RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] College study finds Oreo cookies are as addictive as drugs

2013-10-17 Thread doctordumbass
Thanks for the tips - CVS is quite the sugar mecca. Speaking of sugar, the 
store, Sugar, is cool too, with lots of snarky novelty items.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Look for Flicks dark chocolate at CVS or Luckys. Some of the best dark 
chocolate available in the US.  If you have a cup cake crave but don't want to 
wreck your pancreas try Red Velvet cupcake bites at Dollar Tree and Nestle's 
(though I hate their no right to water CEO) Sno Caps semi-sweet little 
chocolates.  Also Nob Hill has Cutie Pie which if you like Hostess pies are 
smaller and 6 to a box and oddly with whole wheat crusts (but unfortunately 
HFCS).  You can balance the sugar hit with Frito-Lay Ruffles potato sticks 
which I have also only found at Dollar Tree.  The plain are just potatoes, oil 
and salt.
  
 On 10/16/2013 07:32 PM, doctordumbass@... mailto:doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
   Just found a double pack of 12 Tootsie Rolls, at Target, for a buck. (Also 
four stuffed turkey *hats* - awesome) 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Ooo, now I'm remembering all the candy I did like: Tootsie Rolls and Mary 
Janes and Baby Ruths. Plus some whose name I can't remember. And I was the 
original Cookie Monster. Plus my Mom baked great cakes. It's a wonder I have 
any teeth left!
 
 
 
 
 On Wednesday, October 16, 2013 1:41 PM, doctordumbass@... 
mailto:doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... mailto:doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
   All candy was the ambrosia of the gods to me, when I was ten, KK too - pure 
magic, or at least fertile grounds for discovery. And the infamous butterscotch 
pudding - after a serious binge, couldn't even look at that concoction for the 
next few decades!
 
  
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Never liked it enough to OD on it. 
 
 
 
 On Wednesday, October 16, 2013 12:47 PM, doctordumbass@... 
mailto:doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... mailto:doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
   LOL You didn't do Halloween right if you didn't OD at least once on Kandy 
Korn as a kid.
 
  
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Candy corn! Yuck! Might as well fill up the syringe with high fructose corn 
syrup and inject it right into your bloodstream! Perfect dessert to accompany 
streak o lean IMHO! Make sure your will, etc. is in order first!
 
 
 
 
 On Wednesday, October 16, 2013 8:51 AM, doctordumbass@... 
mailto:doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... mailto:doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
   Yes, ready-made Double-stuff is an abomination! Only the painstaking 
twisting off, of two dry wafers, from two intact Oreos, and then the blessed 
union of creme-stuff from each, making a home-grown double-stuff, is 
acceptable. It tastes pretty good, when you work for it, but just adding 
another blob of creme at the factory, no fucking way!!!
 
  
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 That is my experience. Those things are deadly, seriously. It is impossible to 
eat one. Eating six is about the minimum at any one sitting that I can handle. 
I only like the originals though - non of that double stuff for me. The balance 
of outer wafer to inner white filling is perfection just as it is.
 
 
 On Tuesday, October 15, 2013 8:27:53 PM, anartaxius@... 
mailto:anartaxius@... anartaxius@... mailto:anartaxius@... wrote:
 
   
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/10/15/college-study-finds-oreo-cookies-are-as-addictive-as-drugs/
 
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/10/15/college-study-finds-oreo-cookies-are-as-addictive-as-drugs/
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] quot;Embracing the Voidquot;

2013-10-17 Thread doctordumbass
I love the night sky, and enjoy taking pictures of it. I was actually a bit 
nonplussed by those sun tunnels, in the article. Having been on a lot of 
construction sites, they look to me, like massive concrete sewer pipes.
  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Fabulous article.  I love the picture of the sun tunnels too.  The last time I 
was at the beach this summer, I laid out on the sand at night for quite a while 
and watched the sky and shooting stars; such an inexplicable feeling in the 
quiet and silence and dark with the waves in the background...very humbling.  I 
love the last line in the quote.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I thought of him too as I was reading the essay.
 

 Share wrote:
 
 So lovely...and how I wish that salyavin is lurking and will stumble onto this!
 
 
 
 On Wednesday, October 16, 2013 6:41 PM, authfriend@... authfriend@... 
wrote:
 
   Embracing the void
 The ancients had gods and pyramids to tame the sky's mystery. We have Star 
Axis, a masterpiece forty years in the making
 By Ross Andersen
 

 Another terrific essay from Aeon magazine, about a massive work of land art, 
a naked-eye observatory called Star Axisa ‘perceptual instrument’...meant 
to offer an ‘intimate experience’ of how ‘the Earth’s environment extends into 
the space of the stars’.
 

 The descriptions of the author's visit to the site are wonderful, but he also 
takes some absorbing excursions into the history of astronomy and the 
psychology of our fascination with the night sky. For example:
 

 ‘One may try to look at the sky,’ the scholar of ancient philosophy Thomas 
McEvilley once wrote, ‘but in fact one looks through it ... for no matter how 
deeply one sees into the sky, there is always an infinite depth remaining.’ 
When we peer into the sky’s abyssal recesses, its blank blues and deep starlit 
voids, we catch a glimpse of infinity, and, as McEvilley says, ‘the finite mind 
has difficulty processing infinity.’ The psychology of this phenomenon was 
described best by Pascal, the 17th-century mathematician who said the starry 
sky made him think of time’s crushing enormity. It made him see that human life 
is a microsecond, beset by two eternities, past and future. ‘The eternal 
silence of these infinite spaces frightens me,’ he said. And who can blame him? 
To look at the sky is to be reminded that oceans of space and time lie beyond 
the reach of our minds. Who can help but feel small under it? By showing us the 
true scope of the unknown, the sky forces us to confront the mysterious nature 
of human experience. It puts us face to face with the most basic of truths — 
that we are all, in some sense, existentially adrift.
 

 Read more:
 

 
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/nature-and-cosmos/star-axis-is-a-profound-meditation-on-the-sky
 
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/nature-and-cosmos/star-axis-is-a-profound-meditation-on-the-sky

 

 The site on Google Maps:
 

 http://goo.gl/maps/NYCBQ http://goo.gl/maps/NYCBQ

 

 

 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 









[FairfieldLife] RE: Americans need to know exactly how backwards they are

2013-10-17 Thread merudanda
 Most current universal health care systems were implemented in the period 
following the Second World War as a process of health care reform, intended to 
make health care available to all, in the spirit of Article 25 of the Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights of 1948, signed by every country doing so. However, 
the USA did not ratify the social and economic rights sections, including 
Article 25's right to health.
 http://www.amnestyusa.org/pdfs/escr_qa.pdf 
http://www.amnestyusa.org/pdfs/escr_qa.pdf
 

 http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd47/EN/constitution-en.pdf 
http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd47/EN/constitution-en.pdf
 http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd47/EN/constitution-en.pdf
 The concept of a right to health ( (WHO) Constitution defines health broadly 
as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely 
the absence of disease or infirmity.)has been enumerated in international 
agreements which include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the 
Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. 
Patient rights in healthcare delivery include: the right to privacy, 
information, life, and quality care, as well as freedom from discrimination, 
torture, and cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 
 
https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_10151915751529805_1134352580_n.png
 
https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_10151915751529805_1134352580_n.png
 

 


RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread dhamiltony2k5
 Dateline:
 Pope is 
 “Filled with light.”
 That is good and really mystical. 
 Pope Frances experienced the field of “glow”,
 of that Unified Field in nature.
 Maharishi Mahesh Yogi talked [taught] of that
 as he came out of India to the West.
 -Buck 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 can you ask them to compare and contrast the two and get back to us?
 
 On Mon, 10/14/13, awoelflebater@... mailto:awoelflebater@... 
awoelflebater@... mailto:awoelflebater@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: RE: Pope Francis technique
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Monday, October 14, 2013, 3:36 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Centering
 Prayer description and instructions. This seems to pretty
 much cover the TM and mindfulness marketplace.
 Many of my closest six or
 seven friends moved to Colorado and spent vast amounts of
 time around Father Thomas Keating in the Benedictine
 monastery in Snowmass. It is an extraordinary place and
 Thomas Keating is equally as special. These were my friends
 'recovering' from their time around WTS and the
 trauma they experienced in the last few months in Victoria
 especially.
 These are also people who, I
 believe, reject TM absolutely and yet adopted and practiced
 and embraced centering prayer. They would probably have an
 interesting perspective on the differences or similarities
 of the two practices since most of them did TM for many
 years and more currently have been practicing centering
 prayer for probably even more years (25 or
 more). 



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Think of the children

2013-10-17 Thread Michael Jackson
the Old Man had someone who would occasionally deliver - I would get home from 
school and there would be a quart Lipton Instant Ice Tea glass jar with a clear 
liquid in it - the Old Man would scoop it up and enjoy - I told him he was 
crazy and would go blind from drinking bad likker - he claimed his connection 
used an all copper still and if you took a tablespoon full and stuck a lit 
match to it, if it burned with a blue flame that meant it was pure - he 
demonstrated and it did burn with a blue flame but I was not convinced enough 
to try any, although my brother and I would threaten to drink it all up. The 
Old Man told us if we were man enough to drink it, we were welcome to it, but 
we never did. 

On Thu, 10/17/13, s3raph...@yahoo.com s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Think of the children
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 12:58 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Re Seems
 hard to believe - my grandpap drank copious amounts of
 moonshine and hated black folks as did my pappy, but those
 decisions have not made their way into my energy
 field.:Not
 hard to believe at all. I have very different attitude to
 blacks than did my grandparents because they knew
 next-to-nothing about blacks never having met one! I - and
 no doubt you - have worked alongside blacks - and other
 races - and know that some can be complete arseholes, some
 can be regular folks and some can be generous, warm-hearted
 and attractive. Our knowledge has expanded and that has had
 a corresponding effect on our outlooks. Genetics isn't
 fatalistic destiny - unless we're talking ginger hair
 and skin tone - but it can modify our tendencies. The
 interesting thing about the article I linked to is that it
 suggests your behaviour can tweak your descendents'
 characteristics.
 Never tried
 moonshine; is it any good?
 
  
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@...
 wrote:
 
 seems hard to
 believe - my grandpap drank copious amounts of moonshine and
 hated black folks as did my pappy, but those decisions have
 not made their way into my energy field.
 
 
 
  On Wed, 10/16/13, s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
 wrote:
 
 
 
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] Think of the children
 
  To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
  Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 9:16 PM
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 

 
We’ve long
 
  been told our genes are our destiny. But it’s now
 thought
 
  they can be changed by habit, lifestyle, even finances.
 What
 
  does this mean for our children? Your bad habits –
 
  smoking, overeating – can be passed onto your offspring,
 
  and even further down the hereditary line. Or, put another
 
  way: your grandfather was making lifestyle decisions that
 
  affect you today.http://tinyurl.com/qhso6vx
 
  
 
  The Lord is long suffering . . .
 
  visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children,
 unto
 
  the third and fourth generation. Numbers
 
  14:18  
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: A vision of Fairfield#39;s future?

2013-10-17 Thread dhamiltony2k5
 Interesting that so many of these spiritual groups that developed historically 
had commonly started out around a mystic in meetings held in people's living 
rooms then going on towards facilitating around that in to organizations and 
becoming a history. In Europe they would have living room meetings [satsanga?] 
and then grow in to facilitating groups while defending themselves against the 
persecutions that would come from the established local orthodoxy, be that the 
Lutherans, Papists, or Anglicans of their day.  Then, eventually fleeing to 
America.
  
 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Thanks. Yes, the world could use a lot more piety. FFL could too.
 -Buck the Pious
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Nicely put. It reminds me of something I wanted to say about awoelflebater's 
post on another thread (power naps): Now, these long-term, incessant 
meditators obviously have absolutely nothing else pressing in their lives to 
compel them to want to stand up and open their eyes.: 
 We understand what you're saying but it is a common belief in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together practising silent 
prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even though 
to practical, common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. Indeed, even 
the very recollection that there are men and women who forsake the feverish 
ambitions of the mass of people induces a feeling of calm!
 

 

  
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

  [Pietist, belief in the power of individual meditation [Quietism] on the 
divine [Unified Field] – a direct, individual approach to the ultimate 
spiritual reality of the [Unified Field] – ]
 
 


 









 

 






[FairfieldLife] RE: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread iranitea
Emptyji,
 

 I was away just for a few days, but I'm still busy in general, but I'm back 
now...
 

 I was actually not thinking of the first article in the blog, where Swartz is 
only mentioned, but I was more relating to this one 
http://chi-ting.blogspot.de/2010/11/heres-jimmy.html 
http://chi-ting.blogspot.de/2010/11/heres-jimmy.html called 'Here's Jimmy..' 
Jimmy rants about all the Neo-Advaitin Satsang scene, and if you read the 
article, you'll see that 'Kevin' (it's just a pseudonym of my friend to write 
satirical about things going on in Tiru, which has quite the scene with all the 
influx of Papaji disciples) actually agrees to a great part with Swartz, but , 
well you read it yourself. I read this article (I don't know the man really), 
and then clicked on the Swartz tag, and the first article, is actually about 
some kind of philosophic issue between Advaita and Buddhism, and was largely 
written by my friends girlfriend, who is the more intellectual one, and has 
experiences with both Hindu and Tibetan masters, and is also very familiar with 
the scene in Tiru, having had her master there. This article is something not 
really relating to our issue at all, as I said, I was in a hurry, and again, 
even the article I link to above is satirical, so you have to take it with a 
grain of salt.
 

 Regarding my use of the term 'enlightenment' - well it is in response to the 
article you posted and fully quoted, dumping Ganapati Muni - you see the 
argument here was, he didn't quite get enlightened, because he couldn't abandon 
his tantric world view, and somehow had only managed to infiltrate his 
philosophy into some books, still sold at the ashram, while the newer books 
were 'right' - at the same time dumping on Aurobindo!
 

 You just take the arguments as you need it. With regard to Non-Ramana-TB's, 
they miss N'lightenment, because they are distracted by wanting Siddhis or 
powers. With Ramana TB ashramites like Swartz though, big E is not an issue, 
cause there's is nor path at all, we are already that, just somebody has to 
tell you. This is what we call circular logic.
 

 If everything is so simple, and everything is just perfect as it is, why is 
there a need to talk about this at all? Why even satsangs to attend, books to 
read, there is no path, right? Now that's Neo-Advaita.
 

 Swartz typically is a Neo-Advaitin dressed up as a traditionalist. To me all 
the arguments you cite of him, are phony. What Swartz misses is, that in 
traditional Advaita, there are two types of knowledge, higher and lower. 
Traditionally, the lower knowledge is the Veda, the Higher is the Vedanta, the 
end of the Veda. Now you, and he juxtaposes yoga/meditation to Vedanta. Wrong, 
according to tradition you have to go through the lower knowledge, in olden 
times the vedic rituals, so that you are purified enough, to receive the higher 
knowledge, the Vedanta. In Shankaras times, only Brahmins were entitled to 
study the Vedanta, this is the reason why Maharishi never became a Swami, he 
wasn't a Brahmin. So, for the general people, as they are not allowed to even 
study the vedas, this lower, purificatory knowldege has been substituted by 
bhakti, tantra, and yoga. Then after that the higher knowledge comes, the 
mahavakhyas and all that. Even there are different levels in Kevala Advaita. In 
Ramanas method, people still meditate, they do atma vichara. That's not yet the 
highest really. Ramana also told many people that they still could do japa, if 
they can't do atma-vichara yet.
 

