Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Harmony

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
Good poem for this Harmony thread, just received this morning...

Harmony
by Stuart Kestenbaum
You know the Beatles could have
afforded another microphone,

but George would always stand
in
 the middle and step up to

Paul's when it was time to
join in. Because that's the way

harmony is, you need to share the
electricity, the voice, the words.

Just the way we do when we drive
in our cars with the radio on,

the
 windows rolled down with fall in the
air, dead leaves swirling in the wake,

or in the spring, the earth damp and soft,
the air hazy with pollen. We hear

the song that moves us, crank the
radio
 and sing along, at the top of

our lungs, as if we just joined
the group. In tune out of tune,

country western, rock and roll, we want
to harmonize. A whole country of

would-be stars losing love, finding love
with the radio in different

cars, on different paths, the dark
road rumbling beneath. 
Harmony by Stuart Kestenbaum, from Pilgrimage. © Coyote Love Press, 1990.  




On Saturday, November 2, 2013 8:33 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com 
s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 Yes Man Tran were good - a bit AOR maybe? - a bit commercial maybe? 
Here's some quality music. Pentangle in their heyday:
http://tinyurl.com/od9g4u4



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, jr_esq@... wrote:


Now you guys got me going here.  Many years ago we saw the Manhattan Transfer 
in Sacramento, CA.  They were excellent in harmonizing songs.  Here they sing 
Route 66:



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Michael Jackson
what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or five 
hours without food or water?? People including me do that all the time. 

On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Doc.
 What
 did you experience after four hours without food or water?
  Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
  
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 Horse.
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
  
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
  
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread doctordumbass
No Way! If this is true, I'm getting my $1,000 back. I'm starting to think my 
Breatharian  teacher is ripping me off! However, you have been known to 
exaggerate, MJ, so, if anyone else on here, can substantiate the claim of 
actually going for a total of four hours, without food, water, beer, twinkies, 
or even raw Swiss chard, I'd like to hear about it. Thanks.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or five 
hours without food or water?? People including me do that all the time. 
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... 
wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Doc.
 What
 did you experience after four hours without food or water?
  Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 Horse.
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c 



[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread doctordumbass
I remember being very hungry, afterwards. It was difficult to distinguish 
between meditation and the lightheadedness that settles in, after such forced 
starvation. At one point, lying weakly on the floor, I thought I saw Shiva, 
dressed as a tuna fish sandwich. The mind plays odd tricks. He even had a side 
of chips, and a dill pickle spear. Freaky stuff - I wouldn't mess with it, 
except under close supervision.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Doc.
 

 What did you experience after four hours without food or water?  Were you also 
meditating during the fast?
 

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I did it, once, for *four* solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 

 

 Nothing - not even a peanut, or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably 
don't believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a lot. I must 
have been in a trance or something, to withstand it. I seriously thought I was 
going to pass out. Almost like Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man 
Called Horse.

 

 Even so, I am working with a teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five 
hours*, of non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but worth it. I 
think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000 (not including the non-food and 
non-water, of course). 

 

 This is a tough crowd, here on FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult 
leader. After all, I've been around the block. Don't knock it, 'til you've 
tried it.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Michelle Pfeiffer, the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a 
“cult” which believed humans can exist without food or water. 
http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c




 




RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Michael Jackson
as a type two diabetic, which I am, there are times when my blood sugar is high 
enough that I have to go for more than four hours without food - it doesn't 
happen often, but it does happen. 

Separately from that, yesterday I had a number of errands to run requiring me 
to drive a good distance - I left the house at 12:30 pm got back at 4:30 pm - I 
had my breakfast at 10:00 am which consisted of two vegetarian sausage patties 
on one piece of Ezekial bread with Duke's mayo and about 8 ozs of water.

No food or water from 10:30 am till about quarter till five and that was one 
trader joe's lemon bar - had a home emergency that required my attention from 5 
pm till I had a pot pie for supper at 9 pm - 

even before I started having blood sugar problems, I was used to going more 
than four hours without food or water - that's kind of how many people I know 
have done, when you are working at certain jobs that's just how you do. 

I once had a job driving for a courier service, leaving the base at 8:00 am, 
and if I was lucky having lunch in the vehicle around 1 or 2 pm - having had 
breakfast at 7 am before leaving the house - its just life. 

Its not my business how you spend your money, but if you wanna pay me that 
thousand I will be glad to entertain you with more of my stories of my misspent 
youth and you can eat and drink all you like as you read 'em.

On Sun, 11/3/13, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com doctordumb...@rocketmail.com 
wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 12:29 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   No Way! If this is true, I'm getting my
 $1,000 back. I'm starting to think my Breatharian 
 teacher is ripping me off! However, you have been known to
 exaggerate, MJ, so, if anyone else on here, can substantiate
 the claim of actually going for a total of four hours,
 without food, water, beer, twinkies, or even raw Swiss
 chard, I'd like to hear about it. Thanks.
  
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 what in the world
 are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or
 five hours without food or water?? People including me do
 that all the time. 
 
 
 
  On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
 
 
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from
 a cult
 
  To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
  Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 

 
Doc.
 
  What
 
  did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 
   Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 
  no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
  
 
  I did it, once, for *four*
 
  solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
  
 
  Nothing - not even a peanut,
 
  or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 
  believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 
  lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to
 withstand
 
  it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost
 like
 
  Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 
  Horse.
 
  
 
  Even so, I am working with a
 
  teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 
  non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 
  worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 
  (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
  
 
  This is a tough crowd, here on
 
  FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 
  After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 
  knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
   
 
  
 
  ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 
  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
  
 
  Michelle Pfeiffer,
 
  the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 
  “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 
  water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread j_alexander_stanley
This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my first 
thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital radio-controlled clock 
shift back to standard time. But, at the top of the hour, the clock stayed on 
2am, and I realized that I had woken up during the second 1am hour. And, it got 
me wondering how astrology deals with the one day of the year in DST areas 
where there are two periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has 
to deal with a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify DST 
or standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the better 
fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of taking note of 
which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth certificate that hospitals aren't 
always focused on recording accurate birth time. 
 



RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Michael Jackson
another example is this morning - my cat woke me at 2 am (corrected time) - 
I've been awake ever since - no food or water from 2 am till just now, 8:30 am 
- I should have eaten an hour ago, but I was messin' around - still that's 6 
and a half hours - just started getting light headed a half  hour ago - maybe I 
should be the one charging big money to teach what I normally do anyway.

On Sun, 11/3/13, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com doctordumb...@rocketmail.com 
wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 12:29 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   No Way! If this is true, I'm getting my
 $1,000 back. I'm starting to think my Breatharian 
 teacher is ripping me off! However, you have been known to
 exaggerate, MJ, so, if anyone else on here, can substantiate
 the claim of actually going for a total of four hours,
 without food, water, beer, twinkies, or even raw Swiss
 chard, I'd like to hear about it. Thanks.
  
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 what in the world
 are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or
 five hours without food or water?? People including me do
 that all the time. 
 
 
 
  On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
 
 
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from
 a cult
 
  To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
  Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 

 
Doc.
 
  What
 
  did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 
   Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 
  no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
  
 
  I did it, once, for *four*
 
  solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
  
 
  Nothing - not even a peanut,
 
  or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 
  believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 
  lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to
 withstand
 
  it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost
 like
 
  Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 
  Horse.
 
  
 
  Even so, I am working with a
 
  teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 
  non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 
  worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 
  (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
  
 
  This is a tough crowd, here on
 
  FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 
  After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 
  knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
   
 
  
 
  ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 
  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
  
 
  Michelle Pfeiffer,
 
  the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 
  “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 
  water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread doctordumbass
I do not envy you - My brother in law is also type 2. Went from being a big 
overweight guy, to skinny as a rail. Hang in there.
 

 A very fair trade you propose, my virtual thousand, for more real stories! OK!

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 as a type two diabetic, which I am, there are times when my blood sugar is 
high enough that I have to go for more than four hours without food - it 
doesn't happen often, but it does happen. 
 
 Separately from that, yesterday I had a number of errands to run requiring me 
to drive a good distance - I left the house at 12:30 pm got back at 4:30 pm - I 
had my breakfast at 10:00 am which consisted of two vegetarian sausage patties 
on one piece of Ezekial bread with Duke's mayo and about 8 ozs of water.
 
 No food or water from 10:30 am till about quarter till five and that was one 
trader joe's lemon bar - had a home emergency that required my attention from 5 
pm till I had a pot pie for supper at 9 pm - 
 
 even before I started having blood sugar problems, I was used to going more 
than four hours without food or water - that's kind of how many people I know 
have done, when you are working at certain jobs that's just how you do. 
 
 I once had a job driving for a courier service, leaving the base at 8:00 am, 
and if I was lucky having lunch in the vehicle around 1 or 2 pm - having had 
breakfast at 7 am before leaving the house - its just life. 
 
 Its not my business how you spend your money, but if you wanna pay me that 
thousand I will be glad to entertain you with more of my stories of my misspent 
youth and you can eat and drink all you like as you read 'em.
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, doctordumbass@... mailto:doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... 
mailto:doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 12:29 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 No Way! If this is true, I'm getting my
 $1,000 back. I'm starting to think my Breatharian 
 teacher is ripping me off! However, you have been known to
 exaggerate, MJ, so, if anyone else on here, can substantiate
 the claim of actually going for a total of four hours,
 without food, water, beer, twinkies, or even raw Swiss
 chard, I'd like to hear about it. Thanks.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 what in the world
 are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or
 five hours without food or water?? People including me do
 that all the time. 
 
