Re: Failure IS an option

2001-06-09 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Bruce wrote: ... for the simple reason that MGS' photos have a top resolution of fully 1.4 meters per pixel -- which means there's no way they could possibly show the lander as anything more than a speck composed of 2 or 3 pixels, which would thus show absolutely nothing about its landing

Re: Chemoautotrophas

2001-06-14 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
And isn't sulfides one thing that Europa has in spades? National Geographic recently had an article about a cave in Mexico that abounds in strange forms of acid loving bacteria... I'll try to dig up a reference if anyone's interested. The book you want to read is Dark Life by Michael Ray

What about the power source?

2001-10-04 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
I was under the impression that there was still no solution, particularly no flight-tested solution to the problem of a long term radioactive power source. Has this problem been solved? If so do they plan to test it in space before they fly it all the way to Jupiter? Thanks, Robert == You

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-08 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sun, 7 Oct 2001, Bruce Moomaw wrote: NASA believes it has whittled its $4.8 billion shortfall on the Space Station to about $500 million, but that only buys a three-man crew -- barely enough to keep the station operating, and woefully inadequate for 'world-class science'. To my way of

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-08 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 8 Oct 2001, Gary McMurtry wrote: So, we got it. Now, we have the space station to give the shuttles someplace to go when they're not launching satellites, fixing telescopes, bore-bore-bore, etc. I've read someplace, perhaps The Case for Mars, that the space station was designed

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-08 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 8 Oct 2001, Bruce Moomaw wrote: It's what it has been from the start: some kind of thermionic nuclear generator converting the heat from Pu-238 into electrical energy. However, NASA would like to develop a new system more efficient at this conversion than the current RTGs, thereby

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-08 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 8 Oct 2001, David M Harland wrote: I disagree, the problem is its functionality has been pared back to much, it needs to be expanded! Hogwash. Its real cost was always ridiculously disproportionate to the size of the scientific benefits it would supposedly produce -- that,

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-08 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 8 Oct 2001, Bruce Moomaw wrote: Forgive me for saying so, but you have a complete bee in your bonnet on the urgency of asteroid deflection. Bruce, it is precisely because I understand the laws of statistics that I have such a bee. I have sat at the roulette tables in Las Vegas

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-08 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Tue, 9 Oct 2001, David M Harland wrote: There is no viable alternative to the Shuttle for human spaceflight. It is now running about as efficiently as it ever will. It is simply a costly business. Huh? Does anyone know what the costs are for the Russian missions? If they will take

Re: More jolly Space Station news

2001-10-09 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 8 Oct 2001, Bruce Moomaw wrote: From: David M Harland [EMAIL PROTECTED] INDUSTRIAL SPACE FACILITY [snip] In reality, however, this revolutionary start-up deal had its origins in the Reagan administration's July 1984 call for commercialisation of space operations, and this was

Re: Europa Orbiter's nuclear power source

2001-10-11 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Thu, 11 Oct 2001, Bruce Moomaw wrote: The US currently has enough domestic Pu-238 to fuel any one of these RTGs (enough for the Pluto probe) -- but not two of them (and Europa Orbiter by itself would require two). I assume this is because you are assuming a lander and not just an

Re: The Great Mars Chlorophyll Flap

2002-04-06 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 5 Apr 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote: Nevertheless, the flap has begun (this sort of thing always sells newspapers, after all). I shudder to report that CNN, in its new headline story on the subject, doesn't even bother to mention that 4 of the spots were on the spacecraft and so

Re: NASA MOVES FORWARD ON HUMAN MISSIONS TO MOON, MARS AND ASTEROIDS

2002-09-27 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 27 Sep 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote: Chris Cantrell wrote: But part of me wishes that I couldn't remember the Apollo days ... I wish I had been born generations later when it would be possible to take my passion for SCUBA to the ocean of Europa. Of course, given the increasing

Re: NASA MOVES FORWARD ON HUMAN MISSIONS TO MOON, MARS AND ASTEROIDS

2002-09-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sat, 28 Sep 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: Robert, your enthusiasm is astounding. Where are the off-the-shelf microplate sapphire suits? Sorry, not here yet. We can't even assemble sapphire at the molecular level yet. But we do have a design for an internalized sapphire wet-suit:

