Re: [O] How to make a non-GPL Org-mode exporter?

2015-07-28 Thread Andreas Hilboll
 Look here:
 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=GNU_General_Public_Licensesection=11#Libraries

 Most useful quote:

 The Free Software Foundation (which holds the copyright of several
 notable GPL-licensed software products and of the license text itself)
 asserts that an executable which uses a dynamically linked library is
 indeed a derivative work. This does not however apply to separate
 programs communicating with one another.
 
 Oleh,
 
 thanks for this link and excerpt.  I could argue that the key word in
 the excerpt is executable.  I cannot see how code written in elisp
 itself would need to be GPL.

Exactly.  To quote again
https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#IfInterpreterIsGPL:

   When the interpreter just interprets a language, the answer is no.
   The interpreted program, to the interpreter, is just data; a free
   software license like the GPL, based on copyright law, cannot limit
   what data you use the interpreter on. You can run it on any data
   (interpreted program), any way you like, and there are no
   requirements about licensing that data to anyone.

--
Andreas Hilboll



Re: [O] How to make a non-GPL Org-mode exporter?

2015-07-28 Thread Andreas Hilboll
On 28.07.2015 11:30, Oleh Krehel wrote:
 Andreas Hilboll li...@hilboll.de writes:
 
 Look here:
 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=GNU_General_Public_Licensesection=11#Libraries

 Most useful quote:

 The Free Software Foundation (which holds the copyright of several
 notable GPL-licensed software products and of the license text itself)
 asserts that an executable which uses a dynamically linked library is
 indeed a derivative work. This does not however apply to separate
 programs communicating with one another.
 
 thanks for this link and excerpt.  I could argue that the key word in
 the excerpt is executable.  I cannot see how code written in elisp
 itself would need to be GPL.

 Exactly.  To quote again
 https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#IfInterpreterIsGPL:

When the interpreter just interprets a language, the answer is no.
The interpreted program, to the interpreter, is just data; a free
software license like the GPL, based on copyright law, cannot limit
what data you use the interpreter on. You can run it on any data
(interpreted program), any way you like, and there are no
requirements about licensing that data to anyone.
 
 Just to link the paragraph exactly below the one you quoted
 
 However, when the interpreter is extended to provide “bindings” to
 other facilities (often, but not necessarily, libraries), the
 interpreted program is effectively linked to the facilities it uses
 through these bindings. So if these facilities are released under the
 GPL, the interpreted program that uses them must be released in a
 GPL-compatible way. The JNI or Java Native Interface is an example of
 such a binding mechanism; libraries that are accessed in this way are
 linked dynamically with the Java programs that call them. These
 libraries are also linked with the interpreter. If the interpreter is
 linked statically with these libraries, or if it is designed to link
 dynamically with these specific libraries, then it too needs to be
 released in a GPL-compatible way.
 
 Indeed, the Emacs interpreter gives bindings to all Emacs facilities,
 which are GPL, and the interpreted program that uses them must be
 released in a GPL-compatible way.

I would interpret this as

   As long as I write pure elisp and don't require' and GPL'ed part of
   Emacs, I can release my code under any license I want.  If I do
   require' any part of Emacs, I have to go the GPL path.

If I'm wrong with this interpretation, please explain why.

-- Andreas.



Re: [O] How to make a non-GPL Org-mode exporter?

2015-07-27 Thread Andreas Hilboll
On 27.07.2015 15:09, Greg Troxel wrote:
 
 Rainer M Krug rai...@krugs.de writes:
 
 These packages all depend on R itself.

 So isn't this the same as in emacs / elisp? Isn't an exporter / .el file
 the same as a package in R, something which enhances the original
 product using a provided interface (the functions) but does not change
 anything in the original program (R or emacs)?
 
 It's both the same and different.
 
 The legal question of whether R packages are derivative works of R is
 similar to the question of elisp packages that use editing primitives
 are derivative works of emacs.

https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#IfInterpreterIsGPL seems to
give an answer:

The interpreted program, to the interpreter, is just data; a free
software license like the GPL, based on copyright law, cannot limit what
data you use the interpreter on. You can run it on any data (interpreted
program), any way you like, and there are no requirements about
licensing that data to anyone.

[...]

Another similar and very common case is to provide libraries with the
interpreter which are themselves interpreted. For instance, Perl comes
with many Perl modules, and a Java implementation comes with many Java
classes. These libraries and the programs that call them are always
dynamically linked together.

A consequence is that if you choose to use GPL'd Perl modules or Java
classes in your program, you must release the program in a
GPL-compatible way, regardless of the license used in the Perl or Java
interpreter that the combined Perl or Java program will run on.


So if I understand this correctly, an R module can be non-GPL if and
only if it does not use any GPL'ed R modules.

Cheers,
  Andreas.



[O] Title/Author missing in Markdown export?

