Re: being inside a universe

2002-07-02 Thread Tim May
is a professional physicist, and has done much good work on conventional cosmology, so I'm not dissing him. More on this later. --Tim May -- Timothy C. May [EMAIL PROTECTED]Corralitos, California Political: Co-founder Cypherpunks/crypto anarchy/Cyphernomicon Technical: physics/soft errors

Egan's All Topologies Model--an excerpt

2002-07-04 Thread Tim May
turned out to be favorable to life. 85 It was the old anthropic principle, the fudge which had saved a thousand cosmologies. And I had no real argument with it even if all the other universes were destined to be forever hypothetical. --end excerpt-- --Tim May (.sig for Everything list

Re: being inside a universe

2002-07-05 Thread Tim May
on some computer. I have a hard time conceiving of how so much interesting mathematics would exist with simple local CA rules. But I could be wrong. :-) ) --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category

Some books on category and topos theory

2002-07-05 Thread Tim May
that I speak about Goldblatt, because of Tim May who dares to refer to algebra, category and topos! I want mention that Goldblatt did wrote an excellent introduction to Toposes: Topoi. (One of the big problem in topos theory is which plural chose for the word topos. There are two schools: topoi

Re: Some books on category and topos theory

2002-07-05 Thread Tim May
On Friday, July 5, 2002, at 01:16 PM, Tim May wrote: The category and topos theory books I actually _own_ (bought through Amazon) are: Oops! I left out one of the most important and accessible of the books I have and recommend: * McLarty, Colin, Elementary Categories, Elementary Toposes

The relevance of category and topos theory

2002-07-07 Thread Tim May
areas. I'll keep you all posted! --Tim May

Fwd: being inside a universe

2002-07-08 Thread Tim May
I got a bounce ( - The following addresses had permanent fatal errors - |flist everything-list (expanded from: [EMAIL PROTECTED]) so I'm trying to send this a second time: Begin forwarded message: From: Tim May [EMAIL PROTECTED] Date: Mon Jul 08, 2002 12:17:27 PM US

Which universe are we in?

2002-07-08 Thread Tim May
is that it simply defines omniscience as being enough to have complete knowledge. There is no evidence that such omniscience is possible, not even with all the computer power in the universe.) --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current

Re: Which universe are we in?

2002-07-08 Thread Tim May
.) --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Re: Some books on category and topos theory

2002-07-09 Thread Tim May
for at least the _next_ decade. My apologies if this explanation of enthusiasm is too personal for you the reader, but I think enthusiasm is a good thing. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos

Fwd: Which universe are we in?

2002-07-09 Thread Tim May
different, perhaps. --Tim May --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Re: Some books on category and topos theory

2002-07-09 Thread Tim May
categorial. Functors are the morphisms between categories. The first chapter of Yetter's book is an intro to category theory, the second one, on Knot theory, ... Exciting stuff. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main

Pointers to places in vast spaces

2002-07-10 Thread Tim May
the topology and geometry of life space: we know something about what nearness means, through single-point mutations and their effects of organism viability, and we are learning what rearrangements and insertions of string sequences may mean.) --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA

Causality

2002-07-12 Thread Tim May
organs are part of the package. But I have no particular philosophical or cognitive special competence in this area, so I won't participate in the debate. Maybe later I will turn my attention to it. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel

Re: Causality

2002-07-14 Thread Tim May
to think about and respond to tonight.) --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Plurality of Worlds

2002-07-16 Thread Tim May
at David Lewis's work. It's a bit off the beaten track for most MWI thinkers, but it clearly deals with the same general ideas. And it offers new language and new tools. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-12 Thread Tim May
this relates to cosmology. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-13 Thread Tim May
reason about the entire Universe or Multiverse unless we can reason about very simple sub-parts of it. In any case, it's my particular interest at this time. I hope this helps clarify things a bit. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-13 Thread Tim May
On Tuesday, August 13, 2002, at 10:08 AM, Tim May wrote: This graph, this set of vertices and edges, is a per-ordered set. More than just a set, any category with the property that between any two objects p and q there is AT MOST one arrow p -- q is said to be pre-ordered. I meant

