annoying.


I even took `const` off of the parameter in case that was the 
problem but clearly not.


Atila


impl.cpp:


namespace ns1 {

struct Options {

};

struct Struct {

};

namespace ns2 {
ns1::Struct* createStruct(Options&) {
return nullptr;
}

}

}


header.d:

extern(C++, ns1) {
struct Options {

}

struct Struct {
}
}


main.d:

extern(C++, ns1.ns2) {
import header;
Struct* createStruct(ref Options);
}


void main() {
import header;
Options options;
auto s = createStruct(options);
}




Re: Weird template error in Phobos (after editing) that I can't quite get. Compiler bug?

2017-03-22 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 22 March 2017 at 14:06:56 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

isInputRange looks like this:

template isInputRange(R)
{
enum bool isInputRange = is(typeof(
(inout int = 0)
{
R r = R.init; // can define a range object
if (r.empty) {}   // can test for empty
r.popFront;   // can invoke popFront()
auto h = r.front; // can get the front of the range
}));
}

[...]


Got the same error when I changed it to:

enum isInputRange(R) = is(typeof({...}));

Which might explain why it's still inside an explicit template 
declaration. Or not, this whole thing is weird to me.


Atila


Weird template error in Phobos (after editing) that I can't quite get. Compiler bug?

2017-03-22 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

isInputRange looks like this:

template isInputRange(R)
{
enum bool isInputRange = is(typeof(
(inout int = 0)
{
R r = R.init; // can define a range object
if (r.empty) {}   // can test for empty
r.popFront;   // can invoke popFront()
auto h = r.front; // can get the front of the range
}));
}


If I change the `enum bool` line to `enum bool isInputRange = 
true && is(typeof(`, all is fine.

If instead I:

enum foo = true;
enum bool isInputRange = foo && is(typeof(

Then:

std/range/primitives.d(352): Error: static assert  "Cannot put a 
char[] into a Appender!string."
std/format.d(1877):instantiated from here: 
put!(Appender!string, char[])
std/format.d(1784):instantiated from here: 
formatUnsigned!(Appender!string, ulong, char)
std/format.d(1755):instantiated from here: 
formatIntegral!(Appender!string, ulong, char)

std/format.d(3778):... (3 instantiations, -v to show) ...
std/typecons.d(421):instantiated from here: format!(char, 
ulong, ulong)
std/encoding.d(3468):instantiated from here: Tuple!(BOM, 
"schema", ubyte[], "sequence")



Surely they should be identical? Obviously I was trying to do 
something else with an enum, but this is the reduced sample.


Atila


Re: Can't send messages to tid spawned in a Windows DLL. Bug?

2017-02-16 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Thursday, 16 February 2017 at 15:14:25 UTC, kinke wrote:
On Thursday, 16 February 2017 at 12:07:40 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:

This fails for me in a DLL:

auto tid = spawn();
assert(tid != Tid.init);

If I print out the tid, I find that its message box is null. 
This is odd, since according the code in std.concurrency 
there's nothing weird about how it gets a message box, it's 
just `auto spawnTid = Tid(new MessageBox);`. So... `new` is 
returning null???


The really weird thing is that a thread is spawned and func 
starts executing. I just can't send it any messages without 
crashing.


Atila


If you suspect `new` of returning null, a GC issue seems 
likely. Is your DLL linked statically against druntime, thus 
having its own GC? Or are you using a shared druntime (and thus 
GC) across multiple binaries?


Whatever's default on Windows 32-bit. The thing is, all other 
uses of GC allocations in the same DLL work as expected.


Atila


Can't send messages to tid spawned in a Windows DLL. Bug?

2017-02-16 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

This fails for me in a DLL:

auto tid = spawn();
assert(tid != Tid.init);

If I print out the tid, I find that its message box is null. This 
is odd, since according the code in std.concurrency there's 
nothing weird about how it gets a message box, it's just `auto 
spawnTid = Tid(new MessageBox);`. So... `new` is returning null???


The really weird thing is that a thread is spawned and func 
starts executing. I just can't send it any messages without 
crashing.


Atila


Re: How do I call a C++ struct default constructor from D?

2017-02-07 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 7 February 2017 at 10:46:24 UTC, kinke wrote:

On Tuesday, 7 February 2017 at 10:15:09 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

I can declare a C++ struct like so:

extern(C++, mynamespace)
struct Foo {
   //...
}

But... I don't want to repeat the initialisation code for that 
struct's default constructor. I can't declare one in D because 
D doesn't allow default constructors for structs. What's my 
way out? Thanks,


Atila


I'm afraid there's no way out. I summarized some of my C++ 
interop findings incl. default constructor here: 
http://forum.dlang.org/thread/nqxsdehlydizatopr...@forum.dlang.org


Ugh, I was afraid of that. I ended up having to write (!) a C++ 
function that returned the default-initialised struct and called 
that from D.


It got uglier soon after...

I've only every done trivial C++ integration before. As soon as I 
tried something "real" it all broke down incredibly fast. 
Probably going to have to file some bugs on name mangling.



Atila




How do I call a C++ struct default constructor from D?

2017-02-07 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

I can declare a C++ struct like so:

extern(C++, mynamespace)
struct Foo {
   //...
}

But... I don't want to repeat the initialisation code for that 
struct's default constructor. I can't declare one in D because D 
doesn't allow default constructors for structs. What's my way 
out? Thanks,


Atila


Re: Why is [0] @safer than array.ptr?

2017-01-24 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Tuesday, 24 January 2017 at 11:32:47 UTC, TheFlyingFiddle 
wrote:

On Tuesday, 24 January 2017 at 11:28:17 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

void main() {
foo;
}

void foo() @safe {
int[] array;
auto ptr = array.ptr;
}


foo.d(7): Deprecation: array.ptr cannot be used in @safe code, 
use [0] instead



[0] is incredibly ugly and feels like an unnecessary 
hack, and I'm wondering why it's @safe.


Atila


Just a speculative guess.

unittest @safe
{
   int[] array;

   auto ptr  = array.ptr; //could be null
   auto ptr2 = [0]; //Does a bounds check?
   auto ptr3 = [5]; //Should do a bounds check.
}


[5] makes sense to bounds check, and I guess then the issue 
is I could instead do `array.ptr + 5` which would be bad. But 
it's still annoying to have to do [0] just to pass it to a 
C function, since `my_c_func(array.ptr)` isn't going to screw up 
anything.


BTW, in that example above array.ptr is null even though array is 
null. It doesn't crash.


Atila





Why is [0] @safer than array.ptr?

2017-01-24 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

void main() {
foo;
}

void foo() @safe {
int[] array;
auto ptr = array.ptr;
}


foo.d(7): Deprecation: array.ptr cannot be used in @safe code, 
use [0] instead



[0] is incredibly ugly and feels like an unnecessary hack, 
and I'm wondering why it's @safe.


Atila


Re: Does anyone know of an sdl-mode for Emacs?

