[FairfieldLife] Corollory to Murphy#39;s law

2013-10-04 Thread cardemaister













[FairfieldLife] Christopher Moore may have scooped historians with Sacre Bleu

2013-10-04 Thread turquoiseb
Those who read my posts may have noticed that I raved recently
about Christopher Moore's book Sacré Bleu. In that novel, he
utilized his writing and humor skills to examine the outrageous
premise that Vincent Van Gogh did not commit suicide, but was
murdered. Doing this, he managed to turn it into an entertaining
(although somewhat twisted, as is his wont) detective story, with
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and other famous painters of the era
trying to track down a serial killer who has been plying his trade
with the help of a lovely muse for hundreds -- maybe thousands --
of years.

Turns out Chris might have been onto something. The following
article extract (translated by Google and *only* an excerpt,
because Le Point only puts the first bit of its articles on their
website for free) talks about a recent biography by former
Pulitzer Prize winners Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith
that asserts the very same thing -- that Van Gogh was murdered.
The full text of the article in the print version of Le Point goes
on to explain a little of their theory, and it involves neither
muses nor humor, but it looks as if Chris' intuition when read-
ing the last letters of Van Gogh might have been correct. This
was not a suicidal man, so something else must have been up.

http://tinyurl.com/p6v56lq http://tinyurl.com/p6v56lq





[FairfieldLife] OMG: hebrew4christians statistics...

2013-10-04 Thread cardemaister













[FairfieldLife] Re: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread turquoiseb
s3raphita sez:
 
 When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the 
 whole surreal, glossy surface but couldn't make head 
 or tail of what the movie was about (ditto Lost 
 Highway, etc. ).

Have you considered the possibility that Lynch's
films aren't really about ANYTHING?

Certainly a number of critics (many of them French,
who otherwise tend to adore Lynch because they have
a tendency to adore *anything* pretentious that they 
can't understand) have considered this and discussed
it. I agree with them. I don't think Lynch *does*
have anything he's trying to say in his movies.
I think he's just filming dream images (in his case
nightmare images) that *he* doesn't understand, either.

In other words, I think Lynch's films exemplify the
same solipsism and narcissism that we see in so many
other long-term TMers. If it's happening in my 
head, it must be important and meaningful. 





[FairfieldLife] RE: The NSA will be imprisoning us next for not kowtowing

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Welcome back, iranitea. When turq mentions walking home in the rain, etc. he is 
alluding to a famous movie scene in which another famous dancer/actor, Gene 
Kelly dances in the rain. In fact the movie is called Singing In the Rain. Fred 
Astaire is also a famous dancer/actor of approximately the same era. He often 
appeared in movies with a partner, Ginger Rogers who did what he did, only 
moving backwards and wearing high heeled shoes!





 From: iranitea no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 5:46 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux
 


  
 
Where in the world does he talk about film?

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:


Barry wrote: 
(snip)
 Then I walked
 home in the rain, doing my best Fred Astaire imitation all the way.

Dear heaven, that's funny. Our resident film expert. Please, nobody tell him.

 

Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Ann, I believe that to the degree that our physical brain is fully functional, 
we have free will with regards to our behavior, including the thoughts and 
emotions we focus on. I believe that this free will arises from the soul.





 From: awoelfleba...@yahoo.com awoelfleba...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 9:18 PM
Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of 
Nature
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Ann, that was the phrase that wgm4u used and I'm assuming it has the same 
meaning as the phrase free will.

What do you think it means though? And do you think there is a difference and 
do you believe the soul has free will because do souls actually do anything 
other than exist (or maybe not)? I think I believe that people are the doers 
not the soul and therefore it is people who either have free will or not, 
exercise free will or not. The soul to me just sort of is.





 From: awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:53 AM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
 Share, how do you define free will of the soul and how does that differ from 
plain old 'free will'?


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


The idea that humans don't use free will of the soul very often reminds me of 
something in a recent post of Seraphita: Witness Dostoevsky's parable of the 
Grand Inquisitor: from Wiki: The Inquisitor states that Jesus rejected these 
three temptations in favour of freedom, but the Inquisitor thinks that Jesus 
has misjudged human 
nature.He does not believe that the vast majority of humanity can 
handle the freedom which Jesus has given them.



 From: wgm4u no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:06 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
Predicting or explaining *change* is merely looking at the odds, as is 
astrology. If a car turns right at a given signal every day for the last 20 
days what are the odds of it doing the same thing on the 21st day? 
 
This is what astrology gives us, past tendencies, what it doesn't give us is 
the *X factor* and that is the freewill of the soul which is the Achilles heel 
of Astrology, but people don't on use the freewill of the soul very often,  so 
there you go! FWIW.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb  wrote:


 s3raphita replies:
 
  snippus interruptus
  
  Your  question also touches on the issue of the fine-tuning of the
  various  constants of physics. It's too improbable that these
  values were an  accident that just happened to benefit the
  creation of intelligent life  (in the long run). Alternatives are:
  1) it's a set-up : step forward  God; 2) there are an infinite
  or very large number of universes :  where's the evidence?;
  3)
 there's a feedback mechanism at a subtle level  we've yet
  to discover.
 
 Interesting speculations, but you'll have to forgive me if I
 don't
 pile on. I don't find myself very interested in theoretical discus-
 sions for which no answer can ever be found. It's probably a
 Buddhist/Taoist thang -- we don't spend time pondering why
 the world seems to be the way that it is or coming up with
 made-up explanations for why it is the way that it is. That
 is seen as a waste of time and life. The only thing that matters
 is how to DEAL with the world the way it is.

Just to explain a bit further, I see ALL systems proposed
to explain the how and why of things as human constructs,
driven by humans' seeming need to feel as if they're on top of
things and understand them, and to make them feel as if they
can to some extent predict
 and/or control them. In other words, 
fantasies. 

In this category of fantasies I class all religious explanations
for the world and how/whether/why it was created, all 
supposed descriptions of karma or the equally-supposed 
Laws Of Nature, all predictive systems such as astrology or 
Jyotish, and all prescriptive systems such as Ayurveda, 
Sthapatya Veda, food trips or fad diets, various healing 
methods, etc. 

I have seen ZERO evidence that ANY of these systems --
including science -- can adequately cover all possible events
and scenarios, or that they can be relied on to work in all
cases or for all people. I see them as best
 guesses, driven
in many cases by the egos of their proponents, and being
of (at best) questionable use in the real world. 

Therefore I can't justify spending any of the remaining time
of my life investigating or even discussing any of them, as
if they mattered. As noted above, I tend to have a more 
pragmatic 

[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Thanks, John, I didn't remember that about the unified field being the most 
fundamental law of nature but it makes sense if one holds to the idea that 
everything else is a permutation of it. I think the phrase law of nature can 
have several connotations and that's what makes it a fascinating topic for me.





 From: jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 4:27 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
 Share,

As MMY explained, the most fundamental law of nature is the Unified Field from 
which everything else comes from.  As he said, you water the root to enjoy the 
fruit.  It sounds simple, but it takes many books and lectures to explain the 
truth behind the vedic literature and technology.


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


John, if I understand Maharishi correctly, different laws of nature operate at 
each level of creation. Laws of nature at the level of DNA would certainly be 
powerful given that they operate at such a fundamental level. I'm pondering if 
there might exist one most fundamental law of nature that is even more 
fundamental and therefore more powerful. Just pondering. 





 From: jr_esq@... jr_esq@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 1:33 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
Share,

The laws of nature concerning the human body are contained in the DNA.  If one 
violates the sequencing of the DNA sequence, he or she will alter the form of 
the entity involved.  A drastic violation could turn the entity into a tree, 
fish or reptile.  Even a very slight change could make a human being into a 
chimpanzee.

Similarly, a thorough and responsible knowledge of the human DNA sequences 
could eliminate genetic diseases and promote longer and healthier lives.  But 
human beings still have the responsibility of knowing how to care of their 
bodies, such as the avoidance of cigarettes, alcohol, and other toxic 
ingredients, to stay healthy.


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Ok, John or anyone, here's a hypothetical and a question: I'm assuming that 
there are laws of nature that govern the body. For example, if someone smokes 
for a long time, they would die before age 80 of a lung disease. But there are 
people who smoke and live beyond age 80 and then die of some other disease. 
What happened? Did they break laws of nature? Transcend them? Or, what I think, 
there are undiscovered laws of nature operating.





 From: jr_esq@... jr_esq@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 1:16 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
 Barry,

Some times we wonder if you think before you type your ideas on the computer.  
Isn't there a law of nature that governs the structure of the atom and the 
subparticles that are contained within which cannot be seen by human eyes?

If you split the atom, as in violating the law of nature, you get a big 
explosion like the atomic bomb that was dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:


I know that some have a kind of reverence for the Laws Of Nature. They tend to 
view them *as* Laws, and so sacrosanct that Bad Things Will Happen To You If 
You Violate Them. 

I don't see them that way. I see them the same way I see the laws of men. That 
is, as a conceptual framework, within which to exercise one's free will. 

That's the way physical, lawbreakin' outlaws view the laws of men. They know 
they're there, and
 that there may be consequences for violating them, but they're willing to bet 
on that may be. They exercise their free will, roll the dice, and see what 
happens. 

As we can all tell just by looking at the headlines and around us in daily 
life, the Bad Things that will supposed;y occur if people break the laws of men 
don't always happen. At least within the outlaw's lifetime, which is the only 
one we know fersure exists. So some of the outlaws who broke the law skate away 
Scot-free. They rolled the dice and won, at least from a 
being-punished-for-violating-the-laws-of-men point of view. 

Looking back on my life, I've heard a LOT about the supposed higher-level Laws 
Of Nature, and how Bad Things Will Happen To You If You Violate Them. Such 
beliefs are legion in the TMO, and in many other spiritual trips. It is not 
hyperbole to suggest that *many* people on this planet 1) are convinced
 that these Laws Of Nature exist, and 2) are convinced that they 'know' what 
these Laws Of Nature are. 