 
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
 
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from
 a cult
 
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Doc.
 
 What
 
 did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 
  Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
 
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 
 lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to
 withstand
 
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost
 like
 
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 
 Horse.
 
 
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 
 After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
 
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 
 “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c 



[FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread doctordumbass
 Interesting that DST is only used in Western, or Westernized, countries, vs. 
most of S. America, Asia, and Africa. As usual, we are obviously Far More 
Advanced - lol. I've read all the justification for it, and yet, the only 
benefit for DST seems to be a low cost way to experience jet-lag, without 
actually going anywhere. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my first 
thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital radio-controlled clock 
shift back to standard time. But, at the top of the hour, the clock stayed on 
2am, and I realized that I had woken up during the second 1am hour. And, it got 
me wondering how astrology deals with the one day of the year in DST areas 
where there are two periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has 
to deal with a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify DST 
or standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the better 
fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of taking note of 
which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth certificate that hospitals aren't 
always focused on recording accurate birth time. 
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
Hospitals only record the generic TOB (i.e. when the attending 

 nurses look to the clock). They don't have astrological thinking, so
 they look only for the general time (live birth was about 10:28 am).
 

 The one degree per six minutes effect doesn't doesn't exist for them

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, j_alexander_stanley@... wrote:

 This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my first 
thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital radio-controlled clock 
shift back to standard time. But, at the top of the hour, the clock stayed on 
2am, and I realized that I had woken up during the second 1am hour. And, it got 
me wondering how astrology deals with the one day of the year in DST areas 
where there are two periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has 
to deal with a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify DST 
or standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the better 
fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of taking note of 
which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth certificate that hospitals aren't 
always focused on recording accurate birth time. 
 


 


Re: [FairfieldLife] Before the British Invasion

2013-11-03 Thread Richard Williams
According to John Lennon, Cliff Richard's hit 'Move It',1958, was the first
authentic rock and roll song. According to John, before Cliff and the
Shadows, there had been nothing worth listening to in British music.

Cliff Richard In The Park 11 Move It
http://youtu.be/Ncff-Qn7TLI

[image: Inline image 1]

Cliff Richard - Devil Woman 1976
http://youtu.be/px7ilisAGj0

Cliff Richard - We Don't Talk Anymore 1979
http://youtu.be/htZir_Taizg


On Sun, Nov 3, 2013 at 12:28 AM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:



 During the 1950s when rock 'n' roll reigned supreme young British rockers
 tried to imitate their American heroes with pretty cringe-worthy songs. One
 guy who came closest to pulling it off was Vince Taylor. He eventually
 became a victim of drugs and alcohol. At one point, in front of a large
 audience at a concert in London, Taylor declared himself the biblical
 apostle Matthew .

 His biggest claim to fame is that, according to David Bowie, Taylor was
 the main inspiration for Bowie's character Ziggy Stardust.
 Anyway, here's his 1959 classic Brand New Cadillac. :
 http://tinyurl.com/pe58f5s


  



[FairfieldLife] Mani, was MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-03 Thread Richard J. Williams

So, let's review what we know about the prophet Mani.

The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle 
between the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the 
material world darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in 
a battle for power. There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of 
both good and evil. Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, 
Paulicians, and Cathars. It's not complicated.


Adepts in China and the Far East would probably relate to this with 
their own notions of Yin and Yang, which is probably derived from the 
Indian Sankhya, a radical dualism, and later tantra- a theory of 
polarity which posits male and female energies.


The name 'Mani' is Sanskrit. Mani traveled and lived in India for 
several years, visiting  Buddhist lands such as Bamiyan in Afghanistan, 
so it is not surprising that Buddhist influences would be apparent. Mani 
apparently adopted his theory of the reincarnation (transmigration of 
souls) from the Buddhists. Mani's sect structure was apparently based on 
the Buddhist Sangha, that is, Arhants and the lay follower community.



On 11/2/2013 11:31 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


No wonder the Near-Eastern realm got so mixed up. *//*

It seems that as Manichean ideology spread to the East it incorporated 
Buddhist concepts along the way in a effort to show the superiority of 
the Religion of Light. Mani lived during the third century of the 
current era. Mani used the epitaph Buddha of Light and identified 
himself as Maitreya. He and his followers specifically borrowed from 
early Pure Land Sutras and Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka philosophy. As it 
entered the region of Gandhara and spread to China it used the 
Buddhist Hinayana tradition to support its views of matter, the body 
and the world.


MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM


*/David A. Scott /*
*//*

*/Christ Church College /**/of /**/Higher Education/*







RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Michael Jackson
I've been this way for about 7 years now so Im used to it - the one thing I 
really miss sometimes is apple pie - used to love it.

But today I will cook my organic beef from Trader Joe's - already got the 
pattys in their marinade - its gonna be good.

On Sun, 11/3/13, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com doctordumb...@rocketmail.com 
wrote:

 Subject: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1:46 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   I do not envy you - My brother in law is also
 type 2. Went from being a big overweight guy, to skinny as a
 rail. Hang in there.
 A
 very fair trade you propose, my virtual thousand, for more
 real stories! OK!
  
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 as a type two
 diabetic, which I am, there are times when my blood sugar is
 high enough that I have to go for more than four hours
 without food - it doesn't happen often, but it does
 happen. 
 
 
 
 Separately from that, yesterday I had a number of errands to
 run requiring me to drive a good distance - I left the house
 at 12:30 pm got back at 4:30 pm - I had my breakfast at
 10:00 am which consisted of two vegetarian sausage patties
 on one piece of Ezekial bread with Duke's mayo and about
 8 ozs of water.
 
 
 
 No food or water from 10:30 am till about quarter till five
 and that was one trader joe's lemon bar - had a home
 emergency that required my attention from 5 pm till I had a
 pot pie for supper at 9 pm - 
 
 
 
 even before I started having blood sugar problems, I was
 used to going more than four hours without food or water -
 that's kind of how many people I know have done, when
 you are working at certain jobs that's just how you do.
 
 
 
 
 I once had a job driving for a courier service, leaving the
 base at 8:00 am, and if I was lucky having lunch in the
 vehicle around 1 or 2 pm - having had breakfast at 7 am
 before leaving the house - its just life. 
 
 
 
 Its not my business how you spend your money, but if you
 wanna pay me that thousand I will be glad to entertain you
 with more of my stories of my misspent youth and you can eat
 and drink all you like as you read 'em.
 
 
 
  On Sun, 11/3/13, doctordumbass@...
 doctordumbass@...
 wrote:
 
 
 
  Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer
 escaped from a cult
 
  To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
  Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 12:29 PM
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 

 
No Way! If this is true, I'm getting my
 
  $1,000 back. I'm starting to think my
 Breatharian 
 
  teacher is ripping me off! However, you have been known to
 
  exaggerate, MJ, so, if anyone else on here, can
 substantiate
 
  the claim of actually going for a total of four hours,
 
  without food, water, beer, twinkies, or even raw Swiss
 
  chard, I'd like to hear about it. Thanks.
 
   
 
  
 
  ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 
  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
  
 
  what in the world
 
  are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or
 
  five hours without food or water?? People including me do
 
  that all the time. 
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... jr_esq@... wrote:
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped
 from
 
  a cult
 
  
 
   To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
  
 
   Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
    
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
 Doc.
 
  
 
   What
 
  
 
   did you experience after four hours without food or
 water?
 
  
 
    Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
  
 
   
 
  
 

 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 
  
 
   no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 
  wrote:
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   I did it, once, for *four*
 
  
 
   solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   Nothing - not even a peanut,
 
  
 
   or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 
  
 
   believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped,
 a
 
  
 
   lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to
 
  withstand
 
  
 
   it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost
 
  like
 
  
 
   Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 
  
 
   Horse.
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
   Even so, I am working with a
 
  
 
   teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 
  
 
   non-food, non-water - no problem. He's 

Re: [FairfieldLife] Harmony

2013-11-03 Thread Richard J. Williams
Some of these boy bands remind me of a barber shop quartet or a gospel 
music singalong. Apparently Barry is not aware of these male vocal 
harmony groups: New Edition, New Kids on the Block, Boyz II Men, 
Backstreet Boys, NSync, Jonas Brothers or One Direction. Go figure.


On 11/2/2013 2:22 PM, TurquoiseB wrote:


Given the response to my recent posts about Crosby, Stills,  Nash, I 
shall continue on the general theme of vocal harmony. It's to some 
extent a lost art in modern music, and that, to my way of seeing, is 
a pity. It's a high art.


One of the best harmonists I know of in music is Emmylou Harris. In 
her taste for this artform, she continues in the footsteps of her 
mentor, Gram Parsons, and his love for the country harmonies he grew 
up with and introduced her to.


Although I appreciate the more formal art of musical composition, and 
charting out harmonies on sheet music before attempting to perform 
them, for me, there is nothing quite like spontaneous harmony, the 
thing that happens between two or more musicians who suddenly find 
themselves on the same musical wavelength during the performance of 
the same song, spontaneously. Here are a few examples.