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-13 Thread Tim May
On Monday, August 12, 2002, at 11:18 PM, Wei Dai wrote: Tim, I'm afraid I still don't understand you. On Mon, Aug 12, 2002 at 06:00:26PM -0700, Tim May wrote: It is possible that WWIII will happen before the end of this year. In one possible world, A, many things are one way...burned

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-13 Thread Tim May
as the math of nonstandard logic goes, I think the most interesting application within our lifetimes will come with AI. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-13 Thread Tim May
On Tuesday, August 13, 2002, at 06:16 PM, Wei Dai wrote: On Tue, Aug 13, 2002 at 10:08:50AM -0700, Tim May wrote: * Because toposes are essentially mathematical universes in which various bits and pieces of mathematics can be assumed. A topos in which Euclid's Fifth Postulate is true

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-13 Thread Tim May
to believe. --Tim May That the said Constitution shall never be construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms. --Samuel Adams

Re: modal logic and possible worlds

2002-08-17 Thread Tim May
). --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Recurrence in the universe

2002-08-17 Thread Tim May
by such a recurrence.) Nietzsche had similar ideas of the eternal recurrence, circa 1870. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel

Re: Doomsday-like argument in cosmology

2002-08-18 Thread Tim May
the visible Universe. --Tim May (who also thinks the difficulty of time-reversing things like ripples in a pond, radiation in general, and all sorts of other things makes the Poincare recurrence a useful topological dynamics idea, but one of utterly no cosmological significance)

Entropy, Time's Arrow, and Urns

2002-08-18 Thread Tim May
Hal has brought up Huw Price's book, Time's Arrow and Arhimedes' Point, and especially the thermodynamic/entropy arguments related to recurrence a la Poincare, Boltzmann, and others. A point Price makes several times is th ..though it needs to be borne in mind that not everyone had a clear

Re: Entropy, Time's Arrow, and Urns

2002-08-18 Thread Tim May
(A minor typo is corrected) On Sunday, August 18, 2002, at 01:00 PM, Tim May wrote: In Sequence One, the two urns are filled with stones of mixed color at the start of the film. As the main transfers stones, the number of black and white stones in each of the urns fluctuates

Re: Yetter's Functorial Knot Theory and the Mind/Body Problem

2002-08-21 Thread Tim May
. And motivated me to finish reading Huw Price's book. This is the real blessing of mailing lists like this one! I may now be motivated to understand the kinds of logic you discuss if only to try to refute you! (no offense intended) --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA

Time

2002-08-31 Thread Tim May
Barbour, Kip Thorne, and others. I didn't buy the issue. Meanwhile, my study of lattice and order continues. I'll say more in the future (if it exists, that is). --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest

Time as a Lattice of Partially-Ordered Causal Events or Moments

2002-09-02 Thread Tim May
. --Tim May

Re: Time as a Lattice of Partially-Ordered Causal Events or Moments

2002-09-02 Thread Tim May
, are the points of intersection between logic and geometry. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Re: Time as a Lattice of Partially-Ordered Causal Events or Moments

2002-09-03 Thread Tim May
for dealing with quantum cosmology, it is also the right logic for dealing with a huge number of other things. --Tim May

Re: Time as a Lattice of Partially-Ordered Causal Events or Moments

2002-09-03 Thread Tim May
On Tuesday, September 3, 2002, at 02:21 PM, scerir wrote: Tim May: I don't have a comprehensive theory of time, but I am very fond of causal time. Sometimes we read papers saying there is now experimental evidence that quantum phenomena are a-causal or non

Re: Time as a Lattice of Partially-Ordered Causal Events or Moments

2002-09-04 Thread Tim May
along to a fairly predictable conclusion.) I hope this explains why I don't look to Egan's fictional character for actual theories, just stimulation. --Tim May

Re: Time as a Lattice of Partially-Ordered Causal Events or Moments

2002-09-04 Thread Tim May
, etc. are perhaps defined by 40-digit or even 200-digit numbers, the Laplacian dream of a suffiicently powerful mind being able to know the future is dashed. Unpredictability, or randomness, arises even in a fully classical real world. --Tim May As my father told me long ago, the objective