Me, I'm convinced of neither. As to whether a fixed and universal set of Laws 
Of Nature exist, I am an agnostic. As to whether *anyone* on this planet 
'knows' what the Laws Of Nature actually *are* if they do 

RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Doc, when you ask what is the problem with that, I don't know what *that* 
refers to. If it refers to the highlighted sentence, then you'll have to ask 
the Grand Inquisitor (-:





 From: doctordumb...@rocketmail.com doctordumb...@rocketmail.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 11:57 AM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
So, what is the problem with that? Life is a constant learning process, whether 
we happen to like it, or not. I think I would be pretty pissed off if I had 
landed here to live a life of utter perfection, without any challenge or want, 
only to have it arbitrarily snatched away at age 80, or so. I so enjoy being 
right in the middle of the scrum.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


The idea that humans don't use free will of the soul very often reminds me of 
something in a recent post of Seraphita: Witness Dostoevsky's parable of the 
Grand Inquisitor: from Wiki: The Inquisitor states that Jesus rejected these 
three temptations in favour of freedom, but the Inquisitor thinks that Jesus 
has misjudged human 
nature.He does not believe that the vast majority of humanity can 
handle the freedom which Jesus has given them.



 From: wgm4u no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:06 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature
 


  
Predicting or explaining *change* is merely looking at the odds, as is 
astrology. If a car turns right at a given signal every day for the last 20 
days what are the odds of it doing the same thing on the 21st day? 
 
This is what astrology gives us, past tendencies, what it doesn't give us is 
the *X factor* and that is the freewill of the soul which is the Achilles heel 
of Astrology, but people don't on use the freewill of the soul very often,  so 
there you go! FWIW.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb  wrote:


 s3raphita replies:
 
  snippus interruptus
  
  Your  question also touches on the issue of the fine-tuning of the
  various  constants of physics. It's too improbable that these
  values were an  accident that just happened to benefit the
  creation of intelligent life  (in the long run). Alternatives are:
  1) it's a set-up : step forward  God; 2) there are an infinite
  or very large number of universes :  where's the evidence?;
  3) there's a feedback mechanism at a subtle level  we've yet
  to discover.
 
 Interesting speculations, but you'll have to forgive me if I
 don't
 pile on. I don't find myself very interested in theoretical discus-
 sions for which no answer can ever be found. It's probably a
 Buddhist/Taoist thang -- we don't spend time pondering why
 the world seems to be the way that it is or coming up with
 made-up explanations for why it is the way that it is. That
 is seen as a waste of time and life. The only thing that matters
 is how to DEAL with the world the way it is.

Just to explain a bit further, I see ALL systems proposed
to explain the how and why of things as human constructs,
driven by humans' seeming need to feel as if they're on top of
things and understand them, and to make them feel as if they
can to some extent predict
 and/or control them. In other words, 
fantasies. 

In this category of fantasies I class all religious explanations
for the world and how/whether/why it was created, all 
supposed descriptions of karma or the equally-supposed 
Laws Of Nature, all predictive systems such as astrology or 
Jyotish, and all prescriptive systems such as Ayurveda, 
Sthapatya Veda, food trips or fad diets, various healing 
methods, etc. 

I have seen ZERO evidence that ANY of these systems --
including science -- can adequately cover all possible events
and scenarios, or that they can be relied on to work in all
cases or for all people. I see them as best guesses, driven
in many cases by the egos of their proponents, and being
of (at best) questionable use in the real world. 

Therefore I can't justify spending any of the remaining time
of my life investigating or even discussing any of them, as
if they mattered. As noted above, I tend to have a more 
pragmatic approach to spirituality. Theory -- whether 
spouted by scientists or supposed seers -- will always be
theory, and nothing more. What's the point of arguing 
about that which can never be proven one way or another?

The world is and will always be a constant field of change.
Humans who believe they've got a handle on that change
have a really terrible track record of being correct. So
why bother with them? Why not focus on
 ways to become
more capable of DEALING WITH constant, unpredictable
change, rather than trying (ineffectively) to predict or
explain it?

Just my opinion...






RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: [FairfieldLife] Bob Roth; on a Mission

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Welcome back, Nablusoss, have you been traveling?





 From: nablusoss1008 no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 1:29 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] Bob Roth; on a Mission
 


  
http://mariashriver.com/blog/2013/09/on-a-mission-both-roth-executive-director-of-the-david-lynch-foundation/


Re: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Ha! regarding that quote about Ginger Rogers doing everything Fred Astaire did, 
but backwards and in high heels, I bet it has mostly to do with her not getting 
paid as much as he did!





 From: authfri...@yahoo.com authfri...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 7:00 AM
Subject: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux
 


  
 Ooops.. doesn't want to make a clickable link.
 He often appeared in movies with a partner, Ginger Rogers who did what he 
 did, only moving backwards and wearing high heeled shoes!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxPgplMujzQ


http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8amp;page=1amp;rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3ABackwards%20In%20High%20Heels



Try this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_gnr_spell?rh=i%3Astripbooks%2Ck%3Abackwards+and+in+high+heelsamp;amp;keywords=backwards+and+in+high+heelsamp;amp;ie=UTF8amp;amp;qid=1380887795




Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread Michael Jackson
I'll have to ask him - also as to place - I think it was in Iowa City but it 
may have been elsewhere - my friend was a real Charlie Lutes fan, he liked all 
the esoteric stuff Charlie yapped about, he also was real curious about Robin, 
but after he attended a meeting he got grilled by the MIU bruisers and steered 
clear - I think it was a surprise that RC showed up at Charlie's lecture - but 
I'll find out.





 From: awoelfleba...@yahoo.com awoelfleba...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:20 AM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


I forgot to mention my buddy was at a Charlie Lutes lecture, in Iowa City I 
think when Robin C and his supporters came in to sort of get in Lute's face - 
he said it was a surreal experience - I have encouraged him to write about it 
but he hasn't gotten around to it yet.

I never heard about that one. What year was that? I wouldn't have been involved 
yet because I would have remembered it. I missed nothing between Jan. 1983 and 
August 1986.





 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:10 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the whole surreal, glossy 
surface but couldn't make head or tail of what the movie was about (ditto Lost 
Highway, etc. ). It was after the film came out that Lynch first revealed to 
the world that he was a regular practitioner of TM. And when I say regular, I 
mean he claims never to have missed a single session since he learned the 
technique back in the early 1970s. That sounds scarily obsessive to me. I mean, 
never to miss one, single, solitary session over a period of forty years! How 
can you be so completely in control of what's happening in your life to achieve 
that 100 per cent score? (Do we know if Lynch ever took the sidhi supplement?)

Anyway, when I heard about Lynch's involvement in TM I immediately rented the 
DVD of Mulholland Drive to take a second look. Was the film an esoteric, 
symbolist art work on the importance of contacting the source of creative 
intelligence? I was wondering if I now had the key to unlock its arcane 
secrets? No - I didn't! I actually found myself *more* bemused by the film than 
I did on that first viewing. It's still a great movie of course: turn off your 
mind, relax and float downstream . . . and just enjoy the experience.


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@... wrote:


Oh so funny, so funny - I just got off the phone with an old friend who was at 
MIU as staff and student for a number of years - he was a big Charlie Lutes fan 
and also saw Robin C a few times - he told me he was at MIU when Blue Velvet 
came out, the honchos at the Capital of the A of E there in Fairfield told 
everyone not to see the movie, but Charlie said in some lectures my friend went 
to that he (Charlie) saw it twice to try to figure it out.

My buddy also thinks he saw the influence of Charlie Lutes in some of the 
aspects of Twin Peaks - such as secret societies and so forth. I thought it was 
funny.





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread turquoiseb
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 Ha! regarding that quote about Ginger Rogers doing 
 everything Fred Astaire did, but backwards and in 
 high heels, I bet it has mostly to do with her not 
 getting paid as much as he did!

As for their characteristic at-arms-length dancing
style, a common tale told in Hollywood has it that 
Astaire said he came up with the style because she 
had such intense B.O. that he couldn't stand to 
dance closer to her. 

:-)






[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams
Now this is funny - a guy obsessed with the comings and goings of his 
'Marshy', thirty or more years after he got kicked off the program; a 
guy that posts messages to a spiritual discussion group on Yahoo about 
his guru, who he never met. A guy that makes claims to being the guru's 
baker on staff at a religious school; a guy that took zero courses at 
the university in over two years; talking about Robin Carlsen and 
Charles Lutes, both of whom he never met; in a message about a film 
maker whose works he doesn't even understand. This is a classic!


When I need some spiritual help, or a film review, this is the guy I'll 
be consulting, fer sure. LoL!


On 10/4/2013 7:13 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
I'll have to ask him - also as to place - I think it was in Iowa City 
but it may have been elsewhere - my friend was a real Charlie Lutes 
fan, he liked all the esoteric stuff Charlie yapped about, he also was 
real curious about Robin, but after he attended a meeting he got 
grilled by the MIU bruisers and steered clear - I think it was a 
surprise that RC showed up at Charlie's lecture - but I'll find out.




*From:* awoelfleba...@yahoo.com awoelfleba...@yahoo.com
*To:* FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
*Sent:* Friday, October 4, 2013 12:20 AM
*Subject:* RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


I forgot to mention my buddy was at a Charlie Lutes lecture, in Iowa 
City I think when Robin C and his supporters came in to sort of get in 
Lute's face - he said it was a surreal experience - I have encouraged 
him to write about it but he hasn't gotten around to it yet.


I never heard about that one. What year was that? I wouldn't have been 
involved yet because I would have remembered it. I missed nothing 
between Jan. 1983 and August 1986.




*From:* s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
*To:* FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
*Sent:* Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:10 PM
*Subject:* [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the whole surreal, 
glossy surface but couldn't make head or tail of what the movie was 
about (ditto Lost Highway, etc. ). It was after the film came out that 
Lynch first revealed to the world that he was a regular practitioner 
of TM. And when I say regular, I mean he claims never to have missed a 
single session since he learned the technique back in the early 1970s. 
That sounds scarily obsessive to me. I mean, never to miss one, 
single, solitary session over a period of forty years! How can you be 
so completely in control of what's happening in your life to achieve 
that 100 per cent score? (Do we know if Lynch ever took the sidhi 
supplement?)


Anyway, when I heard about Lynch's involvement in TM I immediately 
rented the DVD of Mulholland Drive to take a second look. Was the film 
an esoteric, symbolist art work on theimportance of contacting the 
source of creative intelligence? I was wondering if I now had the key 
to unlock its arcane secrets? No - I didn't! I actually found myself 
*more* bemused by the film than I did on that first viewing. It's 
still a great movie of course: turn off your mind, relax and float 
downstream . . . and just enjoy the experience.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@... wrote:

Oh so funny, so funny - I just got off the phone with an old friend 
who was at MIU as staff and student for a number of years - he was a 
big Charlie Lutes fan and also saw Robin C a few times - he told me he 
was at MIU when Blue Velvet came out, the honchos at the Capital of 
the A of E there in Fairfield told everyone not to see the movie, but 
Charlie said in some lectures my friend went to that he (Charlie) saw 
it twice to try to figure it out.