With Rodney Crowell (pure Louvin Brothers harmony):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6g8EqgRk-nw

With John Starling (from the folk group Seldom Scene):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYs2RbCcKsk

With Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cnieh0Y1V-o

With Mark Knopfler:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsMO0A1iE0I

With Gram:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vO8C9fqC3uk








[FairfieldLife] HealthCare.gov Users Warn of Security Risk, Breach of Privacy

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill

 
http://blog.heritage.org/2013/11/02/exclusive-healthcare-gov-users-warn-of-security-risk-breach-of-privacy/
 
http://blog.heritage.org/2013/11/02/exclusive-healthcare-gov-users-warn-of-security-risk-breach-of-privacy/


Re: [FairfieldLife] Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
Astrology, astronomy and the FFL Postcount use UTC or Coordinated 
Universal Time.  It mostly the same as GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) except 
that GMT become BST (British Summer Time) in the summer.  UTC does not 
change.  The process of getting the correct birth time is using the time 
zone at the place of birth to get UTC  on which the planetary ephemeris 
is based.  Time zones are the bane of astrologers existence.


I also have a clock radio like that.  Your Android phone has the Olson 
Time Zone Database on it which has not only current time zone data for 
locations all over the world but historical as well.  In fact the 
astrology software company AstroLabe sued the Olson Database because 
they bought the ACS Atlas after ACS went out of business.  They thought 
that the Olson Time Zone Database was infringing on the work of the ACS 
Atlas.  However ACS itself was well aware of the Time Zone Database and 
didn't see any problem at all.  In fact the Time Zone Database which is 
open source merely mentioned the ACS Atlas (both book and software) as a 
resource for researchers.  IOW, ACS sold some extra copies that way 
($200 a pop for the software back then).  AstroLabe had to withdraw the 
suit because the ACS Atlas is based on public non-copyrightable 
information.  Any judge would have thrown it out.  ICANN took over the 
Time Zone Database and it is maintained by iana.org.


Some of the minor non OS updates on Android devices are for updates of 
the Time Zone Database which kept up far better than ACS or AstroLabe 
could ever afford to do.  In fact Alios Treindl who runs the Swiss 
Ephemeris wanted to buy the ACS Atlas and make it an open source 
project.  Microsoft which runs on NIH (Not Invented Here) has their own 
time zone database which is nowhere near as complete as the Olson one.  
Linux and other systems run on the Time Zone Database.


Techies would like to see time zones deprecated.  We live in a 
microsecond Internet world so time zones are archaic.  Techies want UTC 
for the world.  Think about it.  If you want to call friends on the 
other side of the world you wouldn't have to deal with calculations to 
know their time. UTC is also 24 hour not AM/PM.


On 11/03/2013 05:30 AM, j_alexander_stan...@yahoo.com wrote:


This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my 
first thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital 
radio-controlled clock shift back to standard time. But, at the top of 
the hour, the clock stayed on 2am, and I realized that I had woken up 
during the second 1am hour. And, it got me wondering how astrology 
deals with the one day of the year in DST areas where there are two 
periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has to deal with 
a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify DST or 
standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the 
better fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of 
taking note of which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth 
certificate that hospitals aren't always focused on recording accurate 
birth time.








Re: [FairfieldLife] Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:04 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
Astrology, astronomy and the FFL Postcount use UTC or Coordinated Universal 
Time.  It mostly the same as GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) except that GMT become 
BST (British Summer Time) in the summer.  UTC does not change.  The process of 
getting the correct birth time is using the time zone at the place of birth to 
get UTC  on which the planetary ephemeris is based.  Time zones are the bane of 
astrologers existence.

I also have a clock radio like that.  Your Android phone has the
  Olson Time Zone Database on it which has not only current time
  zone data for locations all over the world but historical as
  well.  In fact the astrology software company AstroLabe sued the
  Olson Database because they bought the ACS Atlas after ACS went
  out of business.  They thought that the Olson Time Zone Database
  was infringing on the work of the ACS Atlas.  However ACS itself
  was well aware of the Time Zone Database and didn't see any
  problem at all.  In fact the Time Zone Database which is open
  source merely mentioned the ACS Atlas (both book and software) as
  a resource for researchers.  IOW, ACS sold some extra copies that
  way ($200 a pop for the software back then).  AstroLabe had to
  withdraw the suit because the ACS Atlas is based on public
  non-copyrightable information.  Any judge would have thrown it
  out.  ICANN took over the Time Zone Database and it is maintained
  by iana.org.

Some of the minor non OS updates on Android devices are for
  updates of the Time Zone Database which kept up far better than
  ACS or AstroLabe could ever afford to do.  In fact Alios Treindl
  who runs the Swiss Ephemeris wanted to buy the ACS Atlas and make
  it an open source project.  Microsoft which runs on NIH (Not
  Invented Here) has their own time zone database which is nowhere
  near as complete as the Olson one.  Linux and other systems run on
  the Time Zone Database.

Techies would like to see time zones deprecated.  We live in a
  microsecond Internet world so time zones are archaic.  Techies
  want UTC for the world.  Think about it.  If you want to call
  friends on the other side of the world you wouldn't have to deal
  with calculations to know their time. UTC is also 24 hour not
  AM/PM.

On 11/03/2013 05:30 AM, j_alexander_stan...@yahoo.com wrote:

  
This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my first 
thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital radio-controlled clock 
shift back to standard time. But, at the top of the hour, the clock stayed on 
2am, and I realized that I had woken up during the second 1am hour. And, it 
got me wondering how astrology deals with the one day of the year in DST areas 
where there are two periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has 
to deal with a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify 
DST or standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the 
better fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of taking 
note of which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth certificate that 
hospitals aren't always focused on recording accurate birth time. 






Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
Actually most countries in the tropics don't use it.  That's because the 
sunrise and sunset don't change much throughout the year so it is 
superfluous for them.  Russia did away with DST a couple years ago.  
However they just stayed on the old DST instead of going back to 
Standard Time.  There are folks in the US who want that too.


I've mentioned before that the Insurance Institute has found that 
accidents increase during the first two weeks of DST but there is no 
change when we go off DST.   The US Chamber of Commerce loves DST 
because research shows that when there is that extra hour of daylight 
employees tend to stop off and shop after work.


As I mentioned to Alex, techies want to do away with time zones 
altogether and just run on UTC.  Makes sense because with the Internet 
we live in a global society.  Time zones came into being with 
transcontinental railroads.  Prior to that you had LAT (Local Actual 
Time) which was based on sun dial time.  But that meant that  time might 
change too much during the year (especially in more northern towns).  So 
Local Mean Time replaced Local Actual Time.  It's based on longitude.  
But then you would have different times among cities in the same state 
or country so they came up with standard time zones which worked better 
with the new travel venues.


BTW, I also think that DST contributes to obesity because people 
suddenly are eating earlier than they are used to and hence putting on 
some pounds.


On 11/03/2013 06:02 AM, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com wrote:


 Interesting that DST is only used in Western, or Westernized, 
countries, vs. most of S. America, Asia, and Africa. As usual, we are 
obviously Far More Advanced - lol. I've read all the justification for 
it, and yet, the only benefit for DST seems to be a low cost way to 
experience jet-lag, without actually going anywhere.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my 
first thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital 
radio-controlled clock shift back to standard time. But, at the top of 
the hour, the clock stayed on 2am, and I realized that I had woken up 
during the second 1am hour. And, it got me wondering how astrology 
deals with the one day of the year in DST areas where there are two 
periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has to deal with 
a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify DST or 
standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the 
better fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of 
taking note of which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth 
certificate that hospitals aren't always focused on recording accurate 
birth time.








Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
In the US, back in the 1970s nurses lobbied for recording the time 
accurately supposedly because of the rising interest in astrology.  
However my bet is the hospital lawyers looked at it and saw possible 
legal consequences if the time wasn't recorded accurately so made it a 
policy.  Hence my great nieces and nephews have accurate to the minute 
birth times not ones that say 7:30 PM or 2 AM.


It's been said that back in the 40's and 50's in the smokin' old US the 
doctor would deliver a child take a smoke break and filled out the birth 
certificate, glanced at the clock on the wall and entered that time.  So 
births may be off in those cases by several minutes.


Of course in India a lot of older folks don't even know what year they 
were born.


On 11/03/2013 06:03 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


Hospitals only record the generic TOB (i.e. when the attending

nurses look to the clock). They don't have astrological thinking, so

they look only for the general time (live birth was about 10:28 am).


The one degree per six minutes effect doesn't doesn't exist for them

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, j_alexander_stanley@... wrote:

This morning, a weird dream woke me up at a little before 2am, and my 
first thought was that it would be cool to watch my digital 
radio-controlled clock shift back to standard time. But, at the top of 
the hour, the clock stayed on 2am, and I realized that I had woken up 
during the second 1am hour. And, it got me wondering how astrology 
deals with the one day of the year in DST areas where there are two 
periods of 1:00am to 1:59am. I guess if an astrologer has to deal with 
a 1am hour fall back morning birth time that doesn't specify DST or 
standard time, he'll have to run both charts and see which one is the 
better fit. I'd like to assume that hospitals would make a point of 
taking note of which 1am hour, but I know from my own birth 
certificate that hospitals aren't always focused on recording accurate 
birth time.








Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu

Isn't that why they call it break fast?

People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about missing 
meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant mainly due to 
eating bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to eating meat and felt 
better.  Maybe some truth in MMY's eat what your mother puts before 
you?  We are essentially what our ancestors ate.