 If you ask a traditionalist like Dayananda, he will deny that Ramana had 
reached the highest level, because he didn't really learn the vedantic 
scriptures, like the Brahma Sutras, from an authorized teacher! Really! He, 
Dayananda would say, he, Ramana, just had a way of talking! You know, this 
typical 'Find out who is asking the question' this thought stopper, that all 
Neo-Advaitins use. Shankara didn't speak like this, if Shankara came to Ramana, 
and Shankara would try to refute some philosophical point of Ramana, Ramana 
would say, Who is asking the question? and that would be the end of all the 
commentaries on the Upanishads and the Brahma sutras. Regarding this other 
phony argument, that Ramana spoke only in the words of the Upanishads, while 
Aurobindo was rephrasing everything, even inventing his own language, I can 
only say two things:  

 

 Number 1: If the Upanishadic teachers wouldn't have done the same at their 
time, we wouldn't have hundreds of Upanishads today, but we would have only 
one! If teachers are disallowed to express their knowledge in their own way, 
you would be left with a very stereotype, narrow teaching indeed. 

 

 Number 2: Ramana may have cited the Upanishads with his every word, but he 
cherry-picked  his quotes, just as Shankara did himself, explaining those 
passages away that didn't fit into his system, or simply ignoring them. For 
example the more devotional or yogic passages in 

[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: A vision of Fairfield#39;s future?

2013-10-17 Thread dhamiltony2k5

 Like in Fairfield it [satsang] starts as small living room satsanga or 
meetings in home or in the public community meeting rooms with a teacher, 
mystic or visiting saint. Friends in meetings. Occasionally it goes straight to 
a big space like Adyashanti coming to the Fairfield convention center once. But 
Satsanga certainly lives and thrives in an old fashion too under the radar 
where necessary in meditating Fairfield, just like in history. It's part of the 
story. 
 

 Interesting that so many of these spiritual groups that developed historically 
had commonly started out around a mystic in meetings held in people's living 
rooms then going on towards facilitating around that in to organizations and 
becoming a history. In Europe they would have living room meetings [satsanga?] 
and then grow in to facilitating groups while defending themselves against the 
persecutions that would come from the established local orthodoxy, be that the 
Lutherans, Papists, or Anglicans of their day.  Then, eventually fleeing to 
America.
  
 
  Thanks. Yes, the world could use a lot more piety. FFL could too.
 -Buck the Pious
 

 Nicely put. It reminds me of something I wanted to say about awoelflebater's 
post on another thread (power naps): Now, these long-term, incessant 
meditators obviously have absolutely nothing else pressing in their lives to 
compel them to want to stand up and open their eyes.: 
 We understand what you're saying but it is a common belief in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together practising silent 
prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even though 
to practical, common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. Indeed, even 
the very recollection that there are men and women who forsake the feverish 
ambitions of the mass of people induces a feeling of calm!
 

 

  
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:






  [Pietist, belief in the power of individual meditation [Quietism] on the 
divine [Unified Field] – a direct, individual approach to the ultimate 
spiritual reality of the [Unified Field] – ] 
 


  TM and Quietist Pietistic [meditating] Fairfield, Iowa
 in companion as with other historic places like
 for instance on the Registry of National Historic Places, organized here A to 
Z..
 


  Other Meissner Effect [ME] group meditators...
 


  Amana Colonies
 Long Meissner Effect group meditations every day.
 http://amanacolonies.com/pages/about-amana-colonies/history.php 
http://amanacolonies.com/pages/about-amana-colonies/history.php
 


 Brook Farm
 http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dcr/parks/boston/brookfarmbrochure.pdf 
http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dcr/parks/boston/brookfarmbrochure.pdf 
 


  Pleasant Hill,
 Half hour silent meditation twice a day and daily group Meissner Effect [ME] 
meditations 
 http://www.shakervillageky.org/ http://www.shakervillageky.org/ 
 


  Whittier, Iowa Hicksite Quakers,
 National Registry of Historic Places; 
 Settlement era 
 Iowa Meissner Effect [ME] Group Meditation:
 
https://sites.google.com/site/ffhamfampage/clients/whittier-quaker-meeting-house
 
https://sites.google.com/site/ffhamfampage/clients/whittier-quaker-meeting-house
 
 


  Zoar
 
http://www.ohiohistory.org/museums-and-historic-sites/museum--historic-sites-by-name/zoar-village
 
http://www.ohiohistory.org/museums-and-historic-sites/museum--historic-sites-by-name/zoar-village
 
 



  [Pietist, belief in the power of individual meditation [Quietism] on the 
divine [Unified Field] – a direct, individual approach to the ultimate 
spiritual reality of the [Unified Field] – ]
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 In a coming future, meditating Fairfield, Iowa very likely shall also come to 
be on the National Registry of Historic Places along with other important 
spiritual practice communities of American and Western history. 
 

 Going forward meditating Fairfield, Iowa is blazing still its contemporary and 
revolutionary commentary on 21st Century materialism and spiritual and 
religious American community. Jai Brahmananda Saraswati!
 -Buck, in the Dome 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Yes, meditating Fairfield as a spiritual practice community was never 
conceived an amusement park. Even right now it is a living artifact of 20th 
Century American spiritual experience and community.
  

 

 Feste37 makes a very important distinction here. Fairfield clearly is even now 
a historic American pietist spiritual practice community rooted in the 
practices of Quietism. 
 -Buck 
 

 Feste37 writes, “Fairfield is not a theme park, dummy.” 
 
 Fairfield is not a theme park, dummy.  

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 
http://www.messynessychic.com/2013/10/04/holy-land-usa-before-after-the-abandoned-christian-theme-park/
 

[FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread emptybill
I had a long time friend who was a TM teacher in Thailand, Malaysia and 
Singapore in the mid-70's who talked with Basil Pennington on ATR.
 

 Basil's concern was how to port over the TM technique to revive the Catholic 
contemplative tradition. He believed this could be done and was working with a 
few others who had learned the technique to make it happen. We now know who 
those others were. 

 

 This Rock Catholic Evangelical magazine (now called Catholic Answers) has 
repeatedly condemned the entry of Hindu TM along with Buddhist Vipassana into 
Catholic practice. They consider it all to be the devious subterfuge of the 
Evil One working to overthrow the pure teachings of Roman Catholicism.


I agree with their premise. TM and its Vedic roots are in contradiction to the 
Sin-Guilt-Redemption miasma of Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity. 
These Western Christian lineages are an Augustinian deviation from original 
Christianity - which only still exists (to some extent) in the Eastern Orthodox 
church. 

However, the Eastern Orthodox teachings and contemplative practices are solely 
Christo-centric and have no place (nor need any) for TM practice or theories. 

 

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Buck wrote:
 
  Dear Turq; to give credit where credit is due, actually Centering Prayer
  was drawn from the range of Christian and Eastern mystics but to be
  more honest and accurate was distilled from Transcendental Meditation
  in the 1970's by the three monks and their brethren at St. Joseph's
  Abbey in Spencer Massachusetts.
  
  I know, I was there and watched them rip Transcendental Meditation [TM]
  off for their own purposes.
 
  -Buck in the Dome 
 
 I'll confirm that the assumption among TMers that these three clerics' version
 of Centering Prayer was based on TM was current back in the late 1970s. It
 isn't something Buck made up. Photocopies of the chapter entitled TM and
 Centering Prayer from Pennington's 1977 book Daily We Touch Him were
 routinely passed around among TMers.
 
 Moreover, if Barry had any curiosity at all, or any desire to get his facts 
straight,
 he would have checked out the PDF that Xeno uploaded. It would be extremely
 difficult for anyone familiar with TM instruction to read those two pages on 
how 
 to do Centering Prayer and claim that it had nothing to do with TM. It's
 obvious that the clerics did indeed rip off the instructions for TM, just as 
Buck
 says above.
 
 The mechanics of the techniques are virtually identical. The only two 
significant
 differences are (1) that TM uses a teacher-assigned Sanskrit mantra, whereas
 Centering Prayer uses a self-chosen sacred word from the Christian tradition;
 and (2) that the explicit context of Centering Prayer is Christian, whereas 
TM's is
 either secular, religious/nondenominational, or Hindu, depending on one's
 approach.
 
 --The Corrector
 
 
 
 Barry wrote:
 (snip) 
   I think we all know that The Corrector will probably rip Buck a new 
   asshole for
   running this tired and intentionally misleading routine again, but just on 
   the off
   chance that she doesn't, I will. The bolded section in brackets above comes
   only from Buck's fevered imagination. Anyone who reads the rest of the
   descriptions on that page knows that it has nothing to do with TM. 
   
   Buck's as bad as Willytex at making shit up and presenting it as fact.  
 


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Think of the children

2013-10-17 Thread Richard J. Williams

You really told off your crazy father with this post. Good work!

Now this is funny - a guy that spent two years trying to learn how to 
fly and working for room and board as kitchen help at a religious school 
up in Iowa making fun of his dad for drinking alcohol. Go figure.


On 10/17/2013 6:57 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:


the Old Man had someone who would occasionally deliver - I would get 
home from school and there would be a quart Lipton Instant Ice Tea 
glass jar with a clear liquid in it - the Old Man would scoop it up 
and enjoy - I told him he was crazy and would go blind from drinking 
bad likker - he claimed his connection used an all copper still and if 
you took a tablespoon full and stuck a lit match to it, if it burned 
with a blue flame that meant it was pure - he demonstrated and it did 
burn with a blue flame but I was not convinced enough to try any, 
although my brother and I would threaten to drink it all up. The Old 
Man told us if we were man enough to drink it, we were welcome to it, 
but we never did.


On Thu, 10/17/13, s3raph...@yahoo.com s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:

Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Think of the children
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 12:58 AM


























Re Seems
hard to believe - my grandpap drank copious amounts of
moonshine and hated black folks as did my pappy, but those
decisions have not made their way into my energy
field.:Not
hard to believe at all. I have very different attitude to
blacks than did my grandparents because they knew
next-to-nothing about blacks never having met one! I - and
no doubt you - have worked alongside blacks - and other
races - and know that some can be complete arseholes, some
can be regular folks and some can be generous, warm-hearted
and attractive. Our knowledge has expanded and that has had
a corresponding effect on our outlooks. Genetics isn't
fatalistic destiny - unless we're talking ginger hair
and skin tone - but it can modify our tendencies. The
interesting thing about the article I linked to is that it
suggests your behaviour can tweak your descendents'
characteristics.
Never tried
moonshine; is it any good?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@...
wrote:

seems hard to
believe - my grandpap drank copious amounts of moonshine and
hated black folks as did my pappy, but those decisions have
not made their way into my energy field.



On Wed, 10/16/13, s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
wrote:



Subject: [FairfieldLife] Think of the children

To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 9:16 PM





















































We’ve long

been told our genes are our destiny. But it’s now
thought

they can be changed by habit, lifestyle, even finances.
What

does this mean for our children? Your bad habits –

smoking, overeating – can be passed onto your offspring,

and even further down the hereditary line. Or, put another

way: your grandfather was making lifestyle decisions that

affect you today.http://tinyurl.com/qhso6vx



The Lord is long suffering . . .

visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children,
unto

the third and fourth generation. Numbers

14:18




























Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Americans need to know exactly how backwards they are

2013-10-17 Thread Richard J. Williams

Let's be realistic for a minute.

Now you tell me - how many times are young people, who are already upset 
that the federal government is spying on their Facebook wall and 
tracking their email and cell phone calls, going to want to key in all 
their information in to the Obamacare program only to be told that they 
either have to pay $300 every month for health insurance they don't need 
or even want? How many times? Do they even really care?


Some kids can't wait 2 seconds to get to a web page to load! Go figure.

 It’s time to panic. Now. Why? Because the exchanges are the way to 
sign up young, healthy people and prevent the fabled 'death spiral,' in 
which only older, sicker people sign up for insurance, causing rates to 
rise and healthier people to drop out, causing rates to rise even more...


'Obamacare is in Crisis Now. Right Now'
Daily Caller:
http://dailycaller.com/2013/10/16/obamacare-is-in-crisis-now-right-now/

On 10/17/2013 6:24 AM, merudanda wrote:


 Most current universal health care systems were implemented in the 
period following the Second World War as a process of health care 
reform, intended to make health care available to all, in the spirit 
of Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948, 
signed by every country doing so. However, the USA did not ratify the 
social and economic rights sections, including Article 25's right to 
health.


http://www.amnestyusa.org/pdfs/escr_qa.pdf


http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd47/EN/constitution-en.pdf


http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd47/EN/constitution-en.pdf

The concept of a right to health ( (WHO) Constitution defines health 
broadly as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being 
and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.)has been 
enumerated in international agreements which include the Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Economic, 
Social and Cultural Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons 
with Disabilities.
Patient rights in healthcare delivery include: the right to privacy, 
information, life, and quality care, as well as freedom from 
discrimination, torture, and cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_10151915751529805_1134352580_n.png

https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_10151915751529805_1134352580_n.png 







[FairfieldLife] Re: Americans need to know exactly how backwards they are

2013-10-17 Thread Jason

This is exactly the reason he hates you, and moreover, Xeno,
WillyTex, iranitea and wayback71 also pointed out to you
once.

He probably meant the term uncivilised.  If he did mean
backwards, he probably meant it in the social sense.

Do you have to pounce on every single semantic vagueness and
ambiguity he makes on the net? What are you exactly trying
to say in this post? Can't you ask him what exactly he is
trying to say?

Have you ever wondered why he loves Lawson inspite of all
the disagreements he had with him?


 --- authfriend authfriend@... wrote:

 Thank you, Barry, for letting Americans in on this
 disgraceful secret. We here on FFL have been wondering how
 to get the word out, but we never thought of just putting
 it in a post so all Americans could read it. You're a
 genius.

  Now that they all know how backwards [sic] they are,
 maybe they'll all just leave America and go to one of
 those other countries to live.


  (guffaw)

  Barry wrote:
 
  https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_101
  51915751529805_1134352580_n.png

 




Re: [FairfieldLife] Americans need to know exactly how backwards they are

2013-10-17 Thread Richard J. Williams
You did a good service, Barry, warning us about those Americans. Good 
job - we can tell you really like to keep up with current events. But, 
you left out a few things - like how they hate you for coming over there 
to take away their jobs. Go figure.


Ms Le Pen, 45, will next month travel to Holland to chart a joint 
campaign with Geert Wilders, whose anti-Islamic Freedom Party (PVV) 
currently tops national opinion polls for May's European elections.


'EU will collapse like the Soviet Union'
The Telegraph:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/ 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/10383879/Marine-Le-Pen-EU-will-collapse-like-the-Soviet-Union.html


On 10/15/2013 12:40 PM, TurquoiseB wrote:


https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_10151915751529805_1134352580_n.png

https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_10151915751529805_1134352580_n.png 








[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
empty, are you saying Pennington was a TM teacher? That was my understanding, 
but I didn't know whether it was correct, so I didn't mention it in my 
comments. How about Keating?
 
emptybill wrote:
 
 I had a long time friend who was a TM teacher in Thailand, Malaysia and 
Singapore in the mid-70's who talked with Basil Pennington on ATR.
 

 




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Richard J. Williams
CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, 
which I believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of 
a burden.”