2017-01-05 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 4 January 2017 at 18:50:21 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
On Wed, 2017-01-04 at 17:24 +, Atila Neves via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
It's getting tedious editing dub.sdl files with no editor 
support. If nobody's written one, I will.




Emacs has an sdlang-mode. It's on MELPA so installable via 
packages.


Huh. I guess I search for sdl-mode when I didn't find it. Thanks!

Atila


Does anyone know of an sdl-mode for Emacs?

2017-01-04 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
It's getting tedious editing dub.sdl files with no editor 
support. If nobody's written one, I will.


Atila


Re: import("dir/file") does not work

2016-05-18 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 18 May 2016 at 05:11:51 UTC, Vadim Lopatin wrote:

Hello,

Is it intended that import of file as array does not work if 
path is specified for import file name?


import("dir/file.ext"); // does not work
import("file.ext"); // works if dir is added to -J list

I believe it would be convenient if I could just specify one -J 
path (e.g. -Jviews) and import any file from nested directories 
just by providing relative path from one of -J dirs.


(checked on latest DMD under Windows; replacing / with \\ does 
not help)



Best regards,
 Vadim


That was a bug that was recently fixed.

Atila


Re: Why does Reggae use mixins?

2016-04-16 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 16 April 2016 at 13:04:24 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:

On Friday, 15 April 2016 at 13:18:46 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:
Why does the build system Reggae use mixins everywhere in the 
D examples?


https://github.com/atilaneves/reggae


Correction, it can do stuff either at CT or run-time as show 
here:


https://github.com/atilaneves/reggae/blob/master/doc/basics.md

Could somebody highlight when either is adviced?


Mixins are used so a D build description can be written at 
module-scope, thereby looking like a scripting language. The only 
reason this is important is to enable builds that have run-time 
logic, which is pretty much all of the high-level rules (since 
they have to read the file system).
the build template mixin doesn't have to be used, the only thing 
reggae wants from a build description written in D is that there 
be one and exactly one function with the signature:


Build func();

That's the function that gets called to generate the build. Since 
I'm lazy I created a template mixin to write the function for me, 
which again means that all definitions can be at module-scope.

Basically it's so that the file looks like:

alias exe = executable!(...);
mixin build!(exe);

Instead of:

Build myBuild() {
auto exe = executable(...);
return Build(exe);
}


Atila


Initializing global delegate variable - bug or on purpose?

2016-03-25 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

int delegate(int) dg = (i) => i * 2;

Error: non-constant nested delegate literal expression __lambda3


int delegate(int) dg;

static this() {
   dg = i => i * 2; // ok
}


Am I doing anything wrong?

Atila


Re: Whitch can replace std::bind/boost::bind ?

2016-03-19 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 18 March 2016 at 10:50:34 UTC, Dsby wrote:


foreach (i ; 0..4) {
auto th = new Thread(delegate(){listRun(i);});//this is erro
_thread[i]= th;
th.start();
}

void listRun(int i)
{
 writeln("i = ", i); // the value is not(0,1,2,3), it all 
is 2.

}


I want to know how to use it like std::bind.


I would suggest not using Thread directly:

foreach(i; 0..4) {
auto tid = spawn(, i); //from std.concurrency
_tid[i] = tid;
}

Atila


Re: If stdout is __gshared, why does this throw / crash?

2016-03-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 6 March 2016 at 01:28:52 UTC, Marco Leise wrote:

Got it now: https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=15768

writeln() creates a copy of the stdout struct in a non 
thread-safe way. If stdout has been assigned a File struct 
created from a file name this copy includes a "racy" 
increment/decrement of a reference count to the underlying 
C-library FILE*. In the case that the reference count is 
erroneously reaching 0, the file is closed prematurely and when 
Glibc tries to access internal data it results in the 
observable SIGSEGV.


Nice, good work!

Atila


Re: If stdout is __gshared, why does this throw / crash?

2016-03-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 6 March 2016 at 01:10:58 UTC, Anon wrote:

On Saturday, 5 March 2016 at 14:18:31 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

[...]


Note that `1000.iota.parallel` does *not* run 1000 threads. 
`parallel` just splits the work of the range up between the 
worker threads (likely 2, 4, or 8, depending on your CPU). I 
see the effect you describe with any parallel workload. Smaller 
numbers in place of 1000 aren't necessarily splitting things 
off to additional threads, which is why smaller numbers avoid 
the multi-threaded problems you are encountering.


Err, right.




[...]


`File` uses ref-counting internally to allow it to auto-close. 
`stdout` and friends are initialized in a special way such that 
they have a high initial ref-count. When you assign a new file 
to stdout, the ref count becomes one. As soon as one of your 
threads exits, this will cause stdout to close, producing the 
odd errors you are encountering on all the other threads.


I would avoid reassigning `stdout` and friends in favor of 
using a logger or manually specifying the file to write to if I 
were you.


I see. Here's my problem: I want to make it so code not under my 
control doesn't get to write to stdout and stderr. I don't see 
any other way but to reassign stdout. Maybe I can manually bump 
up the ref count?


Atila


Re: Dub and unit-threaded import problem

2016-03-05 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 5 March 2016 at 15:05:50 UTC, Casey wrote:

Hello,

I'm just starting a small project with dub and unit-threaded, 
but I'm getting an issue where the file "unit_threaded.d" 
cannot be found.


[...]


You mispelled "dependencies".

Atila


If stdout is __gshared, why does this throw / crash?

2016-03-05 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
With a small number of threads, things work as intended in the 
code below. But with 1000, on my machine it either crashes or 
throws an exception:



import std.stdio;
import std.parallelism;
import std.range;


void main() {
stdout = File("/dev/null", "w");
foreach(t; 1000.iota.parallel) {
writeln("Oops");
}
}



I get, depending on the run, "Bad file descriptor", "Attempting 
to write to a closed file", or segfaults. What am I doing wrong?


Atila


Re: How would you implement this in D? (signals & slots)

2016-02-02 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 2 February 2016 at 17:35:25 UTC, Chris Wright wrote:

On Tue, 02 Feb 2016 15:59:06 +, Atila Neves wrote:

[...]


I've seen this sort of thing before. A blogger I used to 
follow, Jeremy Miller, implemented an event broker using this 
pattern. I don't like it. It requires a new type for each 
event, and you have to defensively use that pattern even if you 
only have one event at the moment. Every time I implemented an 
event system, I've gone with named events and no special type 
for their parameters.


[...]


Nice. I liked your example and Kagamin's better than mine.

Atila


Re: How would you implement this in D? (signals & slots)

2016-02-02 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 2 February 2016 at 14:49:21 UTC, Gerald wrote:

On Monday, 1 February 2016 at 21:44:28 UTC, Enjoys Math wrote:

On Monday, 1 February 2016 at 21:40:45 UTC, Enjoys Math wrote:

module signals_and_slots;

import std.algorithm: remove;

[...]



D's signals & slots:

https://dlang.org/phobos/std_signals.html


I looked at that and perhaps I'm not reading the exampes 
correctly but I'm not sure how useful std.signals is in the 
real world. If you have a bunch of slots which take the same 
parameter types, not unusual in the GUI world, how would that 
work?