If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat rather 
than do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.


On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:


what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four 
or five hours without food or water?? People including me do that all 
the time.


On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:

Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM


























Doc.
What
did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 Were you also meditating during the fast?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

I did it, once, for *four*
solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day.

Nothing - not even a peanut,
or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
Horse.

Even so, I am working with a
teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
(not including the non-food and non-water, of course).

This is a tough crowd, here on
FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
After all, I've been around the block. Don't
knock it, 'til you've tried it.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Michelle Pfeiffer,
the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
“cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c





























Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
My Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her blood sugar is so 
high even though she injects insulin every day. She went from being normal to 
borderline to Type 2 and now, daily injections. A big problem is that she 
doesn't like traditional breakfast food. And I think she doesn't quite get that 
carbs contribute to high blood sugar. Anyway, I've got high hopes about this 
consult on Tuesday. 





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
Isn't that why they call it break fast?

People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about
  missing meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant
  mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to
  eating meat and felt better.  Maybe some truth in MMY's eat what
  your mother puts before you?  We are essentially what our
  ancestors ate.

If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat
  rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout
  the day.

On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:

  
what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or five 
hours without food or water?? People including me do that all the time. 

On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:

Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped
  from a cult
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
















 









Doc.
What
did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 Were you also meditating during the fast?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

I did it, once, for *four*
solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 

Nothing - not even a peanut,
or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to
  withstand
it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost
  like
Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
Horse.

Even so, I am working with a
teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
(not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 

This is a tough crowd, here on
FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
After all, I've been around the block. Don't
knock it, 'til you've tried it.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Michelle Pfeiffer,
the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
“cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c




























[FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread anartaxius
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 
 Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.
 

 I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.
 

 If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.
 

 Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.
 

 Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because 
it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.
 

 There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?


 


[FairfieldLife] RE: All About Mantra and Japa

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
 
 The Lectures of Professor Troll:
  
 “Before we get started …”
 “Are we agreed so far? …”
 “So, let's review what we know …”
  
 Same with “Swami Agehananda Bharati” (aka Leopold Fischer)
 “Bharati is the particular name of one single monastic order – 
 one out of ten (dasanami). It is not a personal name but a title.
 Saying “Swami Bharati” is like addressing someone as 
 “Monsignor Franciscan”.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 In TM you get one bija mantra to meditate on. So, where does this bija mantra 
come from? We do not know where or how the bija mantras came to be formed, or 
how they ones used in TM came to be used - we can only speculate. The origin of 
the TM bija mantras is not explained by Larry Domash in big blue books.
 

 History of TM:
 http://tinyurl.com/34bras http://tinyurl.com/34bras

 

 So, let's review what we know:
 

 Swami Brahmananda Saraswati was a dasanami sannyasin whose guru was Swami 
Krishnananda Saraswati. So, SBS got the Saraswati bija mantra from SKS, who got 
the same bija from his guru, passed on from a long line of gurus founded by the 
Adi Shankaracharya in 800 Ad at Sringeri in Karnataka, India - as the Sri Vidya 
sect. The Sringeri adherents worship the Sri Chakra, a mystic diagram or 
mandala, used as a symbol for Saraswati, the Goddess of Learning, with the TM 
bija mantras inscribed thereon. 
 

 The main spiritual scripture of the the Sri Vidya is the Soundaryalahari 
attributed to Shankara, which enumerates the sixteen bija mantras used for 
spiritual practice- meditation that is transcendental. All the Upanishad 
thinkers were transcendentalists of one sort or another. According to the 
Shankara tradition, Shankara visited Kashmere and brought the Trika to South 
Asia along with a copy of the Sri Yantra and installed it at all the Shankara 
maths, dedicated to Tripursundari, the Goddess of Speech. It is a fact that the 
Sri Yantra is present at all the Shankara maths including the math at Sringeri.
 

 Are we agreed so far?
 

 According to Bharati, one explanation for the origin of bija mantras is that 
the mantra shows itself in a process of introspective sensory perception, as a 
result of deep meditation; or through the grace of the guru or the istadevata; 
bijas are either seen or heard,they are not the result of discursive 
composition; bijas are revealed in a flash of insight, as one complete unit; 
bijas are eternal and only revealed in time; as the result of deep meditation 
or from performing japa; or as an act of grace through supernatural initiation; 
or bijas may be drug induced.
 

 Or,the bijas were concocted by some early yogins or other esoteric illuminati 
when they conceived the idea of using verbal sound clusters which are not 
intelligible to the non-initiate to mark off a circle of adepts. According to 
Brhaspati, the founder of the Carvaka materialistic school, bija mantras were 
made up that cunning priests and that the bijas sole purpose was to fool 
gullible folks for their own aggrandizement and that the tantric gurus were 
nothing but impostors, rogues and skrimshanks passing off unintelligible 
nonsense gibberishfor words of wisdom - hocus pocus. 
 

 Or, that bija mantras are the nick names of the istadevatas who are not fond 
of being accosted by their actual names. Go figure.  
 

 Another hypothesis concerns the idea of sound vibration called 'spanda' in 
Sanskrit: certain sounds are felt to have a special resonance or pitch. This is 
the explanation given by MMY who stated that the bijas are sounds whose 
effects are known from the experience of countless yogins over many centuries. 
This may explain why MMY was so attracted to the teachings of Kashmere tantrism 
and why MMY was so close to Swami Laksmajoo who taught the Spanda vibration 
theory at the 1968 TTC in India. 
 

 Lama Govinda wrote that bija mantras are symbol or holy words transmitted in 
an initiation that makes his personality vibrate in consonance with the guru 
and the whole line of gurus and opens the initiate to higher states of 
consciousness. MMY thought that TM and the use of bija mantras provided the 
ideal opportunity for transcending and the expansion of consciousness.   
 

 Works cited:
 

 'The Tantric Tradition'
 by Agehanada Bharati
 Rider, 1965
 p. 112-15
 

 'Foundations of Tibetan Mysticism'
 by Lama Govinda
 Rider, 1961
 p. 90
 

 

 

 

 

  
 

 

 


 

 On Wed, Oct 30, 2013 at 9:58 AM, Richard J. Williams punditster@... 
mailto:punditster@... wrote:
 Before we get started we should provide a definition of mantra.
 
 While the term mantra is usually taken to mean phrases from the Vedas. 
However, bija mantras are not mentioned in the Rig Veda. Vedic mantras are 
Sanskrit words while bija mantras are 'seed sounds' with no semantic meaning. 
Bija mantras are given by a guru in an initiation and are thus empowered by the 
guru. Therefore, bija mantras are esoteric sound vibrations, not words found in 
a 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Michael Jackson
I wish her good fortune - I hope the nutritionist gives better advice than most 
MD's (and that doesn't mean Mother Divines) - I thought diabetes was a cut and 
dried deal medically before I had to deal with it - a lot of docs have their 
heads where the sun don't shine where diabetes is concerned

On Sun, 11/3/13, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:33 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   My
 Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her
 blood sugar is so high even though she injects insulin every
 day. She went from being normal to borderline to Type 2 and
 now, daily injections. A big problem is that she doesn't
 like traditional breakfast food. And I think she doesn't
 quite get that carbs contribute to high blood sugar. Anyway,
 I've got high hopes about this consult on Tuesday. 
 
  
  
  On Sunday, November
 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net
 wrote:
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
   
 Isn't
 that why they call it break
   fast?
 
   
 
   People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very
 paranoid about
   missing meals.   In the 1970s among
 TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant
   mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets.  Many
 went back to
   eating meat and felt better.  Maybe some truth in
 MMY's eat what
   your mother puts before you?  We are
 essentially what our
   ancestors ate.
 
   
 
   If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is
 to overeat
   rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals
 throughout
   the day.
 
   
 
   On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
 
 
    
   
   
 what in the world are you all talking
 about? Who doesn't
   go for four or five hours without food or
 water?? People
   including me do that all the time. 
 
  
 
 
   On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com
   wrote:
 
   
 
   Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer
 escaped
   from a cult
 
   To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
   Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
    
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   Doc.
 
   What
 
   did you experience after four hours without
 food or water?
 
    Were you also meditating during the
 fast?
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 
   no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
   
 
   I did it, once, for *four*
 
   solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus
 Day. 
 
   
 
   Nothing - not even a peanut,
 
   or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably
 don't
 
   believe me, but its true. I think my years of
 TM helped, a
 
   lot. I must have been in a trance or
 something, to
   withstand
 
   it. I seriously thought I was going to pass
 out. Almost
   like
 
   Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A
 Man Called
 
   Horse.
 
   
 
   Even so, I am working with a
 
   teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five
 hours*, of
 
   non-food, non-water - no problem. He's
 expensive, but
 
   worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost
 is ~$1,000
 
   (not including the non-food and non-water, of
 course). 
 
   
 
   This is a tough crowd, here on
 
   FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no
 cult leader.
 
   After all, I've been around the block.
 Don't
 
   knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
   
 
   
 
   ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 
   fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
   
 
   Michelle Pfeiffer,
 
   the actress, has disclosed that she was once
 part of a
 
   “cult” which believed humans can exist
 without food or
 
   water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
 
   
 
   
 
  

RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread emilymaenot
It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to do with 
the details of the story, either. Try again. 
 

Bhairitu wrote:

 You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on the web 
site.  The is no gaffe in this line:
 
 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.
 
