Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-06 Thread Elin Pierce
Hi Jacob,

Just one last tip you might be interested in. The current iPhones have very 
good built-in GPS capability, less than 8m.

I used this to do surveys of birds, and I took photos at each sighting. The 
extended info for the photos will show Lat-Long for each — and also altitude!

Here is a weblink that explains quite well the GPS capability of the iPhone:

http://communityhealthmaps.nlm.nih.gov/2014/07/07/how-accurate-is-the-gps-on-my-smart-phone-part-2/

Good luck,
Elin Pierce, Ph.D.

-Original Message-
From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news
[mailto:ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] On Behalf Of Jacob Hadle
Sent: Monday, May 04, 2015 6:18 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

Thank you all for the helpful replies.  This gives me a lot to work with.

It seems that acquiring GPS coordinates should not be that difficult to
obtain on site, but we would prefer the accuracy to be 20m from were the
picture was taken.  Even course geo-references would be valuable as well.

I have one more small question to ask: for those of you who have used PS
cameras with built-in GPS units, were you able to view the lat/long in the
display view right after you took the picture?  Also, is it possible to
convert among different geo-coordinate systems (i.e. degrees minutes seconds
to decimal degree, etc.) in the settings view of some cameras?

Thank you,
Jacob


Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-05 Thread E Johansson
I used this method and it worked well.
http://tjhouston.com/2013/01/exporting-gps-data-from-a-folder-of-images-and-writing-to-a-text-file/

I compared an iPad and a PS Olympus GPS - I made me realize we need good
quality GPS.

Eva

On Mon, May 4, 2015 at 6:18 AM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

 Thank you all for the helpful replies.  This gives me a lot to work with.

 It seems that acquiring GPS coordinates should not be that difficult to
 obtain on site, but we would prefer the accuracy to be 20m from were the
 picture was taken.  Even course geo-references would be valuable as well.

 I have one more small question to ask: for those of you who have used PS
 cameras with built-in GPS units, were you able to view the lat/long in the
 display view right after you took the picture?  Also, is it possible to
 convert among different geo-coordinate systems (i.e. degrees minutes
 seconds to decimal degree, etc.) in the settings view of some cameras?

 Thank you,
 Jacob




 On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 1:52 PM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

  Hello,
 
  I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot
  digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired
  this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and
  dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture
  of each plant species and document their latitude and longitude
  coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that
  geotags each picture would seem to work well.
 
  The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much
  how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick
  up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and
  calling local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera
  would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found very little
  information about the accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS
  units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh
  G700 SE-M.
 
  If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units
  in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.
 
  Most grateful,
 
  Jacob
 
 



Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras (2)

2015-05-04 Thread Martin Obrist
Jacob

I own a Canon Powershot S100 camera with built in GPS. I think it is not 
available anymore, but I assume the newer cameras have similar systems built 
in, Picture quality is excellent, setting options too. GPS accuracy is quite 
good (few meters, if I compare locations on GIS), once the camera finds its 
position. Status of the GPS locating is indicated on the screen. You can even 
set the camera to log your track, without taking shots - but see comments 
below. Two points on top of the comments of Malcolm are to be considered:
- Finding a satellite fix for an accurate position can be painstakingly slow 
with the camera. I literally wait for several minutes, after having moved for 
long distances. That may have to do with resyncing the satellite almanach, but 
nevertheless slows your work.
- GPS operation is power hungry. You may want to take additional batteries 
(plural) into the field. It will burn your charge considerably quicker, if you 
use the track-logging mode mentioned above.

Regards

Martin


 Am 04.05.2015 um 06:00 schrieb ECOLOG-L automatic digest system 
 lists...@listserv.umd.edu:
 
 There are 2 messages totalling 165 lines in this issue.
 
 Topics of the day:
 
  1. Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras (2)
 
 --
 
 Date:Sun, 3 May 2015 14:52:48 -0400
 From:=?windows-1252?Q?Jacob_Hadle?= jjha...@gmail.com
 Subject: Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras
 
 Hello,
 
 I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot=20=
 
 digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired=20=
 
 this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and=20=
 
 dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture=20=
 
 of each plant species and document their latitude and longitude=20
 coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that=20
 geotags each picture would seem to work well.=20=20
 
 The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much=20=
 
 how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick=20=
 
 up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and=20=
 
 calling local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera=20
 would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found very little=20
 information about the accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS=20
 units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh=20=
 
 G700 SE-M.
 
 If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units=20=
 
 in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.=20
 
 Most grateful,
 
 Jacob

  Dr. Martin K. Obrist^v^
 ^v^
   Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL
   Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
   CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland
   MG D 52phone: ++41 44 739 24 66fax: ++41 44 739 22 15 
   E- mailto:martin.obr...@wsl.ch   WWW http://www.wsl.ch/fe/biodiversitaet/


Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-04 Thread karen golinski
Hi Jacob,

If you normally use a Garmin GPS, you can geotag your photos using the
Garmin Basecamp program. Just make sure your camera and GPS unit are set to
the same date/ timezone/ time, and enable the tracking function on your
GPS. Check out the instructions on this page:
http://garminbasecamp.wikispaces.com/Photos

I found that using the GPS function in my camera used a lot of battery
power, and my Garmin has better accuracy than my camera.