Switch on the value inside the slot. Or use different types by 
wrapping, say, an int or a string with a struct:



import std.stdio;
import std.signals;


struct String1 { string s; }
struct String2 { string s; }

class Observer {
void watch1(String1) { writeln("watch1"); }
void watch2(String2) { writeln("watch2"); }
}

class Signals {
mixin Signal!String1;
mixin Signal!String2;
}


void main() {
auto o = new Observer;
auto s = new Signals;
s.connect();
s.connect();
s.emit(String1("foo"));
s.emit(String2("bar"));
}

The other thing that bugs me is lack of naming for slots and 
signals, again in the GUI world where you typically have dozens 
of these on an an individual widget differentiation is quite 
important.


Slots are named: the methods are slots. Signals can be named if 
you use only one struct as the parameter, as above. The signals 
would be String1 and String2, the slots watch1 and watch2.


Atila


Re: virtual destructor in C++ integration: bug or me being stupid?

2015-12-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 29 December 2015 at 18:41:41 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:

On Tuesday, 29 December 2015 at 18:32:23 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

The problem here is that I don't know what the workaround is.


The one I used (well, last time I tried this) was to just put a 
dummy function in the D interface that is a placeholder for it.


interface C++Class {
   // at the same place as
   void _dontCallMeIamjustadestructor();
   void other_function_you_actually_want();
}


Ugh. As long as it works... thanks!

Atila


virtual destructor in C++ integration: bug or me being stupid?

2015-12-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

cpp.cpp:

class Oops {
public:

virtual ~Oops() {}
virtual int number() const { return 42; }
};

Oops* newOops() {
return new Oops;
}

d.d:

import std.stdio;


extern(C++) {
interface Oops {
int number() const;
}
Oops newOops();
}

void main() {
auto oops = newOops();
writeln(oops.number());
}


I get garbage in the output (I found this due to a crash in much 
more complicated code). If I comment out the virtual destructor, 
it works.


It seems that the presence of the virtual destructor changes the 
layout and D doesn't know about it. Thinking about it now, it 
makes sense, how would D know?


The problem here is that I don't know what the workaround is. 
Abstract classes in C++ usually have virtual destructors...


Atila


Re: struct constructor co nfusion

2015-11-06 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 6 November 2015 at 17:34:29 UTC, Spacen Jasset wrote:

Hello,

I have read various things about struct constructors, 
specifically 0 argument constructors, and using opCall and 
@disable this(); which no longer seems to work.


What I am after I think is the behavior of C++'s structs on the 
stack, namely for some or all of these uses at a given time:



1. Allocation on the stack
2. Value type semantics
3. RAII (combined with (1) often)


This is common in D as well. The difference to C++ is 0-argument 
struct constructors to do extra work to satisfy invariants.


Is it the case that a struct should now be used with a factory 
method? Does this also mean that the struct destructor must be


It's the easiest way to emulate C++'s 0-argument struct 
constructors.



made to work when .init is called instead of the factory method?


If the factory method isn't called, then yes, the destructor 
shouldn't blow up just because all the struct members are T.init.


This idiom is inconsistent with struct constructors that do 
have one or more arguments, and I think that this question is 
likely to arise time immemorial from others who are not 
expecting this particular inconstancy.



How is it inconsistent? Nobody stops me from doing this:

struct Struct {
void* ptr = cast(void*)5;
this(int size) {
ptr = malloc(size);
}

~this() {
free(ptr);
}

}

void main() {
auto ok = Struct(10);
//auto oops = Struct.init;
}

Atila



Re: Access violation when calling C DLL from D

2015-11-02 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 2 November 2015 at 02:30:09 UTC, AnoHito wrote:

On Monday, 2 November 2015 at 02:13:29 UTC, BBasile wrote:

On Monday, 2 November 2015 at 01:02:45 UTC, AnoHito wrote:

[...]
the headers are very long and complicated, and porting them 
entirely to D would be a huge project in and of itself.

[...]


You can give a try at h2d, the C header to D interface 
converter:


http://dlang.org/htod.html


I did, but it just produced a ton of errors...


Try this instead:

https://github.com/jacob-carlborg/dstep

It's been used to convert C Ruby declarations to D:

https://github.com/jacob-carlborg/orbit/tree/master/ruby

Atila


Re: D serialization temporary fixup?

2015-10-26 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Friday, 23 October 2015 at 16:27:11 UTC, Shriramana Sharma 
wrote:

Shriramana Sharma wrote:


I'd just like to have a quick but reliable way to
store real and int data types into a binary data file and read 
therefrom.

Is there such a solution?


Wow thank you people! Nice to know I can do rawWrite and also 
have other options.


BTW is there a reason that either msgpack or cerealed are not 
made part of Phobos but developed separately?


Developing a library and getting it on the dub registry is easy. 
Getting a whole library into Phobos is incredibly hard.


Atila


Re: D serialization temporary fixup?

2015-10-23 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Thursday, 22 October 2015 at 16:15:23 UTC, Shriramana Sharma 
wrote:
I wanted a D equivalent to: 
http://doc.qt.io/qt-5/qdatastream.html 
https://docs.python.org/3/library/pickle.html


and saw that one is under construction: 
http://wiki.dlang.org/Review/std.serialization


But till it's finalized, I'd just like to have a quick but 
reliable way to store real and int data types into a binary 
data file and read therefrom. Is there such a solution? The 
size of the data is fixed, but especially since I have real 
values, I'd like to not write to limited fixed decimal text 
format.


https://github.com/atilaneves/cerealed

Atila


Re: How to do unittests

2015-10-02 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 2 October 2015 at 10:22:40 UTC, Namal wrote:

On Wednesday, 30 September 2015 at 14:44:20 UTC, qsdf wrote:

On Wednesday, 30 September 2015 at 14:20:28 UTC, Namal wrote:

[...]


D unit tests are like a stack of free functions. You put them 
separatly.



when there's a main: dmd -unittest a.d
--
module a;
void main(){}

unittest{}
--


when there is no main: (like std.uri): dmd -main -unittest a.d
--
module a;
unittest{}
--

the -main switch adds a dummy main function so that the output 
can be executed.


But most of the time you'll think that nothing happens because 
the tests succeed...


So do I understand it right that it stops after the first 
failed test? Is it possible to continue and get a list of all 
failed tests?


http://code.dlang.org/packages/unit-threaded
https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/phobos/pull/3207

Atila


Re: Range of variables

2015-10-01 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 30 September 2015 at 20:11:56 UTC, Freddy wrote:

Is there a way to make a range of a variables lazily?
---
int var1;
int var2;
void func()
{
int var3;
auto range = /*range of var1,var2,var3*/ ;
}
---


std.range.iota

Atila


Re: Why getting private member fails using getMember trait in a template?

2015-09-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Tuesday, 29 September 2015 at 09:40:41 UTC, Alexandru Ermicioi 
wrote:
On Saturday, 26 September 2015 at 10:10:39 UTC, Alexandru 
Ermicioi wrote:

Suppose we have, two modules:

module testOne;

[...]