Re: NASA MOVES FORWARD ON HUMAN MISSIONS TO MOON, MARS AND ASTEROIDS

2002-09-29 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sun, 29 Sep 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED], commenting on my comments wrote: A vasculoid system is apparently a concept for the creation of billions of nanosized platelets, to cover the internal surfaces of every blood vessel in the human body, and increase the efficiency of blood, by replacing

Life and SETI [was RE: Survival of the Flattest]

2002-10-09 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Tue, 8 Oct 2002, Gary McMurtry wrote: In the collection is an article by Ian Crawford entitled Where Are They?, subtitled Maybe we are alone in the galaxy after all. I found this article thought provoking to say the least. Crawford uses the SETI results to date to suggest that we

Re: Life and SETI [was RE: Survival of the Flattest]

2002-10-09 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Wed, 9 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED], responding to my comments, wrote: He suggests that we can't find suns transmitting signals, because those suns are already cloaked, and pumping energy into vast 'ringworlds'. Actually, more like sphere-worlds but that is a technical detail. I'd have

Re: So what should the first words on Europa be?

2002-10-09 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Wed, 9 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: 'Crap, 100 billion tons of ice, and no scotch for 10 billion miles!' Actually, my brief back of the envelope calculations suggest that it would be more likely to be ~58 peta-miles (58 quadrillion miles). I suspect the amount of ice is off by a

Re: [Spaceref-daily] The Mars Institute: A New Resource for a New Century of...

2002-10-18 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Thu, 17 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: I shall rise to that challenge, Robert. I'm not a scientist per se, but I do like to tell myself that I am at times, rational. On my better days, I can make that claim too! :-) Dismantling Mars is not going to happen, ever. This is more a

Re: Icepick

2002-10-22 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Scott wrote: Who are the key players? How can I get involved? By leaning on NASA to do some out-of-the-box thinking. I wrote a long letter on Sunday to the NEO search folks and the NEXT folks (who are proposing the Earth-moon L1 station) suggesting that they combine their interests. Leaving

Re: Drake still sticking with estimate of 10K civs in MWG

2002-10-11 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 11 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: I'm not convinced the Drake Formula is complete. After all, presume that there are 100 billion stars in the galaxy. I believe the numbers are up to around 400 billion at this time. Not all of them will be positioned well. Clearly true -- the

Re: Drake still sticking with estimate of 10K civs in MWG

2002-10-12 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 11 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: One can easily take technological progress and project it. How? Could anyone living in 1950 have predicted the personal computer? That isn't relevant. The paper I cited has a graph showing an exponential increase in telescope collecting area.

Re: Drake still sticking with estimate of 10K civs in MWG

2002-10-12 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 11 Oct 2002, LARRY KLAES wrote: My question is, aside from most of our television programs, political and religious attitudes, and our general backwards behavior, what would or could we do to annoy such an advanced society to the point of earning their wrath? Well, gee that sounds

RE: [Spaceref-daily] The Mars Institute: A New Resource for a New Century of Mar (fwd)

2002-10-17 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Mickey Schmidt observed: How will this organization (Mars Institute) do anything that the Mars Society is not already set up to do? It looks like they are positioning themselves to divide and dilute the community interested persons who want to further Mars Exploration, support, and

RE: [Spaceref-daily] The Mars Institute: A New Resource for a New Century of Mar (fwd)

2002-10-17 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Thu, 17 Oct 2002, Gary McMurtry wrote: What? Dismantle Mars? No way! Some of us like it just fine the way it is. In fact, let me be one of the first (this week?) to call for an International Mars Preserve, for science, culture, etc. like we've done for Antarctica. Hey Gary, its nice

No power sources available

2002-10-27 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sun, 27 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: Two key points: the word 'future', suggests 'someday, when/if we get the technology, we might do something like this'. Forget it. This is not about someday. This is about NOW. This is the future. It's 2002. The parts are out there. They

Re: Ice phases, etc.

2002-10-27 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sun, 27 Oct 2002, Gary McMurtry wrote: Also, why worry about the power source for a demo? Because if it isn't realistic enough it gets labeled a 'joke'. Its a no brainer that if I stick a radiative ball on the top of a glacier connected to an endless supply of steam that its going to melt

Re: Radio control v. Wire... and 1 part or 2?