My buddy also thinks he saw the influence of Charlie Lutes in some of 
the aspects of Twin Peaks - such as secret societies and so forth. I 
thought it was funny.










Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread Michael Jackson
it is a classic from an idiot (meaning you) by your standards no one can say 
anything unless they have met whatever it is, thus no one can talk about the 
moon, since most of us on earth have never been there, we can't talk about 
ancient Rome since we weren't there and so on. 

I really didn't know what kinds of experiences I would have when I joined FFL - 
I certainly didn't know I would get to communicate the crazy people (again, 
that's you)





 From: Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
To: Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 9:01 AM
Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
Now this is funny - a guy obsessed with the comings and goings of his 'Marshy', 
thirty or more years after he got kicked off the program; a guy that posts 
messages to a spiritual discussion group on Yahoo about his guru, who he never 
met. A guy that makes claims to being the guru's baker on staff at a religious 
school; a guy that took zero courses at the university in over two years; 
talking about Robin Carlsen and Charles Lutes, both of whom he never met; in a 
message about a film maker whose works he doesn't even understand. This is a 
classic! 

When I need some spiritual help, or a film review, this is the guy
  I'll be consulting, fer sure. LoL!

On 10/4/2013 7:13 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:

  
I'll have to ask him - also as to place - I think it was in Iowa City but it 
may have been elsewhere - my friend was a real Charlie Lutes fan, he liked all 
the esoteric stuff Charlie yapped about, he also was real curious about Robin, 
but after he attended a meeting he got grilled by the MIU bruisers and steered 
clear - I think it was a surprise that RC showed up at Charlie's lecture - but 
I'll find out.







 From: awoelfleba...@yahoo.com awoelfleba...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:20 AM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


I forgot to mention my buddy was at a Charlie Lutes lecture, in Iowa City I 
think when Robin C and his supporters came in to sort of get in Lute's face - 
he said it was a surreal experience - I have encouraged him to write about it 
but he hasn't gotten around to it yet.


I never heard about that one. What year was that? I wouldn't have been 
involved yet because I would have remembered it. I missed nothing between Jan. 
1983 and August 1986.
 






 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:10 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the whole surreal, glossy 
surface but couldn't make head or tail of what the movie was about (ditto Lost 
Highway, etc. ). It was after the film came out that Lynch first revealed to 
the world that he was a regular practitioner of TM. And when I say regular, I 
mean he claims never to have missed a single session since he learned the 
technique back in the early 1970s. That sounds scarily obsessive to me. I 
mean, never to miss one, single, solitary session over a period of forty 
years! How can you be so completely in control of what's happening in your 
life to achieve that 100 per cent score? (Do we know if Lynch ever took the 
sidhi supplement?)


Anyway, when I heard about Lynch's involvement in TM I immediately rented the 
DVD of Mulholland Drive to take a second look. Was the film an esoteric, 
symbolist art work on the importance of contacting the source of creative 
intelligence? I was wondering if I now had the key to unlock its arcane 
secrets? No - I didn't! I actually found myself *more* bemused by the film 
than I did on that first viewing. It's still a great movie of course: turn off 
your mind, relax and float downstream . . . and just enjoy the experience.


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@... wrote:


Oh so funny, so funny - I just got off the phone with an old friend who was at 
MIU as staff and student for a number of years - he was a big Charlie Lutes 
fan and also saw Robin C a few times - he told me he was at MIU when Blue 
Velvet came out, the honchos at the Capital of the A of E there in Fairfield 
told everyone not to see the movie, but Charlie said in some lectures my 
friend went to that he (Charlie) saw it twice to try to figure it out.


My buddy also thinks he saw the influence of Charlie Lutes in some of the 
aspects of Twin Peaks - such as secret societies and so forth. I thought it 
was funny.






 

[FairfieldLife] RE: Ishvara - The Transcendental Person

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread awoelflebater













RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread awoelflebater













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread awoelflebater













RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Iranitea, it's not just that turq was walking in the rain, it's that he said he 
was doing a Fred Astaire imitation. The movie isa classic so I'm sure everyone 
knew which movie and scene and dancer he meant. BTW, the scenery in that clip 
is beautiful.





 From: iranitea no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 7:50 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux
 


  
 
Thank's Share. It still escapes me that narrating a story of him walking in the 
rain has to be automatically  a reference to a movie. How conditioned is that? 
Have you never walked in the rain? 

My guess is that somebody wanted to dis Barry for a reference he didn't make. 
Very low indeed. 

Btw. this would be my reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy-pnpZfRZg

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Welcome back, iranitea. When turq mentions walking home in the rain, etc. he is 
alluding to a famous movie scene in which another famous dancer/actor, Gene 
Kelly dances in the rain. In fact the movie is called Singing In the Rain. Fred 
Astaire is also a famous dancer/actor of approximately the same era. He often 
appeared in movies with a partner, Ginger Rogers who did what he did, only 
moving backwards and wearing high heeled shoes!





 From: iranitea no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 5:46 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux
 


  
 
Where in the world does he talk about film?

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:


Barry wrote: 
(snip)
 Then I walked
 home in the rain, doing my best Fred Astaire imitation all the way.

Dear heaven, that's funny. Our resident film expert. Please, nobody tell him.





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Heck if Fred had to wear all that makeup and synthetic clothing, including 
(gasp) nylon stockings, he'd stink too!





 From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 7:17 AM
Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux
 


  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 Ha! regarding that quote about Ginger Rogers doing 
 everything Fred Astaire did, but backwards and in 
 high heels, I bet it has mostly to do with her not 
 getting paid as much as he did!

As for their characteristic at-arms-length dancing
style, a common tale told in Hollywood has it that 
Astaire said he came up with the style because she 
had such intense B.O. that he couldn't stand to 
dance closer to her. 

:-)




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
LOL, Richard, you do have a way of summing up that tickles my funny bone.





 From: Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
To: Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 8:01 AM
Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
Now this is funny - a guy obsessed with the comings and goings of his 'Marshy', 
thirty or more years after he got kicked off the program; a guy that posts 
messages to a spiritual discussion group on Yahoo about his guru, who he never 
met. A guy that makes claims to being the guru's baker on staff at a religious 
school; a guy that took zero courses at the university in over two years; 
talking about Robin Carlsen and Charles Lutes, both of whom he never met; in a 
message about a film maker whose works he doesn't even understand. This is a 
classic! 

When I need some spiritual help, or a film review, this is the guy
  I'll be consulting, fer sure. LoL!

On 10/4/2013 7:13 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:

  
I'll have to ask him - also as to place - I think it was in Iowa City but it 
may have been elsewhere - my friend was a real Charlie Lutes fan, he liked all 
the esoteric stuff Charlie yapped about, he also was real curious about Robin, 
but after he attended a meeting he got grilled by the MIU bruisers and steered 
clear - I think it was a surprise that RC showed up at Charlie's lecture - but 
I'll find out.







 From: awoelfleba...@yahoo.com awoelfleba...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:20 AM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


I forgot to mention my buddy was at a Charlie Lutes lecture, in Iowa City I 
think when Robin C and his supporters came in to sort of get in Lute's face - 
he said it was a surreal experience - I have encouraged him to write about it 
but he hasn't gotten around to it yet.


I never heard about that one. What year was that? I wouldn't have been 
involved yet because I would have remembered it. I missed nothing between Jan. 
1983 and August 1986.
 






 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 10:10 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the whole surreal, glossy 
surface but couldn't make head or tail of what the movie was about (ditto Lost 
Highway, etc. ). It was after the film came out that Lynch first revealed to 
the world that he was a regular practitioner of TM. And when I say regular, I 
mean he claims never to have missed a single session since he learned the 
technique back in the early 1970s. That sounds scarily obsessive to me. I 
mean, never to miss one, single, solitary session over a period of forty 
years! How can you be so completely in control of what's happening in your 
life to achieve that 100 per cent score? (Do we know if Lynch ever took the 
sidhi supplement?)


Anyway, when I heard about Lynch's involvement in TM I immediately rented the 
DVD of Mulholland Drive to take a second look. Was the film an esoteric, 
symbolist art work on the importance of contacting the source of creative 
intelligence? I was wondering if I now had the key to unlock its arcane 
secrets? No - I didn't! I actually found myself *more* bemused by the film 
than I did on that first viewing. It's still a great movie of course: turn off 
your mind, relax and float downstream . . . and just enjoy the experience.


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@... wrote:


Oh so funny, so funny - I just got off the phone with an old friend who was at 
MIU as staff and student for a number of years - he was a big Charlie Lutes 
fan and also saw Robin C a few times - he told me he was at MIU when Blue 
Velvet came out, the honchos at the Capital of the A of E there in Fairfield 
told everyone not to see the movie, but Charlie said in some lectures my 
friend went to that he (Charlie) saw it twice to try to figure it out.


My buddy also thinks he saw the influence of Charlie Lutes in some of the 
aspects of Twin Peaks - such as secret societies and so forth. I thought it 
was funny.








[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams
So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate 
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have 
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to 
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told 
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active, 
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because 
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager 
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He 
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end 
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles 
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it 
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on 
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount 
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] Re: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread turquoiseb
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb  wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  Ha! regarding that quote about Ginger Rogers doing
  everything Fred Astaire did, but backwards and in
  high heels, I bet it has mostly to do with her not
  getting paid as much as he did!

 As for their characteristic at-arms-length dancing
 style, a common tale told in Hollywood has it that
 Astaire said he came up with the style because she
 had such intense B.O. that he couldn't stand to
 dance closer to her.

 :-)

Just to follow up (and as should have been obvious
to anyone with half a brain), I threw this out as fodder
for the Mean Girls Clique, to further fuel their get
Barry sessions so that they'd reveal to lurkers who
and what they are. And they fell for it, as I expected
them to.  :-)

But to forestall any of their attempts to portray this
as misogyny, this is a story told to me by a former
girlfriend, in a conversation with others about a subject
that few grasp. She used to be a ballet dancer, and was
trying to convey to us what it *smelled like* onstage
and backstage at the Joffrey Ballet. She made the point
of saying she had never been in any locker room in any
gym or exercise parlor since that smelled as bad.

Dancers sweat. Furthermore, they sweat all over their
bodies, and nobody yet has invented a deodorant that
is easy to apply all over one's body. Onstage during a
live performance, the dancers are out there sweating
like pigs, but this is hidden from the audiences by
makeup that is designed to absorb the sweat so they
don't look all shiny and glisteny and...uh...sweaty.