'Sympathy for the euthanists'
Posted by Ann Althouse:
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html

On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:


Seraphita,


Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the 
best natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a 
given society. There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some 
individuals who excel in science, business or sports.  As such, the 
natural way of selection is promoted to let people enjoy the quality 
of life that is most beneficial for the entire world.



IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and 
some people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with 
nature's functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's 
experiment of having a communal family didn't work.






---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit 
in order to have a stable population in any country.:


That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a 
genetic component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, 
and - rather like global warming - you need to invest so much effort 
into studying the relevant data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an 
open mind though.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


 Carde,


According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent 
of the entire US population.  But they do appear to have many 
successful people in this country, including Einstein and Barbara 
Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the Jewish families encourage their 
children to be successful in whatever field they choose to work in.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews


Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit 
is in disarray, guess what would happen to the entire country?




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, cardemaister@... wrote:

I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or 
stuff.



In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half 
of the experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names??




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only 
on the 5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius 
visas to the best and brightest from countries around the world.


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html





[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Americans need to know exactly how backwards they are

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Yes, I know exactly what he meant. It wasn't exactly profound. My point with 
[sic] was that the word that means uncivilized or retarded in a social 
sense is backward, no s.
 

 Did you really think that was the only point of my post? Hint: The main point 
had nothing to do with semantic vagueness or ambiguity. Now take another 
look, and see if you can figure it out.
 

 And why on earth do you think I would care if he, Xeno, iranitea, Willytex, 
and/or wayback hate me? I only care what people I respect think about me.
 

 Oh, and Barry doesn't love Lawson. Not sure where you got that idea either.
 

 Jason wrote:
 
 This is exactly the reason he hates you, and moreover, Xeno, 
  WillyTex, iranitea and wayback71 also pointed out to you 
 once.

 He probably meant the term uncivilised.  If he did mean 
 backwards, he probably meant it in the social sense.

 Do you have to pounce on every single semantic vagueness and 
 ambiguity he makes on the net? What are you exactly trying 
 to say in this post? Can't you ask him what exactly he is 
 trying to say?

  Have you ever wondered why he loves Lawson inspite of all 
 the disagreements he had with him?


  --- authfriend authfriend@... wrote:
 
 Thank you, Barry, for letting Americans in on this 
 disgraceful secret. We here on FFL have been wondering how 
 to get the word out, but we never thought of just putting 
 it in a post so all Americans could read it. You're a  
 genius.
  
  Now that they all know how backwards [sic] they are,  
 maybe they'll all just leave America and go to one of 
 those other countries to live.
  
 
  (guffaw)
  
  Barry wrote:
  
  https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_101
  51915751529805_1134352580_n.png 
 
  





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM. Back 
in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the devil, 
that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the phrase 
Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but you 
know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based on 
my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus would 
continue it.

I was once told by a conservative spiritual teacher of great learning that 
there is a Council on the non physical plane that meets regularly and that 
determines which spiritual system has ascendency at which time in history. This 
resonates as true to me and is how I understand the seeming ignorance of some 
systems. I guess wisdom too unfolds over time even though on the deepest level, 
it is always alive.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 8:15 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com 
emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
I had a long time friend who was a TM teacher in Thailand, Malaysia and 
Singapore in the mid-70's who talked with Basil Pennington on ATR.

Basil's concern was how to port over the TM technique to revive the Catholic 
contemplative tradition. He believed this could be done and was working with a 
few others who had learned the technique to make it happen. We now know who 
those others were. 


This Rock Catholic Evangelical magazine (now called Catholic Answers) has 
repeatedly condemned the entry of Hindu TM along with Buddhist Vipassana into 
Catholic practice. They consider it all to be the devious subterfuge of the 
Evil One working to overthrow the pure teachings of Roman Catholicism.

I agree with their premise. TM and its Vedic roots are in contradiction to the 
Sin-Guilt-Redemption miasma of Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity. 
These Western Christian lineages are an Augustinian deviation from original 
Christianity - which only still exists (to some extent) in the Eastern Orthodox 
church. 

However, the Eastern Orthodox teachings and contemplative practices are solely 
Christo-centric and have no place (nor need any) for TM practice or theories. 






---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:


Buck wrote:


 Dear Turq;  to give credit where credit is due, actually Centering Prayer
 was drawn from the range of Christian and Eastern mystics but to be
 more honest and accurate was distilled from Transcendental Meditation
 in the 1970's by the three monks and their brethren at St. Joseph's
 Abbey in Spencer Massachusetts.
 
 I know, I was there and watched them rip Transcendental Meditation [TM]
 off for their own purposes.

 -Buck in the Dome 

I'll confirm that the assumption among TMers that these three clerics' version
of Centering Prayer was based on TM was current back in the late 1970s. It
isn't something Buck made up. Photocopies of the chapter entitled TM and
Centering Prayer from Pennington's 1977 book Daily We Touch Him were
routinely passed around among TMers.

Moreover, if Barry had any curiosity at all, or any desire to get his facts 
straight,
he would have checked out the PDF that Xeno uploaded. It would be extremely
difficult for anyone familiar with TM instruction to read those two pages on 
how 
to do Centering Prayer and claim that it had nothing to do with TM. It's
obvious that the clerics did indeed rip off the instructions for TM, just as 
Buck
says above.

The mechanics of the techniques are virtually identical. The only two 
significant
differences are (1) that TM uses a teacher-assigned Sanskrit mantra, whereas
Centering Prayer uses a self-chosen sacred word from the Christian tradition;
and (2) that the explicit context of Centering Prayer is Christian, whereas 
TM's is
either secular, religious/nondenominational, or Hindu, depending on one's
approach.

--The Corrector



Barry wrote:
(snip) 

  I think we all know that The Corrector will probably rip Buck a new asshole 
  for
  running this tired and intentionally misleading routine again, but just on 
  the off
  chance that she doesn't, I will. The bolded section in brackets above comes
  only from Buck's fevered imagination. Anyone who reads the rest of the
  descriptions on that page knows that it has nothing to do with TM. 
  
  Buck's as bad as Willytex at making shit up and presenting it as fact.  


[FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread jr_esq
 Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
cardemaister@... mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:
 
 I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.
 
 
 In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 
 
 http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html 
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Share wrote:
 

  emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.
 

 No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.
 

 Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.
 

 

  Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.






Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com 
wrote:
 
  
 Richard,

A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.

IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:


CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”

'Sympathy for the euthanists'
Posted by Ann Althouse:
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html


On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... wrote:

  
Seraphita,


Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is 
promoted to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for 
the entire world.


IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  






---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


 Carde,


According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that 
the Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever 
field they choose to work in.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews



Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, cardemaister@... wrote:


I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.


In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html




[FairfieldLife] RE: A vision of Fairfield#39;s future?

2013-10-17 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

 Nicely put. It reminds me of something I wanted to say about awoelflebater's 
post on another thread (power naps): Now, these long-term, incessant 
meditators obviously have absolutely nothing else pressing in their lives to 
compel them to want to stand up and open their eyes.: 
 We understand what you're saying but it is a common belief in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together practising silent 
prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even though 
to practical, common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. Indeed, even 
the very recollection that there are men and women who forsake the feverish 
ambitions of the mass of people induces a feeling of calm!
 

 What I have a problem with is not the genuine monks or contemplatives (and I 
think true Holy men and women with a one-pointed desire to live their lives in 
spiritual contemplation and prayer are very few and far between) who sit for 
hours day in and day out meditating, chanting, reflecting, reading etc. but 
these psuedo/faux contemplatives who live in places like FF and live otherwise 
normal western lives shopping at their Walmarts and driving their Subaru's 
are somehow in the same league. Sorry, I've been around the MIU campus and seen 
the various participants of Mother Divine or what-have-you and I'm stickin' to 
my guns in my estimation that most of these serial meditators have nothin' 
better to do.
 

 

  
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

  [Pietist, belief in the power of individual meditation [Quietism] on the 
divine [Unified Field] – a direct, individual approach to the ultimate 
spiritual reality of the [Unified Field] – ]
 
 


 









 

 

 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 
 

 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say they went out screaming.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
cardemaister@... mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:
 
 I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.
 
 
 In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 
 
 http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html 
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 


 


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 

Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say they went out screaming.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
  
 Richard,

A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.

IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:


CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”

'Sympathy for the euthanists'
Posted by Ann Althouse:
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html


On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... wrote:

  
Seraphita,


Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is 
promoted to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for 
the entire world.


IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  






---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


 Carde,


According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that 
the Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever 
field they choose to work in.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews



Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, cardemaister@... wrote:


I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.


In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html






Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Judy, indeed emptybill is very knowledgeable. I was launching into my 
experience with that sentence.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:10 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com 
authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Share wrote:

 emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.

No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.

Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.


 Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: A vision of Fairfield's future?

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Actually they'd probably agree, thinking that rounding is the BEST thing they 
can do!





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:14 AM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:


Nicely put. It reminds me of something I wanted to say about awoelflebater's 
post on another thread (power naps): Now, these long-term, incessant 
meditators obviously have absolutely nothing else pressing in their lives to 
compel them to want to stand up and open their eyes.: 
We understand what you're saying but it is a common belief in all contemplative 
traditions that communities joined together practising silent prayer (eg, monks 
and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even though to practical, 
common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. Indeed, even the very 
recollection that there are men and women who forsake the feverish ambitions of 
the mass of people induces a feeling of calm!

What I have a problem with is not the genuine monks or contemplatives (and I 
think true Holy men and women with a one-pointed desire to live their lives in 
spiritual contemplation and prayer are very few and far between) who sit for 
hours day in and day out meditating, chanting, reflecting, reading etc. but 
these psuedo/faux contemplatives who live in places like FF and live otherwise 
normal western lives shopping at their Walmarts and driving their Subaru's 
are somehow in the same league. Sorry, I've been around the MIU campus and seen 
the various participants of Mother Divine or what-have-you and I'm stickin' to 
my guns in my estimation that most of these serial meditators have nothin' 
better to do.


 
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:


 [Pietist, belief
in the power of individual meditation [Quietism] on the divine
[Unified Field] – a direct, individual approach to
the ultimate spiritual reality of the [Unified Field] –  ] 





[FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread TurquoiseB
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?

In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
True Believers do. 

Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
some of his TBs claimed that he passed peacefully.
The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
*literally* died screaming. 

 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
 awoelflebater@... wrote:
  
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin 
 board of the coat room in the women's Dome often say that 
 the person passed peacefully and or blissfully surrounded 
 by friends and family.
 
 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say 
 they went out screaming.
 




Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Well we're talking about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones. I 
would think that families would simply not mention if the passing was rough. 
Actually I have heard of one such rough passing of a TMer so there has also 
been honesty about such.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:35 AM, TurquoiseB turquoi...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?

In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
True Believers do. 

Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
some of his TBs claimed that he passed peacefully.
The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
*literally* died screaming. 

 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
 awoelflebater@... wrote:
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin 
 board of the coat room in the women's Dome often say that 
 the person passed peacefully and or blissfully surrounded 
 by friends and family.
 
 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say 
 they went out screaming.
 




RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] quot;Embracing the Voidquot;

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Ha.  Yes, I used to be in infrastructure; I've always been partial to 
utilities.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I love the night sky, and enjoy taking pictures of it. I was actually a bit 
nonplussed by those sun tunnels, in the article. Having been on a lot of 
construction sites, they look to me, like massive concrete sewer pipes.
  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Fabulous article.  I love the picture of the sun tunnels too.  The last time I 
was at the beach this summer, I laid out on the sand at night for quite a while 
and watched the sky and shooting stars; such an inexplicable feeling in the 
quiet and silence and dark with the waves in the background...very humbling.  I 
love the last line in the quote.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I thought of him too as I was reading the essay.
 

 Share wrote:
 
 So lovely...and how I wish that salyavin is lurking and will stumble onto this!
 
 
 
 On Wednesday, October 16, 2013 6:41 PM, authfriend@... authfriend@... 
wrote:
 
   Embracing the void
 The ancients had gods and pyramids to tame the sky's mystery. We have Star 
Axis, a masterpiece forty years in the making
 By Ross Andersen
 

 Another terrific essay from Aeon magazine, about a massive work of land art, 
a naked-eye observatory called Star Axisa ‘perceptual instrument’...meant 
to offer an ‘intimate experience’ of how ‘the Earth’s environment extends into 
the space of the stars’.
 

 The descriptions of the author's visit to the site are wonderful, but he also 
takes some absorbing excursions into the history of astronomy and the 
psychology of our fascination with the night sky. For example:
 

 ‘One may try to look at the sky,’ the scholar of ancient philosophy Thomas 
McEvilley once wrote, ‘but in fact one looks through it ... for no matter how 
deeply one sees into the sky, there is always an infinite depth remaining.’ 
When we peer into the sky’s abyssal recesses, its blank blues and deep starlit 
voids, we catch a glimpse of infinity, and, as McEvilley says, ‘the finite mind 
has difficulty processing infinity.’ The psychology of this phenomenon was 
described best by Pascal, the 17th-century mathematician who said the starry 
sky made him think of time’s crushing enormity. It made him see that human life 
is a microsecond, beset by two eternities, past and future. ‘The eternal 
silence of these infinite spaces frightens me,’ he said. And who can blame him? 
To look at the sky is to be reminded that oceans of space and time lie beyond 
the reach of our minds. Who can help but feel small under it? By showing us the 
true scope of the unknown, the sky forces us to confront the mysterious nature 
of human experience. It puts us face to face with the most basic of truths — 
that we are all, in some sense, existentially adrift.
 

 Read more:
 

 
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/nature-and-cosmos/star-axis-is-a-profound-meditation-on-the-sky
 
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/nature-and-cosmos/star-axis-is-a-profound-meditation-on-the-sky

 

 The site on Google Maps:
 

 http://goo.gl/maps/NYCBQ http://goo.gl/maps/NYCBQ

 

 

 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 











Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Richard J. Williams
In the future, when we break free from earth, people will probably live 
a lot longer - once we cut loose from the fact of gravity. When I go, I 
want to go in my sleep. Now that's better!


If you want to make God laugh, just tell Him your plans. LoL!

On 10/17/2013 10:03 AM, jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:


 Richard,


A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, 
stated that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's 
saying that for most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't 
say that euthanasia is the answer.



IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural 
way, and not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming 
experience both for the dying person and the family members.  But it 
obviously is not a pleasant one.





---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, 
which I believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more 
of a burden.”


'Sympathy for the euthanists'
Posted by Ann Althouse:
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html

On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:


Seraphita,


Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is 
the best natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in 
a given society. There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some 
individuals who excel in science, business or sports.  As such, the 
natural way of selection is promoted to let people enjoy the quality 
of life that is most beneficial for the entire world.



IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and 
some people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with 
nature's functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's 
experiment of having a communal family didn't work.






---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family 
unit in order to have a stable population in any country.:


That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a 
genetic component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, 
and - rather like global warming - you need to invest so much effort 
into studying the relevant data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an 
open mind though.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


 Carde,


According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent 
of the entire US population.  But they do appear to have many 
successful people in this country, including Einstein and Barbara 
Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the Jewish families encourage their 
children to be successful in whatever field they choose to work in.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews


Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit 
is in disarray, guess what would happen to the entire country?




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, cardemaister@... 
mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:


I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, 
or stuff.



In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half 
of the experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names??




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is 
only on the 5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering 
Genius visas to the best and brightest from countries around the 
world.