 But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents that's 
what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They later recanted.
 
 There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and random 
these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really cares about that on 
a message board anyway?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too difficult. 
Mike Dixon got it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  And exactly what gaffe might that be?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't see it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  Must be a sign 
  of her advancing old age.
 
 On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Er, Bhairitu...
 
 
 No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to snicker at: 
 
 
 Bhairitu bumbled:
 
 
  Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to distract 
attention from the food stamp cuts. 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA agents 
 seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article on the 
 news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how convenient).
 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 
 The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go 
 after the rich. Let's party like it's Greece and Spain.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
Xeno, I think of jyotish as an ancient science whose practitioners have 
collected data for thousands of years. But like any science, just because x 
gave rise to y 100 times, isn't a guarantee that it will do so on the 101th 
time. Also, as you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. So I 
often go more by how something feels or what I sense about it. For example, 
some jyotishis gave me a birth time and I told them it did not feel right based 
on the dasha changes and when events occurred in my life. So they gave me a new 
birth time that felt more right to me. They were the jyotishis who looked at 
the time on my birth certificate and told me it couldn't be right because 
otherwise I would have been male! btw, I'm always testing jyotish and that's 
one of the aspects of it that I enjoy.





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:48 AM, anartax...@yahoo.com 
anartax...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:



Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.


I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.

If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.

Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.

Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because it 
has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.

There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?


Re: [FairfieldLife] HealthCare.gov Users Warn of Security Risk, Breach of Privacy

2013-11-03 Thread Richard J. Williams

So, you just had to go on the internet and broadcast your IP address.

On 11/3/2013 9:55 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


http://blog.heritage.org/2013/11/02/exclusive-healthcare-gov-users-warn-of-security-risk-breach-of-privacy/






Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
I agree somewhat on rectifications of charts.  A good test would be to 
give an astrologer a birth chart which has an accurate birth time and 
have them rectify.  A really good astrologer might say I think the 
birth time given is accurate.


I was blue baby at birth and since my birth certificate time makes me 
an early Libra due to my technical interests had some amateur 
astrologers believe I was a late Virgo.  This is ALL jyotish mind you as 
I don't pay much heed to tropical astrology. However the pros said I 
wouldn't have an older sister (which I do) if I was a Virgo.


The problem with many westerners in astrology (both tropical and 
jyotish) is they become too infatuated with minutia.  I like to tell the 
story of Hart DeFouw putting up a chart in one of his classes and asking 
for an interpretation.  He got all kinds of stuff back based on the 
nakashatras but what he wanted was a reading just based on the planetary 
positions.  Another astrologer friend from India came to one of our 
study sessions and some folks in the group started asking questions 
about nakshatras etc.  He paused for a moment and said, actually many 
successful Indian astrologers just use simple methods.


Many amateur jyotishis forget that jyotish means science of light.  
Some think that planetary periods are binary.  One minute you are in one 
dasha and the next minute another.  But it's more like a fadeout and 
fade in.  Same with infancy in old age in a chart.  Planets don't become 
weak because they are going between houses and signs.  Instead the 
meaning of that house and sign is waning (fading out) while the next 
sign is waxing (fading in). This gave mixed results for astrologers.


Still I wager that astrology is far, far better than any WAG (Wild Ass 
Guess).  There has been research into effects of births at different 
times of the year and even interest in researching births at certain 
times of the day.   Of course OMG that might validate astrology.


Bad astrologers give astrology a bad name not astrology itself.

On 11/03/2013 08:47 AM, anartax...@yahoo.com wrote:


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the 
birth certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by 
details of one's life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time 
and asked if I had known my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using 
details of her life, he was able to determine my accurate birth time. 
Which was a few minutes before the time on my birth certificate so 
that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back then, 1948, 
stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.


I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition 
that an astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover 
an actual birth time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is 
that rectification of times is a dodge developed to counteract the 
discrepancies that arise when astrology fails to predict events. By 
adjusting the time, the chart then 'works better'.


If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, 
then a double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times 
when that information is withheld in various ways would be possible to 
see if they can really do that. My bet is they cannot because 
astrology is largely a matter of delusional thinking.


Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the 
scientific validity of astrology. There have been very few 
double-blind tests of any astrological system that have been well 
designed. There was one done at UC Berkeley some 25 years ago with 
Western astrology, and all the work was done by professional 
astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That study 
dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a 
standardised personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times 
was required for the participants. The result was published in Science.


Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But 
because it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, 
I do not see how the results would be any better.


There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for 
example, would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? 
What laws of nature would be invoked and how do they function?






Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
hey Bhairitu, thank you so much for that idea of dashas fading in and out. 
Today I've gone from Mars Ketu to Mars Venus but actually I began feeling 
different about a week ago. So this is a way to understand that and it makes 
sense and, I've never heard it before! 





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:08 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
I agree somewhat on rectifications of charts.  A good test would be to give an 
astrologer a birth chart which has an accurate birth time and have them 
rectify.  A really good astrologer might say I think the birth time given is 
accurate.

I was blue baby at birth and since my birth certificate time
  makes me an early Libra due to my technical interests had some
  amateur astrologers believe I was a late Virgo.  This is ALL
  jyotish mind you as I don't pay much heed to tropical astrology.  
  However the pros said I wouldn't have an older sister (which I do)
  if I was a Virgo.

The problem with many westerners in astrology (both tropical and
  jyotish) is they become too infatuated with minutia.  I like to
  tell the story of Hart DeFouw putting up a chart in one of his
  classes and asking for an interpretation.  He got all kinds of
  stuff back based on the nakashatras but what he wanted was a
  reading just based on the planetary positions.  Another astrologer
  friend from India came to one of our study sessions and some folks
  in the group started asking questions about nakshatras etc.  He
  paused for a moment and said, actually many successful Indian
  astrologers just use simple methods. 

Many amateur jyotishis forget that jyotish means science of
  light.  Some think that planetary periods are binary.  One minute
  you are in one dasha and the next minute another.  But it's more
  like a fadeout and fade in.  Same with infancy in old age in a
  chart.  Planets don't become weak because they are going between
  houses and signs.  Instead the meaning of that house and sign is
  waning (fading out) while the next sign is waxing (fading in).
  This gave mixed results for astrologers.

Still I wager that astrology is far, far better than any WAG (Wild
  Ass Guess).  There has been research into effects of births at
  different times of the year and even interest in researching
  births at certain times of the day.   Of course OMG that might
  validate astrology.

Bad astrologers give astrology a bad name not astrology itself.

On 11/03/2013 08:47 AM, anartax...@yahoo.com wrote:

  
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:



Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of 
one's life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had 
known my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was 
able to determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the 
time on my birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that 
nurses back then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.



I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 
'works better'.


If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.


Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done 
by professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. 
That study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to 
define. The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a 
standardised personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was 
required for the participants. The result was published in Science.


Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because 
it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see 
how the results would be any better.


There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
My mother's twin sister was an RN and worked for several doctors.  She 
told me once that she thought my mother was a brittle diabetic. I 
thought it was a term she made up and then looked it up.  That diagnosis 
fits me too.  Brittle diabetes never go full blown type one but have 
similar symptoms throughout life.


There is also the relatively recently discovered type three diabetes 
which is seen to be prevalent in folks who sit on their butts and use 
computers a lot.  The research on that suggests that the pancreas is not 
the only organ which secretes insulin but our brain as well.



On 11/03/2013 08:33 AM, Share Long wrote:
My Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her blood sugar 
is so high even though she injects insulin every day. She went from 
being normal to borderline to Type 2 and now, daily injections. A big 
problem is that she doesn't like traditional breakfast food. And I 
think she doesn't quite get that carbs contribute to high blood sugar. 
Anyway, I've got high hopes about this consult on Tuesday.




On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu 
noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Isn't that why they call it break fast?

People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about 
missing meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant 
mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets. Many went back to eating 
meat and felt better.  Maybe some truth in MMY's eat what your mother 
puts before you?  We are essentially what our ancestors ate.


If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat 
rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.


On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four 
or five hours without food or water?? People including me do that all 
the time.


On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com mailto:jr_...@yahoo.com 
jr_...@yahoo.com mailto:jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:


Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM


























Doc.
What
did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 Were you also meditating during the fast?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,

no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

I did it, once, for *four*
solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day.

Nothing - not even a peanut,
or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
Horse.

Even so, I am working with a
teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
(not including the non-food and non-water, of course).

This is a tough crowd, here on
FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
After all, I've been around the block. Don't
knock it, 'til you've tried it.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Michelle Pfeiffer,
the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
“cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c

































[FairfieldLife] It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread sharelong60
MJ, thank you so much for your good wishes. Right now I'm resisting giving you 
tons of advice but I'll just say one thing anyway: I think a big key is being 
careful to avoid carbs and favor protein early in the day.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I wish her good fortune - I hope the nutritionist gives better advice than 
most MD's (and that doesn't mean Mother Divines) - I thought diabetes was a cut 
and dried deal medically before I had to deal with it - a lot of docs have 
their heads where the sun don't shine where diabetes is concerned
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, Share Long sharelong60@... mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com; 
FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:33 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 My
 Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her
 blood sugar is so high even though she injects insulin every
 day. She went from being normal to borderline to Type 2 and
 now, daily injections. A big problem is that she doesn't
 like traditional breakfast food. And I think she doesn't
 quite get that carbs contribute to high blood sugar. Anyway,
 I've got high hopes about this consult on Tuesday. 
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November
 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... mailto:noozguru@...
 wrote:
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Isn't
 that why they call it break
 fast?
 