2015-04-28 Thread Andreas Hilboll
Using the current git master, any exported Markdown doesn't include
title, author, and date information.  Is this desired behaviour, or is
it a bug?

-- Andreas.



[O] Traking estimated time for TODO items

2015-01-23 Thread Andreas Hilboll
Dear org experts,

I have a bunch of TODOs which represent tasks that I'd like to do some
time.  When I end up having a certain amount of spare time, I'd like to
be able to get a list of all of these someday tasks which would fit
into the available time frame.  I.e., when I know I have about 30mins,
I'd like to see only those someday tasks which are estimated to be
shorter than 30 mins.

I'd like to see how people are dealing with this sort of thing.  One
easy possibility would be to have tags 1hr, 2hrs, 0hrs, etc.

I appreciate any ideas =)

Cheers,
  Andreas.



[O] How to access tables headers from within code block?

2014-11-18 Thread Andreas Hilboll

Hi,

I have a table like this

#+TBLNAME: t_tracers
| Trace gas | SCIATRAN alias |
|---+|
| O3| O3 |
| NO2   | NO2|
| HCHO  | HCHO   |
| CHOCHO| NO3|
| HONO  | OCLO   |
| BRO   | BRO|
| H2O   | H2O|
| O4| O4 |

and want to access the data from within a Python code block:

#+BEGIN_SRC python :var tracers_raw=t_tracers
return (tracers_raw)
#+END_SRC

My problem is that the table headers are apparently not passed to 
Python, as my results look like this:


#+RESULTS:
| O3 | O3   |
| NO2| NO2  |
| HCHO   | HCHO |
| CHOCHO | NO3  |
| HONO   | OCLO |
| BRO| BRO  |
| H2O| H2O  |
| O4 | O4   |

How can I access the table headers also from within the code block?

Thanks for you help,
  Andreas.



Re: [O] Help tangling

2014-04-03 Thread Andreas Hilboll
On 03.04.2014 01:05, Eric Schulte wrote:
 and the :tangle SConstruct

 yes

 #+Property: tangle SConstruct


 Thanks for your feedback, Eric!  However, it doesn't seem to work properly.

 The first two lines of my file read

#+OPTIONS: toc:4 h:4
#+PROPERTY: tangle SConstruct

 and I have several code blocks like

#+begin_src python
[...]
#+end_src

 However, when I invoke org-babel-tangle, I get the message Tangled 0
 code blocks from SConstruct.org, and no output file is created.

 Have I misunderstood you?  What am I doing wrong?

 
 You may have to C-c C-c on the property line so that it is re-read by
 Emacs (which normally only happens when opening the file).

Cool -- thanks =)

-- Andreas.



[O] Help tangling

2014-04-02 Thread Andreas Hilboll
Hi,

I want to write a SConstruct file (for SCons, a Python make
alternative) in orgmode, using literate programming.  So I have a file
SConstruct.org, where I include the code blocks with #+begin_src ...
#+end_src.  My question:

   How can I specify that *all* code blocks shall be tangled into one
single file called SConstruct?

I know I could do this by writing

   #+begin_src python :tangle SConstruct
   [...]
   #+end_src

instead of

   #+begin_src
   [...]
   #+end_src

but is there some way to define the python and the :tangle
SConstruct 'globally' for the whole file?

Thanks for helping me orgmode-newbie!

-- Andreas.



Re: [O] Help tangling

2014-04-02 Thread Andreas Hilboll
On 02.04.2014 23:04, Eric Schulte wrote:
 Andreas Hilboll li...@hilboll.de writes:
 
 Hi,

 I want to write a SConstruct file (for SCons, a Python make
 alternative) in orgmode, using literate programming.  So I have a file
 SConstruct.org, where I include the code blocks with #+begin_src ...
 #+end_src.  My question:

How can I specify that *all* code blocks shall be tangled into one
 single file called SConstruct?

 I know I could do this by writing

#+begin_src python :tangle SConstruct
[...]
#+end_src

 instead of

#+begin_src
[...]
#+end_src

 but is there some way to define the python
 
 no
 
 and the :tangle SConstruct
 
 yes
 
 #+Property: tangle SConstruct
 

Thanks for your feedback, Eric!  However, it doesn't seem to work properly.

The first two lines of my file read

   #+OPTIONS: toc:4 h:4
   #+PROPERTY: tangle SConstruct

and I have several code blocks like

   #+begin_src python
   [...]
   #+end_src

However, when I invoke org-babel-tangle, I get the message Tangled 0
code blocks from SConstruct.org, and no output file is created.

Have I misunderstood you?  What am I doing wrong?

Cheers, Andreas.

 'globally' for the whole file?

 Thanks for helping me orgmode-newbie!

 
 Best,
 

 -- Andreas.

 


-- 
-- Andreas.