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html







[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Think of the children

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Yes, I don't know if I buy that, but I will say that my kiddos were born with a 
certain individuality already in residence.  No clean slate there.  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Hjust like all human beings, no?
 Precisely the point I'm making. But that wasn't clear to some in earlier 
generations who didn't mix with other races and so had to rely on prejudiced 
reporting and accepted the media stereotypes. Bit off topic though: it's the 
discovery that our experiences can alter how our DNA affects our children. So 
bad habits are not *just* passed on by kids mimicking parents' behaviour.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emilymaenot@... wrote:

 Re: and know that some can be complete arseholes, some can be regular folks 
and some can be generous, warm-hearted and attractive.   Hjust like 
all human beings, no?  Excuse you?  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Re Seems hard to believe - my grandpap drank copious amounts of moonshine and 
hated black folks as did my pappy, but those decisions have not made their way 
into my energy field.:
 Not hard to believe at all. I have very different attitude to blacks than did 
my grandparents because they knew next-to-nothing about blacks never having met 
one! I - and no doubt you - have worked alongside blacks - and other races - 
and know that some can be complete arseholes, some can be regular folks and 
some can be generous, warm-hearted and attractive. Our knowledge has expanded 
and that has had a corresponding effect on our outlooks. Genetics isn't 
fatalistic destiny - unless we're talking ginger hair and skin tone - but it 
can modify our tendencies. The interesting thing about the article I linked to 
is that it suggests your behaviour can tweak your descendents' characteristics.
 

 Never tried moonshine; is it any good?
 

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, mjackson74@... wrote:

 seems hard to believe - my grandpap drank copious amounts of moonshine and 
hated black folks as did my pappy, but those decisions have not made their way 
into my energy field.
 
 On Wed, 10/16/13, s3raphita@... mailto:s3raphita@... s3raphita@... 
mailto:s3raphita@... wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Think of the children
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 9:16 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 We’ve long
 been told our genes are our destiny. But it’s now thought
 they can be changed by habit, lifestyle, even finances. What
 does this mean for our children? Your bad habits –
 smoking, overeating – can be passed onto your offspring,
 and even further down the hereditary line. Or, put another
 way: your grandfather was making lifestyle decisions that
 affect you today.http://tinyurl.com/qhso6vx http://tinyurl.com/qhso6vx
 
 The Lord is long suffering . . .
 visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children, unto
 the third and fourth generation. Numbers
 14:18 
 



 




RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Because you thought he thought it was just Catholics and wanted him to know it 
was also Jehovah's Witnesses. But you weren't aware that fundamentalist 
Christians (Protestants) generally, not just Jehovah's Witnesses, think TM is 
of the devil.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Judy, indeed emptybill is very knowledgeable. I was launching into my 
  experience with that
  sentence.
 

 Share wrote:

 

  emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.
 

 No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.
 

 Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.
 

 

  Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.




 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Share, have you ever attended to someone dying?  My guess is no based on your 
comments.  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
awoelflebater@... wrote:
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 
 

 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say they went out screaming.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
cardemaister@... mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:
 
 I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.
 
 
 In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 
 
 http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html 
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 




 
 
 
 


 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to the very top (not just 
you guys), the most exalted scholarship and experience and holiness--and it's 
the same damn bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.
 
iranitea wrote:

 Emptyji,
 

 I was away just for a few days, but I'm still busy in general, but I'm back 
now...
 

 I was actually not thinking of the first article in the blog, where Swartz is 
only mentioned, but I was more relating to this one 
http://chi-ting.blogspot.de/2010/11/heres-jimmy.html 
http://chi-ting.blogspot.de/2010/11/heres-jimmy.html called 'Here's Jimmy..' 
Jimmy rants about all the Neo-Advaitin Satsang scene, and if you read the 
article, you'll see that 'Kevin' (it's just a pseudonym of my friend to write 
satirical about things going on in Tiru, which has quite the scene with all the 
influx of Papaji disciples) actually agrees to a great part with Swartz, but , 
well you read it yourself. I read this article (I don't know the man really), 
and then clicked on the Swartz tag, and the first article, is actually about 
some kind of philosophic issue between Advaita and Buddhism, and was largely 
written by my friends girlfriend, who is the more intellectual one, and has 
experiences with both Hindu and Tibetan masters, and is also very familiar with 
the scene in Tiru, having had her master there. This article is something not 
really relating to our issue at all, as I said, I was in a hurry, and again, 
even the article I link to above is satirical, so you have to take it with a 
grain of salt.
 

 Regarding my use of the term 'enlightenment' - well it is in response to the 
article you posted and fully quoted, dumping Ganapati Muni - you see the 
argument here was, he didn't quite get enlightened, because he couldn't abandon 
his tantric world view, and somehow had only managed to infiltrate his 
philosophy into some books, still sold at the ashram, while the newer books 
were 'right' - at the same time dumping on Aurobindo!
 

 You just take the arguments as you need it. With regard to Non-Ramana-TB's, 
they miss N'lightenment, because they are distracted by wanting Siddhis or 
powers. With Ramana TB ashramites like Swartz though, big E is not an issue, 
cause there's is nor path at all, we are already that, just somebody has to 
tell you. This is what we call circular logic.
 

 If everything is so simple, and everything is just perfect as it is, why is 
there a need to talk about this at all? Why even satsangs to attend, books to 
read, there is no path, right? Now that's Neo-Advaita.
 

 Swartz typically is a Neo-Advaitin dressed up as a traditionalist. To me all 
the arguments you cite of him, are phony. What Swartz misses is, that in 
traditional Advaita, there are two types of knowledge, higher and lower. 
Traditionally, the lower knowledge is the Veda, the Higher is the Vedanta, the 
end of the Veda. Now you, and he juxtaposes yoga/meditation to Vedanta. Wrong, 
according to tradition you have to go through the lower knowledge, in olden 
times the vedic rituals, so that you are purified enough, to receive the higher 
knowledge, the Vedanta. In Shankaras times, only Brahmins were entitled to 
study the Vedanta, this is the reason why Maharishi never became a Swami, he 
wasn't a Brahmin. So, for the general people, as they are not allowed to even 
study the vedas, this lower, purificatory knowldege has been substituted by 
bhakti, tantra, and yoga. Then after that the higher knowledge comes, the 
mahavakhyas and all that. Even there are different levels in Kevala Advaita. In 
Ramanas method, people still meditate, they do atma vichara. That's not yet the 
highest really. Ramana also told many people that they still could do japa, if 
they can't do atma-vichara yet.
 

 If you ask a traditionalist like Dayananda, he will deny that Ramana had 
reached the highest level, because he didn't really learn the vedantic 
scriptures, like the Brahma Sutras, from an authorized teacher! Really! He, 
Dayananda would say, he, Ramana, just had a way of talking! You know, this 
typical 'Find out who is asking the question' this thought stopper, that all 
Neo-Advaitins use. Shankara didn't speak like this, if Shankara came to Ramana, 
and Shankara would try to refute some philosophical point of Ramana, Ramana 
would say, Who is asking the question? and that would be the end of all the 
commentaries on the Upanishads and the Brahma sutras. Regarding this other 
phony argument, that Ramana spoke only in the words of the Upanishads, while 
Aurobindo was rephrasing everything, even inventing his own language, I can 
only say two things:  

 

 Number 1: If the Upanishadic teachers wouldn't have done the same at their 
time, we wouldn't have hundreds of Upanishads today, but we would have only 
one! If teachers are disallowed to express their knowledge in their own way, 
you would be left with a very stereotype, narrow teaching indeed. 

 

 Number 2: Ramana may have cited 

Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
I didn't think that about empty. It was simply my intro into my story.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com 
authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Because you thought he thought it was just Catholics and wanted him to know it 
was also Jehovah's Witnesses. But you weren't aware that fundamentalist 
Christians (Protestants) generally, not just Jehovah's Witnesses, think TM is 
of the devil.

Share wrote:


 Judy, indeed emptybill is very knowledgeable. I was launching into my 
 experience with that
 sentence.


Share wrote:



 emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.

No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.

Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.


 Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.






RE: Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Don't believe you, sorry. 
 
Share wrote:

 I didn't think that about empty. It was simply my intro into my story.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01 AM, authfriend@... authfriend@... 
wrote:
 
   Because you thought he thought it was just Catholics and wanted him to know 
it was also Jehovah's Witnesses. But you weren't aware that fundamentalist 
Christians (Protestants) generally, not just Jehovah's Witnesses, think TM is 
of the devil.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Judy, indeed emptybill is very knowledgeable. I was launching into my 
  experience with that
  sentence.
 

 Share wrote:

 

  emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.
 

 No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.
 

 Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.
 

 

  Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.




 
 

 




 
 
 
 



 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Emily, I haven't but I believe people who report a peaceful or blissful death. 
Do you think they're lying?





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01 AM, emilymae...@yahoo.com 
emilymae...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Share, have you ever attended to someone dying?  My guess is no based on your 
comments.  


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@... 
wrote:
 
  
 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 

Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say they went out screaming.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
  
 Richard,

A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.

IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:


CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”

'Sympathy for the euthanists'
Posted by Ann Althouse:
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html


On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... wrote:

  
Seraphita,


Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is 
promoted to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for 
the entire world.


IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  






---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


 Carde,


According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that 
the Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever 
field they choose to work in.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews



Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, cardemaister@... wrote:


I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.


In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html








RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Who have you heard of who has personally reported.  Also, you have taken the 
conversation to a ludicrous place again with your trying to turn it into a case 
of lying.  Nonsense, my dear, more nonsense.  Waste of time.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Emily, I haven't but I believe people who report a peaceful or blissful death. 
Do you think they're lying?
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01 AM, emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@... 
wrote:
 
   Share, have you ever attended to someone dying?  My guess is no based on 
your comments.  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
awoelflebater@... wrote:
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 
 

 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say they went out screaming.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
cardemaister@... mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:
 
 I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.
 
 
 In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from 

RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] quot;Embracing the Voidquot;

2013-10-17 Thread doctordumbass
Interesting - yeah, me too, though on the datacomm side - switches and 
protocols. My last contract, though, before I got out of the biz world, was 
PMing for a natural gas co., working on the distribution side, with a lot of 
time in the field. Loved it. Feels real. I enjoy studying the design, 
implementation, and maintenance of large systems, like networks, or highways, 
or manufacturing flows; applied tech, the sculpture of social solutions. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Ha.  Yes, I used to be in infrastructure; I've always been partial to 
utilities.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I love the night sky, and enjoy taking pictures of it. I was actually a bit 
nonplussed by those sun tunnels, in the article. Having been on a lot of 
construction sites, they look to me, like massive concrete sewer pipes.
  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Fabulous article.  I love the picture of the sun tunnels too.  The last time I 
was at the beach this summer, I laid out on the sand at night for quite a while 
and watched the sky and shooting stars; such an inexplicable feeling in the 
quiet and silence and dark with the waves in the background...very humbling.  I 
love the last line in the quote.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I thought of him too as I was reading the essay.
 

 Share wrote:
 
 So lovely...and how I wish that salyavin is lurking and will stumble onto this!
 
 
 
 On Wednesday, October 16, 2013 6:41 PM, authfriend@... authfriend@... 
wrote:
 
   Embracing the void
 The ancients had gods and pyramids to tame the sky's mystery. We have Star 
Axis, a masterpiece forty years in the making
 By Ross Andersen
 

 Another terrific essay from Aeon magazine, about a massive work of land art, 
a naked-eye observatory called Star Axisa ‘perceptual instrument’...meant 
to offer an ‘intimate experience’ of how ‘the Earth’s environment extends into 
the space of the stars’.
 

 The descriptions of the author's visit to the site are wonderful, but he also 
takes some absorbing excursions into the history of astronomy and the 
psychology of our fascination with the night sky. For example:
 

 ‘One may try to look at the sky,’ the scholar of ancient philosophy Thomas 
McEvilley once wrote, ‘but in fact one looks through it ... for no matter how 
deeply one sees into the sky, there is always an infinite depth remaining.’ 
When we peer into the sky’s abyssal recesses, its blank blues and deep starlit 
voids, we catch a glimpse of infinity, and, as McEvilley says, ‘the finite mind 
has difficulty processing infinity.’ The psychology of this phenomenon was 
described best by Pascal, the 17th-century mathematician who said the starry 
sky made him think of time’s crushing enormity. It made him see that human life 
is a microsecond, beset by two eternities, past and future. ‘The eternal 
silence of these infinite spaces frightens me,’ he said. And who can blame him? 
To look at the sky is to be reminded that oceans of space and time lie beyond 
the reach of our minds. Who can help but feel small under it? By showing us the 
true scope of the unknown, the sky forces us to confront the mysterious nature 
of human experience. It puts us face to face with the most basic of truths — 
that we are all, in some sense, existentially adrift.
 

 Read more:
 

 
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/nature-and-cosmos/star-axis-is-a-profound-meditation-on-the-sky
 
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/nature-and-cosmos/star-axis-is-a-profound-meditation-on-the-sky

 

 The site on Google Maps:
 

 http://goo.gl/maps/NYCBQ http://goo.gl/maps/NYCBQ

 

 

 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 













RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Re: Well we're talking about the death notices of plain folks, not famous 
ones.  Share, this is *not* what you were talking about.  You continually 
betray yourself in your own posts - why do you do this?  Yet more absurd 
nonsense; words that mean nothing and go nowhere.  Dig a little deeper, maybe?  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Well we're talking about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones. I 
would think that families would simply not mention if the passing was rough. 
Actually I have heard of one such rough passing of a TMer so there has also 
been honesty about such.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:35 AM, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:
 
  Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 
 In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
 though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
 True Believers do. 
 
 Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
 some of his TBs claimed that he passed peacefully.
 The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
 *literally* died screaming. 
 
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
  awoelflebater@... wrote:
  
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@ wrote:
  
   John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin 
  board of the coat room in the women's Dome often say that 
  the person passed peacefully and or blissfully surrounded 
  by friends and family.
  
  Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say 
  they went out screaming.
  
 
 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread Richard J. Williams
What you have to realize is that for many people posting here, this is 
their only spiritual practice of their entire day. Go figure. Maybe 
somehow it harks back to the time they used to meditate. I don't 
know.Some people just feel better when they have someone to talk to, I 
guess.


You've got to admit, it's tricky to actually practice being a spiritual 
anything posting one-liners on an internet chat room. Then you've got 
those who will say that everything is spiritual, all day and all the 
time. Now that's better!


There are a few things you can do to have a spiritual feeling. 
Meditation is one thing you can do - or doing some yoga poses with some 
candles and incense burning. Some people like to attend a church service 
or go to a Bible class.


For many people, getting out in nature provides a spiritual uplift. I 
get a spiritual feeling of sorts every time I visit the beach and walk 
in the sand or climb a mountain or a hill. Sometimes I get a spiritual 
feeling just hanging out at Whole Foods or going to the Y for a workout.


But, I've got to tell you, it's really a stretch sometimes to imagine 
some of these informants being spiritual teachers at one time, although 
ostensibly that's their reason for informing us here.


It's kind of fun sometimes to imagine what people are really like by 
reading their messages and trying to figure out their take on life from 
their postings. Where is Dr. Pete when we need him?


So, where is the Buddha, anyway - downtown, uptown, or out of town?

Go figure.

On 10/17/2013 11:08 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to the very top 
(not just you guys), the most exalted scholarship and experience and 
holiness--and it's the same damn bickering and squabbling as on lowly, 
ignorant FFL.



iranitea wrote:

Emptyji,


I was away just for a few days, but I'm still busy in general, but I'm 
back now...