 
 
 People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very
 paranoid about
 missing meals.   In the 1970s among
 TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant
 mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets.  Many
 went back to
 eating meat and felt better.  Maybe some truth in
 MMY's eat what
 your mother puts before you?  We are
 essentially what our
 ancestors ate.
 
 
 
 If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is
 to overeat
 rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals
 throughout
 the day.
 
 
 
 On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
 
 
  
 
 
 what in the world are you all talking
 about? Who doesn't
 go for four or five hours without food or
 water?? People
 including me do that all the time. 
 
 
 
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@...
 wrote:
 
 
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer
 escaped
 from a cult
 
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Doc.
 
 What
 
 did you experience after four hours without
 food or water?
 
  Were you also meditating during the
 fast?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
 
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus
 Day. 
 
 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably
 don't
 
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of
 TM helped, a
 
 lot. I must have been in a trance or
 something, to
 withstand
 
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass
 out. Almost
 like
 
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A
 Man Called
 
 Horse.
 
 
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five
 hours*, of
 
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's
 expensive, but
 
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost
 is ~$1,000
 
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of
 course). 
 
 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no
 cult leader.
 
 After all, I've been around the block.
 Don't
 
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
 wrote:
 
 
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once
 part of a
 
 “cult” which believed humans can exist
 without food or
 
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c 



[FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
1948? Yep, I'm also officially an old bastard now too.
 Thus, you learn a few things along the way. 

 That's why I only believe in not believing. 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, anartaxius@... wrote:

 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 
 Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.
 

 I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.
 

 If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.
 

 Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.
 

 Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because 
it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.
 

 There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?


 
 
 


RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread emilymaenot
Share, I think I read you sometimes for the shock factorthis...Also, as 
you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. ...is so amusing 
to me. It's the best rationalization ever, isn't it?  Sometimes I wish you 
could experience you the way I do smile.
 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Xeno, I think of jyotish as an ancient science whose practitioners have 
collected data for thousands of years. But like any science, just because x 
gave rise to y 100 times, isn't a guarantee that it will do so on the 101th 
time. Also, as you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. So I 
often go more by how something feels or what I sense about it. For example, 
some jyotishis gave me a birth time and I told them it did not feel right based 
on the dasha changes and when events occurred in my life. So they gave me a new 
birth time that felt more right to me. They were the jyotishis who looked at 
the time on my birth certificate and told me it couldn't be right because 
otherwise I would have been male! btw, I'm always testing jyotish and that's 
one of the aspects of it that I enjoy.
 

 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:48 AM, anartaxius@... anartaxius@... wrote:
 
   ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 
 Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.
 

 I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.
 

 If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.
 

 Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.
 

 Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because 
it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.
 

 There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?


 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
Well, Emily I admit that sometimes I write for the shock value. Glad I make you 
smile.





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:21 AM, emilymae...@yahoo.com 
emilymae...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Share, I think I read you sometimes for the shock factorthis...Also, as 
you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. ...is so amusing 
to me. It's the best rationalization ever, isn't it?  Sometimes I wish you 
could experience you the way I do smile.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Xeno, I think of jyotish as an ancient science whose practitioners have 
collected data for thousands of years. But like any science, just because x 
gave rise to y 100 times, isn't a guarantee that it will do so on the 101th 
time. Also, as you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. So I 
often go more by how something feels or what I sense about it. For example, 
some jyotishis gave me a birth time and I told them it did not feel right based 
on the dasha changes and when events occurred in my life. So they gave me a new 
birth time that felt more right to me. They were the jyotishis who looked at 
the time on my birth certificate and told me it couldn't be right because 
otherwise I would have been male! btw, I'm always testing jyotish and that's 
one of the aspects of it that I enjoy.





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:48 AM, anartaxius@... anartaxius@... wrote:
 
  
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:



Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.


I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.

If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.

Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.

Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because it 
has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.

There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?




RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread sharelong60
Well, Bhairitu, it's always a good day when I learn something new and in this 
case it's 2 new bits of info. Have not heard of either of these kinds of 
diabetes and admit am horrified by the Type 3. I still think, and am hoping I'm 
right, that diet can go far in controlling it. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 My mother's twin sister was an RN and worked for several doctors.  She told me 
once that she thought my mother was a brittle diabetic. I thought it was a 
term she made up and then looked it up.  That diagnosis fits me too.  Brittle 
diabetes never go full blown type one but have similar symptoms throughout life.
 
 There is also the relatively recently discovered type three diabetes which is 
seen to be prevalent in folks who sit on their butts and use computers a lot.  
The research on that suggests that the pancreas is not the only organ which 
secretes insulin but our brain as well.
 
 
 On 11/03/2013 08:33 AM, Share Long wrote:
 
   My Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her blood sugar is so 
high even though she injects insulin every day. She went from being normal to 
borderline to Type 2 and now, daily injections. A big problem is that she 
doesn't like traditional breakfast food. And I think she doesn't quite get that 
carbs contribute to high blood sugar. Anyway, I've got high hopes about this 
consult on Tuesday. 
 
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... 
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:
 
   
 Isn't that why they call it break fast?
 
 People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about missing 
meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant mainly due to eating 
bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to eating meat and felt better.  Maybe 
some truth in MMY's eat what your mother puts before you?  We are essentially 
what our ancestors ate.
 
 If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat rather than 
do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.
 
 On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
   what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or five 
hours without food or water?? People including me do that all the time. 
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... 
wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Doc.
 What
 did you experience after four hours without food or water?
  Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 Horse.
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread j_alexander_stanley
 I have some sort of carbohydrate sensitivity/reactive hypoglycemia, but it's 
really only a problem if I eat meals with a lot of starch. If I need to go as 
much as 7 hours without eating, I eat a steak slathered with butter. That keeps 
me going for hours and hours, and when hunger does return, it is very gentle. 
As it happens, in addition to having 2.9% Neanderthal DNA, I am also APO E4/E4, 
which puts me at the highest risk of Alzheimer's. As I understand it, the E4 
variant is the most ancient form of that allele, which amuses me greatly 
because in the rarefied woo community that is Fairfield, I am literally a less 
evolved creature. From what I've read, sensitivity to carbohydrate is not 
uncommon with E4s, which makes us less able to handle a diet of cheap, 
fungible, neolithic grains/beans than our more evolved E2 and E3 brethren. With 
Alzheimer's sometimes described as diabetes of the brain, I figure I'm on the 
right track keeping carb intake low enough to maintain even blood sugar levels.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Isn't that why they call it break fast?
 
 People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about missing 
meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant mainly due to eating 
bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to eating meat and felt better.  Maybe 
some truth in MMY's eat what your mother puts before you?  We are essentially 
what our ancestors ate.
 
 If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat rather than 
do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.
 
 On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
   what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or five 
hours without food or water?? People including me do that all the time. 
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com mailto:jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com 
mailto:jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Doc.
 What
 did you experience after four hours without food or water?
  Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 Horse.
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread sharelong60
yes, emptybill, 1948, Year of the Earth Rat in Chinese astrolgy (-: Just in 
case people were getting bored with posts about jyotish and astrolgy!

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 1948? Yep, I'm also officially an old bastard now too.
 Thus, you learn a few things along the way. 

 That's why I only believe in not believing. 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, anartaxius@... wrote:

 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 
 Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.
 

 I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.
 

 If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.
 

 Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.
 

 Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because 
it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.
 

 There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?


 
 
 




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails and 
web site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or something 
people are somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they are confused 
about my joke of calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an fun retort given 
her first response to my post.  Or maybe you all think you are screwing 
with my but then you're wasting your time.


On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymae...@yahoo.com wrote:


It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


*LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to 
do with the details of the story, either. Try again. *


*

Bhairitu wrote:
*
You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on the 
web site.  The is no gaffe in this line:


Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.

But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents 
that's what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They later 
recanted.


There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and 
random these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really 
cares about that on a message board anyway?


On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:

*I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too 
difficult. Mike Dixon got it. *


*
Bhairitu wrote:
*
 And exactly what gaffe might that be?

On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

*Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't see 
it. *



*Bhairitu wrote:*

 Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  Must 
be a sign of her advancing old age.


On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:


*Er, Bhairitu...*

*
*

*No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to snicker 
at: *


*
*

*Bhairitu bumbled:*


 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:

Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to 
distract attention from the food stamp cuts.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA agents
seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article 
on the
news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how 
convenient).


http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/

The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go
after the rich. Let's party like it's Greece and Spain.













Re: [FairfieldLife] It's starting already. We gonna line 'em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?





On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com 
emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html


Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Astrology in the New Testament

2013-11-03 Thread Share Long
John, one tidbit I've heard about Pisces, which is my Moon sign, is that they 
contain qualities of all the previous 11 signs. They're very sensitive, picking 
up on the vibe of others and might need to be alone just to avoid overwhelm 
from that.





On Saturday, November 2, 2013 6:01 PM, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com 
wrote:
 
  
Share,

An argument can be made for Pisces as the birth month of Jesus.  Specifically, 
Pisces is a sign owned by Jupiter, the teacher of the gods.  So, by analogy, 
Jesus was born as a teacher in this world during Kali Yuga.