In films, what you in the audience never see is that
they stop shooting after every take and then go and
mop the sweat from the dancers so that it will look
on film as if what they are doing is all graceful and
effortless. Fred's comment was to indicate that this
may have worked for the camera, but it didn't do shit
for the dancers themselves.

Now you know. Now the Mean Girls can go back to
their get Barry and get Share sessions, and acting
as if they're still in Junior High School. But let's hope
for purposes of hygiene that they don't work up too
much of a sweat while doing it.  :-)





[FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread s3raphita













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Ishvara - The Transcendental Person

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams
The Personality of Godhead is perfect and complete, and because He is 
completely perfect, all emanations from Him, such as this phenomenal 
world, are perfectly equipped as complete wholes. Whatever is produced 
of the Complete Whole is also complete in itself. Because He is the 
Complete Whole, even though so many complete units emanate from Him, He 
remains the complete balance. 


Invocation:
http://vedabase.com/en/iso

The Ultimate Reality is two fulls - 200% of each. One who knows 
nescience side-by-side with the transcendent, can pass beyond repeated 
birth and death, and can enjoy the full blessings of immortality.


Work cited:

'Isha Upanishad'
Translation by Sri Aurobindo
Sri Aurobindo Ashram Trust
Pondicherry, India 1914

On 10/4/2013 9:03 AM, iranitea wrote:


The commentary of the Isha Upanishad, actually a very short Upanishad, 
was later expanded by Aurobindo and served as the starting point of 
The Life Divine, which is really his magnum opus. You are right, he 
didn't subscribe to Shankaras Kevala, but would call his philosophy to 
be based on Bhedabheda.



Could you say, where you actually cite, and where you paraphrase? I 
didn't find : the Ultimate Reality is two fulls - 200% of each. One 
who knows nescience side-by-side with the transcendent,in his Isha 
commentary.




Richard wrote:

Because many of these good fellows (sadhus) do not ascribe to the illusion
theory, 'maya' proposed by the Adi. According to Sri Aurobindo, this
Transcendental Person is not false - He is real, not an illusion.

Isha Upanishad:

The face of Truth is covered with a brilliant
golden lid; that do thou remove O'Fosterer,
for the law of the Truth, for sight. - Isha v 2

The term 'Isha' refers to Ishvara, the cosmic person, Paramatman or
Brahman.
Ishvara is the supreme controller.

Sri Aurobindo wrote that the Ultimate Reality is two fulls - 200% of
each. One
who knows nescience side-by-side with the transcendent, can pass beyond
repeated birth and death, and can enjoy the full blessings of immortality.

Work cited:

'Isha Upanishad'
Translation by Sri Aurobindo
Sri Aurobindo Ashram Trust
Pondicherry, India 1914



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

So, since Krishna is the Absolute, he is in fact 'indescribably
different', (Acyenta
Bheda Bheda). At first this seems to be non-sensical, but if you think
about it,
it makes more sense, and if you remember what MMY said in CBG 1-6.

According to MMY, Lord Krishna is the 'Transcendental Person', 
mentioned in

Bhagavad Gita. That means that He is beyond, or transcendental to,
phenomenon
- the relative world of change.

Many of the Vedantists who composed the Vedic literature were dualists or
qualified-dualists, and others were mixed dualists and some were
qualified-dualists. While all the Upanishadic thinkers were
transcendentalists,
not all of them ascribed to the Advaita philosophy, non-dualism.

In fact, there is good reason to doubt the Advaita of the Adi
Shankaracharya.
Because many of these good fellows (sadhus) do not ascribe to the illusion
theory, 'maya' proposed by the Adi. According to Sri Aurobindo, this
Transcendental Person is not false - He is real, not an illusion.

Isha Upanishad:

The face of Truth is covered with a brilliant
golden lid; that do thou remove O'Fosterer,
for the law of the Truth, for sight. - Isha v 2

The term 'Isha' refers to Ishvara, the cosmic person, Paramatman or
Brahman.
Ishvara is the supreme controller.

Sri Aurobindo wrote that the Ultimate Reality is two fulls - 200% of
each. One
who knows nescience side-by-side with the transcendent, can pass beyond
repeated birth and death, and can enjoy the full blessings of immortality.

Work cited:

'Isha Upanishad'
Translation by Sri Aurobindo
Sri Aurobindo Ashram Trust
Pondicherry, India 1914

Notes:

nescience

adjective

from Latin nescient, present participle of nescire not to know, from ne-
not + scire to know — more at no, science.

1. lack of knowledge or awareness
2. ignorance

Synonyms

benightedness, cluelessness, incognizance, innocence, ignorance,
obliviousness,
unawareness, unfamiliarity

Examples:

The appalling nescience of today's high schoolers concerning
international affairs.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nescience





Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] Itzhak Bentov reaches for the skies

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Xeno, thanks for your suggestions. I think I skim even when I check my own 
posts! So I'll slow down with that and see if I can detect the gaps in my logic.
I really don't like all the space that Neo puts between paragraphs so instead 
I'll do what I did here. I skipped to the next line when I skipped to a new sub 
topic. I'll see if I like how that comes out once it's sent.
As for my allegedly spongy worldview, maybe it has to do with that *diagnostic 
thinking* that I mentioned before and that indicates a strong tendency to make 
connections and make big leaps when drawing conclusions. Maybe the slower 
checking will help alleviate that.
I'll have to work that line between staunch precision and harsh anger. 
Tomorrow, October 5 is the 4th anniversary of my 15 yr long SO. I'm still upset 
about harsh words I said to him. So I'm more careful about that in general.







 From: anartax...@yahoo.com anartax...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 3:39 PM
Subject: RE: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] Itzhak Bentov reaches 
for the skies
 


  
Share -

I do not think Judy parrots me at all, and certainly she does not parrot Turq. 
If there is a common element which we have all arrived at independently, it is 
your thinking, as expressed on FFL, often seems very out of focus when applied 
to the matter at hand. Now someone like Judy might not grasp what you are 
talking about because the world view gap is significant, but in your case, it 
is often hard to determine if there is a consistent experience behind what you 
say. I have a definite world view; Turq seems to have a fairly definite way of 
viewing life, and Judy has a fairly standard way of approaching those, but I do 
not think Judy grasps these world views of ours. And she definitely has a very 
well delineated world view. 

But I find what I can grasp of your world view is so spongy, like a melted 
marshmallow, it is often hard to grasp what you are talking about, which is why 
I recommend you post less but spend some time writing longer posts, and 
reviewing them once, twice, thrice, before sending them off. I would love to 
post more, but I do not have the time or stamina to do it. There have been 
times when you have gotten precise and direct - when you are angry, I think, 
and then sometimes a staunch precision comes through. I think Judy probably 
would like to see more of that from you. 

Arguments about world views or states of consciousness do not seem to appeal to 
her, telling her that because of her 'lower' state of consciousness she does 
not understand something that someone is experiencing in a 'higher' state of 
consciousness, or vice versa.  It is particularly important when interacting 
with Judy to be precise, even though she may use her precision to de-track your 
argument in various ways. I do not think Judy often argues with the point to 
gain knowledge, just argues for the glory of running you off the rails.

Stephen King wrote a book on writing. Here are a couple of tips:

'Paragraphs are almost always as important for how they look as for what they 
say; they are maps of intent.'

'Writing is refined thinking.'

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com SHARE 
wrote:


Judy, I don't think the views of Xeno or turq or noozguru spring from the same 
prejudice towards me as yours do and therefore they are not similar at all. 
Except that you've parroted them.





 From: authfriend@... authfriend@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 12:14 PM
Subject: RE: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] Itzhak Bentov reaches for 
the skies
 


  
Actually I haven't parroted anything they've said to you. Sorry, but what I 
wrote happens to be my own thoughts about you. But it's certainly interesting 
that all three of us have similar views, isn't it? Especially since we don't 
agree on much of anything else?


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com SHARE 
wrote:


Judy, your parroting some of what Xeno and turq have said to me does not make 
your observations or suggestions more valid to me. IMO they are coming from a 
more neutral place with regards to me.





 From: authfriend@... authfriend@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 11:31 AM
Subject: RE: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] Itzhak Bentov reaches for the 
skies
 


  
You obviously had time to write a detailed response to the post of Seraphita's 
you say you just skimmed because you were rushing, Share, so that claim 
doesn't hold much water.

As to your having more stuff than others, it's what compels you to spew umpty 
posts with almost no content, including your pandering posts and your feeble 
attempts at gotcha posts, as well as your inability to take responsibility 
for your 

Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Mike Dixon
Geez William, give these poor businesses a break. They have to pay for all that 
Obamacare now. Premiums are going up, up and up. Somebaody's got to pay for all 
that free healthcare.

 


 From: Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
To: Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 7:27 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!
  
  
So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate 
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have 
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to 
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told 
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active, 
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because 
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager 
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He 
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end 
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles 
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it 
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on 
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount 
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!
  


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













[FairfieldLife] quot;David Bagvillequot; and Amma?

2013-10-04 Thread cardemaister













[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Barry, the rage-a-holic

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread awoelflebater













Re: [FairfieldLife] David Bagville and Amma?

2013-10-04 Thread Michael Jackson
Only Ravi would know





 From: cardemais...@yahoo.com cardemais...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 10:51 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] David Bagville and Amma?
 


  
Taavi Kassila (David Bagville)  is a Finnish film maker and rishi, son of 
the famous film maker Matti Kassila (Matthew Bagville [kassi-la]). I wonder 
how accurate these
stories actually could be:

http://amma-taavi-kassila-sex-cover-up.blogspot.fi/2012/07/mother-amma-amritanandamayi-patron.html

 

[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Cafe Nostalgia

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] Obama Explains GOPs Shutdown Demands

2013-10-04 Thread jr_esq













[FairfieldLife] RE: Cafe Nostalgia

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













RE: RE: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: Post Count Sat 28-Sep-13 00:15:03 UTC

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Re: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Seraphita, The Straight Story is IMO wonderful and atypical Lynch. Elephant Man 
I found very moving and more typical of his work I think.





 From: s3raph...@yahoo.com s3raph...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 9:36 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
Re Have you considered the possibility that Lynch's films aren't really 
about ANYTHING?: 
Indeed, I've been driven to the same conclusion. The first time I saw Lost 
Highway I was quite taken by its shifting moods and flashy exterior; the second 
(and last) time I just thought that Lynch was taking the piss and found it 
pretty tiresome. If you're going to construct a movie that mimics a detective 
story but then can't tie up all the loose ends it's just a glorified shaggy dog 
story.