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 28 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: Are we going to have this thing radio controlled or a cable/wire attached to it? From the CalTech glaciology website... For electromagnetic waves with frequencies from 5 to 300 MHz the loss of energy by absorption in ice is sufficiently small

Re: Some more thoughts on Proteus/IcePIC

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 28 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: Shouldn't we include in our goals a cryobot and hydrobot that could test for life in a place like Lake Vostok? The folks from NSF/NASA are working on this. Its been an ongoing effort for a decade or more. Serious scientists will scream very

Re: Working Model Points Addressed

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sun, 27 Oct 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: (By the way, the Cryobot does NOT generate hydraulic pressure when it melts ice -- quite apart from the fact that any such pressure would be in every direction anyway, remember that water ice is one of the very few substances that SHRINKS when it

Re: No power sources available

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
It is worth noting that according to: http://helios.jpl.nasa.gov/%7Ebehar/AntWebSite/MainPage/documents/JPLAntIceProbe.pdf Slide #26 of 48, that the Hot-water jet drilling required 480kw of power. That is *not* a small amount of power (its approximately equal to 24 homes drawing their full

RE: No power sources available

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Robert, If I understand this correctly, lithium makes lithium hydroxide and hydrogen after being exposed to water. Could there be a chemical way to revitalize this process without adding tons of materials? Is anyone on this list a chemical engineer? Generally speaking in chemistry you are

RE: Radio control v. Wire... and 1 part or 2?

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 28 Oct 2002, Reeve, Jack W. wrote: A few miles of light-transmitting fiber spooled out behind the cryobot shouldn't weigh any more than the proposed transmission pucks. Also, if a metallic filament were adjacent the optical line(s), it could be periodically heated to reposition and

RE: No power sources available

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 28 Oct 2002, Christlieb, Scott F. wrote: One grenade would go through the whole cabinet in a few moments. On a larger scale, could we control and direct this type of energy to quickly clear a path for Icepick? It would be a fast way to the bottom of the ice. The problem is that

RE: No power sources available

2002-10-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 28 Oct 2002, Robert Crawley wrote: Yes, that should work nicely. Let's see... drop grenade on ice. Wait 30-45 minutes. Drop grenade #2 down the hole. Wait a few minutes before it gets to the bottom. Wait another 30-45 minutes. Drop grenade #3... this might take a little while. Rob,

Power requirements

2002-10-29 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
In response to my inquiry to Dr. Behar, he provided the following information: The 2 20KW generators was for electric power, to run pumps, controls, computers, etc. The 480KW was what was calculated to be produced from burning diesel to heat up the water. So we are *not* talking a small

Re: Heating and Power

2002-11-01 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 1 Nov 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: I know some debates have surfaced over batteries. The pro's for batteries as I see them are: [snip] I would strongly urge people to *read* the materials available on the web about previous cryobot efforts. You are *NOT* going to get 400+ kW out

Re: Power Source

2002-11-03 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sat, 2 Nov 2002, Gail Leatherwood wrote: The original concept proposed motorcycle batteries for the power source, primarily, I think, because of their small size. How long would they continue providing enough current to melt the ice enough for the vehicle to sink? For about 2 minutes.

Re: Power Source

2002-11-05 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 4 Nov 2002 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: What about rocks?? You have to come up with a scheme to navigate around the rocks anyway -- you sure aren't going to melt them. You also may hit patches of salt. That too requires a lot more energy to melt than ice -- though not as much as rock.

Re: Guidance System for Icepick I, and Cryobot thoughts

2002-11-05 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 4 Nov 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote: As for mechanical drilling through ice rather than melting; it can be done, but all the studies conducted over the past few years have concluded that, on balance, it requires much more energy expenditure than hot-water jet melting. There might also

Europan Lava Lamp

2002-11-11 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Red Freckles On Europa Suggest Lava Lamp Action http://www.sciencedaily.org/releases/2002/11/02071410.htm == You are subscribed to the Europa Icepick mailing list: [EMAIL PROTECTED] Project information and list (un)subscribe info: http://klx.com/europa/

Re: Great Moments on the Space Frontier (continued)

2002-11-20 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Wed, 20 Nov 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote: Soyuz 5S/TMA-211, the new CRV (crew return vehicle) docked at the DC-1 compartment, currently has no altimeter (VP) for the terminal landing phase. [snip] I've been trying, so far unsuccessfully, to get word from Sen. Bond on whether he still

