Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-21 Thread John Mikes
countered his arguement? Kindest regards, Stephen - Original Message - From: ronaldheld ronaldh...@gmail.com To: Everything List everything-l...@googlegroups.com Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2009 7:22 AM Subject: Re: Newbie Questions I do not see the Inflation paradigm as ad-hoc

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-21 Thread Günther Greindl
Ronald, the ad hoc is because of the introduction of the inflatons which do nothing but, um, inflate... Stephen said: b) some sound explanation where given as to how an in principle unknowable phenomenon - the BB singularity itself - is any different from a Creative Deity, sans only the

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-21 Thread ronaldheld
I do not know that the ekpyrotic and cyclic models reprodce the observations better than the BB+inflation. Yes, no one knows what the inflation field is, but no one has observed a gluon or single quark either. I do not know what Penrose's argument is.Without the observable Universe being in

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-21 Thread Michael Gough
Getting back to the original question: Are ALL quantum variations explored? So let me ask some more basic questions: How many distinct choices of new state does a particle, say an electron, have at each time quanta? Let's call that number X. In an admittedly over-simplified universe of two

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-20 Thread ronaldheld
I do not see the Inflation paradigm as ad-hoc, for it explains the flatness, Horizon problem and lack of early universe relics better than any other to date. Now the Big Bang may be replaced by oscillating solutions from LQG or other theories, but AFAIK they still need an Inflation period.

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-20 Thread Stephen Paul King
? Kindest regards, Stephen - Original Message - From: ronaldheld ronaldh...@gmail.com To: Everything List everything-l...@googlegroups.com Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2009 7:22 AM Subject: Re: Newbie Questions I do not see the Inflation paradigm as ad-hoc, for it explains the flatness

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-19 Thread Bruno Marchal
Le 18-janv.-09, à 16:23, A. Wolf a écrit : So you are saying the mass of the universe is infinite. I mean the number of particles is infinite (mass is a characteristic of some particles). It is still possible it could be finite but unbounded, and just extremely extremely large, but

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-19 Thread Michael Rosefield
My understanding is that the set of possible histories and future at any point are made up of eigenstates - and that the way a system splits into eigenstates is dependent upon the question you ask it. For example, it may split into momentum/position eigenstates, or along some other conjugal

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-19 Thread Günther Greindl
Hi, Naive question: do physicists reconcile a really flat universe and the big bang theory? I don't see how. you mean this problem? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_bang#Flatness.2Foldness_problem Inflationary theories give a solution, but it is a bit ad hoc. I am not a big fan of Big Bang

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-18 Thread A. Wolf
So you are saying the mass of the universe is infinite. I mean the number of particles is infinite (mass is a characteristic of some particles). It is still possible it could be finite but unbounded, and just extremely extremely large, but unless there's a logical reason it would appear

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-18 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 17 Jan 2009, at 04:10, fragamus (Michael Gough) wrote: I would like to ask the board: Are ALL possible quantum histories realized in the multiverse? I would say yes. Even as the superposition states of the vacuum. Note that all computational histories are in Arithmetic, or are

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread Abram Demski
Fragamus, That depends on definitions! What counts as a history, and when do we count them? In order for the number of histories to be merely a fantastically large and growing number, we need to be inside of time when we count the number of histories-- otherwise it could not be growing.

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread Abram Demski
Fragamus, That depends on definitions! What counts as a history, and when do we count them? In order for the number of histories to be merely a fantastically large and growing number, we need to be inside of time when we count the number of histories-- otherwise it could not be growing.

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread Michael Gough
I understand. I was trying ask about whether or not, if there were say 10^10^10 slits, would the electron go through all of them. Do we know for sure? Also, I want the inside of time answer. Right now, in the multiverse, it seems like the number of differentiated states may be a very large

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread A. Wolf
I understand. I was trying ask about whether or not, if there were say 10^10^10 slits, would the electron go through all of them. Do we know for sure? You can perform the experiment with a thin grid instead of slits and get similar patterns. But 10^10^10 in the traditional top-down way is a

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread Michael Gough
Thank you. However, I don't understand your objection to an infinite number of states. The universe in which we live appears by current measurements to be infinite in size (because it is geometrically flat), and will last forever (because its expansion is hastening). Yes, but space may be

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread A. Wolf
Yes, but space may be simply the coordinate system in which matter and energy move. Even if the coordinate system is infinite, it doesn't matter because the particles' occupy a finite (but growing) part of it. I don't think your conceptualization of an expanding universe is correct. No

Re: Newbie Questions

2009-01-17 Thread Michael Gough
So you are saying the mass of the universe is infinite. On Sat, Jan 17, 2009 at 4:40 PM, A. Wolf a.lup...@gmail.com wrote: Yes, but space may be simply the coordinate system in which matter and energy move. Even if the coordinate system is infinite, it doesn't matter because the