I still like Mulholland Drive though and I really enjoyed Inland Empire. The 
last one I saw on DVD and split the viewing over two evenings. I'd hate to have 
had to sit through 180 minutes at a cinema. 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:


s3raphita sez:

 
 When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the 
 whole surreal, glossy surface but couldn't make head 
 or tail of what the movie was about (ditto Lost 
 Highway, etc. ).

Have you considered the possibility that Lynch's
films aren't really about ANYTHING?

Certainly a number of critics (many of them French,
who otherwise tend to adore Lynch because they have
a tendency to adore *anything* pretentious that they 
can't understand) have considered this and discussed
it. I agree with them. I don't think Lynch *does*
have anything he's trying to say in his movies.
I think he's just filming dream images (in his case
nightmare images) that *he* doesn't understand, either.

In other words, I think Lynch's films exemplify the
same solipsism and narcissism that we see in so many
other long-term TMers. If it's happening in my 
head, it must be important and meaningful.


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Sorry, forgot to post the url for rotten tomatoes on The Straight Story. Senior 
moment (-:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/straight_story/




 From: s3raph...@yahoo.com s3raph...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 9:36 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Charlie Lutes and David Lynch
 


  
Re Have you considered the possibility that Lynch's films aren't really 
about ANYTHING?: 
Indeed, I've been driven to the same conclusion. The first time I saw Lost 
Highway I was quite taken by its shifting moods and flashy exterior; the second 
(and last) time I just thought that Lynch was taking the piss and found it 
pretty tiresome. If you're going to construct a movie that mimics a detective 
story but then can't tie up all the loose ends it's just a glorified shaggy dog 
story.

I still like Mulholland Drive though and I really enjoyed Inland Empire. The 
last one I saw on DVD and split the viewing over two evenings. I'd hate to have 
had to sit through 180 minutes at a cinema. 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:


s3raphita sez:

 
 When I first watched Mulholland Drive I enjoyed the 
 whole surreal, glossy surface but couldn't make head 
 or tail of what the movie was about (ditto Lost 
 Highway, etc. ).

Have you considered the possibility that Lynch's
films aren't really about ANYTHING?

Certainly a number of critics (many of them French,
who otherwise tend to adore Lynch because they have
a tendency to adore *anything* pretentious that they 
can't understand) have considered this and discussed
it. I agree with them. I don't think Lynch *does*
have anything he's trying to say in his movies.
I think he's just filming dream images (in his case
nightmare images) that *he* doesn't understand, either.

In other words, I think Lynch's films exemplify the
same solipsism and narcissism that we see in so many
other long-term TMers. If it's happening in my 
head, it must be important and meaningful.


[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: One Outlaw#39;s View Of The Laws Of Nature

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Bhairitu

Welcome to Austerity!

On Tuesday Comcast encrypted all the Open QAM channels (mostly local 
broadcast and a few extras they throw into Limited Basic). So if someone 
had a small TV in the kitchen they only watched local news on while 
getting breakfast they now have to get a small box from Comcast.  The 
reason they encrypted Limited Basic was so they didn't have to roll a 
truck out and put a trap on the line. They could just turn the customer 
on and off from the head end. Apparently Time-Warner hasn't done that yet.


Also most cable companies who haven't done so already want to move to 
IPTV.  That's what U-Verse is.  Instead of sending you all the channels 
it works like the Internet and when you change channels the server at 
the central office switches channels sent to you. They also can send out 
4-6 channels at once over one IP address. It's MPEG-4 encoding not 
MPEG-2 which requires less bandwidth per channel and also doesn't 
pixelate like MPEG-2 on action scenes.  I do think some of the cable 
companies are holding out to use Google's On8 technology which is used 
in WebM.  It's open source and free or no royalties.  They have to pay 
a royalty to MPEG-LA for the use of MPEG-4.


On 10/04/2013 07:27 AM, Richard J. Williams wrote:


So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active,
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!






Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The NSA will be imprisoning us next for not kowtowing

2013-10-04 Thread Bhairitu
I frequenly say that America is now the Nazi Germany on the 21st 
century.  Obama has carried forward the Neo-Liberalist policies of the 
Bush administration.  He is not our friend. He has turned out to be a 
wolf in sheep's clothing.


On 10/04/2013 02:45 AM, iranitea wrote:


Bhairitu, you are right. Did you read this: 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/01/ilija-trojanow-nsa-criticism_n_4024595.html 
Only recently, we would have expected such behavior from North Korea, 
Iran, China etc. Freedom of expressing one's opinion is considered one 
of the fundamentals of democracy. You should see the reader comments 
in German magazines to this and similar topics. The reputation of the 
US is now at a new low, similar to the worst time of Bush and the Iraq 
war.




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

The NSA is an insult to America and Americans.  It has gotten out of 
hand and needs to be shut down.


On 10/03/2013 06:22 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/03/us/snowdens-e-mail-provider-discusses-pressure-from-fbi-to-disclose-data.html?pagewanted=1_r=0








[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Re: Barry, the rage-a-holic

2013-10-04 Thread doctordumbass













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
iranitea, usually people say back peddling, like on a bicycle. But I like back 
paddling too. Like in a boat. I also could go for, on a rainy day, back 
puddling, that is, jumping backwards into a puddle (-:





 From: iranitea no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 11:14 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk 
Road suspect
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Iranitea, now truly desperate to score a point:

 But have you ever considered, that you don't know anything about what you are 
 talking
 about?

You mean, as to whether Barry knows about the Dark Web? I'm not certain of 
that, of course, which is why I said I don't think Barry knows... See his 
post #359659 to Seraphita and let us know what you think.

Oh, oh, back-paddling


 I mean, you say 'Gracious no' as if it would be illegal or even ethical wrong 
 to use Tor, or
 pages accessible only through it - or encryption in times of almost total 
 Internet surveillance!


Yar. That must be why I posted this to Seraphita (#359600):

There are apparently many thousands of similar sites on the Dark Web. Silk Road 
and Atlantis (which closed down a couple of weeks ago) were only the most 
prominent.

(Disclaimer: I don't use any of 'em, but I've been reading about them; I find 
the whole Dark Web concept fascinating. It's also used, BTW, by legit activists 
and journalists who need to keep their communications secret and untraceable. 
So it isn't inhabited only by Bad Guys selling drugs and guns and child porn.)

Opsie...

Ooopsie, then why did you say: Gracious No?

 And, I think, you know as much about 'Spirituality' and 'Sadhana' as you know 
 about Tor and
 PGP. It's something that you are reading about on the internet and then 
 regurgitate it.


Well, I do think you and I have different ideas of what an effective sadhana 
should result in. Repeatedly shooting yourself in the foot and not having the 
minimal humility to laugh at yourself for doing so is not on my list of 
positive outcomes.

Neither mine. Oh, did you say this about me?

 And with regard to you, I do think it's a function of old age.

What is a function of old age?

Now, please spare me a detailed analysis. But it has been pointed out and 
explained to you quite recently by a number of people, most recent one was 
Xeno. You are of course immune to that, which is part of the problem. Now, 
Judy, I do indeed believe, that you basically believe in what you are saying. 
That is to say, to your own conscious awareness, you are truthful. The problem 
is only, that you take your own insights, or opinions for granted, and your 
'intuitions' for facts, which they are not. 

This, together with an increased aggressiveness, and stubbornness, and an 
attempt to cover up your own mistakes, concentrate on silly side issues, that 
is basically what has been perceived and pointed out by many here. Your 
constant GET Barry and Share, or whoever is in the shooting line. So don't 
complain if someone is shooting back. 



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Iranitea, each time you return to FFL from wherever you go when you aren't 
here, it seems as though both your IQ and your spirituality have deteriorated 
from your previous visit. Oh, and your English comprehension and mind-reading 
abilities as well.

Maybe you should reconsider whether your sadhana is actually depriving you of 
brain cells. I don't think what we're seeing here is just the normal gradual 
mental decline of aging.

Iranitea wrote:


 Of course! You sounded so proud, knowing about these things, so I thought you 
 might at
 least know what you are talking about. 



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Iranitea keeps trying:


 And you surely have been to the dark web, have been using Tor and encrypted 
 emails with 
 PGP or GPG, right?



Gracious, no, wrong. Have you?


I wrote:


I don't think [Barry] knows about the Dark Web and Tor and Atlantis and 
Silk Road and so on.


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread doctordumbass













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: Re: Barry, the rage-a-holic

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Bhairitu
Did you try a search on C Band?  Those were really big back in the 
1980s.  A friend installed them and was willing to give me a deal on 
them for my mother's house.  She thought they were ugly and wouldn't put 
one in but then she never saw what was available on them and that would 
have been another story. :-D

http://www.cband.net/

It's probably cheaper to just use one of the two satellite providers.  I 
had Dish Network for a while when they went HD.  My HD receiver was the 
first one my installer had ever installed. And I had to fix it after he 
left because he didn't know what he was doing. ;-)



On 10/04/2013 09:34 AM, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com wrote:


I wonder if it is possible to buy a used C-band or KU-band satellite 
dish, and just start checking out available transponders? Pretty sure 
decryption boxes are available, too.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


Welcome to Austerity!

On Tuesday Comcast encrypted all the Open QAM channels (mostly local 
broadcast and a few extras they throw into Limited Basic).  So if 
someone had a small TV in the kitchen they only watched local news on 
while getting breakfast they now have to get a small box from 
Comcast.  The reason they encrypted Limited Basic was so they didn't 
have to roll a truck out and put a trap on the line.  They could just 
turn the customer on and off from the head end.  Apparently 
Time-Warner hasn't done that yet.


Also most cable companies who haven't done so already want to move to 
IPTV.  That's what U-Verse is. Instead of sending you all the channels 
it works like the Internet and when you change channels the server at 
the central office switches channels sent to you. They also can send 
out 4-6 channels at once over one IP address.  It's MPEG-4 encoding 
not MPEG-2 which requires less bandwidth per channel and also doesn't 
pixelate like MPEG-2 on action scenes.  I do think some of the cable 
companies are holding out to use Google's On8 technology which is used 
in WebM.  It's open source and free or no royalties.  They have to 
pay a royalty to MPEG-LA for the use of MPEG-4.


On 10/04/2013 07:27 AM, Richard J. Williams wrote:


So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active,
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!








[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Bhairitu
On the tires they often only put 40,000 mile tires on new cars anyway.  
My Subaru came with those.  My mechanic told me to be careful about 
skimping on tires because cheap ones can cost you mileage.  But he also 
said you don't need to buy the most expensive ones.  I'm due for some 
new tires too to keep the old jalopy going.  I put about $2000 into it 
which was just regular maintenance around 100K miles to keep it going 
another 100K.