RE: Titan: Exploring the origins of life

2002-12-12 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Thu, 12 Dec 2002, Reeve, Jack W. wrote: Titan's tale of a potentially bio-generative molecular soup existing at another temperature realm begs the question: How many of these temperature realms are there where an appropriate liquid solvent provides a medium for genesis? Robert Freitas

Re: Plutonium is the latest superconductor

2002-12-25 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 2 Dec 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote: On Dec 2, 2002, James McEnanly wrote: Is there a stable plutonium isotope? Nope -- the highest atomic-number element to have any stable isotopes is bismuth (# 83). According to the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, the most stable Pu isotopes

Re: Plutonium is the latest superconductor

2002-12-25 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Wed, 25 Dec 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote, in response to my comments: It isn't clear to me whether it has been determined that all of [Pu's] isotopes are superconducting. I would doubt it. Actually, I imagine all Pu isotopes are superconducting, [snip] Sorry, I wasn't clear. I was

Re: Plutonium is the latest superconductor

2002-12-27 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 27 Dec 2002, Bruce Moomaw wrote: [snip] In short -- though I still don't know for certain -- I still imagine that there are no differences in the superconductive ability of the different isotopes of an element. Bruce -- a quick Google on superconductivty isotope turns up a fair

Re: 'NASA Sets its Sights on Nuclear Rocket to Mars

2003-01-17 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 17 Jan 2003, Bruce Moomaw wrote: Starting this program at this particular time strikes me as absolutely harebrained; but then this administration seems to specialize in the harebrained, particularly in recent months. You will get no argument from me with respect to our harebrained

RE: 'NASA Sets its Sights on Nuclear Rocket to Mars

2003-01-18 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 17 Jan 2003, Thomas Green wrote: Yeesh! and I thought I was a pessimist :-) As far as can NASA do anything useful for $1B and innovate? Get a grip!! NEAR: total mission cost of $200m Pathfinder: total mission cost of $260m Is this unreasonable costs? Inefficient? Seems

Better heat shielding

2003-02-03 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
I believe that I've read articles that much better heat shielding materials have been developed since the shuttle tile system was created. Does anyone know what these materials might be and who is developing them? Also, does anyone know the heat tolerance of the tiles on the shuttles is?

RE: What the hell?!!

2003-02-20 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Jack wrote: How could the foam hit the shuttle at 500mph??? [snip] Now, ask yourself, did that 2 lb piece of plastic do much damage to the aluminum alloy leading edge of that wing? [more snips] Though I hate to bring it up in the Europa discussion, I think the comment points out how much

Re: Life on Europa: So what?

2003-02-21 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Fri, 21 Feb 2003, Rulx Narcisse wrote: It is important to know about the origin of life! When we know our origin, we know ourselves. Rulx, with all respect, it isn't of much use to know oneself if one second later one is extinct. I have a strong drive to know my origin and know what

RE: Life on Europa: So what?

2003-02-22 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Sat, 22 Feb 2003, Gary McMurtry wrote: Please don't forget that if you argue for panspermia (like Earth-born life on Europa or vice versa) you are presupposing the answer to the question of how unique the origin of life may be. Let me say that I'm not arguing for panspermia -- but I do

RE: Life on Europa: So what?

2003-02-23 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Some of these points may be useful for the list (which is why I'm posting it there). On Sat, 22 Feb 2003, Gary McMurtry wrote: The concept that DNA may not be the most efficient or reliable information carrier is intriguing. There are days (not many mind you) when I even amaze myself...

RE: What about intelligent life on Europa?

2003-02-24 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 24 Feb 2003, CHRIS CANTRELL wrote: Depending on how intelligent you mean, civilization (as we know it) must eventually learn to produce rapid and intense energy e.g. fire in order to grow technologically. Strongly agree -- technology is the issue and that would seem to require fire

Re: What about intelligent life on Europa?

2003-02-24 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 24 Feb 2003, adam . wrote: Personally i think it is very possible for intelligent life forms to evolve naturally on Europa. Adam, you need to make a better case than simply thinking. I would say a good place to start is in calculating free energy fluxes. On Earth one has at least a

RE: What about intelligent life on Europa?

2003-02-24 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 24 Feb 2003, Eugen Leitl wrote: There are not many sources of such utilizable entropy gradients on Europa. Direct photons are the least important of them, it's probably magnetic trap proton irradiation and chemothrophy harkening back to the original molecular nebula. Put much more

Re: What about intelligent life on Europa?

