Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Gary McMurtry
Robert, Joe, et al., We've been down this road before. Even if the folklore (?) about the blueprints being stored in a trailer that burned is true, there is at least one Saturn V left--on display at Johnson Space Center in Houston, possibly yet another in Huntley, Alabama--that could be

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Michael Turner
Joe Latrell writes, in response to Robert Bradbury, about the loss of Saturn V design information: ... if the Rocketdyne people kept anything about how the engines were built, then we could design a HLLV (heavy lift launch vehicle) that could lift significantly more than

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Michael Turner
I am no fan of Tricky Dick, but his decision on funding a penny-wise- pound-foolish compromised design for future space transportation has to be put into political perspective -- I don't think it was simply a swipe at JFK's legacy. Apollo was, after all, planned with the idea in mind that it

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Joe Latrell
Michael, I do not pine for the old days of apollo - I just want the technology. The engines were fabulous and as pointed out could probably be reverse engineered. An HLLV would be a fantastic addition to our lift capabilities. According to my calculations, $250 Million divided by 100 tons

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Michael Turner
Joe writes: I do not pine for the old days of apollo - I just want the technology. The engines were fabulous and as pointed out could probably be reverse engineered. An HLLV would be a fantastic addition to our lift capabilities. According to my calculations, $250

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread James McEnanly
I seem to recall that in the wake of the Challenger accident, Hughes was working on something called a Jarvis launcher http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/jarvis.htm, which used components from the Saturn V. this would be very difficult if the tooling and blueprints were destroyed.Michael Turner [EMAIL

The true colors of Europa

2003-09-06 Thread LARRY KLAES
A very interesting look at the Galilean worlds in their real appearances to our eyes: http://pirlwww.lpl.arizona.edu/HIIPS/EPO/gallery.html Larry

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread LARRY KLAES
Since we are speculating here, I would like to ask: Would a Space Elevator pay for itself in the end? http://www.highliftsystems.com/ Some day we are going to look back at rockets and think how utterly crude and dangerous they were as a means to leave Earth. Larry- Original Message

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Ok, the best information I been advised of at this time (from what I would call semi-authoritative sources) is that the blueprints for the Saturn V are preserved on microfilm. However they would be insufficient because apparently there were on-the-fly modifications made by the

mass drivers for earth-to-orbit cargo lift (was Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V)

2003-09-06 Thread Michael Turner
Robert (or maybe Larry) writes: I suspect I'd lean towards a mass-driver + small rocket combination before I'd go with a space elevator. The nice thing about robotic missions is that they can be hurled off a mass-driver at much higher velocity (due to higher G-force acceleration) than can