I was actually not thinking of the first article in the blog, where 
Swartz is only mentioned, but I was more relating to this one 
http://chi-ting.blogspot.de/2010/11/heres-jimmy.html called 'Here's 
Jimmy..' Jimmy rants about all the Neo-Advaitin Satsang scene, and if 
you read the article, you'll see that 'Kevin' (it's just a pseudonym 
of my friend to write satirical about things going on in Tiru, which 
has quite the scene with all the influx of Papaji disciples) actually 
agrees to a great part with Swartz, but , well you read it yourself. I 
read this article (I don't know the man really), and then clicked on 
the Swartz tag, and the first article, is actually about some kind of 
philosophic issue between Advaita and Buddhism, and was largely 
written by my friends girlfriend, who is the more intellectual one, 
and has experiences with both Hindu and Tibetan masters, and is also 
very familiar with the scene in Tiru, having had her master there. 
This article is something not really relating to our issue at all, as 
I said, I was in a hurry, and again, even the article I link to above 
is satirical, so you have to take it with a grain of salt.



Regarding my use of the term 'enlightenment' - well it is in response 
to the article you posted and fully quoted, dumping Ganapati Muni - 
you see the argument here was, he didn't quite get enlightened, 
because he couldn't abandon his tantric world view, and somehow had 
only managed to infiltrate his philosophy into some books, still sold 
at the ashram, while the newer books were 'right' - at the same time 
dumping on Aurobindo!



You just take the arguments as you need it. With regard to 
Non-Ramana-TB's, they miss N'lightenment, because they are distracted 
by wanting Siddhis or powers. With Ramana TB ashramites like Swartz 
though, big E is not an issue, cause there's is nor path at all, we 
are already that, just somebody has to tell you. This is what we call 
circular logic.



If everything is so simple, and everything is just perfect as it is, 
why is there a need to talk about this at all? Why even satsangs to 
attend, books to read, there is no path, right? Now that's Neo-Advaita.



Swartz typically is a Neo-Advaitin dressed up as a traditionalist. To 
me all the arguments you cite of him, are phony. What Swartz misses 
is, that in traditional Advaita, there are two types of knowledge, 
higher and lower. Traditionally, the lower knowledge is the Veda, the 
Higher is the Vedanta, the end of the Veda. Now you, and he juxtaposes 
yoga/meditation to Vedanta. Wrong, according to tradition you have to 
go through the lower knowledge, in olden times the vedic rituals, so 
that you are purified enough, to receive the higher knowledge, the 
Vedanta. In Shankaras times, only Brahmins were entitled to study the 
Vedanta, this is the reason why Maharishi never became a Swami, he 
wasn't a Brahmin. So, for the general people, as they are not allowed 
to even study the vedas, this lower, purificatory knowldege has been 
substituted by bhakti, tantra, and yoga. 

[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread doctordumbass
I wonder why he died screaming?? Even with very painful diseases, like stomach 
cancer, there have been drugs for pain treatment, usually morphine, for a 
looong time. So, he must have denied the treatment for himself. Or you made it 
up.

Also, having personally witnessed a number of deaths, they were all peaceful, 
timely, or not. Oftentimes, death is a massive relief, from the unremitting 
suffering that the body is going through. I did not witness anyone faced with 
it, being afraid of death - any remorse expressed was more in terms of leaving 
loved ones behind.
  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:
 
  Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 
 In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
 though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
 True Believers do. 
 
 Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
 some of his TBs claimed that he passed peacefully.
 The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
 *literally* died screaming. 
 
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
  awoelflebater@... wrote:
  
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
  sharelong60@ wrote:
  
   John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin 
  board of the coat room in the women's Dome often say that 
  the person passed peacefully and or blissfully surrounded 
  by friends and family.
  
  Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say 
  they went out screaming.
  



RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
peaceful deaths. Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen 
have been about unfamous people. What do you think I'm talking about?

On Thu, 10/17/13, emilymae...@yahoo.com emilymae...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:46 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Re: Well
 we're talking about the death notices of plain folks,
 not famous ones.  Share, this is *not* what you
 were talking about.  You continually betray yourself in
 your own posts - why do you do this?  Yet more absurd
 nonsense; words that mean nothing and go nowhere.  Dig
 a little deeper, maybe?   
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well we're talking
 about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones. I
 would think that families would simply not mention if the
 passing was rough. Actually I have heard of one such rough
 passing of a TMer so there has also been honesty about
 such.
 
  
  
  On Thursday, October
 17, 2013 10:35 AM, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
  

  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
--- In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long
 sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do
 you?
 
 
 
 In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
 
 though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
 
 True Believers do. 
 
 
 
 Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
 
 some of his TBs claimed that he passed
 peacefully.
 
 The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
 
 *literally* died screaming. 
 
 
 
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM,
 awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
 wrote:
 
   
 
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  
 
   John, just to share that death notices on the
 bulletin 
 
  board of the coat room in the women's Dome often
 say that 
 
  the person passed peacefully and or blissfully
 surrounded 
 
  by friends and family.
 
  
 
  Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going
 to say 
 
  they went out screaming.
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Emily, there's a fellow in FF who has shared his NDE. I said that I think the 
notices of blissful and or peaceful death are honest and since you and Ann 
disagreed, I asked if you thought the notices were lying.

On Thu, 10/17/13, emilymae...@yahoo.com emilymae...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:37 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Who have you heard of who has personally
 reported.  Also, you have taken the conversation to a
 ludicrous place again with your trying to turn it into a
 case of lying.  Nonsense, my dear, more
 nonsense.  Waste of time.    
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Emily, I
 haven't but I believe people who report a peaceful or
 blissful death. Do you think they're lying?
 
  
  
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01
 AM, emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Share, have you ever attended to someone dying?
  My guess is no based on your comments.  
 
 
 ---In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Ann, I
 don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 
 
 
  
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16
 AM, awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
     
 
 ---In
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@...
 wrote:
 
 John,
 just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of
 the coat room in the women's Dome often say that the
 person passed peacefully and or blissfully surrounded by
 friends and family. 
 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going
 to say they went out screaming.
 
  
  
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03
 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
    Richard,
 A
 Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay
 Area, stated that 90 percent of us will know when death is
 near.  So, he's saying that for most of us, we can
 prepare for death.  But he didn't say that
 euthanasia is the answer.
 IMO,
 death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a
 natural way, and not hastened by unnatural means.  It
 is a transforming experience
  both for the dying person and the family members.  But
 it obviously is not a pleasant one.
  
 
 ---In
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@...
 wrote:
 
 
   
 
   
   
 CULTURE:
 “I’m looking for early
   symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I believe
 will creep
   in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a
 burden.”
 
   
 
   'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 
   Posted by Ann Althouse:
 
   http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
   
 
  
 
 
   On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... wrote:
 

 
 
    
   
   
 Seraphita,
 
 
 
 Based
   on historical records, it's apparent that
 the family unit
   is the best natural way to maintain or improve
 the quality
   of people in a given society. There is no
 doubt that
   genetics are involved in some individuals who
 excel in
   science, business or sports.  As such,
 the natural way of
   selection is promoted to let people enjoy the
 quality of
   life that is most beneficial for the entire
 world.
 
 
 
 IMO,
   this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced
 by the
   Nazi's and some people here in the USA,
 won't work as it
   would interfere with nature's functioning.
  Similarly,
   this is the reason why Osho's experiment
 of having a
   communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
   fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
   
 
   
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for
   having a cohesive family unit in order
 to have a
   stable population in any
 country.: 
 That makes good sense . . .
 but would you *completely* rule out a
 genetic
 component in this case? It's such a
 controversial
 minefield, and - rather like global
 warming - you
 need to invest so much effort into
 studying the
 relevant data that I can't be
 bothered. I'd keep an
 open mind though.
 
 
   
 
   ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
   fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 

RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Then he didn't die (near death doesn't count), did he?  I didn't disagree - I 
didn't comment on that at all; that, Share, is a lie. *You* determined to 
subvert the conversation and brought up lying, as if that has anything to do 
with anything.  Don't you see that the question itself is completely 
nonsensical?   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Emily, there's a fellow in FF who has shared his NDE. I said that I think the 
notices of blissful and or peaceful death are honest and since you and Ann 
disagreed, I asked if you thought the notices were lying.
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@... 
mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:37 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Who have you heard of who has personally
 reported.  Also, you have taken the conversation to a
 ludicrous place again with your trying to turn it into a
 case of lying.  Nonsense, my dear, more
 nonsense.  Waste of time.
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Emily, I
 haven't but I believe people who report a peaceful or
 blissful death. Do you think they're lying?
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01
 AM, emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Share, have you ever attended to someone dying?
  My guess is no based on your comments.  
 
 
 ---In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Ann, I
 don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16
 AM, awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 ---In
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
sharelong60@...
 wrote:
 
 John,
 just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of
 the coat room in the women's Dome often say that the
 person passed peacefully and or blissfully surrounded by
 friends and family. 
 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going
 to say they went out screaming.
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03
 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Richard,
 A
 Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay
 Area, stated that 90 percent of us will know when death is
 near.  So, he's saying that for most of us, we can
 prepare for death.  But he didn't say that
 euthanasia is the answer.
 IMO,
 death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a
 natural way, and not hastened by unnatural means.  It
 is a transforming experience
 both for the dying person and the family members.  But
 it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 
 
 ---In
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
punditster@...
 wrote:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 CULTURE:
 “I’m looking for early
 symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I believe
 will creep
 in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a
 burden.”
 
 
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... wrote:
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 Seraphita,
 
 
 
 Based
 on historical records, it's apparent that
 the family unit
 is the best natural way to maintain or improve
 the quality
 of people in a given society. There is no
 doubt that
 genetics are involved in some individuals who
 excel in
 science, business or sports.  As such,
 the natural way of
 selection is promoted to let people enjoy the
 quality of
 life that is most beneficial for the entire
 world.
 
 
 
 IMO,
 this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced
 by the
 Nazi's and some people here in the USA,
 won't work as it
 would interfere with nature's functioning.
  Similarly,
 this is the reason why Osho's experiment
 of having a
 communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
 
 
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for
 having a cohesive family unit in order
 to have a
 stable population in any
 country.: 
 That makes good sense . . .
 but would you *completely* rule out a
 genetic
 component in this case? It's such a
 controversial
 minefield, and - rather like global
 warming - you
 need to invest so much effort into
 studying the
 relevant data that I can't be
 bothered. I'd keep an
 open mind though.
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 

RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
I have no idea Share what you are talking about.  You are talking gibberish 
based on a knowledge base of death and dying that appears to be zero, based on 
your comments.  That's what I'm saying here.  That's my point.  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
peaceful deaths. Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen 
have been about unfamous people. What do you think I'm talking about?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@... 
mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:46 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Re: Well
 we're talking about the death notices of plain folks,
 not famous ones.  Share, this is *not* what you
 were talking about.  You continually betray yourself in
 your own posts - why do you do this?  Yet more absurd
 nonsense; words that mean nothing and go nowhere.  Dig
 a little deeper, maybe?   
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well we're talking
 about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones. I
 would think that families would simply not mention if the
 passing was rough. Actually I have heard of one such rough
 passing of a TMer so there has also been honesty about
 such.
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October
 17, 2013 10:35 AM, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long
 sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do
 you?
 
 
 
 In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
 
 though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
 
 True Believers do. 
 
 
 
 Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
 
 some of his TBs claimed that he passed
 peacefully.
 
 The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
 
 *literally* died screaming. 
 
 
 
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM,
 awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  
 
   John, just to share that death notices on the
 bulletin 
 
  board of the coat room in the women's Dome often
 say that 
 
  the person passed peacefully and or blissfully
 surrounded 
 
  by friends and family.
 
  
 
  Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going
 to say 
 
  they went out screaming.
 
  



[FairfieldLife] Upside Down

2013-10-17 Thread Bhairitu
This is a Canadian sci-fi fantasy film available on Netflix WI.   It 
stars Kirsten Dunst, Jim Sturgess and Timothy Spall.  It's about two 
worlds living opposite each other.  The world of the wealthy is in the 
sky and the world of poor on the ground.   Sorta like Elysium but with a 
much larger world of the wealthy.  It has some shades of Brazil to it 
too.  Since it is rated PG-13 it's just fine for Buck.
http://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/Upside_Down/70224735



[FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread TurquoiseB
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,  the Steinbot wrote:

 FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to the
 very top (not just you guys), the most exalted scholarship
 and experience and holiness--and it's the same damn
 bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.

I will reply to this, because for once I agree with Judy. :-)

I've told this story before, but it's apropos, so I'll tell it
again. Back in the day, in Boulder, CO, a bunch of folks
organized what they called Holy Man Jams. They
would invite supposed holy men -- ALL of them recog-
nized (at least by their followers) as fully enlightened,
many of them famous within the American spiritual
community -- to appear onstage together and debate/
discuss things.

ALL of these gathering devolved into petty ego arguments
within minutes of them starting. It was a zoo.

I mean, you had guys onstage (mainly guys, with only
a few women, which was more a reflection of the times
than sexism) -- some of them wearing white dhotis, some
of them wearing the ochre robes of Buddhist monks, some
in Western clerical garb, and some in street clothes --
yelling at each other at the top of their lungs over points
of OPINION that each of them claimed they knew the
truth about. Blows were occasionally exchanged. Really.

I've seen the same thing over the years inside spiritual
orgs, as the teacher-in-charge dissed other competing
teachers and put them down. You *certainly* saw this
with Maharishi.

Bottom line seems to be just as Judy expressed it -- it's
bickering all the way down. What, after all, is the real
difference between a bunch of old women having petty
ego-arguments over personalities on FFL, a bunch of
similarly old men having petty ego-arguments on FFL
about how much they know and how little the other
person knows, and these supposed holy men?

Where there are people, there are egos. And egos act out.






[FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread jr_esq
Share,
 

 We should remember that those who are dying in hospices or hospitals are most 
likely given a heavy doze of pain relievers like morphine.  So, death for them 
would appear peaceful and blissful.
 

 Nonetheless, the fact remains that death is a loss of life and of a loved one 
by family members.  For this reason, I stated that it is not a pleasant 
experience.  I witnessed my parents die in the hospital, and for my part the 
experience was definitely not blissful.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
cardemaister@... mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:
 
 I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.
 
 
 In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 
 
 http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html 
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 


 


RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
What was the point you thought you were making? That famous people are more 
likely to have unpleasant deaths than people who aren't famous? And therefore 
we should trust reports of peaceful deaths of the not-famous?
 

 Makes no sense, Share (not to mention the fact that whatever you were trying 
to say was based on the single example of Castaneda, in which those closest to 
him lied about how he died).
 

 Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING, 
ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author of a 
post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution or not.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
  peaceful deaths.
  Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen have been 
  about unfamous
  people. What do you think I'm talking about?





RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
 I wrote:
 (snip)
  Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING,
  ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author 
  of a  post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution 
  or not.
 

 Just to add: It's as if the only way you know you exist is if you can see your 
words and your name on your computer screen.
 
 
 






[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread sharelong60
John, I'm sorry about your parents. I was mainly replying to your saying that 
death is obviously not a pleasant experience. From what I've heard and read, it 
can be quite positive for all concerned even though very sad. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Share,
 

 We should remember that those who are dying in hospices or hospitals are most 
likely given a heavy doze of pain relievers like morphine.  So, death for them 
would appear peaceful and blissful.
 