So, is this behavior correct?
If yes, then why?


Yes, because private members aren't accessible from another 
module. If they need to be accessed, then they need to be public.


Atila


Re: Dub package with C code

2015-09-24 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Thursday, 24 September 2015 at 11:38:08 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
On Thursday, 24 September 2015 at 08:35:40 UTC, Edwin van 
Leeuwen wrote:

Alternatively you could use reggea to build both.


I want to use dub.

Simply because of code.dlang.org. Or can reggae also pull 
packages from there?


Yes.

Atila


Re: No -v or -deps for gdc?

2015-09-16 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Tuesday, 15 September 2015 at 18:12:56 UTC, Johannes Pfau 
wrote:

Am Tue, 15 Sep 2015 12:19:34 +
schrieb Atila Neves :

gdmd supports those options but gdc doesn't. Is that likely to 
always be the case?


Atila


gdmd is just a wrapper around gdc. If something is supported by 
gdmd it must also be supported by gdc (the exact switch names 
might differ).


See: 
https://github.com/D-Programming-GDC/GDMD/blob/master/dmd-script


Seems like -v maps to -fd-verbose and -deps to -fdeps.


Ah cool, thanks!

Atila


No -v or -deps for gdc?

2015-09-15 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
gdmd supports those options but gdc doesn't. Is that likely to 
always be the case?


Atila


Re: Is D suitable for my latest project?

2015-09-09 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 6 September 2015 at 14:36:53 UTC, chris stevens wrote:

Hi All,

I am considering using D for my latest project and there are a 
few features I would like and am not entirely sure at this 
point whether D has them. They are:


- dynamic creation of classes/structs at runtime (think I can 
emulate this with variants/dynamic)


At runtime, no. However... if it doesn't actually need to be 
runtime and is in the code itself you can have code be generated 
at compile time.



- dynamic compilation of code files at runtime


Only by running a compiler. But as above, if it doesn't strictly 
have to be at runtime and everything is specified in the source 
files, you can compute strings at compile-time and mix them in to 
generate code.



- some basic code creation tools


mixin, template mixin, CTFE.


Are the above possible?


It really depends on what you want to do. A lot of the dynamic 
code generation that goes on is done at runtime because that's 
what other languages support. In my experience a lot of those 
use-cases can be done at compile-time in D. A famous example is 
compile-time regular expressions. Unless you're writing a tool 
similar to grep, all regexes in your program are known at 
compile-time. They don't _need_ to be parsed/interpreted/compiled 
at run-time, that's just what every other language that isn't D 
does.


So, if your use-case depends on information from the file-system, 
user interaction, networking, etc. then your only choice is to 
generate text files with D code and compile it. If, on the other 
hand, it's all defined by the code you write, then D has 
excellent compile-time code generation tools at your disposal.


Atila


Re: What is "FilterResult" type?

2015-09-09 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Wednesday, 9 September 2015 at 07:19:06 UTC, Bahman Movaqar 
wrote:
On Tuesday, 8 September 2015 at 18:45:33 UTC, Jonathan M Davis 
wrote:

If you're returning a range, you should be returning auto.


@Jonathan, @cym13 and @Meta
It's reasonable to use `auto`.  However there are times when 
you need to pass the `auto` value to another function and the 
receiving function needs to know the type of its input 
arguments.


No, it doesn't. It needs to know what the compile-time interface 
is, i.e. what it can do with that type. If the type in question 
happens to be an InputRange, then the consumer function would be:


void func(R)(R range) if(isInputRange!R) { ... }

instead of using a concrete type like this:

void func(MyType range) { ... }

That way you can change range types and `func` doesn't care.

Atila



Re: What is the D way to map a binary file to a structure?

2015-08-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 29 August 2015 at 12:56:08 UTC, cym13 wrote:

Hi,

Let's say I have a simple binary file whose structure is 
well-known. Here is

an example which stores points:

struct Point {
long x;
long y;
long z;
}

struct BinFile {
uintmagicNumber;  // Some identifier
ulong   pointsNumber;
Point[] points;   // Array of pointsNumber points.
}

What is the best way to read some file and fill a structure 
with it? Would
reading the file into a void[] and then casting it to the 
struct work with

things like internal struct padding?


https://github.com/atilaneves/cerealed

Just pass the bytes obtained from reading the file to 
`Decerealiser`.


Atila


Re: post on using go 1.5 and GC latency

2015-08-23 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Saturday, 22 August 2015 at 06:54:43 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grøstad 
wrote:
On Saturday, 22 August 2015 at 06:48:48 UTC, Russel Winder 
wrote:

But one that Google are entirely happy to fully fund.


Yes, they have made Go fully supported on Google Cloud now, so 
I think it is safe to say that Google management is backing Go 
fully.


I'm kinda hoping for Go++...


The other day I thought it'd be hilarious if I did a Bjarne and 
wrote a preprocessor to generate Go code that would accept a 
superset of Go syntax but added generics, function overloading, 
etc. And, of course, called it Go++.


Alas, 'tis too much work for just the lulz. I'd rather spend the 
time making D better.


Atila


Re: Compiletime Vs Runtime bencmarks

2015-08-18 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 17 August 2015 at 14:43:35 UTC, D_Learner wrote:
Hello everyone . I need advice on my first D-project . I have 
uploaded it at :-


[...]


I wouldn't compare benchmarks without optimisations turned on.

Atila



Re: dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:21:14 UTC, Rikki Cattermole 
wrote:

On 13/08/2015 12:16 a.m., Atila Neves wrote:

[...]


Perhaps this small snippet from my Windows install might shred 
some light. Specifically the LIB property.


[Environment32]
LIB=%@P%\..\lib
LINKCMD=%@P%\link.exe


[Environment64]
LIB=%@P%\..\lib64


Tried setting LIB, still doesn't work. Sigh.

Atila


Re: dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 15:22:39 UTC, wobbles wrote:

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 14:05:57 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 13:46:24 UTC, wobbles wrote:
On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 13:00:45 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:
On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:40:49 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe 
wrote:

[...]


I downloaded the zip, added linux/bin64 to PATH, tried 
compiling a hello world and got:


usr/bin/ld: cannot find -l:libphobos2.a

That's when I started trying to set the configuration but 
nothing seems to work.


Atila


Have you run dmd from the directory you unzipped it to?
libphobos2.a is in there I think, so ld wouldn't be able to 
find it.


Just did, didn't work. Tried it from lib64 and lib32 as well, 
nothing.


Atila


Hmm, I'll setup a VM later this evening to test, see if I can 
figure it out. This really should be easier.


It really should. I straced it and it's trying to link to phobos 
with `-l:libphobos2.a`. I've never seen a colon in library 
options before and the (ancient) gcc on the system doesn't seem 
to like it one bit. I added a hand-compiled gcc 4.9 to my PATH 
and... it worked.


Atila


Re: dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 15:49:37 UTC, Joakim Brännström 
wrote:

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 15:30:09 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

[...]