2003-02-25 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Wed, 26 Feb 2003, H Frank Benford wrote: Cats don't have the physical capability of opening a jar(paw with oposable thumb) whereas an Octopus does(tentacles). It took one time showing my cat how to open a door and my house hasn't been safe since. Typical example of the linear thinking on

Bruce in print

2003-02-26 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
I'm sure Bruce ends up in print a lot, but I just ran across this Space Daily piece from a few days ago. Lost in LEO http://www.spacedaily.com/news/oped-03q1.html Robert == You are subscribed to the Europa Icepick mailing list: [EMAIL PROTECTED] Project information and list (un)subscribe

Columbia analysis and space exploration

2003-02-26 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
(I wrote much of this first to Bruce and John offlist, but I realized upon re-reading that it might have general list significance.) I would tend to agree with John that we may want to simply let the investigation run its course. Unfortunately the news media seem to be turning up revealing

Re: WORRY ABOUT INCOMING

2003-02-28 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Chris, The meteor crater in Arizona was formed about 45,000 years ago. I'm not much on statistics, but an interesting guess might be that such a strike has a probability of 1/45,000 per year. This strike was a small one. True, but would you want it to happen in your city? Zodiacal dust

Europa energy fluxes

2003-03-03 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 3 Mar 2003, CHRIS CANTRELL wrote: No matter how simple the organisms are, it would be nice to get a DNA (or RNA) sequence just to compare to life here on Earth. That assumes, of course, that RNA will be the genetic mechanism for Europa too. Making this argument (seriously) requires

Re: Europa energy fluxes

2003-03-03 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Joe, I still see issues with what I will call volume of scale. Agreed. Does one want a larger number of smaller craft with a fair amount of redundancy or a smaller number of larger craft with perhaps greater capabilities? And does one deal with the volume of the Europa ocean better with a

Re: Europa energy fluxes

2003-03-04 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Tue, 4 Mar 2003, Eugen Leitl wrote: It's one big petri dish. If there's life, it's closely related. If it isn't, it's a giant data blip that life emerges rather effortlessly, and that crosscontamination is way harder than we think despite ample material transport. Eugen's points are

SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-05 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
The recent release of the CAIB report has caused both hearings in Congress as well as lots of speculations, e.g.: http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/09/05/1731237mode=threadtid=134tid=160tid=98tid=99 Obviously if we had inexpensive heavy lift capacity today, the entire debate about

Re: Prometheus propulsion

2003-09-05 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Wed, 2 Jul 2003, Christopher England wrote: Ion propulsion is efficient but low in thrust (like ounces of force). Chemical propulsion will be needed for high thrust needs like fast orbital capture, landing and takeoff. Chris, has anyone done an analysis to determine whether one could

Re: SPACE: Loss of the Saturn V

2003-09-06 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Ok, the best information I been advised of at this time (from what I would call semi-authoritative sources) is that the blueprints for the Saturn V are preserved on microfilm. However they would be insufficient because apparently there were on-the-fly modifications made by the

Re: Prometheus propulsion

2003-09-12 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 8 Sep 2003, Christopher England wrote: If nano-devices could do this better, I'm for it. Yes, of course. I think it is an interesting area because I am not aware of anyone, even Drexler, who has investigated this (the limits of ion propulsion). But there is a *lot* of older work on

Re: Rose's Web site

2004-09-04 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
Michael Turner [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: And I'm going to start with what I think is a pretty reasonable assumption: Europa may actually fit the profile of a very average, life-bearing planet in the universe. Most life in the universe may originate from oceans on planets around gas giants.

Re: [esa_general] Stunning new images of Titan!

2005-01-17 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 17 Jan 2005, Eugen Leitl wrote: On Sun, Jan 16, 2005 at 06:13:09PM -0800, Mark Schnitzius wrote: only give us two hours on the surface, and that was exceeding expectations. You want a problem that relates to Europa? There's a problem that relates to Europa. If politics

Extrasolar system science [was: Solar System Science] with SKA

2005-02-14 Thread Robert J. Bradbury
On Mon, 24 Jan 2005, LARRY KLAES wrote: Astrophysics, abstract: astro-ph/0409220 From: Bryan Butler [view emailhttp://arxiv.org/auth/show-email/1e326a36/astro-ph/0409220] Date: Thu, 9 Sep 2004 12:48:16 GMT (1386kb) Solar System Science with SKA Authors: B. J.