Karen



G. Karen Golinski
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Smithsonian Institution

On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 2:52 PM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hello,

 I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot
 digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired
 this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and
 dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture
 of each plant species and document their latitude and longitude
 coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that
 geotags each picture would seem to work well.

 The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much
 how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick
 up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and
 calling local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera
 would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found very little
 information about the accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS
 units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh
 G700 SE-M.

 If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units
 in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.

 Most grateful,

 Jacob



Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-04 Thread Erin Frolli
Hello Jacob,
On the flip side to having the most expensive/best camera, you can always
use your phone. There are lots of apps out there that allow you to take GPS
tracks/way points/even photos and create maps via google earth or other GPS
programs. And most of them are free.  One of my favorites is GPS
Essentials for android. It does all of the things I think you would need
at a decent resolution.


Most of the new phones these days take great pictures as well as has great
satellite tracking (though of course you are still subject to the things
others have listed for GPS quality). Depending on budget, photo quality and
GPS accuracy that that is needed for the project it may be a great
alternative for a better price. Just depends on what you are looking for.
Cheers,
Erin

On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 1:52 PM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hello,

 I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot
 digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired
 this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and
 dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture
 of each plant species and document their latitude and longitude
 coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that
 geotags each picture would seem to work well.

 The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much
 how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick
 up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and
 calling local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera
 would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found very little
 information about the accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS
 units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh
 G700 SE-M.

 If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units
 in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.

 Most grateful,

 Jacob




-- 

*Erin Frolli, M.S.*
Research Science Associate I
University of Texas, Marine Science Institute

750 Channel View Drive
Port Aransas, TX 78373
530.251.7172


Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-04 Thread Peter Morrison
 We have used quite a variety of GPS equipped cameras for the last 5 years
and the results have been quite mixed.  Most of the cameras have been point
and shoot Nikons (P6000, P510, P520, AW100, etc.) and two Panasonics.  Also
tried Nikon's GPS1 plug-in GPS on a DSLR and the relatively new D5300 DSLR
with GPS built in. The bottom line for all the cameras is that all they all
work, but they take a long time to get a GPS fix. The GPS also drains the
battery.  And the GPS is not all that accurate.

We are now using a good quality Garmin GPS (like the GPSmap G2sc) and
leaving it running during the entire field day. Then we download the tracks
from the GPS and use the excellent free software, Geosetter, to geotag the
photos. This method is much more accurate and reliable than the in-camera
GPS. It is easy and works great - with all cameras.  All you have to do is
record the time offset between your GPS and your camera. That is a critical
input parameter.  You can take a picture of the GPS screen displaying the
time with your camera to use for this time offset.  Or you can set your
camera time with the GPS so there is no time offset.

This is much easier than it may sound. We resisted geotagging this way for
years, but we finally realized that the camera GPS systems will never be
that good. 


Peter Morrison
Executive Director
Pacific Biodiversity Institute
PO Box 298
Winthrop, WA 98862
www.pacificbio.org


-Original Message-
From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news
[mailto:ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] On Behalf Of Jacob Hadle
Sent: Sunday, May 03, 2015 11:53 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

Hello,

I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot
digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired this
summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and dense
canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture of each
plant species and document their latitude and longitude coordinates. To
optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that geotags each picture
would seem to work well.  

The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much how
the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick up
coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and calling
local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera would have the
best GPS quality; however, I have found very little information about the
accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS units. I am currently looking
into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh G700 SE-M.

If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units in
the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts. 

Most grateful,

Jacob


Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-04 Thread Peter Morrison
Jacob,  Yes with the cameras I have used, you can view the lat/long when you
preview the photo - as long as you are showing all the photo information. 
And 2nd, I don't think you have the option to convert between formats.
Peter 

-Original Message-
From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news
[mailto:ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] On Behalf Of Jacob Hadle
Sent: Monday, May 04, 2015 6:18 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

Thank you all for the helpful replies.  This gives me a lot to work with.

It seems that acquiring GPS coordinates should not be that difficult to
obtain on site, but we would prefer the accuracy to be 20m from were the
picture was taken.  Even course geo-references would be valuable as well.

I have one more small question to ask: for those of you who have used PS
cameras with built-in GPS units, were you able to view the lat/long in the
display view right after you took the picture?  Also, is it possible to
convert among different geo-coordinate systems (i.e. degrees minutes seconds
to decimal degree, etc.) in the settings view of some cameras?

Thank you,
Jacob




On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 1:52 PM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hello,

 I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and 
 shoot digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have 
 acquired this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site 
 (open and dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to 
 take a picture of each plant species and document their latitude and 
 longitude coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a 
 camera that geotags each picture would seem to work well.

 The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much 
 how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will 
 pick up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time 
 online, and calling local camera stores researching which point and 
 shoot camera would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found 
 very little information about the accuracy and performance in these 
 built-in GPS units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot 
 D20 or the Ricoh G700 SE-M.

 If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units 
 in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.