From man ld :)
-l namespec
Add the archive or object file specified by namespec to the 
list of files to link. This option may be used any number of 
times.  If namespec is of the form :filename, ld will search 
the library path for a file called filename, otherwise it will 
search the library path for a file called libnamespec.a.


On systems which support shared libraries, ld may also search 
for files other than libnamespec.a.  Specifically, on ELF and 
SunOS systems, ld will search a directory for a library called 
libnamespec.so before searching for one called libnamespec.a.  
(By convention, a .so extension indicates a shared library.)  
Note that this behavior does not apply to :filename, which 
always specifies a file called filename.



So in this case it could probably work with -lphobos2.
Maybe -L-l:libphobos2.a was chosen to force the linking with 
the static lib (as can be seen in the second paragraph for 
systems that supports both).


Yeah, pretty sure that was it: when I called gcc myself it linked 
to the shared version. Maybe I should file a bug report for at 
least a proper error message when using it on ancient systems.


Atila


dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
I'm trying to use dmd on a VM where I don't have root privileges 
(don't ask). I can't copy dmd.conf to /etc. According to the 
docs, I should be able to use a dmd.conf that's in the same dir 
as dmd itself, or in my home directory, or even specifying 
-conf=. None of these seems to tell dmd where to find phobos.


I've also tried setting DFLAGS myself, but under no circumstances 
is dmd passing the -L where phobos is to ld, so I can compile but 
not link (well, I can if I use gcc!). Also tried dmd 
-L-L/path/to/phobos.


Does anyone have a clue why this doesn't work? My dmd.conf looks 
like this:


[Environment]
DFLAGS=-I/nobackup/dlang/phobos/ 
-I/nobackup/dlang/druntime/import 
-L-L/nobackup/dlang/download/dmd2/linux/lib64


Atila


Re: dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:29:46 UTC, Dicebot wrote:

More info about what gets placed where please.

I have special dev layout on my system that co-exists with 
system-wide installation of dmd. It is as simple as having 
~/dlang/{dmd|druntime|phobos}, linking ~/dlang/dmd/src/dmd to 
~/bin/dmd-dev and placing dmd.conf in ~/bin which adds all 
those paths as -I and -L flags. Works just fine.


There's no system-wide installation (since I don't have root), I 
just downloaded the zip for 2.068 and added dmd2/linux/bin64 to 
my PATH.


Atila


Re: dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:40:49 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:16:50 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:
I'm trying to use dmd on a VM where I don't have root 
privileges (don't ask). I can't copy dmd.conf to /etc.


If you use the dmd zip, everything just works when you just 
unzip it and use it all in-place. No need to move or copy files 
anywhere, no need for root.


I downloaded the zip, added linux/bin64 to PATH, tried compiling 
a hello world and got:


usr/bin/ld: cannot find -l:libphobos2.a

That's when I started trying to set the configuration but nothing 
seems to work.


Atila


Re: dmd.conf... again

2015-08-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 13:46:24 UTC, wobbles wrote:

On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 13:00:45 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:
On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:40:49 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe 
wrote:
On Wednesday, 12 August 2015 at 12:16:50 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:

[...]


If you use the dmd zip, everything just works when you just 
unzip it and use it all in-place. No need to move or copy 
files anywhere, no need for root.


I downloaded the zip, added linux/bin64 to PATH, tried 
compiling a hello world and got:


usr/bin/ld: cannot find -l:libphobos2.a

That's when I started trying to set the configuration but 
nothing seems to work.


Atila


Have you run dmd from the directory you unzipped it to?
libphobos2.a is in there I think, so ld wouldn't be able to 
find it.


Just did, didn't work. Tried it from lib64 and lib32 as well, 
nothing.


Atila


Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-07-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Thursday, 30 July 2015 at 05:53:48 UTC, yawniek wrote:

On Wednesday, 29 July 2015 at 16:36:41 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

LDC:
Cerealed: 970 ms, 482 μs, and 6 hnsecs
MsgPack:  896 ms, 591 μs, and 2 hnsecs


Not too shabby!

Atila


cool.
what are the advantages of cereald over msgpack?


AFAIK, features. The kind of features I need/use to write 
networking code and reduce the boilerplate to an absolute minimum.



can you stream in packets with cereald too?


I don't know exactly what you mean. I've only used it to go from 
network packets structs to bytes and vice-versa.




cool thing about msgpack is that there exist libraries for many 
language.
so we use it do actually store logs and then process them with 
other tools too.


I wrote cerealed for networking. You _can_ use it to convert 
whatever else to binary, but its focus is easy networking.


Atila


Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-07-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 29 June 2015 at 10:22:10 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

On Monday, 29 June 2015 at 08:45:15 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

On Sunday, 28 June 2015 at 17:02:42 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:

On Friday, 26 June 2015 at 21:40:49 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:
I'd have to benchmark it against something, but I'm pretty 
sure cerealed is fast.


Faster than msgpack?


I guess I'm going to have benchmark this now... :)

Atila


In release builds, _nearly_. Here's the benchmark program: 
http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/17b0ed9c0204. Results below. msgpack 
is... fast. From the docs, cerealed seems to have more features 
that I actually use and need though.


Results:

DMD debug:

Cerealed: 4 secs, 987 ms, 700 μs, and 5 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 771 ms, 713 μs, and 7 hnsecs

DMD release:

Cerealed: 2 secs, 556 ms, 714 μs, and 6 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 89 ms, 561 μs, and 3 hnsecs


GDC debug:

Cerealed: 4 secs, 863 ms, 501 μs, and 1 hnsec
MsgPack:  2 secs, 32 ms, 53 μs, and 1 hnsec


GDC release:

Cerealed: 1 sec, 740 ms, 726 μs, and 4 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 20 ms, 287 μs, and 3 hnsecs


LDC debug:

Cerealed: 7 secs, 711 ms, 154 μs, and 4 hnsecs
MsgPack:  3 secs, 694 ms, 566 μs, and 2 hnsecs


LDC release:

Cerealed: 1 sec, 795 ms, 380 μs, and 7 hnsecs
MsgPack:  931 ms, 355 μs, and 5 hnsecs




Before I had time to look into it, somebody graciously optimised 
cerealed for me in this PR:


https://github.com/atilaneves/cerealed/pull/6

And now then benchmarks are (dub build --build=release, fastest 
of 10 runs for each compiler):


DMD:
Cerealed: 1 sec, 199 ms, 118 μs, and 1 hnsec
MsgPack:  1 sec, 85 ms, and 516 μs

GDC:
Cerealed: 927 ms, 677 μs, and 4 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 32 ms, 736 μs, and 5 hnsecs

LDC:
Cerealed: 970 ms, 482 μs, and 6 hnsecs
MsgPack:  896 ms, 591 μs, and 2 hnsecs


Not too shabby!

Atila




Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-07-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 29 June 2015 at 13:59:37 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:

On Monday, 29 June 2015 at 10:22:10 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

I guess I'm going to have benchmark this now... :)


What about doing a memory profiling using DMD fresh builtin 
profiler of


http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/17b0ed9c0204

?