On 10/04/2013 07:27 AM, Richard J. Williams wrote:


So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active,
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!






RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Good catch, but then one can't have fun with paddling and puddling.





 From: authfri...@yahoo.com authfri...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:14 PM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI 
arrests Silk Road suspect
 


  
Share wrote: 

iranitea, usually people say back peddling, like on a bicycle.

Pedaling, not peddling. Peddling is what a peddler does. Pedaling is what you 
do on a bicycle.



Re: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
One hopes he is well and happy wherever he is. And may whatever letters any of 
us brand on another be as lines on water, lines on air.





 From: bobpri...@yahoo.com bobpri...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:07 PM
Subject: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI 
arrests Silk Road suspect
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Oh thanks Share. I like to be corrected, if it's not used as an opportunity for 
a put down, as it has been happening so often.

Share, I really liked your comment about the PR anniversary. I like that you 
don't give in to all the collective pressure, of some of the group members 
here, that you are in fact NOT back peddling. I like you to know, that I am 
completely with you on this issue. PR is a strong word, but I do think that it 
was needed, and can well be understood. Don't give in to some wrong understood 
political correctness, which is basically the argument of your opponents. You 
are the one who clearly felt and perceived the kind of unwanted intrusion, and 
it is you who have to draw the red line. All the bad mouthing of your character 
is rubbish, you have not been the intruder in this regard. You had to deal here 
with a master manipulator - and you were able to see through this, and free 
yourself from that influence. Sometimes you have to step out of a prison, to 
realize you have been in a prison. There are prisons of mental concepts and 
conditionings. To free oneself from
 these may sometimes take years or decades. It doesn't matter how long you were 
exposed to these concepts, they may still take roots in you - obviously many 
have a hard time to get rid of this. Consider yourself lucky!

I wonder if *The Masked Zebra* remembered this all important anniversary, or 
maybe he's off carving the Z on the less lucky?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8ERXJLQySk 

 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


iranitea, usually people say back peddling, like on a bicycle. But I like back 
paddling too. Like in a boat. I also could go for, on a rainy day, back 
puddling, that is, jumping backwards into a puddle (-:





 From: iranitea no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 11:14 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk 
Road suspect
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Iranitea, now truly desperate to score a point:

 But have you ever considered, that you don't know anything about what you are 
 talking
 about?


You mean, as to whether Barry knows about the Dark Web? I'm not certain of 
that, of course, which is why I said I don't think Barry knows... See his 
post #359659 to Seraphita and let us know what you think.

Oh, oh, back-paddling



 I mean, you say 'Gracious no' as if it would be illegal or even ethical 
 wrong to use Tor, or
 pages accessible only through it - or encryption in times of almost total 
 Internet surveillance!



Yar. That must be why I posted this to Seraphita (#359600):


There are apparently many thousands of similar sites on the Dark Web. Silk 
Road and Atlantis (which closed down a couple of weeks ago) were only the 
most prominent.


(Disclaimer: I don't use any of 'em, but I've been reading about them; I find 
the whole Dark Web concept fascinating. It's also used, BTW, by legit 
activists and journalists who need to keep their communications secret and 
untraceable. So it isn't inhabited only by Bad Guys selling drugs and guns 
and child porn.)


Opsie...

Ooopsie, then why did you say: Gracious No?

 And, I think, you know as much about 'Spirituality' and 'Sadhana' as you 
 know about Tor and
 PGP. It's something that you are reading about on the internet and then 
 regurgitate it.



Well, I do think you and I have different ideas of what an effective sadhana 
should result in. Repeatedly shooting yourself in the foot and not having the 
minimal humility to laugh at yourself for doing so is not on my list of 
positive outcomes.

Neither mine. Oh, did you say this about me?

 And with regard to you, I do think it's a function of old age.


What is a function of old age?

Now, please spare me a detailed analysis. But it has been pointed out and 
explained to you quite recently by a number of people, most recent one was 
Xeno. You are of course immune to that, which is part of the problem. Now, 
Judy, I do indeed believe, that you basically believe in what you are saying. 
That is to say, to your own conscious awareness, you are truthful. The 
problem is only, that you take your own insights, or opinions for granted, 
and your 'intuitions' for facts, which they are not. 

This, together with an increased aggressiveness, and stubbornness, and an 
attempt to cover up your own 

RE: Re: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams
Most people don't know how much the Obamacare health insurance is going 
to cost them. But, many younger people, who currently have no insurance, 
are going to find out how much real soon. For a guy who is healthy, 
never get sick, and who seldom visits a doctor, the amount may come as a 
shock, even if it's only $150 a month.


The rent is too damn high!

I'm on medicare and Rita is on my group plan - mine costs about $100 out 
of my SS check and we send a check for $350 to United Health.


The rent is too damn high!

If you skip the insurance, you’ll pay a penalty. For 2014 the fine is 
$95 for an individual or 1 percent of your income, whichever is greater, 
along with $47.50 per uninsured child, maxing out at $285 for the year.


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/not-planning-buy-health-insurance 
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/not-planning-buy-health-insurance-111054106.html



On 10/4/2013 9:47 AM, Mike Dixon wrote:
Geez William, give these poor businesses a break. They have to pay for 
all that Obamacare now. Premiums are going up, up and up. Somebaody's 
got to pay for all that free healthcare.


*From:* Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
*To:* Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
*Sent:* Friday, October 4, 2013 7:27 AM
*Subject:* [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!
So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active,
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!





RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!

2013-10-04 Thread Bhairitu
For the amount of money we wasted in the last ten years on foreign wars  
we could have given EVERYONE in the US free medical health care.


I also saw a really dumb Tea Partier sign the other day that showed a 
woman holding up a sign saying health care is not a right.  Bet she 
would feel differently if she needed it and was gouged for it.  But the 
second line on her sign was even more stupid. It said something to the 
extent that a man shouldn't give away his work for free.  No one is 
asking doctors to work for free.  But we could use market economics to 
make for more doctors and more medical assistants.  The AMA is the 
stodgy one in this case.  It is an old boys network.


On 10/04/2013 10:35 AM, Richard J. Williams wrote:


Most people don't know how much the Obamacare health insurance is 
going to cost them. But, many younger people, who currently have no 
insurance, are going to find out how much real soon. For a guy who is 
healthy, never get sick, and who seldom visits a doctor, the amount 
may come as a shock, even if it's only $150 a month.


The rent is too damn high!

I'm on medicare and Rita is on my group plan - mine costs about $100 
out of my SS check and we send a check for $350 to United Health.


The rent is too damn high!

If you skip the insurance, you’ll pay a penalty. For 2014 the fine is 
$95 for an individual or 1 percent of your income, whichever is 
greater, along with $47.50 per uninsured child, maxing out at $285 for 
the year.


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/not-planning-buy-health-insurance 
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/not-planning-buy-health-insurance-111054106.html



On 10/4/2013 9:47 AM, Mike Dixon wrote:
Geez William, give these poor businesses a break. They have to pay 
for all that Obamacare now. Premiums are going up, up and up. 
Somebaody's got to pay for all that free healthcare.


*From:* Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
*To:* Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
*Sent:* Friday, October 4, 2013 7:27 AM
*Subject:* [FairfieldLife] The Rent is Too Damn High!
So, when I returned the two cable boxes to Time-Warner and to terminate
the HD and DVR service, I asked them how much would it cost just to have
basic cable. The guy said they would have to send out a technician to
put a 'trap' on the line to filter out the other channels, so I told
them to close the account. It's Friday and the cable is still active,
but I have powered antennas from the Shack anyway. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!

This week I took my daughter's PT Cruiser in to the dealership because
she said the front was 'wobbling' at 35-40 mph. The service manager
called back and said one of the front tires had a 'ball' on it. He
recommended getting four new Goodyear Eagles, balanced and a front end
alignment - $950. What!?

Now, why would anyone want to pay close to $1000 to put Goodyear Eagles
back on the same car that already had a Goodyear tire with a ball on it
at 30,000 miles? So, I had the tires rotated, front to back, for $15 on
the south side, sweet!. Maybe I'll buy two new Falken tires at Discount
Tires. Go figure.

The rent is too damn high!







[FairfieldLife] Re: Hayseed Jokes

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams
Red meat, contrary to the advice of some nutritionists, is not bad for 
you. However, gray meat with a furry coating more than probably is.

On 9/25/2013 11:49 AM, Richard J. Williams wrote:
 A guy driving a car carrier truck at night has his headlights go out - 
 so he
 pulls over and climbs up to the car above the cab and turns on the car's
 headlights - then he drives on down the road.

 A hayseed driving an old pickup up ahead suddenly swerves off the road
 into a corn field and the hayseed jumps out and starts running like hell
 into the field.

 So, the trucker pulls over to the side of the road and yells: What's 
 going
 on - you alright?

 The hayseed says: Well I saw your lights in the rear-view mirror and I
 thought that, if you were half as wide as your are tall, then I'd 
 better just
 get the hell out of the way!

 LoL!



[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













Re: Re: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Bob, just like in Vedic cognition, sequence is essential when it comes to FFL 
apologies per Ann: Dear Richard, if you apologize to MJ then I am sure Judy 
might consider 
apologizing to Buck. When Barry apologizes to everybody then Judy might 
consider apologizing to Share. When Share apologizes to Robin then Judy 
might consider apologizing to Steve. An apology to Barry, however, might 
extract a higher price.




 From: bobpri...@yahoo.com bobpri...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:32 PM
Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: 
FBI arrests Silk Road suspect
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


One hopes he is well and happy wherever he is. And may whatever letters any of 
us brand on another be as lines on water, lines on air.

No doubt Share, and in your case he must have had no doubt it was a line on 
air; have you apologized to Barry yet, get with it girl:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWdZEumNRmI  






 From: bobpriced@... bobpriced@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 12:07 PM
Subject: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI 
arrests Silk Road suspect
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Oh thanks Share. I like to be corrected, if it's not used as an opportunity for 
a put down, as it has been happening so often.

Share, I really liked your comment about the PR anniversary. I like that you 
don't give in to all the collective pressure, of some of the group members 
here, that you are in fact NOT back peddling. I like you to know, that I am 
completely with you on this issue. PR is a strong word, but I do think that it 
was needed, and can well be understood. Don't give in to some wrong understood 
political correctness, which is basically the argument of your opponents. You 
are the one who clearly felt and perceived the kind of unwanted intrusion, and 
it is
 you who have to draw the red line. All the bad mouthing of your character is 
rubbish, you have not been the intruder in this regard. You had to deal here 
with a master manipulator - and you were able to see through this, and free 
yourself from that influence. Sometimes you have to step out of a prison, to 
realize you have been in a prison. There are prisons of mental concepts and 
conditionings. To free oneself from these may sometimes take years or decades. 
It doesn't matter how long you were exposed to these concepts, they may still 
take roots in you - obviously many have a hard time to get rid of this. 
Consider yourself lucky!