 Most grateful,

 Jacob




Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-04 Thread Jacob Hadle
Thank you all for the helpful replies.  This gives me a lot to work with.

It seems that acquiring GPS coordinates should not be that difficult to
obtain on site, but we would prefer the accuracy to be 20m from were the
picture was taken.  Even course geo-references would be valuable as well.

I have one more small question to ask: for those of you who have used PS
cameras with built-in GPS units, were you able to view the lat/long in the
display view right after you took the picture?  Also, is it possible to
convert among different geo-coordinate systems (i.e. degrees minutes
seconds to decimal degree, etc.) in the settings view of some cameras?

Thank you,
Jacob




On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 1:52 PM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hello,

 I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot
 digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired
 this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and
 dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture
 of each plant species and document their latitude and longitude
 coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that
 geotags each picture would seem to work well.

 The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much
 how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick
 up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and
 calling local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera
 would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found very little
 information about the accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS
 units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh
 G700 SE-M.

 If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units
 in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.

 Most grateful,

 Jacob




Re: [ECOLOG-L] Built in GPS unit in Point and shoot cameras

2015-05-03 Thread Malcolm McCallum
Remember that you GPS signal is going to be affected by many things other
than the internal electronics. Things like over-story, cloud cover,
position of the satelites will all influence the data.  This is why when
people are doing stuff that requires solid datasets, they will place down
the GPS and let it record a series of points without moving it.  Then, you
put the points into the GIS and you are able to get an idea of the
precision.  It is also possible for you to geocorrect the coordinates.

I suggest that if you are seriously concerned about accuracy of less than a
meter that you use a model comparable to a Trimble XM or higher.  If your
accuracy can be within a hundred feet, its less serious.  I am not sure how
good garmins are these days, but all the GPS units are increasingly better
than only five years ago.

One option you could use is to take the GPS camera and take maybe a dozen
pictures of the exact same waypoint.  Do this at each of your study sites.
More pictures would be better.  Then, you take the coordinates for each
picture at each site, and average them.  This will give you a mean with SD
or SE.  This way, you will know the actual accuracy and precision of the
unit under the weather conditions at the site where you were collecting
data.  You can also check this against a better GPS unit if desiered.  By
doing this at one point, then moving about your site, you will know the
error and can report some kind of confidence in regard to the location of
each point where vegetation is photographed.  It will probably have pretty
consistent precision on any given day within a specific site.  This is a
fair assumption, but some testing at home or on campus should be conducted
to verify it.

one thing to also remember is that what is reported in the paperwork is
best case scenario.  The model will almost never reach this
precision/accuracy in teh field.  The high-dollar GPS units will be more
consistently close than the cheap toy models.

How important your accuracy and precision are in thsi study shoud be
critical in deciding whether to go with one of these models or going with a
genuine research grade unit. A geoexploer XM or higher is a few thousand
dollars last Iooked.

On Sun, May 3, 2015 at 1:52 PM, Jacob Hadle jjha...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hello,

 I have a question for those of you who are familiar with point and shoot
 digital cameras that have built-in GPS units. A project I have acquired
 this summer involves a plant inventory on a ~7,000 acres site (open and
 dense canopy areas). In part, the protocol requires us to take a picture
 of each plant species and document their latitude and longitude
 coordinates. To optimizes my time effectively, using a camera that
 geotags each picture would seem to work well.

 The main interests I have in the point and shoot camera in not so much
 how the quality the picture takes, but how accurate the camera will pick
 up coordinates. I have spent a considerable amount of time online, and
 calling local camera stores researching which point and shoot camera
 would have the best GPS quality; however, I have found very little
 information about the accuracy and performance in these built-in GPS
 units. I am currently looking into the Canon PowerShot D20 or the Ricoh
 G700 SE-M.

 If anyone has experience using digital cameras with built-in GPS units
 in the field, I would truly appreciate your thoughts.

 Most grateful,

 Jacob




-- 
Malcolm L. McCallum, PHD, REP
Environmental Studies Program
Green Mountain College
Poultney, Vermont
Link to online CV and portfolio :
https://www.visualcv.com/malcolm-mc-callum?access=18A9RYkDGxO

 “Nothing is more priceless and worthy of preservation than the rich array
of animal life with which our country has been blessed. It is a
many-faceted treasure, of value to scholars, scientists, and nature lovers
alike, and it forms a vital part of the heritage we all share as Americans.”
-President Richard Nixon upon signing the Endangered Species Act of 1973
into law.

Peer pressure is designed to contain anyone with a sense of drive - Allan
Nation

1880's: There's lots of good fish in the sea  W.S. Gilbert
1990's:  Many fish stocks depleted due to overfishing, habitat loss,
and pollution.
2000:  Marine reserves, ecosystem restoration, and pollution reduction
  MAY help restore populations.
2022: Soylent Green is People!

The Seven Blunders of the World (Mohandas Gandhi)
Wealth w/o work
Pleasure w/o conscience
Knowledge w/o character
Commerce w/o morality
Science w/o humanity
Worship w/o sacrifice
Politics w/o principle

Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message, including any
attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may
contain confidential and privileged information.  Any unauthorized
review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.  If you are not
the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and
destroy all copies of the original message.