Also, since Pisces is the 7th house from Virgo, he is associated with a virgin, 
which in this case is Mary, his mother.  Santos Bonacci, another astrologer, 
stated in his presentation that Pisces can be considered as the womb since the 
sign is watery.

Bill Donohue, in the video clip, further pointed out that Pisces represents the 
disciples of Jesus, who were mostly fishermen, and were tasked to become the 
fishers of men.

Lastly, Dohohue stated that Pisces represented the miracle that Jesus performed 
when he multiplied the fish and bread to feed the hungry followers during the 
Sermon on the Mount.

There are many other points, but I'll cut if off here for brevity.

 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


John, one theory I've heard is that Jesus was born with Sun in Pisces. Thus the 
fish symbol for Christianity and a bunch of other stuff which I no longer 
remember. I do think Jesus embodied that universal love that can be associated 
with Pisces.





On Saturday, November 2, 2013 11:51 AM, authfriend@... authfriend@... wrote:
 
  
Furthermore, Jesus couldn't have been born any later than September anyway, or 
the flocks of sheep wouldn't still have been out in the fields (Luke 2:8, And 
there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch 
over their flock by night). It's pretty well established that by the 4th 
century CE, the presumptive date of Christ's birth had been moved to December 
25 in an attempt to co-opt (or compete with) the Roman solstice festival.

Seraphita wrote:


 Why was it written that Jesus was born in a manger?

 Pedant's Corner: it's not written. It says instead And she brought forth her 
 firstborn son, and 
 wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger. Imagine Mary 
 straddling a 
 feeding trough to give birth.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, jr_esq@... wrote:


Why was it written that Jesus was born in a manger?  Because he was born on 
December 25 which astrologically lies between the signs of Sagittarius, a 
horse, and Capricorn, the goat.  Interesting?  Bill Donohue explains more of 
his observations as follows:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M6j6DwBWBgamp;list=PL4HZ228v9duPReHJuT6prrAUc9BzFEo_t





RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
Oh, another excellent rationalization. 
 
Share struggled:

  Well, Emily I admit that sometimes I write for the shock value. Glad I make 
  you smile.
 

 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:21 AM, emilymaenot@... emilymaenot@... 
wrote:
 
   Share, I think I read you sometimes for the shock factorthis...Also, as 
you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. ...is so amusing 
to me. It's the best rationalization ever, isn't it?  Sometimes I wish you 
could experience you the way I do smile.
 






 
 
 
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
Yes.
 

 It's called Peoples Justice.
 

 
 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 


 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology in the New Testament

2013-11-03 Thread jr_esq
Share,
 

 Pisces is a dual sign and is watery by astrological definition.  If the Moon 
is placed here, the Moon becomes more sensitive since the Moon is already 
wavering and watery by nature.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, jr_esq@... wrote:

 Why was it written that Jesus was born in a manger?  Because he was born on 
December 25 which astrologically lies between the signs of Sagittarius, a 
horse, and Capricorn, the goat.  Interesting?  Bill Donohue explains more of 
his observations as follows: 

 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M6j6DwBWBgamp;list=PL4HZ228v9duPReHJuT6prrAUc9BzFEo_t
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M6j6DwBWBgamp;list=PL4HZ228v9duPReHJuT6prrAUc9BzFEo_t


 


RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
I would check out brittle diabetes if I were you, Share. What Bhairitu says 
doesn't quite match the standard definition:
 

 http://www.diabeticlive.com/diabetes-101/understanding-brittle-diabetes/ 
http://www.diabeticlive.com/diabetes-101/understanding-brittle-diabetes/
 

 Also, there's as yet no scientific consensus on whether there is such a thing 
as type 3 diabetes. Some claim it's Alzheimer's disease.
 
Share wrote:

 Well, Bhairitu, it's always a good day when I learn something new and in this 
case it's 2 new bits of info. Have not heard of either of these kinds of 
diabetes and admit am horrified by the Type 3. I still think, and am hoping I'm 
right, that diet can go far in controlling it. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 My mother's twin sister was an RN and worked for several doctors.  She told me 
once that she thought my mother was a brittle diabetic. I thought it was a 
term she made up and then looked it up.  That diagnosis fits me too.  Brittle 
diabetes never go full blown type one but have similar symptoms throughout life.
 
 There is also the relatively recently discovered type three diabetes which is 
seen to be prevalent in folks who sit on their butts and use computers a lot.  
The research on that suggests that the pancreas is not the only organ which 
secretes insulin but our brain as well.
 
 
 On 11/03/2013 08:33 AM, Share Long wrote:
 
   My Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her blood sugar is so 
high even though she injects insulin every day. She went from being normal to 
borderline to Type 2 and now, daily injections. A big problem is that she 
doesn't like traditional breakfast food. And I think she doesn't quite get that 
carbs contribute to high blood sugar. Anyway, I've got high hopes about this 
consult on Tuesday. 
 
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... 
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:
 
   
 Isn't that why they call it break fast?
 
 People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about missing 
meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant mainly due to eating 
bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to eating meat and felt better.  Maybe 
some truth in MMY's eat what your mother puts before you?  We are essentially 
what our ancestors ate.
 
 If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat rather than 
do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.
 
 On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
   what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four or five 
hours without food or water?? People including me do that all the time. 
 
 On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... 
wrote:
 
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Doc.
 What
 did you experience after four hours without food or water?
  Were you also meditating during the fast?
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,
 no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 I did it, once, for *four*
 solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day. 
 
 Nothing - not even a peanut,
 or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
 believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
 lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
 it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
 Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
 Horse.
 
 Even so, I am working with a
 teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
 non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
 worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
 (not including the non-food and non-water, of course). 
 
 This is a tough crowd, here on
 FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
 After all, I've been around the block. Don't
 knock it, 'til you've tried it.
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Michelle Pfeiffer,
 the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
 “cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
 water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
Bhairitu, why would you make fun of me for suggesting that the shooting 
incident was carefully planned to distract attention from the food stamp cuts? 
I mean, it did, did it not? You yourself commented on that.
 
Bhairitu wrote:

 I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails and web 
site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or something people are 
somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they are confused about my joke of 
calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an fun retort given her first response to my 
post.  Or maybe you all think you are screwing with my but then you're wasting 
your time.
 
 On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
   It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?   
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to do with 
the details of the story, either. Try again. 
 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
 You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on the web 
site.  The is no gaffe in this line:
 
 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.
 
 But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents that's 
what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They later recanted.
 
 There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and random 
these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really cares about that on 
a message board anyway?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too difficult. 
Mike Dixon got it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  And exactly what gaffe might that be?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't see it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  Must be a sign 
  of her advancing old age.
 
 On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Er, Bhairitu...
 
 
 No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to snicker at: 
 
 
 Bhairitu bumbled:
 
 
  Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to distract 
attention from the food stamp cuts. 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA agents 
 seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article on the 
 news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how convenient).
 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 
 The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go 
 after the rich. Let's party like it's Greece and Spain.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
Because you always accuse me of being a conspiracy theorist.  So I 
joshed you back on it.  Yes it did distract.  No we don't know if it was 
a planned incident or not. Given how corrupt this country and government 
is it could have been a planned incident.   Here's an LA TV news report 
with a guy who was there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY

On 11/03/2013 11:38 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


*Bhairitu, why would you make fun of me for suggesting that the 
shooting incident was carefully planned to distract attention from the 
food stamp cuts? I mean, it /did/, did it not? You yourself commented 
on that.*


*
Bhairitu wrote:*

I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails 
and web site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or 
something people are somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they 
are confused about my joke of calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an 
fun retort given her first response to my post.  Or maybe you all 
think you are screwing with my but then you're wasting your time.


On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@...
wrote:

It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


*LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to 
do with the details of the story, either. Try again. *


*

Bhairitu wrote:
*
You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on the 
web site.  The is no gaffe in this line:


Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.

But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents 
that's what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They 
later recanted.


There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and 
random these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really 
cares about that on a message board anyway?


On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@...
mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

*I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too 
difficult. Mike Dixon got it. *


*
Bhairitu wrote:
*
 And exactly what gaffe might that be?

On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:

*Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't see 
it. *



*Bhairitu wrote:*

 Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  
Must be a sign of her advancing old age.


On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:


*Er, Bhairitu...*

*
*

*No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to snicker 
at: *


*
*

*Bhairitu bumbled:*


 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:

Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to 
distract attention from the food stamp cuts.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA 
agents
seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article 
on the
news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how 
convenient).


http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/

The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go
after the rich. Let's party like it's Greece and Spain.















Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
I disagree.  My information came from mainstream medical articles on 
both brittle diabetes and type 3. Judy just wants to be the center of 
attention and will knock down anyone who takes it from her (she will 
deny this of course).   I often write about things from memory  because 
I'm not OCD about facts.  Exactism is a mental affliction in the 
Internet age.  In would be impolite if we all sat around a table 
discussing these things and pausing to check our facts on the Internet 
using our smart phones before saying anything.


On 11/03/2013 11:17 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


I would check out brittle diabetes if I were you, Share. What 
Bhairitu says doesn't quite match the standard definition:



http://www.diabeticlive.com/diabetes-101/understanding-brittle-diabetes/


Also, there's as yet no scientific consensus on whether there is such 
a thing as type 3 diabetes. Some claim it's Alzheimer's disease.