I wonder if *The Masked Zebra* remembered this all important anniversary, or 
maybe he's off carving the Z on the less lucky?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8ERXJLQySk 

 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


iranitea, usually people say back peddling, like on a bicycle. But I like back 
paddling too. Like in a boat. I also could go for, on a rainy day, back 
puddling, that is, jumping backwards into a puddle (-:





 From: iranitea no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 11:14 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk 
Road suspect
 


  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Iranitea, now truly desperate to score a point:

 But have you ever considered, that you don't know anything about what you are 
 talking
 about?


You mean, as to whether Barry knows about the Dark Web? I'm not certain of 
that, of course, which is why I said I don't think Barry knows... See his 
post #359659 to Seraphita and let us know what you think.

Oh, oh, back-paddling



 I mean, you say 'Gracious no' as if it would be illegal or even ethical 
 wrong to use Tor, or
 pages accessible only through it - or encryption in times of almost total 
 Internet surveillance!



Yar. That must be why I posted this to Seraphita (#359600):


There are apparently many thousands of similar sites on the Dark Web. Silk 
Road and Atlantis (which closed down a couple of weeks ago) were only the 
most prominent.


(Disclaimer: I don't use any of 'em, but I've been reading about them; I 
find the whole Dark Web concept fascinating. It's also used, BTW, by legit 
activists and journalists who need to keep their communications secret and 
untraceable. So it isn't inhabited only by Bad Guys selling drugs and guns 
and child porn.)


Opsie...

Ooopsie, then why did you say: Gracious No?

 And, I think, you know as much about 'Spirituality' and 'Sadhana' as you 
 know about Tor and
 PGP. It's something that you are reading about on the internet and then 
 regurgitate it.



Well, I do think you and I have different ideas of what an effective 

[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: Barry, the rage-a-holic

2013-10-04 Thread doctordumbass













RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams
...he failed to follow his own security rules. While seeking tech help 
for his site, he used his personal email and gave his real name.


What was alleged Silk Road mastermind's 'fatal flaw'? Find out how FBI 
tracked him down?
http://www.cbsnews.com/ 
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505263_162-57605882/what-was-alleged-silk-road-masterminds-fatal-flaw-find-out-how-fbi-tracked-him-down/


'We Are Anonymous'
Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec, Anonymous, and the Global Cyber 
Insurgency

by Olson, Parmy
Back Bay Books, 2013

'Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet'
by Andrew Blum
Ecco, 2013

'PGP: Pretty Good Privacy'
by Garfinkel and Simson
O'Reilly, 1991

On 10/4/2013 1:08 PM, iranitea wrote:




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


Iranitea tries a different tack:

 Share, I really liked your comment about the PR anniversary.

It was pretty funny.

 I like that you don't give in to all the collective pressure, of 
some of the group members here,
 that you are in fact NOT back peddling. I like you to know, that I 
am completely with you on

 this issue.

Surprise!

 PR is a strong word,

(For those who weren't around at the time, PR stands for 
psychological rape.)


Repeating the word she finds so offensive.

 but I do think that it was needed, and can well be understood. Don't give in 
to some wrong
 understood political correctness, which is basically the argument of your 
opponents.

Not sure what's politically correct about objecting to a very 
inflammatory accusation, especially given that it was false as could be.


In any case, the offensiveness of the term and its falsehood were only 
part of the problem.


The phrase is just a characterizations of what has happened to her, 
and how it felt to her. The offense, intrusion, was made by Robin, not 
her. She is the victim, not Robin. There is NO chance this word can be 
misunderstood, for example as physical rape. There is no falsehood at 
all involved in it. If she felt this was a psychological rape, she has 
every right to express this.


The other part was that Share lied /either/ about her initial reaction 
to what Robin had said (which was utterly innocuous, BTW), or about 
what she /said/ her initial reaction had been four weeks later. She 
has never acknowledged the gross discrepancy, much less offered an 
explanation.


You don't know about her initial reaction, you only know what she 
wrote here. She might have felt it earlier, but wasn't able to express 
it then. It sometimes needs time to become clear of one's feelings.


Were you around at the time, iranitea? I don't recall your having 
commented on any of it.


And? I had seen it at some point, when I was not subscribed. I was 
somewhat surprised, how you had managed to alienate  yet another 
follower .


 You are the one who clearly felt and perceived the kind of unwanted 
intrusion, and it is you
 who have to draw the red line. All the bad mouthing of your character is 
rubbish, you have
 not been the intruder in this regard. You had to deal here with a master 
manipulator - and
 you were able to see through this, and free yourself from that influence. 
Sometimes you have
 to step out of a prison, to realize you have been in a prison. There are 
prisons of mental
 concepts and conditionings. To free oneself from these may sometimes take 
years or
 decades. It doesn't matter how long you were exposed to these concepts, they 
may still take
 roots in you - obviously many have a hard time to get rid of this. Consider yourself 
lucky!


This is fascinating. I wonder if Share will set him straight. I doubt it.

Yeah, sure, people have to be 'set straight'. This attitude says 
really all about you, that's why you are so much liked here. Consider 
this to be talking also about myself.







[FairfieldLife] Stock Market Goes Up In Spite of Shutdown

2013-10-04 Thread jr_esq













RE: Re: Re: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: Barry, the rage-a-holic

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: Barry, the rage-a-holic

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













[FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles

2013-10-04 Thread turquoiseb
So here I am, on the train home to the Netherlands, having taken
advantage of my frequent trips to and from the last few months
to upgrade to First Class on this commute.

So, what's the difference? Well, they serve you dinner in your seat.
And the seat is wider, a feature I have blessedly had no need for
so far, not having qualified as wide-body yet. :-) And if you ask
for a second 25cl bottle of good Spanish wine with your meal,
they just bring it, no questions asked.

Oh. And when you log in to the WiFi, they don't ask you for a
password, which they do on lesser class tickets.

Other than that, no difference. Not worth the price differential.
Just sayin', if you're ever traveling via Thalys.

Besides, I like the people I meet who travel Second Class far
more than the ones I meet who travel First Class.

And that's the news from this end. How are you people who
seem to live for getting the people you don't like doing?






[FairfieldLife] Re: The Twilight Zone, was The Theology of Breaking Bad

2013-10-04 Thread Richard J. Williams

Also Recommended:

Episode 46 A Most Unusual Camera
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Twilight_Zone_episodes

On 9/24/2013 2:47 PM, Richard J. Williams wrote:
You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of 
sight and sound but of mind.

A journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination.

That's a sigh post up ahead! Your next stop: The Twilight Zone.

Recommended:

Nick of Time
Episode with William Shatner
November 18, 1960
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IJ3DiqhlTw

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Twilight_Zone_episodes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_Serling 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shatner


On 9/24/2013 11:24 AM, Share Long wrote:
Richard, get this, which I am not making up: I first watched Twilight 
around the same time my landlords started making garlic infused oil 
in the third apartment of the house! Ok, I'm gonna do some research 
on Walking Dead because it definitely sounds like a very cool theme 
even though generally I'm not into horror shows. I think Twilight is 
tame compared to most.




*From:* Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
*To:* Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
*Sent:* Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:50 AM
*Subject:* Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: The Theology of Breaking Bad

Now this is funny- a guy thinks a Twilight book is about sex between 
werewolves.


Go figure.

If you enjoyed the Twilight movies you may want to check out AMC's 
The Walking Dead.


Based on the comic book series of the same name, AMC's The Walking 
Dead tells the
story of a small group of survivors living in the aftermath of a 
zombie apocalypse. A

Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series, Drama.

The series follows a group of survivors, led by police officer Rick 
Grimes, who are traveling
in search of a safe and secure home. However, instead of the zombies, 
it is the living who

remain that truly become the walking dead.

And guess what - The Walking Dead is not about zombies at all. LoL!

Read more:

'At AMC, Zombies Topple Network TV'
New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/ 
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/04/business/media/walking-dead-helps-solidify-amcs-ratings-success.html?pagewanted=all_r=0


'The Walking Dead,' Like All Zombie Stories: ... Not About Zombies at 
All'

The Atlantic:
http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/ 
http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/the-walking-dead-like-all-zombie-stories-not-about-zombies-at-all/265549/


On 9/24/2013 7:27 AM, turquoiseb wrote:
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... 
mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:


 turq, I don't find the writing in the Twilight novels
 that great. But I think it's a powerful retelling of
 the archetypal story of love between an immortal and
 a mortal, between God and human for us non atheists.
 In this sense, it's a story of surrender and unity to
 something greater than ourselves. Actually I think
 most romantic love stories are, on the deepest level,
 evoking the human yearning for unity with something
 more complete than ourselves. Also with regards to
 Twilight, perhaps a retelling of Beauty and the Beast,
 another archetypal love story. Maybe it's not an
 accident that the heroine is called Bella and the
 hero Edward calls himself a monster. Hopefully the
 archetypal aspects are also getting through to the
 teen audiences.

I can hardly speak as an expert, having made my
way through the first novel only because someone
was begging me to. It was like pulling my own teeth.

I later found criticisms of it that echoed what I
was feeling as I read. FAR from archetypal or
mythic, I found it to be the literary counterpart
of those creepy clubs in high schools where they
talk guys and gals into wearing virginity rings.

It was the mindset of the 1950s, with vampires and
the dangers of getting close to them taking the
place of the dangers of...uh...SEX. It was preaching
sublimation, and resisting of natural desires, and
trying to elevate those things as if they were noble
and wonderful. I didn't feel that was an appropriate
message for teenagers, so I wasn't a fan.

But obviously, tastes vary. What surprises me about
the whole Twilight thang are the number of *older*
women who fixate on it.

 
 From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 6:53 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: The Theology of Breaking Bad



 Â
 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long wrote:

 
  Seraphita, I think both CS Lewis and the listener are right.
  Continuing the food analogy, it's as if an essential nutrient
  has been missing from the diet for a long time and now the
  person is overindulging to make 

Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: The Twilight Zone, was The Theology of Breaking Bad

2013-10-04 Thread Share Long
Richard, do you remember the episode about the little boy who could predict the 
future, but only if he has pertinent knowledge? Very poignant.