I'm guessing the GC might give misguiding results as your 
testStruct returns a relatively small data structure.


I would rather like to see a larger (randomized) structure 
being tested on.


You could make use of my

https://github.com/nordlow/justd/blob/master/random_ex.d

for random instance generation :)


I tried your code and added it to the benchmark. It didn't make 
much of a difference.


Atila


Re: goroutines vs vibe.d tasks

2015-06-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 30 June 2015 at 16:43:58 UTC, anonymous wrote:

On Tuesday, 30 June 2015 at 15:18:36 UTC, Jack Applegame wrote:
Just creating a bunch (10k) of sleeping (for 100 msecs) 
goroutines/tasks.


Compilers
go: go version go1.4.2 linux/amd64
vibe.d: DMD64 D Compiler v2.067.1 linux/amd64, vibe.d 0.7.23

Code
go: http://pastebin.com/2zBnGBpt
vibe.d: http://pastebin.com/JkpwSe47

go version build with go build test.go
vibe.d version built with dub build --build=release test.d

Results on my machine:

go: 168.736462ms (overhead ~ 68ms)
vibe.d: 1944ms   (overhead ~ 1844ms)

Why creating of vibe.d tasks is so slow (more then 10 times)???


I think this might be a problem with vibe.d's `sleep`. Putting 
a `writeln(...);` there is a lot faster than `sleep`ing even 
the tiniest amount of time.


Sleep will almost certainly pause and block the fiber. Vibe.d 
only switches between them when there's IO to be done or 
something else from the event loop. A better way of comparing 
would be to actually do something: use channels to ping-pong back 
between the goroutines and use vibe.d's concurrency to send 
messages betweeen fibers. Whatever you do, don't sleep.


Atila



Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-06-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Monday, 29 June 2015 at 08:45:15 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:

On Sunday, 28 June 2015 at 17:02:42 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:

On Friday, 26 June 2015 at 21:40:49 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:
I'd have to benchmark it against something, but I'm pretty 
sure cerealed is fast.


Faster than msgpack?


I guess I'm going to have benchmark this now... :)

Atila


In release builds, _nearly_. Here's the benchmark program: 
http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/17b0ed9c0204. Results below. msgpack is... 
fast. From the docs, cerealed seems to have more features that I 
actually use and need though.


Results:

DMD debug:

Cerealed: 4 secs, 987 ms, 700 μs, and 5 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 771 ms, 713 μs, and 7 hnsecs

DMD release:

Cerealed: 2 secs, 556 ms, 714 μs, and 6 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 89 ms, 561 μs, and 3 hnsecs


GDC debug:

Cerealed: 4 secs, 863 ms, 501 μs, and 1 hnsec
MsgPack:  2 secs, 32 ms, 53 μs, and 1 hnsec


GDC release:

Cerealed: 1 sec, 740 ms, 726 μs, and 4 hnsecs
MsgPack:  1 sec, 20 ms, 287 μs, and 3 hnsecs


LDC debug:

Cerealed: 7 secs, 711 ms, 154 μs, and 4 hnsecs
MsgPack:  3 secs, 694 ms, 566 μs, and 2 hnsecs


LDC release:

Cerealed: 1 sec, 795 ms, 380 μs, and 7 hnsecs
MsgPack:  931 ms, 355 μs, and 5 hnsecs



Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-06-30 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Sunday, 28 June 2015 at 17:02:42 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:

On Friday, 26 June 2015 at 21:40:49 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:
I'd have to benchmark it against something, but I'm pretty 
sure cerealed is fast.


Faster than msgpack?


I guess I'm going to have benchmark this now... :)

Atila


Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-06-26 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 26 June 2015 at 12:31:04 UTC, Dicebot wrote:
std.concurrency was supposed to be able to handle that by 
design but it is impossible to do without any sort of standard 
serialization utility in Phobos (and, ideally, very fast binary 
serialization utility)


I'd have to benchmark it against something, but I'm pretty sure 
cerealed is fast.


Re: Typed Message Passing between D Processes

2015-06-26 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Thursday, 25 June 2015 at 14:04:23 UTC, Per Nordlöw wrote:

Is there an alternative to

http://dlang.org/phobos/std_process.html#.pipe

that can be used to do _typed_ _message_ _passing_ between two 
D processes with the same convenience as `send` and `receive` in


std.concurrency

?

Either in Phobos or in a third party library?


You'd have to implement your own IPC for that to work. You can 
always use TCP and serialise everything.


Atila


Does anyone get line numbers in stack traces on Linux?

2015-06-17 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
I thought it was because I was weird and I use gold as my linker, 
but ld.bfd produced the same results. The most I could find in 
bug reports was someone complaining it used to work but the 
consensus was that it never did?


Atila


Re: dmd/druntime/phobos HEAD: can't link binaries on Arch Linux

2015-06-16 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Tuesday, 16 June 2015 at 01:18:29 UTC, Vladimir Panteleev 
wrote:
Not using Arch Linux, but just from your post it looks like 
it's not finding the libphobos.a from HEAD and using the system 
one instead.


You may want to check the dmd.conf file for your HEAD D 
install: make sure DMD is using it (dmd | head -4), and that it 
adds the library search path correctly (-L-L switch in DFLAGS).


Thanks! Typo in dmd.conf... sigh.

Atila


dmd/druntime/phobos HEAD: can't link binaries on Arch Linux

2015-06-15 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

Anyone else getting this problem on Arch Linux?

dmd hello.d

hello.o:hello.d:TypeInfo_S3std3uni38__T13InversionListTS3std3uni8GcPolicyZ13InversionList67__T9IntervalsTS3std3uni32__T8CowArrayTS3std3uni8GcPolicyZ8CowArrayZ9Intervals.init$:
 error: undefined reference to 
'std.uni.InversionList!(std.uni.GcPolicy).InversionList.Intervals!(std.uni.CowArray!(std.uni.GcPolicy).CowArray).Intervals.__fieldPostblit()'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
--- errorlevel 1

With -v I see that it's compiling phobos in by calling gcc like 
this:


-l:libphobos2.a

When I replace that with just the path to phobos instead, it 
works.



Atila


dmd and string imports on Windows

2015-06-10 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Linux:

foo.d:
import std.stdio;
void main() { writeln(import(dir/bar.txt)); }

dmd -J. foo.d # ok

On Windows:

Error: file dir/bar.txt cannot be found or not in a path 
specified with -J


I tried the obvious buildPath(dir, bar.txt) instead and now:

Error: file dir\\bar.d cannot be found or not in a path 
specified with -J


I tried rdir\bar.txt and dir\\bar.txt and still nothing. What 
am I supposed to do? Thanks,


Atila



Re: How to append range to array?

2015-05-23 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

std.range.chain?

Atila

On Saturday, 23 May 2015 at 07:03:35 UTC, Vladimir Panteleev 
wrote:

int[] arr = [1, 2, 3];
auto r = iota(4, 10);
// ???
assert(equal(arr, iota(1, 10)));

Hopefully in one GC allocation (assuming we know the range's 
length).