MWI, Copenhage, Randomness

2002-09-04 Thread Tim May
On Wednesday, September 4, 2002, at 02:44 PM, Hal Finney wrote: Tim May wrote: In weaker forms of the MWI, where it's the early state of the Big Bang (for example) which are splitting off into N universes, De Witt and others have speculated (as early as around 1970) that we may

Re: MWI, Copenhagen, Randomness

2002-09-05 Thread Tim May
Zeilinger papers on delayed-choice and double-slit experiments, but haven't had a chance to read them except by skimming.) --Tim May

Time-varying sets and modal logic

2002-09-09 Thread Tim May
of a coin, for example, form a fork which is part of a poset. The outcomes, H or T, do not obey the usual law of trichotomy, hence the set is a poset. I outlined this in earlier posts as well. --Tim May

Good article in American Scientist on cosmology and cosmic background variations

2002-09-17 Thread Tim May
I took a quick look at a newstand copy of American Scientist, the current issue. A good article on variations in the cosmic background and how this might be able to give some indications about very early forks taken in the evolution of the universe we are in. In other news, am reading Graham

Re: MWI of relativistic QM

2002-09-20 Thread Tim May
and branes, spin foams, twistors, etc.), is to unify these two fundamentally different outlooks. As of now, this hasn't happened. * Personally, I think there is much of interest in the discrete at Planck scales relational approach. --Tim May

New special issue of Scientific American on Cosmology

2002-09-20 Thread Tim May
. But this reasoning is speculative and needs a lot more thought...maybe. Someone could probably write a nice Baxterian story with this theme.) --Tim May, Occupied America They that give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -- Benjamin

Re: Tegmark's TOE Cantor's Absolute Infinity

2002-09-23 Thread Tim May
in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks --Tim May Dogs can't conceive of a group of cats without an alpha cat. --David Honig, on the Cypherpunks list, 2001-11

Many Fermis Interpretation Paradox -- So why aren't they here?

2002-09-30 Thread Tim May
even crude estimates difficult and probably worthless.) Hmmm --Tim May Prime, resident of Earth Prime

Re: Many Fermis Interpretation Paradox -- So why aren't they here?

2002-10-01 Thread Tim May
On Tuesday, October 1, 2002, at 06:37 AM, Bruno Marchal wrote: At 12:26 -0700 30/09/2002, Tim May wrote: If the alternate universes implied by the mainstream MWI (as opposed to variants like consistent histories) are actual in some sense, with even the slightest chance of communication

Modal Realism vs. MWI

2002-10-04 Thread Tim May
On Friday, October 4, 2002, at 09:13 AM, Bruno Marchal wrote: At 9:36 -0700 1/10/2002, Tim May wrote: MWI looks, then, like just another variant of modal realism. To wit, there IS a universe in which unicorns exist, and another in which Germany won the Second World War

Good summary of Bogdanov controversy

2002-11-10 Thread Tim May
continues to be in topos theory, modal logic, and quantum logic. --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto

Re: The number 8. A TOE?

2002-11-18 Thread Tim May
.). --Tim May (.sig for Everything list background) Corralitos, CA. Born in 1951. Retired from Intel in 1986. Current main interest: category and topos theory, math, quantum reality, cosmology. Background: physics, Intel, crypto, Cypherpunks

Algorithmic Revolution?

2002-11-19 Thread Tim May
either for his career or for getting any kind of progress or confirmation (!).) My belief is that basic mathematics is much more important than computer use, in terms of understanding the cosmos and the nature of reality. --Tim May

Re: Algorithmic Revolution?

2002-11-19 Thread Tim May
. Today I ordered the Peter Johnstone 2-volume set Sketches of an Elephant: A Topos Theory Compendium. Not that I am saying the universe is a topos.) --Tim May

Re: Algorithmic Revolution?

2002-11-24 Thread Tim May
with instantons, where perhaps wormholes are opening and closing, where perhaps Kalabi-Yau topological structures are vibrating or whatever it is they do. Fascinating stuff, to be sure. --Tim May He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long

Re: Is emergence real or just in models?

2002-11-28 Thread Tim May
On Wednesday, November 27, 2002, at 11:42 PM, Eric Hawthorne wrote: I'm in the camp that thinks that emergent systems are real phenomena, and that eventually, objective criteria would be able to be established that would allow us to say definitively whether an emerged system existed in some

Re: The universe consists of patterns of arrangement of 0's and 1's?