 Nonetheless, the fact remains that death is a loss of life and of a loved one 
by family members.  For this reason, I stated that it is not a pleasant 
experience.  I witnessed my parents die in the hospital, and for my part the 
experience was definitely not blissful.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in disarray, 
guess what would happen to the entire country?
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
cardemaister@... mailto:cardemaister@... wrote:
 
 I'm afraid without Abraham's descendants US might be way worse off, or stuff.
 
 
 In scientific documentaries from the US of A, usually at least a half of the 
experts interviewed appear to have Jewish family names?? 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Would you believe Russia is on top of this list?  And, the USA is only on the 
5th place.  But the US has a secret weapon by offering Genius visas to the 
best and brightest from countries around the world. 
 
 http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html 

RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread sharelong60
Judy, it's true, I trust those death notices I read because I don't see why 
people would lie about how the person passed. Others can trust or not as they 
wish. I was discussing something of interest to me with John and turq. There 
are many topics and posts on FFL that I ignore. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 What was the point you thought you were making? That famous people are more 
likely to have unpleasant deaths than people who aren't famous? And therefore 
we should trust reports of peaceful deaths of the not-famous?
 

 Makes no sense, Share (not to mention the fact that whatever you were trying 
to say was based on the single example of Castaneda, in which those closest to 
him lied about how he died).
 

 Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING, 
ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author of a 
post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution or not.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
  peaceful deaths.
  Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen have been 
  about unfamous
  people. What do you think I'm talking about?

 





[FairfieldLife] A rare interview with Bill Watterson

2013-10-17 Thread TurquoiseB
Y'know...the guy who created these guys:



http://mentalfloss.com/article/53216/mental-floss-exclusive-our-intervie\
w-bill-watterson
http://mentalfloss.com/article/53216/mental-floss-exclusive-our-intervi\
ew-bill-watterson





[FairfieldLife] OK, this looks like state of the art in music video

2013-10-17 Thread TurquoiseB
And it's for the Web. Designed for Chrome with help from Google,
this video addresses the needs of those who've always wanted to
be IN the music videos they watch. You'll need a smartphone
to really participate...

  https://www.justareflektor.com/?lng=en 
https://www.justareflektor.com/?lng=en
https://www.justareflektor.com/?lng=en
https://www.justareflektor.com/?lng=en

Read about it, if you don't have one:

http://www.theverge.com/2013/9/9/4711532/arcade-fire-release-just-a-refl\
ektor-interactive-music-video
http://www.theverge.com/2013/9/9/4711532/arcade-fire-release-just-a-ref\
lektor-interactive-music-video





RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Share, this is not a response to my post. Did you not read it? Or is this just 
one more attempt to avoid dealing with reality? Or is it the compulsion I 
mentioned to say SOMETHING, ANYTHING, even if it isn't the tiniest bit 
responsive, so you can pretend you're interacting with other people?
 

 What was the point of your post mentioning Castaneda?
 
Share wrote:
 
  Judy, it's true, I trust those death notices I read because I don't see why 
  people would lie
  about how the person passed. Others can trust or not as they wish. I was 
  discussing
  something of interest to me with John and turq. There are many topics and 
  posts on FFL
  that I ignore. 

 

What was the point you thought you were making? That famous people are more 
likely to have unpleasant deaths than people who aren't famous? And therefore 
we should trust reports of peaceful deaths of the not-famous? 

 Makes no sense, Share (not to mention the fact that whatever you were trying 
to say was based on the single example of Castaneda, in which those closest to 
him lied about how he died).
 

 Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING, 
ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author of a 
post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution or not.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
  peaceful deaths.
  Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen have been 
  about unfamous
  people. What do you think I'm talking about?

 







[FairfieldLife] Vastu Living on $75 a Day?

2013-10-17 Thread Richard Williams
So, who wants to pay all that money for a house to live in when you're
always busy working to pay for it? It's like you have to pay for a car to
get to work so you can pay for the car. The definition of a home is 'a
place to put stuff, while you're out buying more stuff'. You can live in
your car, but you can't drive your house to work - unless it's an RV. So,
where can a person live on $75 a Day?

San Antonio:

[image: Inline image 1]

You don't need a huge nest egg to retire well, especially if you're
willing to move to a place with a low cost of living. Relocating to one of
these places could help you to get by on a combination of Social Security
and a small amount of savings, or allow you to retire younger or maintain a
better lifestyle than you could in a more expensive city.

'The Best Places to Retire on $75 a Day'
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/http://finance.yahoo.com/news/best-places-retire-75-day-180521228.html;_ylt=AwrTWf1xMmBSRWgA.0nQtDMD

Living on $5,000 a year, on purpose: Meet America's 'intentional poor'
http://inplainsight.nbcnews.com/http://inplainsight.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/13/20923154-living-on-5000-a-year-on-purpose-meet-americas-intentional-poor?lite


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: The Federal Court Ruling SCI and TM a Religion

2013-10-17 Thread dhamiltony2k5
   from the Malnak vs. Yogi judgment
 (archived at http://trancenet.net/law/nj1.html) 
 http://trancenet.net/law/nj1.html): 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Thank you muchly. I was going to ask if anyone knew where to get that Malnak 
v. Yogi opinion. And yes, thanks also for that Kingsley Brooks memo about 
re-cert teachers lifestyle. I was thinking there was an earlier rougher file 
version that had more specifics to do with the Raja lifestyle. We are indebted 
to your facility to quick research things with depth. The scholar that 
delivered the paper on the CWLF was more interested in their shared-goods 
communal living arrangement in those years of the hippie communes in and 
outside of Berkeley. The hippies of course were hedonistic and the CWLF was 
emulating the early Christian community in commune then in 1960-70's trying to 
evangelize the hippies. It was an interesting paper that followed their 
Christian fragmentation through time. The TM court case they waged was 
parenthetical to the larger paper about the CWLF. I ran in to the scholar 
before his talk and in asking what he was presenting and he finding I am from 
communal TM Fairfield he brought up the thing about the lawsuit. I pointed out 
the importance of the jurisprudence of the opinion to him such that I bet he 
goes back and really looks at that court case now some more too. He knows about 
the TM case from the standpoint POV of the CWLF waging it. I should bet that 
the TM religion law suit will be subject of further scholarly study.  It should 
be.
 -Buck
 

 

 Authfriend writes:
 Don't know which court or which opinion you're talking about, the district 
 court or the appeals court. I recommend the concurring opinion by Judge Adams 
in the appeal. It's an education in constitutional reasoning.
 

 It's in the Files section, in the Miscellaneous Writings folder. The filename 
is Malnak v. Yogi, Judge Adams's opinion.txt. I uploaded it some years ago. 
I've touted it on FFL and before that on alt.meditation.transcendental.
 

 Also see this FFL post from March 2009 that discusses some of the nuances:
 

 http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/FairfieldLife/conversations/messages/212845 
http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/FairfieldLife/conversations/messages/212845

 

 Did you see the link I posted to the Kingsley Brooks memo, by the way? You had 
said you couldn't find it in the archives.


 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Initially the CWLF [ Christian World Liberation Front] kind of Christians 
came in to the TM case wanting to interrupt hedonisms and narcissisms of the 
hippie culture and new-agers but then with some bad taste in their mouths they 
had to come around to actually argue that TM was legitimate religion more than 
just hedonism and hence it should be thrown out of schools; arguing by bringing 
in all kinds of expert theologians and other scholars on religions to examine 
what religions are and thereby establish that SCI through TM was indeed a 
religion with a religious practice and ironically even on par with 
Christianity. They won the case in the extreme. The judge wrote an important 
opinion that stands in American jurisprudence. I was at a conference last week 
where a scholar presented a paper on the fragmentation of the CWLF during those 
1960's-'70's years. Telling their larger story he incidentally referenced that 
TM court case as coming out of the CWLF. I spoke with him a little afterwards 
learning abou this. I remember reading the court opinion written for the TM 
case. It was really well written and is actually worth reading.
 -Buck in the Dome 
 

 '68 Berkeley also the Christian World Liberation Front began as a mission to 
the city's radicals. CWLF going on to sue and win in New Jersey Federal Court 
the case defining Maharishi's Science of Creative Intelligence a religion and 
hence that TM should not be taught in publicly sponsored schools. It seems that 
the David Lynch Foundation under Roth has won that case in the end. Huzzah!
  

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  '68 at UC Berkeley -- a campus considered Ground Zero for the anti-war 
movement and the cultural changes sweeping through the country at the time.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 1968
 Transcendental Meditation with the following analogy: The surface of the ocean 
is waves and white caps. But deeper down, the ocean is still. How TM differs 
from other meditations, he says, is that it doesn't attempt to still the waves, 
but rather allow access to the stillness. 








 

 Here are links to a five-part post made to alt.m.t
in 1996 containing the text of the appeals court
decision and Judge Adams's concurrence;

1 of 5
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.meditation.transcendental/msg/a175a1217c214306
 

Re: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
laughing, Judy, then why do you not only exchange posts with me? Why do you 
actually butt into my exchanges with others to do so?! And are you even 
interested in the topic?!





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 3:00 PM, authfri...@yahoo.com 
authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Share, this is not a response to my post. Did you not read it? Or is this just 
one more attempt to avoid dealing with reality? Or is it the compulsion I 
mentioned to say SOMETHING, ANYTHING, even if it isn't the tiniest bit 
responsive, so you can pretend you're interacting with other people?

What was the point of your post mentioning Castaneda?

Share wrote:


 Judy, it's true, I trust those death notices I read because I don't see why 
 people would lie
 about how the person passed. Others can trust or not as they wish. I was 
 discussing
 something of interest to me with John and turq. There are many topics and 
 posts on FFL
 that I ignore. 



What was the point you thought you were making? That famous people are more 
likely to have unpleasant deaths than people who aren't famous? And therefore 
we should trust reports of peaceful deaths of the not-famous?


Makes no sense, Share (not to mention the fact that whatever you were trying to 
say was based on the single example of Castaneda, in which those closest to him 
lied about how he died).

Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING, ANYTHING, 
just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author of a post, 
whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution or not.

Share wrote:


 Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
 peaceful deaths.
 Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen have been 
 about unfamous
 people. What do you think I'm talking about?




Re: [FairfieldLife] Vastu Living on $75 a Day?

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
Richard, I read this article earlier and postponed sending it to you via FFL. I 
saw Des Moines was on the list. Just for fun, comparing FF to Des Moines:
http://www.bestplaces.net/cost-of-living/fairfield-ia/des-moines-ia/5





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 3:02 PM, Richard Williams pundits...@gmail.com 
wrote:
 
  
So, who wants to pay all that money for a house to live in when you're always 
busy working to pay for it? It's like you have to pay for a car to get to work 
so you can pay for the car. The definition of a home is 'a place to put stuff, 
while you're out buying more stuff'. You can live in your car, but you can't 
drive your house to work - unless it's an RV. So, where can a person live on 
$75 a Day?

San Antonio:



You don't need a huge nest egg to retire well, especially if you're willing to 
move to a place with a low cost of living. Relocating to one of these places 
could help you to get by on a combination of Social Security and a small amount 
of savings, or allow you to retire younger or maintain a better lifestyle than 
you could in a more expensive city.

'The Best Places to Retire on $75 a Day'
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/

Living on $5,000 a year, on purpose: Meet America's 'intentional poor'
http://inplainsight.nbcnews.com/


RE: Re: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Very hollow laughter, Share. You can't even write a coherent sentence.
 

 You've asked those (disingenuous) questions before, and you know what my 
answers are. But you're afraid to even try to answer my questions.
 

 What was the point of your post mentioning Castaneda?

 

Share babbled dishonestly:

  laughing, Judy, then why do you not only exchange posts with
  me? Why do you actually butt into my exchanges with others
  to do so?! And are you even interested in the topic?!
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 3:00 PM, authfriend@... authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Share, this is not a response to my post. Did you not read it? Or is this 
just one more attempt to avoid dealing with reality? Or is it the compulsion I 
mentioned to say SOMETHING, ANYTHING, even if it isn't the tiniest bit 
responsive, so you can pretend you're interacting with other people?
 

 What was the point of your post mentioning Castaneda?
 
Share wrote:
 
  Judy, it's true, I trust those death notices I read because I don't see why 
  people would lie
  about how the person passed. Others can trust or not as they wish. I was 
  discussing
  something of interest to me with John and turq. There are many topics and 
  posts on FFL
  that I ignore. 

 

What was the point you thought you were making? That famous people are more 
likely to have unpleasant deaths than people who aren't famous? And therefore 
we should trust reports of peaceful deaths of the not-famous? 

 Makes no sense, Share (not to mention the fact that whatever you were trying 
to say was based on the single example of Castaneda, in which those closest to 
him lied about how he died).
 

 Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING, 
ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author of a 
post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution or not.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
  peaceful deaths.
  Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen have been 
  about unfamous
  people. What do you think I'm talking about?

 





 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread s3raphita
Richard Dawkins has mentioned a few times that he's worried that when he 
finally kicks the bucket someone will pretend that he had a deathbed conversion 
to belief in God.
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzZ7VkDGuPc 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzZ7VkDGuPc

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 laughing, Judy, then why do you not only exchange posts with me? Why do you 
actually butt into my exchanges with others to do so?! And are you even 
interested in the topic?!
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 3:00 PM, authfriend@... authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Share, this is not a response to my post. Did you not read it? Or is this 
just one more attempt to avoid dealing with reality? Or is it the compulsion I 
mentioned to say SOMETHING, ANYTHING, even if it isn't the tiniest bit 
responsive, so you can pretend you're interacting with other people?
 

 What was the point of your post mentioning Castaneda?
 
Share wrote:
 
  Judy, it's true, I trust those death notices I read because I don't see why 
  people would lie
  about how the person passed. Others can trust or not as they wish. I was 
  discussing
  something of interest to me with John and turq. There are many topics and 
  posts on FFL
  that I ignore. 

 

What was the point you thought you were making? That famous people are more 
likely to have unpleasant deaths than people who aren't famous? And therefore 
we should trust reports of peaceful deaths of the not-famous? 

 Makes no sense, Share (not to mention the fact that whatever you were trying 
to say was based on the single example of Castaneda, in which those closest to 
him lied about how he died).
 

 Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING, 
ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author of a 
post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution or not.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
  peaceful deaths.
  Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen have been 
  about unfamous
  people. What do you think I'm talking about?

 





 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 


 


[FairfieldLife] Don#39;t try this at home!

2013-10-17 Thread cardemaister
Magician Jori [yorry] A. Kopponen (not Koppola) eats some burning cigarettes: 
 

 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr1WFZ45rbk 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr1WFZ45rbk



Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread Michael Jackson
who did Marshy diss?

On Thu, 10/17/13, TurquoiseB turquoi...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 6:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,  the Steinbot
 wrote:
 
 
 
  FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to
 the
 
  very top (not just you guys), the most exalted
 scholarship
 
  and experience and holiness--and it's the same
 damn
 
  bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.
 
 
 
 I will reply to this, because for once I agree with Judy.
 :-)
 
 
 
 I've told this story before, but it's apropos, so
 I'll tell it
 
 again. Back in the day, in Boulder, CO, a bunch of folks
 
 organized what they called Holy Man Jams. They
 
 would invite supposed holy men -- ALL of them recog-
 
 nized (at least by their followers) as fully enlightened,
 
 many of them famous within the American spiritual
 
 community -- to appear onstage together and debate/
 
 discuss things.
 