I tried std.range.primitives.put but its behavior seems a 
little mysterious:


This compiles but asserts at runtime:

int[] arr = [1, 2, 3];
arr.put(iota(4, 10));

And this is even weirder, can you guess what it will print?

int[] arr = [1, 2, 3];
arr.put(4);
writeln(arr);




Re: Possible to write a classic fizzbuzz example using a UFCS chain?

2015-04-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Tuesday, 28 April 2015 at 10:46:54 UTC, Gary Willoughby wrote:

After reading the following thread:

http://forum.dlang.org/thread/nczgumcdfystcjqyb...@forum.dlang.org

I wondered if it was possible to write a classic fizzbuzz[1] 
example using a UFCS chain? I've tried and failed.


[1]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fizz_buzz


import std.stdio, std.algorithm, std.range, std.conv;


void main() {
immutable words = [3: fizz, 5: buzz];
iota(1, 100).
map!((int i) {
immutable res = reduce!((a, b) = a ~ ((i % b == 0) ? 
words[b] : ))(, words.keys);

return res.empty ? i.to!string : res;
}).
writeln;
}


Atila


Re: Looking for MQTT client library

2015-03-12 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
Those are basically your options. You could wrap Mosquitto (a C 
implementation), but I'd just use the existing MQTT broker code. 
Then again, I would say that. :)


Atila

On Thursday, 12 March 2015 at 07:59:55 UTC, o3o wrote:
I'm looking a MQTT [0] client library written in D, if it 
exists.

Anyone know of any?

I found the great Atila Neves MQTT broker (server) [1], and 
some C/C++ libraries [2], so, possible solutions are:


a. Write a native D library from scratch
b. Adapt/copy some parts of [1] to convert from server to client
c. Create a binding from [2]

Anyone has other idea that I could use to create this
myself?

Thanks

[0]http://mqtt.org/
[1]https://github.com/atilaneves/mqtt
[2]http://www.eclipse.org/paho/clients/c/




Re: I want to introduce boost_asio to dlang

2015-03-05 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Thursday, 5 March 2015 at 09:38:27 UTC, zhmt wrote:

On Thursday, 5 March 2015 at 08:22:33 UTC, Jack Applegame wrote:

On Thursday, 5 March 2015 at 06:05:56 UTC, zhmt wrote:

I am a gameserver developer, my programming lang is java now.

I want to change java to dlang, and I like boost_asio and 
it's coroutine,

so, I want to create a binding of boost_asio.

But I am not familiar with dlang, so I want to find someone 
help me, or develope this binding with me.


I will put the asio binding on github, and opensource, and 
free.


Anybody help or join?
There is no need to do it. Just use http://vibed.org/ instead 
of boost::asio.


It sounds like a good choice, is it as good as boost::asio?


Having used both, it's better.

Atila


Re: Import paths do not work

2015-01-29 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
I would suggest instead of using make, use dub[0] build manager 
instead.
It'll handle grabbing all the files and compiling them 
correctly.


[0] http://code.dlang.org/package-format


Or for simple projects such as this one seems to be, just use 
rdmd.


Atila


Re: Any dub tips and tricks

2014-10-17 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
Are you sure your package/dub.json is valid JSON? You can check 
it here:


http://jsonlint.com/

Atila

On Thursday, 16 October 2014 at 22:22:14 UTC, Joel wrote:
Any way of using dub (on Windows or OSX). I've been trying it 
lately, but not much success.


1. (In the command prompt or Terminal), I create a new folder.
2. Run 'dub init' in the new folder
3. I copy the dependency from a lib/app into the dub.json file.
4. Then I just enter 'dub'

In Windows I get this error (and others, but seems to go 
through): Failed to parse package description for dil  in 
C:\Users\Joel\AppData\Roaming\dub\packages\dil-master\.


I'm more interested in using OSX, for D.




Re: Using return type of a predicate function as a template

2014-10-16 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

This works:

import std.range;

auto groupBy(alias func, R)(R values)
if (isInputRange!R)
{

alias K = typeof(func(values.front));
alias V = ElementType!R[];
V[K] grouped;
foreach(value; values) grouped[func(value)] ~= value;
return grouped;
}


unittest {
  struct Test {
string a;
double b;
  }

  auto values = [Test( a, 1 ), Test( a, 2 ), Test( b, 3 )];
  auto grouped = values.groupBy!(a = a.a);
  assert( grouped[a].length == 2 );
  assert( grouped[a][1].b == 2 );
  assert( grouped[b].length == 1 );
  assert( grouped[b][0].b == 3 );
}

Atila

On Thursday, 16 October 2014 at 08:04:08 UTC, Edwin van Leeuwen 
wrote:
I am trying to implement a groupBy function that groups by the 
return type of a predicate. Currently I have to define the 
returntype of the predicate for it to compile. Is there a way 
to get the return type at compile time and use it.


The code:
V[K] groupBy( alias func, K, V )( V values )
{
  V[K] grouped;
  foreach ( value ; values ) {
grouped[func( value )] ~= value;
  }
  return grouped;
}

unittest {
  struct Test {
string a;
double b;
  }

  auto values = [Test( a, 1 ), Test( a, 2 ), Test( b, 3 
)];

  auto grouped = values.groupBy!( (a) = a.a, string );
  assert( grouped[a].length == 2 );
  assert( grouped[a][1].b == 2 );
  assert( grouped[b].length == 1 );
  assert( grouped[b][0].b == 3 );
}

So the above works, but I need to call it with:
values.groupBy!( (a) = a.a, string );
Ideally I would call it instead with:
values.groupBy!( (a) = a.a )
and it would infer that the template K needs to be a string, 
since that is the return type of (a) = a.a.


Cheers,

Edwin




Building a dmd that works on old systems: TLS problems with libc

2014-10-03 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
Both the pre-compiled dmd and building it from source from git 
HEAD give me the same result. I'm trying to compile D programs on 
an ancient Linux distro I have no root access to and hence no 
control over (don't ask). Its libc is so old I can't compile gcc 
4.9 on it (gcc 4.8 is the most recent one that'll compile). I 
also can't copy compiled D programs over since its dynamic linker 
is too old as well. And using dmd works until it tries linking, 
at which point I get this:


ld: .../libphobos2.a(sections_linux_570_420.o): undefined 
reference to symbol '__tls_get_addr@@GLIBC_2.3'
/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2: error adding symbols: DSO 
missing from command line

collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status


Any ideas on what else I could do except for compiling a new 
libc? Cos I tried that a few weeks back and it was a descent into 
madness that didn't work at all.


Atila


Re: Building a dmd that works on old systems: TLS problems with libc

2014-10-03 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Friday, 3 October 2014 at 10:47:11 UTC, David Nadlinger wrote:

On Friday, 3 October 2014 at 08:47:07 UTC, Atila Neves wrote:
   ld: .../libphobos2.a(sections_linux_570_420.o): undefined 
reference to symbol '__tls_get_addr@@GLIBC_2.3'
   /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2: error adding symbols: DSO 
missing from command line

   collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status


So to be clear, this is with a libphobos2.a built on the target 
system? The error message looks like you might have a Phobos 
library built for a newer libc.