2002-11-30 Thread Tim May
. --Tim May

Alien science

2002-11-30 Thread Tim May
point, that such minds are on the other side of some flavor of Singularity, with little to say except to say that there are Entities out there, brooding and thinking their deep alien thoughts like some kind of unseen Lovecraft monster. --Tim May

Funding AI

2002-11-30 Thread Tim May
for moon shots to fund what they think is needed...)) The AGI may come from the distant great-great grandchild of financial AI systems. --Tim May Dogs can't conceive of a group of cats without an alpha cat. --David Honig, on the Cypherpunks list, 2001-11

Re: Applied vs. Theoretical

2002-12-03 Thread Tim May
that you looked at category theory and didn't find it to your taste. I had the opposite experience. Diversity is good. --Tim May

Mathematics and the Structure of Reality

2002-12-03 Thread Tim May
biases (if we only know geometry, we see things geometrically, and so on). One of the reasons I like studying math is to expand my conceptual toolbox, to increase the number of conceptual basis vectors I can use to build models with. --Tim May

QM not (yet, at least) needed to explain why we can't experience other minds

2002-12-24 Thread Tim May
, by John Barnes. A New Zealand astronomer/mathematician with some interesting ideas about abductive reasoning finds himself slipping between different realities. --Tim May

no quantum clones doesn't mean no for all intents and purposes clones

2002-12-24 Thread Tim May
for biological systems is on the order of what Max Tegmark and others have estimated for decoherence.) In other words, no quantum clones doesn't mean no for all intents and purposes clones. --Tim May

Computing with reals instead of integers

2002-12-30 Thread Tim May
, of course.) --Tim May

Re: Quantum Probability and Decision Theory

2002-12-30 Thread Tim May
. We must additionally account for, at least, the illusion of time and concurrency of events. I don't see any problems with either. (Yes, I have read Huw Price's book.) --Tim May

Many Worlds and Oracles

2002-12-30 Thread Tim May
On Monday, December 30, 2002, at 11:57 AM, Jesse Mazer wrote: As I understood it, the basic idea here was to use the fact that history must work out consistently to get a machine that could solve problems much faster than a Turing machine. For example, for any problem that requires

Many Worlds Version of Fermi Paradox

2002-12-30 Thread Tim May
, that other worlds have more than linguistic existence.) --Tim May

Re: Quantum Probability and Decision Theory

2002-12-30 Thread Tim May
.) --Tim May

No infinities needed

2002-12-31 Thread Tim May
here perhaps already know, Halmos was Von Neumann's assistant, writing up his lectures, when he wrote his book.) Provided the complex space is normed, and is complete, which all finite-dimensional vector spaces are, the math works. No infinities are needed, which is good. --Tim May

Re: Quantum suicide without suicide

2003-01-08 Thread Tim May
in the SATs will score around 550-600 combined, but that a random guesser in a non-multiple-choice QM exam will flunk with ovewhelming likelihood.) What should one do? What did all of you actually do? What did Moravec do, what did I do, what did Tegmark do? --Tim May

Re: Quantum suicide without suicide

2003-01-09 Thread Tim May
From: Tim May [EMAIL PROTECTED] Date: Thu Jan 9, 2003 1:22:32 PM US/Pacific To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] Subject: Re: Quantum suicide without suicide On Thursday, January 9, 2003, at 12:32 PM, George Levy wrote: As you can see, suicide is not necessary. One could be on death row - in other words

Re: Quantum Suicide without suicide

2003-01-10 Thread Tim May
, the quantum possible worlds are identical to the possible worlds of Aristotle, Leibniz, Borges, C.I. Lewis, David Lewis, Stalnaker, Kripke, and others.) --Tim May How we burned in the prison camps later thinking: What would things have been like if every security operative, when he went out

Possible Worlds, Logic, and MWI

2003-01-10 Thread Tim May
On Friday, January 10, 2003, at 12:34 PM, George Levy wrote: This is a reply to Eric Hawthorne and Tim May. (Tim comment: the quoted text below is partly a mix of my comments and partly George's.) Lastly, like most many worlds views, the same calculations apply whether one thinks