 
 
 ALL of these gathering devolved into petty ego arguments
 
 within minutes of them starting. It was a zoo.
 
 
 
 I mean, you had guys onstage (mainly guys, with only
 
 a few women, which was more a reflection of the times
 
 than sexism) -- some of them wearing white dhotis, some
 
 of them wearing the ochre robes of Buddhist monks, some
 
 in Western clerical garb, and some in street
 clothes --
 
 yelling at each other at the top of their lungs over points
 
 of OPINION that each of them claimed they knew the
 
 truth about. Blows were occasionally exchanged.
 Really.
 
 
 
 I've seen the same thing over the years inside
 spiritual
 
 orgs, as the teacher-in-charge dissed other
 competing
 
 teachers and put them down. You *certainly* saw this
 
 with Maharishi.
 
 
 
 Bottom line seems to be just as Judy expressed it --
 it's
 
 bickering all the way down. What, after all, is the real
 
 difference between a bunch of old women having petty
 
 ego-arguments over personalities on FFL, a bunch of
 
 similarly old men having petty ego-arguments on FFL
 
 about how much they know and how little the
 other
 
 person knows, and these supposed holy
 men?
 
 
 
 Where there are people, there are egos. And egos act
 out.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Don#39;t try this at home!

2013-10-17 Thread s3raphita
Tom Mullica is the recognised master at this particular trick. Only it isn't 
a trick - he really is putting lighted cigs in his mouth and just putting up 
with the pain!
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJinjpC4hjM 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJinjpC4hjM 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, cardemaister@... wrote:

 Magician Jori [yorry] A. Kopponen (not Koppola) eats some burning 
cigarettes: 

 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr1WFZ45rbk 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr1WFZ45rbk


 


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread iranitea
 
 who did Marshy diss?

Nobody, Michael, they are just making it up.

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 who did Marshy diss?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... mailto:turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 6:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, the 
Steinbot
 wrote:
 
 
 
  FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to
 the
 
  very top (not just you guys), the most exalted
 scholarship
 
  and experience and holiness--and it's the same
 damn
 
  bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.
 
 
 
 I will reply to this, because for once I agree with Judy.
 :-)
 
 
 
 I've told this story before, but it's apropos, so
 I'll tell it
 
 again. Back in the day, in Boulder, CO, a bunch of folks
 
 organized what they called Holy Man Jams. They
 
 would invite supposed holy men -- ALL of them recog-
 
 nized (at least by their followers) as fully enlightened,
 
 many of them famous within the American spiritual
 
 community -- to appear onstage together and debate/
 
 discuss things.
 
 
 
 ALL of these gathering devolved into petty ego arguments
 
 within minutes of them starting. It was a zoo.
 
 
 
 I mean, you had guys onstage (mainly guys, with only
 
 a few women, which was more a reflection of the times
 
 than sexism) -- some of them wearing white dhotis, some
 
 of them wearing the ochre robes of Buddhist monks, some
 
 in Western clerical garb, and some in street
 clothes --
 
 yelling at each other at the top of their lungs over points
 
 of OPINION that each of them claimed they knew the
 
 truth about. Blows were occasionally exchanged.
 Really.
 
 
 
 I've seen the same thing over the years inside
 spiritual
 
 orgs, as the teacher-in-charge dissed other
 competing
 
 teachers and put them down. You *certainly* saw this
 
 with Maharishi.
 
 
 
 Bottom line seems to be just as Judy expressed it --
 it's
 
 bickering all the way down. What, after all, is the real
 
 difference between a bunch of old women having petty
 
 ego-arguments over personalities on FFL, a bunch of
 
 similarly old men having petty ego-arguments on FFL
 
 about how much they know and how little the
 other
 
 person knows, and these supposed holy
 men?
 
 
 
 Where there are people, there are egos. And egos act
 out. 



RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Who's they, iranitea? That post was from Barry.
 
 
   who did Marshy diss?

 Nobody, Michael, they are just making it up.

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 who did Marshy diss?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... mailto:turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 6:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, the 
Steinbot
 wrote:
 
 
 
  FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to
 the
 
  very top (not just you guys), the most exalted
 scholarship
 
  and experience and holiness--and it's the same
 damn
 
  bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.
 
 
 
 I will reply to this, because for once I agree with Judy.
 :-)
 
 
 
 I've told this story before, but it's apropos, so
 I'll tell it
 
 again. Back in the day, in Boulder, CO, a bunch of folks
 
 organized what they called Holy Man Jams. They
 
 would invite supposed holy men -- ALL of them recog-
 
 nized (at least by their followers) as fully enlightened,
 
 many of them famous within the American spiritual
 
 community -- to appear onstage together and debate/
 
 discuss things.
 
 
 
 ALL of these gathering devolved into petty ego arguments
 
 within minutes of them starting. It was a zoo.
 
 
 
 I mean, you had guys onstage (mainly guys, with only
 
 a few women, which was more a reflection of the times
 
 than sexism) -- some of them wearing white dhotis, some
 
 of them wearing the ochre robes of Buddhist monks, some
 
 in Western clerical garb, and some in street
 clothes --
 
 yelling at each other at the top of their lungs over points
 
 of OPINION that each of them claimed they knew the
 
 truth about. Blows were occasionally exchanged.
 Really.
 
 
 
 I've seen the same thing over the years inside
 spiritual
 
 orgs, as the teacher-in-charge dissed other
 competing
 
 teachers and put them down. You *certainly* saw this
 
 with Maharishi.
 
 
 
 Bottom line seems to be just as Judy expressed it --
 it's
 
 bickering all the way down. What, after all, is the real
 
 difference between a bunch of old women having petty
 
 ego-arguments over personalities on FFL, a bunch of
 
 similarly old men having petty ego-arguments on FFL
 
 about how much they know and how little the
 other
 
 person knows, and these supposed holy
 men?
 
 
 
 Where there are people, there are egos. And egos act
 out. 





RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread sharelong60
Judy, I was discussing something of interest to me with John and turq. You are 
of course entitled to your opinion about my posting. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  I wrote:
 (snip)
  Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING,
  ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author 
  of a  post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution 
  or not.
 
 

 Just to add: It's as if the only way you know you exist is if you can see your 
words and your name on your computer screen.
 
 
 







RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Yes, I'm aware of who you were conversing with. And yes, I sure am entitled to 
my opinion about your posting.
 

 Now, let's get back to what I asked you. You wrote to Barry:
 

 Well we're talking about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones.
 

 What was your point? That famous folks are more likely to have unpleasant 
deaths than plain folks, and therefore we should assume that reports of 
peaceful deaths of plain folks are always true?
 

 Share wrote:


  Judy, I was discussing something of interest to me with John and turq. You 
  are of course
  entitled to your opinion about my posting. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  I wrote:
 (snip)
  Again, Share, you have this pathological compulsion to SAY SOMETHING,
  ANYTHING, just to be saying something, just to see your name as the author 
  of a  post, whether it makes sense or not, whether it makes a contribution 
  or not.
 
 

 Just to add: It's as if the only way you know you exist is if you can see your 
words and your name on your computer screen.
 
 
 









[FairfieldLife] Girl power: Liv posed with model Charlotte Kemp Muhl at the event Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2464111/Liv-Tyler-ex-husbal

2013-10-17 Thread srijau
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2464111/Liv-Tyler-ex-husband-Royston-Langdon-reunite-charity-concert.html

RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread iranitea
Ah, okay, it's quoted there a little lower.. but I had meant Marshy, the 
Ramana, and with 'they' the authors of the blog and Empty quoting it. 
Obviously, Michaels reference was to something else Barry wrote. I didn't get 
this (just get it now) :-)

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Who's they, iranitea? That post was from Barry.
 
 
   who did Marshy diss?

 Nobody, Michael, they are just making it up.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 who did Marshy diss?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... mailto:turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 6:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, the 
Steinbot
 wrote:
 
 
 
  FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to
 the
 
  very top (not just you guys), the most exalted
 scholarship
 
  and experience and holiness--and it's the same
 damn
 
  bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.
 
 
 
 I will reply to this, because for once I agree with Judy.
 :-)
 
 
 
 I've told this story before, but it's apropos, so
 I'll tell it
 
 again. Back in the day, in Boulder, CO, a bunch of folks
 
 organized what they called Holy Man Jams. They
 
 would invite supposed holy men -- ALL of them recog-
 
 nized (at least by their followers) as fully enlightened,
 
 many of them famous within the American spiritual
 
 community -- to appear onstage together and debate/
 
 discuss things.
 
 
 
 ALL of these gathering devolved into petty ego arguments
 
 within minutes of them starting. It was a zoo.
 
 
 
 I mean, you had guys onstage (mainly guys, with only
 
 a few women, which was more a reflection of the times
 
 than sexism) -- some of them wearing white dhotis, some
 
 of them wearing the ochre robes of Buddhist monks, some
 
 in Western clerical garb, and some in street
 clothes --
 
 yelling at each other at the top of their lungs over points
 
 of OPINION that each of them claimed they knew the
 
 truth about. Blows were occasionally exchanged.
 Really.
 
 
 
 I've seen the same thing over the years inside
 spiritual
 
 orgs, as the teacher-in-charge dissed other
 competing
 
 teachers and put them down. You *certainly* saw this
 
 with Maharishi.
 
 
 
 Bottom line seems to be just as Judy expressed it --
 it's
 
 bickering all the way down. What, after all, is the real
 
 difference between a bunch of old women having petty
 
 ego-arguments over personalities on FFL, a bunch of
 
 similarly old men having petty ego-arguments on FFL
 
 about how much they know and how little the
 other
 
 person knows, and these supposed holy
 men?
 
 
 
 Where there are people, there are egos. And egos act
 out. 





[FairfieldLife] new Sam Harris article

2013-10-17 Thread yifuxero
http://us-mg6.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=4vd84h8lf2fde#mail 
http://us-mg6.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=4vd84h8lf2fde#mail

Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread Share Long
No need to be sorry, it's just your opinion to which you are entitled.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:21 AM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com 
wrote:
 
  
I didn't think that about empty. It was simply my intro into my story.





On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com 
authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Because you thought he thought it was just Catholics and wanted him to know it 
was also Jehovah's Witnesses. But you weren't aware that fundamentalist 
Christians (Protestants) generally, not just Jehovah's Witnesses, think TM is 
of the devil.

Share wrote:


 Judy, indeed emptybill is very knowledgeable. I was launching into my 
 experience with that
 sentence.


Share wrote:



 emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.

No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.

Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.


 Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.








[FairfieldLife] health benefits of lactoferrin

2013-10-17 Thread yifuxero
http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2000/oct2000_report_lactoferrin.htm 
http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2000/oct2000_report_lactoferrin.htm

RE: Re: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
You seem to be responding to a different post than the one you quote. But don't 
worry, it was just a courtesy because I know it upsets you that I don't fall 
for your dishonesty, and I know you can't help being dishonest; after all, 
being truthful would require you to take account of reality. It's very sad.
 

Share wrote:

 No need to be sorry, it's just your opinion to which you are entitled.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:21 AM, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:
 
   I didn't think that about empty. It was simply my intro into my story.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:01 AM, authfriend@... authfriend@... 
wrote:
 
   Because you thought he thought it was just Catholics and wanted him to know 
it was also Jehovah's Witnesses. But you weren't aware that fundamentalist 
Christians (Protestants) generally, not just Jehovah's Witnesses, think TM is 
of the devil.
 
Share wrote:
 
  Judy, indeed emptybill is very knowledgeable. I was launching into my 
  experience with that
  sentence.
 

 Share wrote:

 

  emptybill, it's not only the Roman Catholic Church that thinks this of TM.
 

 No kidding!! Boy, I bet emptybill will be surprised to learn this.
 

 Actually Protestant fundamentalist Christians generally, not just Jehovah's 
Witnesses, think TM is the work of the devil.
 

 

  Back in the 80s some Jehovah Witnesses told me that TM is the work of the 
devil, that it says so in the Bible. I asked if the Bible actually used the 
phrase Transcendental Meditation. They admitted that it didn't but added, but 
you know that's what it means. They finally left when I told them that, based 
on my own experience I did not think TM to be the work of the devil and thus 
would continue it.




 
 

 




 
 
 
 



 
 

 




 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 




 
 
 
 






RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta

2013-10-17 Thread yifuxero
 Diss might be an inappropriate term.  Generally, he expressed a vp that many 
Gurus have no techniques that compare to TM, in his opinion.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  
 who did Marshy diss?

Nobody, Michael, they are just making it up.

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 who did Marshy diss?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... mailto:turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: On Ramana, Yoga and Vedanta
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 6:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, the 
Steinbot
 wrote:
 
 
 
  FWIW, I find this absolutely hilarious, all the way to
 the
 
  very top (not just you guys), the most exalted
 scholarship
 
  and experience and holiness--and it's the same
 damn
 
  bickering and squabbling as on lowly, ignorant FFL.
 
 
 
 I will reply to this, because for once I agree with Judy.
 :-)
 
 
 
 I've told this story before, but it's apropos, so
 I'll tell it
 
 again. Back in the day, in Boulder, CO, a bunch of folks
 
 organized what they called Holy Man Jams. They
 
 would invite supposed holy men -- ALL of them recog-
 
 nized (at least by their followers) as fully enlightened,
 
 many of them famous within the American spiritual
 
 community -- to appear onstage together and debate/
 
 discuss things.
 
 
 
 ALL of these gathering devolved into petty ego arguments
 
 within minutes of them starting. It was a zoo.
 
 
 
 I mean, you had guys onstage (mainly guys, with only
 
 a few women, which was more a reflection of the times
 
 than sexism) -- some of them wearing white dhotis, some
 
 of them wearing the ochre robes of Buddhist monks, some
 
 in Western clerical garb, and some in street
 clothes --
 
 yelling at each other at the top of their lungs over points
 
 of OPINION that each of them claimed they knew the
 
 truth about. Blows were occasionally exchanged.
 Really.
 
 
 
 I've seen the same thing over the years inside
 spiritual
 
 orgs, as the teacher-in-charge dissed other
 competing
 
 teachers and put them down. You *certainly* saw this
 
 with Maharishi.
 
 
 
 Bottom line seems to be just as Judy expressed it --
 it's
 
 bickering all the way down. What, after all, is the real
 
 difference between a bunch of old women having petty
 
 ego-arguments over personalities on FFL, a bunch of
 
 similarly old men having petty ego-arguments on FFL
 
 about how much they know and how little the
 other
 
 person knows, and these supposed holy
 men?
 
 
 
 Where there are people, there are egos. And egos act
 out. 