David


Yes, built on the target system. It gets worse in that I 
installed gcc 4.8 by compiling it and changing my PATH and 
LD_LIBRARY_PATH to use it. At first I thought that was the 
problem and it sort of is but isn't.


I removed my custom installations from PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH 
and used the system compiler but got the same problem.


Then I tried only using dmd to compile and linking it myself. 
That worked, but the resulting binary crashed. After loading it 
up in gdb, it crashed in __tls_get_addr


Atila


Re: Why is amap implemented as a member function of TaskPool?

2014-09-22 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
On Saturday, 20 September 2014 at 07:25:45 UTC, Russel Winder via 
Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
On Sat, 2014-09-20 at 06:46 +, Nordlöw via 
Digitalmars-d-learn

wrote:
On Thursday, 18 September 2014 at 19:49:00 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:
 I had to roll my own parallel map today, but at least I did 
 get a nice 3x speedup.


How many cores? Is the problem a data parallel one and hence 
should show

linear speedup?


It depends on the data. I was running analysis on a build 
dependency graph. It'd depend on the dependency tree topology. I 
have 4 cores with hyperthreading. 3x speedup seems good to me, 
especially since the implementation is recursive.




Is your own parallel map public somewhere? It would be 
interesting to see it.


Particularly if it can be used to improved the code in 
std.parallelism.


Now that I looked at the bug id referenced above, I don't think 
it'd help. I can see all sorts of problems with guaranteeing no 
mutable references are captured by the delegate.


Atila



Re: Why is amap implemented as a member function of TaskPool?

2014-09-22 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Saturday, 20 September 2014 at 06:46:43 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:
On Thursday, 18 September 2014 at 19:49:00 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:
I had to roll my own parallel map today, but at least I did 
get a nice 3x speedup.


Is your own parallel map public somewhere? It would be 
interesting to see it.


I just did the simplest, stupidest thing that would work, so it's 
probably buggy. It works where I used it (and was faster) so 
that's all I needed to know. To even think of releasing this I'd 
use atomics instead of the mutex and try to break it in all sorts 
of ways. But here it is anyway:


private auto pmap(alias fun, R)(R range) if(isInputRange!R) {
import std.parallelism;
import core.sync.mutex;

static __gshared Mutex mutex;
if(mutex is null) mutex = new Mutex;
typeof(fun(range.front))[] values;
foreach(i, value; range.parallel) {
auto newValue = fun(value);
synchronized(mutex) {
if(values.length  i + 1) values.length = i + 1;
values[i] = newValue;
}
}

return values;
}

Oh, and the reason I don't just append to `values` is that I need 
to preserve the original order.


Atila


Re: Why is amap implemented as a member function of TaskPool?

2014-09-19 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

The point is I _want_ a delegate.

Atila

On Thursday, 18 September 2014 at 20:51:30 UTC, Jared wrote:
On Thursday, 18 September 2014 at 19:49:00 UTC, Atila Neves 
wrote:
Or what I really want to ask: why can't I call amap from 
std.parallelism with a lambda? I assume it's because it's a 
member function but I'm not 100% sure.


Atila


You have to tell DMD that the lambda is not in fact a delegate.

import std.stdio;
import std.range;
import std.parallelism;

void main()
{
auto w = iota(0,1_000_000);
int[] foo;

// Not OK, dmd can't infer lambda isn't a delegate
// foo = taskPool().amap!(a = a + 1)(w);

// OK:
foo = taskPool().amap!`a+1`(w); // string lambdas, yeah!
foo = taskPool().amap!(function int(int a) = a + 1)(w);
static int func(int a) { return a + 1; }
foo = taskPool().amap!func(w);
}




Why is amap implemented as a member function of TaskPool?

2014-09-18 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
Or what I really want to ask: why can't I call amap from 
std.parallelism with a lambda? I assume it's because it's a 
member function but I'm not 100% sure.


I hardly ever call map with a named function (named local 
functions don't work with TaskPool.amap either), it's always a 
closure. Not just in D, pretty much in any language I write code 
in.


I had to roll my own parallel map today, but at least I did get a 
nice 3x speedup.


Atila


Re: Emacs d-mode cannot handle backquoted backslashe

2014-08-04 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn
I took a look and I don't really know if it's possible without 
using the Emacs  24 only suggestion in the Stack Overflow 
comment to your question.


As far as I can see, before that Emacs syntax tables have a 
notion of what a string is and what an escape character is. The 
d-mode code adds the backtick as an alternative to double and 
single quotes but can't do anything about the backslash. Unless 
it disables backslash as an escape character everywhere.


I tried setting backtick to a function that returns \ instead 
of the value to see if I could then tailor the function to depend 
on whether not the point was in a backtick string but that didn't 
work since `modify-syntax-entry` checks to see if the argument is 
a string.


BTW, python-mode has the same problem, I checked with r\.

Atila

On Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 08:40:12 UTC, Nordlöw wrote:

Currently Emacs d-mode cannot correctly highlight

`\`

because it doesn't understand that single backslashes are 
self-contained in back-quoted strings.


I believe this extract from d-mode.el

(defvar d-mode-syntax-table nil
  Syntax table used in d-mode buffers.)
(or d-mode-syntax-table
(setq d-mode-syntax-table
	 (let ((table (funcall (c-lang-const c-make-mode-syntax-table 
d

   ;; Make it recognize D `backquote strings`
   (modify-syntax-entry ?` \ table)

   ;; Make it recognize D's nested /+ +/ comments
   (modify-syntax-entry ?+  . 23n   table)
   table)))

is highly related to this problem but I don't understand the 
comment


   ;; Make it recognize D `backquote strings`

Ideas on how to fix this anyone?




Re: Compile-Time Interfaces (Concepts)

2014-07-21 Thread Atila Neves via Digitalmars-d-learn

On Thursday, 17 July 2014 at 22:52:37 UTC, Justin Whear wrote:

On Thu, 17 Jul 2014 22:49:30 +, Nordlöw wrote:


AFAIK there is no compile-time variant of interfaces right?

Why is that?

Wouldn't it be nice to say something like

 struct SomeRange realize InputRange {
 /* implement members of InputRange */
 }

and then the compiler will statically check that that all 
members are

implemented correctly.

I guess this requires some new syntax to describe what an 
InputRange is.


Kind of like C++ Concepts.


What benefits would accrue from adding this?  Static 
verification that a
structure implements the specified concepts?  If so, you can 
simply do

this instead:

static assert(isInputRange!SomeRange);


This is sufficient, but not adequate. Just as the built-in
unittest blocks with assertions, it's great when the assertion is
true but good luck finding out where the bug is when it's not.

The D Cookbook has an idiom to handle this by checking for __ctfe
but it's super hacky and there should be a better way.

I have lost count of how many times I wish the compiler would
help me with compile time interfaces as it does with runtime
code. static override and static interface? Yes please.

Atila


  1   2   >