Re: Possible Worlds, Logic, and MWI

2003-01-10 Thread Tim May
of the multiverse, the sheaf of universes in which Tim May or Hal Finney even exist is of measure approaching zero. Meanwhile, I'm _here_. --Tim May Dogs can't conceive of a group of cats without an alpha cat. --David Honig, on the Cypherpunks list, 2001-11

Re: Possible Worlds, Logic, and MWI

2003-01-10 Thread Tim May
On Friday, January 10, 2003, at 08:54 PM, Tim May wrote: Wei suggested that in the context of a many-worlds universe (not just the quantum MWI but even for a broader set of possibilities), you might not make this same decision. You know that when the coin flips, the universe is going

Science

2003-01-11 Thread Tim May
on this. --Tim May

Re: Science

2003-01-11 Thread Tim May
into the conventionalities. Talk to Wei Dai. I write what I think is true and important. --Tim May

Re: Science

2003-01-12 Thread Tim May
...they simply prodded me to set down some of the many ideas percolating in my head. This may make me seem like a conservative here, but it's my nature to analyze and critique, to compare and contrast. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. --Tim May

Many Fermis Revisited

2003-01-12 Thread Tim May
time travel nor MWI travel/communication is possible. --Tim May

Re: Many Fermis Revisited

2003-01-12 Thread Tim May
of them to have done so. Since the implications of building such portals are, I think, enormous, I would expect a civilization which has built such things to have expanded even more rapidly through their part of the universe than without such things. --Tim May

Re: Many Fermis Revisited

2003-01-12 Thread Tim May
t;) >From Hal's reference to Mike Price's document (which I read several years ago, so I'd forgotten or had not read his bit about MWI and Fermi), it looks like Price reached the same conclusion. --Tim May

Re: Many Fermis Revisited

2003-01-13 Thread Tim May
.  By reducing their measure through QS and the likes, advanced aliens just evolve out of existence in our world! You ought to read Finity, by John Barnes. He explores a very similar idea. --Tim May They played all kinds of games, kept the House in session all night, and it was a very complicated

Claim: Only one past for a given present

2003-01-13 Thread Tim May
On Monday, January 13, 2003, at 12:38 PM, George Levy wrote: Tim May wrote If you mean that many presents have many pasts, yes. But the current present only has a limited number of pasts, possibly just one. (The origin of this asymmetry in the lattice of events is related to our being

Ways of Arguing Physics

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
_less_ convergence of views than the office arguers above probably see. So, onward to those replies I need to write. --Tim May

Quantum Decision Theory

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
. But I've yet to see anything convincing. More comments: On Monday, January 13, 2003, at 02:33 PM, Wei Dai wrote: On Fri, Jan 10, 2003 at 08:54:38PM -0800, Tim May wrote: But in this, the only universe I will ever, ever have contact with, I optimize as best I can. And I assume all the myriad mes

Re: Claim: Only one past for a given present

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
On Monday, January 13, 2003, at 02:40 PM, Jesse Mazer wrote: Tim May wrote: On your point about many pasts are fundamentally caused by quantum uncertainty in memory devices, I strongly disagree. There is only one past for one present, whether RAMs dropped bits in recording them

Re: Claim: Only one past for a given present

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
On Tuesday, January 14, 2003, at 11:43 AM, Tim May wrote: Rereading my paragraphs, maybe they are unclear. It takes entire chapters of books (I like David Albert's book, or Smolin's Life of the Cosmos (from whence the cat and dog example was taken), Bub, Hughes, and Barrett) to talk about

Re: Claim: Only one past for a given present

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
On Tuesday, January 14, 2003, at 12:35 PM, Hal Finney wrote: Tim May writes: This arises with quantum measurements of course. Once a measurement is made--path of a photon, for example--all honest observers will report exactly the same thing. There simply is no basis for disputing the past

Re: Quantum Decision Theory

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
of my own focus on the branch *I* am in. --Tim May

I am not meant for your religion

2003-01-14 Thread Tim May
Trek movie, the one where a cult of Multiversians is setting off special weapons to destroy universes which fail to be perfect in various ways. I'll miss some tidbits of math I discussed with some of you, but I won't miss the rest. Until we meet in another reality, --Tim May