[FairfieldLife] Post Count Fri 18-Oct-13 00:15:02 UTC

2013-10-17 Thread FFL PostCount
Fairfield Life Post Counter
===
Start Date (UTC): 10/12/13 00:00:00
End Date (UTC): 10/19/13 00:00:00
516 messages as of (UTC) 10/18/13 00:08:30

 64 Share Long 
 59 dhamiltony2k5
 51 authfriend
 38 doctordumbass
 33 Richard J. Williams 
 31 Bhairitu 
 29 Michael Jackson 
 26 emilymaenot
 26 Richard Williams 
 20 s3raphita
 18 jr_esq
 13 TurquoiseB 
 12 emptybill
 12 awoelflebater
 11 iranitea 
 11 cardemaister
 11 Ann Woelfle Bater 
  7 sharelong60
  5 srijau
  5 anartaxius
  4 yifuxero
  4 j_alexander_stanley
  3 turquoiseb 
  3 judy stein 
  3 dmevans365
  2 merudanda 
  2 Mike Dixon 
  2 Duveyoung 
  1 wleed3 
  1 rajawilliamsmith
  1 punditster
  1 nelsonriddle2001
  1 Xenophaneros Anartaxius 
  1 WLeed3
  1 Rick Archer 
  1 Paulo Barbosa 
  1 LEnglish5
  1 Jason 
  1 Dick Mays 
Posters: 39
Saturday Morning 00:00 UTC Rollover Times
=
Daylight Saving Time (Summer):
US Friday evening: PDT 5 PM - MDT 6 PM - CDT 7 PM - EDT 8 PM
Europe Saturday: BST 1 AM CEST 2 AM EEST 3 AM
Standard Time (Winter):
US Friday evening: PST 4 PM - MST 5 PM - CST 6 PM - EST 7 PM
Europe Saturday: GMT 12 AM CET 1 AM EET 2 AM
For more information on Time Zones: www.worldtimezone.com 




RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread doctordumbass
You crack me up, emnot. sounds too much like me, burning another bridge, in 
another meeting, during my working daze. Always got stuff done, though.  

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I have no idea Share what you are talking about.  You are talking gibberish 
based on a knowledge base of death and dying that appears to be zero, based on 
your comments.  That's what I'm saying here.  That's my point.  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
peaceful deaths. Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen 
have been about unfamous people. What do you think I'm talking about?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@... 
mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:46 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Re: Well
 we're talking about the death notices of plain folks,
 not famous ones.  Share, this is *not* what you
 were talking about.  You continually betray yourself in
 your own posts - why do you do this?  Yet more absurd
 nonsense; words that mean nothing and go nowhere.  Dig
 a little deeper, maybe?   
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well we're talking
 about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones. I
 would think that families would simply not mention if the
 passing was rough. Actually I have heard of one such rough
 passing of a TMer so there has also been honesty about
 such.
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October
 17, 2013 10:35 AM, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long
 sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do
 you?
 
 
 
 In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
 
 though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
 
 True Believers do. 
 
 
 
 Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
 
 some of his TBs claimed that he passed
 peacefully.
 
 The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
 
 *literally* died screaming. 
 
 
 
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM,
 awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  
 
   John, just to share that death notices on the
 bulletin 
 
  board of the coat room in the women's Dome often
 say that 
 
  the person passed peacefully and or blissfully
 surrounded 
 
  by friends and family.
 
  
 
  Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going
 to say 
 
  they went out screaming.
 
  





[FairfieldLife] RE: new Sam Harris article

2013-10-17 Thread s3raphita
Your link just sends me to my own email site!
 

 I wanna hear what the great Sam Harris has to say! 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 http://us-mg6.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=4vd84h8lf2fde#mail 
http://us-mg6.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=4vd84h8lf2fde#mail



[FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread emptybill
 
 Judy, 

I remember asking the same question to my friend as he repeated the 
conversation. He said I guess he was a TM teacher because you had to be one to 
be there on course. 

Mm ... a TM teacher.
If Basil is worse than a fallen Catholic then he must be a devil worshiper!

[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Well, at least he uses Christian sacred words rather than the Sanskrit 
mantras the devil prefers...
 

 On a different topic, I'd be interested to know more about what you said 
regarding Augustine and real Christianity, if you have the time and 
inclination. Where did Augustine go wrong?
 

 emptybill wrote:

Judy, 
 
I remember asking the same question to my friend as he repeated the 
conversation. He said I guess he was a TM teacher because you had to be one to 
be there on course. 

Mm ... a TM teacher.
If Basil is worse than a fallen Catholic then he must be a devil worshiper!
 




[FairfieldLife] RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread emptybill
 Read this and then see if you have questions.
 

 
http://www.stmaryorthodoxchurch.org/orthodoxy/articles/ancestral_versus_original_sin

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Well, at least he uses Christian sacred words rather than the Sanskrit 
mantras the devil prefers...
 

 On a different topic, I'd be interested to know more about what you said 
regarding Augustine and real Christianity, if you have the time and 
inclination. Where did Augustine go wrong?
 

 emptybill wrote:

Judy, 
 
I remember asking the same question to my friend as he repeated the 
conversation. He said I guess he was a TM teacher because you had to be one to 
be there on course. 

Mm ... a TM teacher.
If Basil is worse than a fallen Catholic then he must be a devil worshiper!
 



 


RE: RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread emilymaenot
Yes, I was a high producer of high quality stuff myself, no question.  On one 
of the larger projects I was on, the scheduler would invite me to meetings 
because I would say what needed to be said; everyone else was too scared.  
That's what happens when one can't deliver what one has promised.  Smile.   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 You crack me up, emnot. sounds too much like me, burning another bridge, in 
another meeting, during my working daze. Always got stuff done, though.  

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I have no idea Share what you are talking about.  You are talking gibberish 
based on a knowledge base of death and dying that appears to be zero, based on 
your comments.  That's what I'm saying here.  That's my point.  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Emily I shared with John that death notices here report blissful and or 
peaceful deaths. Turq brought up about Castanedas. I said the notices I've seen 
have been about unfamous people. What do you think I'm talking about?
 
 On Thu, 10/17/13, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@... 
mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Most Educated Countries in the World
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:46 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Re: Well
 we're talking about the death notices of plain folks,
 not famous ones.  Share, this is *not* what you
 were talking about.  You continually betray yourself in
 your own posts - why do you do this?  Yet more absurd
 nonsense; words that mean nothing and go nowhere.  Dig
 a little deeper, maybe?   
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well we're talking
 about the death notices of plain folks, not famous ones. I
 would think that families would simply not mention if the
 passing was rough. Actually I have heard of one such rough
 passing of a TMer so there has also been honesty about
 such.
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October
 17, 2013 10:35 AM, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 --- In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long
 sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do
 you?
 
 
 
 In this case, I think that Ann's comment, snarky
 
 though it may be, is valid. That's *exactly* what
 
 True Believers do. 
 
 
 
 Case in point: When Carlos Castaneda died (of cancer)
 
 some of his TBs claimed that he passed
 peacefully.
 
 The real story, according to eyewitnesses, is that he
 
 *literally* died screaming. 
 
 
 
  On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM,
 awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@...
 wrote:
 
  
 
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 sharelong60@ wrote:
 
  
 
   John, just to share that death notices on the
 bulletin 
 
  board of the coat room in the women's Dome often
 say that 
 
  the person passed peacefully and or blissfully
 surrounded 
 
  by friends and family.
 
  
 
  Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going
 to say 
 
  they went out screaming.
 
  







[FairfieldLife] Bullshit - Holier than Thou

2013-10-17 Thread s3raphita
Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi and the Dalai Lama get the Penn and Teller 
treatment in this hilarious and foul-mouthed rant.  
 http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw



[FairfieldLife] RE: Most Educated Countries in the World

2013-10-17 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 Ann, I don't think people are lying about it. Do you?
 

 Whether people are lying or not about the nature of their friend's or 
family's dying is not really my point. I was merely goofing a little because 
you came across so naive and a tad gullible about this and these notices in 
the coat room at the ladies dome. 
 

 If one were to take the trouble to post about the fact that someone had died 
and chose to include a detail about the way they died in their final moments 
they would not, presumably, choose to describe a traumatic or otherwise 
horrible death. Of course they are going to only include those who went with a 
small sigh or were simply comatose at the end. I know that plenty of folks die 
in a drug-induced sleep or simply drift away but plenty do not. Perhaps I just 
wanted you, Share, to acknowledge that death can be horrible, traumatic, 
painful as well as silent and relatively serene.
 

 Both of my parents were the 'victims' of cancer and one simply evaporated to 
nothing until the final overdose of morphine was administered by the hospice 
worker, the other chose to stop using his stomach tube and died of starvation 
and thirst. The third, my sister, went out terrified, cold and confused in a 
submerged car in the darkness on one cold Maine night. She was in the prime of 
her life and didn't go willingly. Death comes, apparently, in many different 
ways.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM, awoelflebater@... 
awoelflebater@... wrote:
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 John, just to share that death notices on the bulletin board of the coat room 
in the women's Dome often say that the person passed peacefully and or 
blissfully surrounded by friends and family. 
 

 Well, it's highly unlikely that they're going to say they went out screaming.
 

 
 
 On Thursday, October 17, 2013 10:03 AM, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
Richard,
 

 A Dominican priest, who heads a hospice center here in the Bay Area, stated 
that 90 percent of us will know when death is near.  So, he's saying that for 
most of us, we can prepare for death.  But he didn't say that euthanasia is the 
answer.
 

 IMO, death is a rite of passage that should be respected in a natural way, and 
not hastened by unnatural means.  It is a transforming experience both for the 
dying person and the family members.  But it obviously is not a pleasant one.
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 CULTURE: “I’m looking for early symptoms of acceptance of euthanasia, which I 
believe will creep in as we Baby Boomers become more and more of a burden.”
 
 'Sympathy for the euthanists'
 Posted by Ann Althouse:
 http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html 
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2013/09/sympathy-for-euthanists.html
 
 On 10/16/2013 9:23 PM, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:
 
   Seraphita,
 
 
 Based on historical records, it's apparent that the family unit is the best 
natural way to maintain or improve the quality of people in a given society. 
There is no doubt that genetics are involved in some individuals who excel in 
science, business or sports.  As such, the natural way of selection is promoted 
to let people enjoy the quality of life that is most beneficial for the entire 
world.
 
 
 IMO, this is the reason why eugenics, as practiced by the Nazi's and some 
people here in the USA, won't work as it would interfere with nature's 
functioning.  Similarly, this is the reason why Osho's experiment of having a 
communal family didn't work.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Re Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in 
order to have a stable population in any country.: 
 That makes good sense . . . but would you *completely* rule out a genetic 
component in this case? It's such a controversial minefield, and - rather like 
global warming - you need to invest so much effort into studying the relevant 
data that I can't be bothered. I'd keep an open mind though.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  Carde,
 
 
 According to Wikipedia, the Jewish population is only about 2 percent of the 
entire US population.  But they do appear to have many successful people in 
this country, including Einstein and Barbara Streisand.  IMO, it shows that the 
Jewish families encourage their children to be successful in whatever field 
they choose to work in.
 
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Jews
 
 
 
 Thus, there is a strong argument for having a cohesive family unit in order to 
have a stable population in any country.  If the family unit is in 

Re: [FairfieldLife] Bullshit - Holier than Thou

2013-10-17 Thread Ravi Chivukula
I had to come out of lurkdom to thank you for this beautiful video dear
Seraphita. I have long railed against Gandhi, Teresa and Dolly Lama and I
totally enjoyed this video, it is a good summary of these three
pseudo-spiritual icons.

That Gandhi was sexually perverted and slept with girls was a well known
fact to me in India and my generation had no fascination for Gandhi. So I
was quite baffled by the adoration of Gandhi by liberals and I know I
pissed off quite a few with my statements on Gandhi. I recently had a
chance to read this article on the Independent - enjoy.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/thrill-of-the-chaste-the-truth-about-gandhis-sex-life-1937411.html

Ravi.



On Thu, Oct 17, 2013 at 7:25 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:



 Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi and the Dalai Lama get the Penn and Teller
 treatment in this hilarious and foul-mouthed rant.

 http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw


 



[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-17 Thread authfriend
Thanks, this is great. For the moment, one question: The expulsion from the 
Garden and from the Tree of Life was an act of love and not vengeance so that 
humanity would not 'become immortal in sin.' What does immortal in sin mean, 
and how would that happen?
 

 emptybill wrote:
 Read this and then see if you have questions.
 

 
http://www.stmaryorthodoxchurch.org/orthodoxy/articles/ancestral_versus_original_sin

 





[FairfieldLife] RE: Bullshit - Holier than Thou

2013-10-17 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, chivukula.ravi@... wrote:

 I had to come out of lurkdom to thank you for this beautiful video dear 
Seraphita. I have long railed against Gandhi, Teresa and Dolly Lama and I 
totally enjoyed this video, it is a good summary of these three 
pseudo-spiritual icons.
 

 That Gandhi was sexually perverted and slept with girls was a well known fact 
to me in India and my generation had no fascination for Gandhi. So I was quite 
baffled by the adoration of Gandhi by liberals and I know I pissed off quite a 
few with my statements on Gandhi. I recently had a chance to read this article 
on the Independent - enjoy.
 
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/thrill-of-the-chaste-the-truth-about-gandhis-sex-life-1937411.html
 
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/thrill-of-the-chaste-the-truth-about-gandhis-sex-life-1937411.html
 

 Ravi.
 

 HI RAVI, GREAT TO HEAR FROM YOU!



 

 On Thu, Oct 17, 2013 at 7:25 PM, s3raphita@... mailto:s3raphita@... wrote:
 

 Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi and the Dalai Lama get the Penn and Teller 
treatment in this hilarious and foul-mouthed rant.  
 http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw

 
 
 
 
 


 
 


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Bullshit - Holier than Thou

2013-10-17 Thread s3raphita
Thrill of the chaste - excellent title! Thanks for the link.
 

 Yes, Gandhi has always been one of my pet peeves. Never been too keen on 
Mother Teresa either.
 

 The thing about Gandhi for me is that, on the one hand, he presented himself 
as a naked sadhu - ie, someone who had *renounced* the world - and yet he was 
also a political figure - ie someone who was very much *engaged* with the world 
(and in a dangerously naive way to boot). The unthinking veneration in which he 
is held baffles me. 
 

 And - no doubt because I'm English - I find the whole sexual hypocrisy aspect 
drives me up the wall!
 

 Maybe Penn  Teller were a bit harsh on the Dalai Lama though. He is also a 
legitimate political leader and it's hard to keep squeaky clean in the world of 
realpolitik. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I had to come out of lurkdom to thank you for this beautiful video dear 
Seraphita. I have long railed against Gandhi, Teresa and Dolly Lama and I 
totally enjoyed this video, it is a good summary of these three 
pseudo-spiritual icons.
 

 That Gandhi was sexually perverted and slept with girls was a well known fact 
to me in India and my generation had no fascination for Gandhi. So I was quite 
baffled by the adoration of Gandhi by liberals and I know I pissed off quite a 
few with my statements on Gandhi. I recently had a chance to read this article 
on the Independent - enjoy.
 
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/thrill-of-the-chaste-the-truth-about-gandhis-sex-life-1937411.html
 
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/thrill-of-the-chaste-the-truth-about-gandhis-sex-life-1937411.html
 

 Ravi.



 

 On Thu, Oct 17, 2013 at 7:25 PM, s3raphita@... mailto:s3raphita@... wrote:
 

 Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi and the Dalai Lama get the Penn and Teller 
treatment in this hilarious and foul-mouthed rant.  
 http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw http://tinyurl.com/nv68blw

 
 
 
 
 


 



[FairfieldLife] Matter and consciousness?

2013-10-17 Thread cardemaister
empty et al:
 

Did Maharishi state something like (paraphrase): the basic state of 
consciousness is subjective experience of the state of least excitation of 
matter??
 

 If that's the case was he more of an advaitic vedantist than a proponent of
 Patañjali's yoga?? I mean, according to saaMhkya and thus PJ, purusha has 
nothing to do with prakRti?