 From: Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
To: Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 1:57 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: The Twilight Zone, was The Theology of Breaking Bad
 


  
Also Recommended:

Episode 46 A Most Unusual Camera
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Twilight_Zone_episodes

On 9/24/2013 2:47 PM, Richard J. Williams wrote:

You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and 
sound but of mind. 
A journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of
imagination. 

That's a sigh post up ahead! Your next stop: The Twilight Zone.

Recommended:

Nick of Time
Episode with William Shatner
November 18, 1960
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IJ3DiqhlTw

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Twilight_Zone_episodes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_Serling

On 9/24/2013 11:24 AM, Share Long wrote:

  
Richard, get this, which I am not making up: I first watched Twilight around 
the same time my landlords started making garlic infused oil in the third 
apartment of the house! Ok, I'm gonna do some research on Walking Dead 
because it definitely sounds like a very cool theme even though generally I'm 
not into horror shows. I think Twilight is tame compared to most. 







 From: Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.com
To: Richard J. Williams FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:50 AM
Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: The Theology of Breaking Bad
 


  
Now this is funny- a guy thinks a Twilight book is about sex between 
werewolves. 

Go figure.

If you enjoyed the Twilight movies you may
  want to check out AMC's The Walking Dead.

Based on the comic book series of the same
  name, AMC's The Walking Dead tells the 
story of a small group of survivors living
  in the aftermath of a zombie apocalypse. A
Golden Globe Award for Best Television
  Series, Drama.

The series follows a group of survivors,
  led by police officer Rick Grimes, who are
  traveling
in search of a safe and secure home.
  However, instead of the zombies, it is the
  living who 
remain that truly become the walking dead.

And guess what - The Walking Dead is not
  about zombies at all. LoL!

Read more:

'At AMC, Zombies Topple Network TV'
New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/

'The Walking Dead,' Like All Zombie
  Stories: ... Not About Zombies at All'
The Atlantic:
http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/

On 9/24/2013 7:27 AM, turquoiseb wrote:

  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 turq, I don't find the writing in
  the Twilight novels 
 that great. But I think it's a
  powerful retelling of 
 the archetypal story of love
  between an immortal and 
 a mortal, between God and human
  for us non atheists. 
 In this sense, it's a story of
  surrender and unity to 
 something greater than ourselves.
  Actually I think 
 most romantic love stories are,
  on the deepest level, 
 evoking the human yearning for
  unity with something 
 more complete than ourselves.
  Also with regards to 
 Twilight, perhaps a retelling of
  Beauty and the Beast, 
 another archetypal love story.
  Maybe it's not an 
 accident that the heroine is
  called Bella and the 
 hero Edward calls himself a
  monster. Hopefully the 
 archetypal aspects are also
  getting through to the 
 teen audiences.

I can hardly speak as an expert,
  having made my
way through the first novel only
  because someone
was begging me to. It was like pulling
  my own teeth.

I later found criticisms of it that
  echoed what I
was feeling as I read. FAR from
  archetypal or
mythic, I found it to be the
  literary counterpart
of those creepy clubs in high schools
  where they
talk guys and gals into wearing
  virginity rings.

It was the 

[FairfieldLife] Trigger (was: Frequent Roller Miles)

2013-10-04 Thread bobpriced













RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread authfriend













Re: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles

2013-10-04 Thread Bhairitu
I'm trying to decide what to do when dropping Comcast.  I didn't get to 
it this week and putting it off until next Tuesday may spare me a line 
at the Comcast office when I need to return the DVR.  Thing is that 
renting the few shows off VUDU or Amazon that I would have watched will 
cost me about as much as getting the promo from U-Verse TV.  There's a 
year contract with U-Verse, none with Astound but they aren't yet on my 
street.  Watching only streaming is iffy because U-Verse might be 
throttling Netflix but they don't seem to throttle VUDU, Amazon nor the 
free sponsor supported apps like Crackle.  The latter has some good 
original 22 minute shows and you only have to put up with 30 second ads 
not 3 minutes like TV.


Otherwise been busy on another software project which is about 
finished.  This one was on MonoDevelop for Linux and Xamarin for Windows 
in C#.  I like C# better than Java is it has more common sense to the 
API than Java.  I can also do Android and iPhone apps with it.


I also just finished selling a house that my relatives lived in (and 
paid for).  Boy, was there a lot of paperwork for that.


Hence I haven't had much time to pay attention to the badminton games.

On 10/04/2013 11:44 AM, turquoiseb wrote:


So here I am, on the train home to the Netherlands, having taken
advantage of my frequent trips to and from the last few months
to upgrade to First Class on this commute.

So, what's the difference? Well, they serve you dinner in your seat.
And the seat is wider, a feature I have blessedly had no need for
so far, not having qualified as wide-body yet. :-) And if you ask
for a second 25cl bottle of good Spanish wine with your meal,
they just bring it, no questions asked.

Oh. And when you log in to the WiFi, they don't ask you for a
password, which they do on lesser class tickets.

Other than that, no difference. Not worth the price differential.
Just sayin', if you're ever traveling via Thalys.

Besides, I like the people I meet who travel Second Class far
more than the ones I meet who travel First Class.

And that's the news from this end. How are you people who
seem to live for getting the people you don't like doing?






Re: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles

2013-10-04 Thread Michael Jackson
I am hanging out with my new cat, or rather kitten who appeared on my back 
steps the day after my birthday five weeks ago - emaciated and ill. 

Two trips to the vet's and three hundred dollars later he is happy and growing. 
He seems to be the smartest cat I have ever had by far, which is saying 
something as I have never had any stupid cats. My daughter is begging to have 
him for her own and I have agreed when he gets a little bigger - her current 
cat is huge compared to new kitty. And that's the news from SC today.





 From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 2:44 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles
 


  
So here I am, on the train home to the Netherlands, having taken
advantage of my frequent trips to and from the last few months
to upgrade to First Class on this commute.

So, what's the difference? Well, they serve you dinner in your seat.
And the seat is wider, a feature I have blessedly had no need for
so far, not having qualified as wide-body yet. :-) And if you ask
for a second 25cl bottle of good Spanish wine with your meal,
they just bring it, no questions asked.

Oh. And when you log in to the WiFi, they don't ask you for a
password, which they do on lesser class tickets.

Other than that, no difference. Not worth the price differential.
Just sayin', if you're ever traveling via Thalys.

Besides, I like the people I meet who travel Second Class far
more than the ones I meet who travel First Class.

And that's the news from this end. How are you people who
seem to live for getting the people you don't like doing?




Re: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles

2013-10-04 Thread Michael Jackson
I assure you you will bitterly regret switching form Comcast to U-Verse. 





 From: Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 3:26 PM
Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles
 


  
I'm trying to decide what to do when dropping Comcast.  I didn't get to it this 
week and putting it off until next Tuesday may spare me a line at the Comcast 
office when I need to return the DVR.  Thing is that renting the few shows off 
VUDU or Amazon that I would have watched will cost me about as much as getting 
the promo from U-Verse TV.  There's a year contract with U-Verse, none with 
Astound but they aren't yet on my street.  Watching only streaming is iffy 
because U-Verse might be throttling Netflix but they don't seem to throttle 
VUDU, Amazon nor the free sponsor supported apps like Crackle.  The latter has 
some good original 22 minute shows and you only have to put up with 30 second 
ads not 3 minutes like TV.

Otherwise been busy on another software project which is about
  finished.  This one was on MonoDevelop for Linux and Xamarin for
  Windows in C#.  I like C# better than Java is it has more common
  sense to the API than Java.  I can also do Android and iPhone
  apps with it.

I also just finished selling a house that my relatives lived in
  (and paid for).  Boy, was there a lot of paperwork for that.

Hence I haven't had much time to pay attention to the badminton
  games. 

On 10/04/2013 11:44 AM, turquoiseb wrote:

  
So here I am, on the train home to the Netherlands, having taken
advantage of my frequent trips to and from the last few
  months
to upgrade to First Class on this commute.

So, what's the difference? Well, they serve you dinner in
  your seat.
And the seat is wider, a feature I have blessedly had no
  need for
so far, not having qualified as wide-body yet. :-) And
  if you ask
for a second 25cl bottle of good Spanish wine with your
  meal,
they just bring it, no questions asked.

Oh. And when you log in to the WiFi, they don't ask you
  for a
password, which they do on lesser class tickets.

Other than that, no difference. Not worth the price
  differential.
Just sayin', if you're ever traveling via Thalys.

Besides, I like the people I meet who travel Second Class
  far
more than the ones I meet who travel First Class.

And that's the news from this end. How are you people who
seem to live for getting the people you don't like
  doing?





[FairfieldLife] Re: Frequent Roller Miles

2013-10-04 Thread turquoiseb
Cool. My two dogs -- now one, sadly -- were both pound
dogs, rescued from a pretty much certain fate in Santa
Fe and brought to Europe to explore new territories, 
and new adventures. There is a certain cool karma in
helping that to happen for another sentient being.

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson mjackson74@... wrote:

 I am hanging out with my new cat, or rather kitten who appeared on my back 
 steps the day after my birthday five weeks ago - emaciated and ill. 
 
 Two trips to the vet's and three hundred dollars later he is happy and 
 growing. He seems to be the smartest cat I have ever had by far, which is 
 saying something as I have never had any stupid cats. My daughter is begging 
 to have him for her own and I have agreed when he gets a little bigger - her 
 current cat is huge compared to new kitty. And that's the news from SC today.
 
 
  From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Friday, October 4, 2013 2:44 PM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles
  
 So here I am, on the train home to the Netherlands, having taken
 advantage of my frequent trips to and from the last few months
 to upgrade to First Class on this commute.
 
 So, what's the difference? Well, they serve you dinner in your seat.
 And the seat is wider, a feature I have blessedly had no need for
 so far, not having qualified as wide-body yet. :-) And if you ask
 for a second 25cl bottle of good Spanish wine with your meal,
 they just bring it, no questions asked.
 
 Oh. And when you log in to the WiFi, they don't ask you for a
 password, which they do on lesser class tickets.
 
 Other than that, no difference. Not worth the price differential.
 Just sayin', if you're ever traveling via Thalys.
 
 Besides, I like the people I meet who travel Second Class far
 more than the ones I meet who travel First Class.
 
 And that's the news from this end. How are you people who
 seem to live for getting the people you don't like doing?





RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: FBI arrests Silk Road suspect

2013-10-04 Thread iranitea













RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Frequent Roller Miles

2013-10-04 Thread j_alexander_stanley













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