Share wrote:

Well, Bhairitu, it's always a good day when I learn something new and 
in this case it's 2 new bits of info. Have not heard of either of 
these kinds of diabetes and admit am horrified by the Type 3. I still 
think, and am hoping I'm right, that diet can go far in controlling it.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


My mother's twin sister was an RN and worked for several doctors.  She 
told me once that she thought my mother was a brittle diabetic. I 
thought it was a term she made up and then looked it up.  That 
diagnosis fits me too.  Brittle diabetes never go full blown type one 
but have similar symptoms throughout life.


There is also the relatively recently discovered type three diabetes 
which is seen to be prevalent in folks who sit on their butts and use 
computers a lot.  The research on that suggests that the pancreas is 
not the only organ which secretes insulin but our brain as well.



On 11/03/2013 08:33 AM, Share Long wrote:

My Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her blood sugar 
is so high even though she injects insulin every day. She went from 
being normal to borderline to Type 2 and now, daily injections. A big 
problem is that she doesn't like traditional breakfast food. And I 
think she doesn't quite get that carbs contribute to high blood 
sugar. Anyway, I've got high hopes about this consult on Tuesday.




On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... 
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:

Isn't that why they call it break fast?

People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about 
missing meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant 
mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to eating 
meat and felt better.  Maybe some truth in MMY's eat what your 
mother puts before you?  We are essentially what our ancestors ate.


If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat 
rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.


On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four 
or five hours without food or water?? People including me do that 
all the time.


On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... jr_esq@... 
mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:


Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM


























Doc.
What
did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 Were you also meditating during the fast?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,

no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

I did it, once, for *four*
solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day.

Nothing - not even a peanut,
or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
Horse.

Even so, I am working with a
teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
(not including the non-food and non-water, of course).

This is a tough crowd, here on
FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
After all, I've been around the block. Don't
knock it, 'til you've tried it.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Michelle Pfeiffer,
the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
“cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c



































Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
You are a fast oxidizer or a parasympathetic type.  Neither does well on 
carbs.


On 11/03/2013 09:32 AM, j_alexander_stan...@yahoo.com wrote:


 I have some sort of carbohydrate sensitivity/reactive hypoglycemia, 
but it's really only a problem if I eat meals with a lot of starch. If 
I need to go as much as 7 hours without eating, I eat a steak 
slathered with butter. That keeps me going for hours and hours, and 
when hunger does return, it is very gentle. As it happens, in addition 
to having 2.9% Neanderthal DNA, I am also APO E4/E4, which puts me at 
the highest risk of Alzheimer's. As I understand it, the E4 variant is 
the most ancient form of that allele, which amuses me greatly because 
in the rarefied woo community that is Fairfield, I am literally a less 
evolved creature. From what I've read, sensitivity to carbohydrate is 
not uncommon with E4s, which makes us less able to handle a diet of 
cheap, fungible, neolithic grains/beans than our more evolved E2 and 
E3 brethren. With Alzheimer's sometimes described as diabetes of the 
brain, I figure I'm on the right track keeping carb intake low enough 
to maintain even blood sugar levels.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Isn't that why they call it break fast?

People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about 
missing meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant 
mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets.  Many went back to eating 
meat and felt better.  Maybe some truth in MMY's eat what your mother 
puts before you?  We are essentially what our ancestors ate.


If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat 
rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.


On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:

what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for four 
or five hours without food or water?? People including me do that all 
the time.


On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_...@yahoo.com mailto:jr_...@yahoo.com 
jr_...@yahoo.com mailto:jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:


Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM


























Doc.
What
did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 Were you also meditating during the fast?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,

no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

I did it, once, for *four*
solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day.

Nothing - not even a peanut,
or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
Horse.

Even so, I am working with a
teacher, now, who says I can achieve *five hours*, of
non-food, non-water - no problem. He's expensive, but
worth it. I think he's Indian. Total cost is ~$1,000
(not including the non-food and non-water, of course).

This is a tough crowd, here on
FFL, so I'll say up front: This guy is no cult leader.
After all, I've been around the block. Don't
knock it, 'til you've tried it.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Michelle Pfeiffer,
the actress, has disclosed that she was once part of a
“cult” which believed humans can exist without food or
water.http://tinyurl.com/odb3y4c































Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.


On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


Yes.


It's called Peoples Justice.


Uncle Obama's Health-O-Rama cartoon




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?



On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... emptybill@... 
wrote:



  Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare
  And Medicaid Patients

http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html







[FairfieldLife] [Old?] Holland#39;s Got Talent!

2013-11-03 Thread cardemaister
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBMfgLvRZJs 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBMfgLvRZJs

RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
Bhairitu wrote: 
 
  Because you always accuse me of being a conspiracy theorist.  So I joshed 
  you back on it.
 

 OK, Bhairitu, I'm going to take pity on you.
 

 You assumed my remark--that the shooting incident was carefully planned to 
distract attention from the food stamp cuts--was serious.
 

 It wasn't. I was making fun of your tendency to see conspiracies everywhere.
 

 That's why your retort was hilarious. You fell for it hook, line, and 
sinker. You are so GULLIBLE.
 


  Yes it did distract.  No we don't know if it was a planned incident or not.
 

 Here's a hint: It wasn't planned, except by the shooter.
 

 

 

 

 

   Given how corrupt this country and government is it could have been a 
planned incident.   Here's an LA TV news report with a guy who was there.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY
 
 On 11/03/2013 11:38 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Bhairitu, why would you make fun of me for suggesting that the shooting 
incident was carefully planned to distract attention from the food stamp cuts? 
I mean, it did, did it not? You yourself commented on that.
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
 I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails and web 
site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or something people are 
somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they are confused about my joke of 
calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an fun retort given her first response to my 
post.  Or maybe you all think you are screwing with my but then you're wasting 
your time.
 
 On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
   It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?   
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to do with 
the details of the story, either. Try again. 
 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
 You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on the web 
site.  The is no gaffe in this line:
 
 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.
 
 But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents that's 
what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They later recanted.
 
 There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and random 
these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really cares about that on 
a message board anyway?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too difficult. 
Mike Dixon got it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  And exactly what gaffe might that be?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't see it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  Must be a sign 
  of her advancing old age.
 
 On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Er, Bhairitu...
 
 
 No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to snicker at: 
 
 
 Bhairitu bumbled:
 
 
  Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to distract 
attention from the food stamp cuts. 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA agents 
 seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article on the 
 news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how convenient).
 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 
 The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go 
 after the rich. Let's party like it's Greece and Spain.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu

LOL!  You are SO WRONG!

On 11/03/2013 01:08 PM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


*Bhairitu wrote: *


 Because you always accuse me of being a conspiracy theorist.  So I 
joshed you back on it.


*OK, Bhairitu, I'm going to take pity on you.*
*
*


*Take pity on you, that's hilarious.  I don't need no stinkin' pity. :-D

*
*You assumed my remark--that the shooting incident was carefully 
planned to distract attention from the food stamp cuts--was serious.*


*No, I didn't think it was serious.  That's why I kidded you back.  
Sometimes you really are dense.


*

*
*
*It wasn't. I was making fun of your tendency to see conspiracies 
everywhere.*


*That's your misperception of me.  I don't see conspiracies everywhere 
but they do happen a lot more frequently than the public thinks.  Those 
in power think the public is too stupid to catch on and those who do 
they make sure that their shills discredit them with the label 
conspiracy theorists.


*

*
*
*That's why your retort was hilarious. You fell for it hook, line, 
and sinker. You are so GULLIBLE.*


*Who's gullible? :-D

*


 Yes it did distract.  No we don't know if it was a planned incident 
or not.


*Here's a hint: It wasn't planned, except by the shooter.*





  Given how corrupt this country and government is it could have been 
a planned incident.   Here's an LA TV news report with a guy who was 
there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY

On 11/03/2013 11:38 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

*Bhairitu, why would you make fun of me for suggesting that the 
shooting incident was carefully planned to distract attention from 
the food stamp cuts? I mean, it /did/, did it not? You yourself 
commented on that.*


*
Bhairitu wrote:*

I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails 
and web site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or 
something people are somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they 
are confused about my joke of calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an 
fun retort given her first response to my post.  Or maybe you all 
think you are screwing with my but then you're wasting your time.


On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@...
wrote:

It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


*LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to 
do with the details of the story, either. Try again. *


*

Bhairitu wrote:
*
You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on 
the web site.  The is no gaffe in this line:


Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.

But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents 
that's what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They 
later recanted.


There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and 
random these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really 
cares about that on a message board anyway?


On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@...
mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

*I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too 
difficult. Mike Dixon got it. *


*
Bhairitu wrote:
*
 And exactly what gaffe might that be?

On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:

*Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't 
see it. *



*Bhairitu wrote:*

 Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again. 
Must be a sign of her advancing old age.


On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:


*Er, Bhairitu...*

*
*

*No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to 
snicker at: *


*
*

*Bhairitu bumbled:*


 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@...
mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to 
distract attention from the food stamp cuts.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA 
agents
seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article 
on the
news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how 
convenient).


http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/

The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go
after the rich. Let's party like it's Greece and Spain.

















RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
LOL right back atcha. You got nailed fair and square. Of course you're not 
going to admit it, but it's transparently obvious.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 LOL!  You are SO WRONG!
 
 On 11/03/2013 01:08 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Bhairitu wrote: 
 
  Because you always accuse me of being a conspiracy theorist.  So I joshed 
  you back on it.
 
 
 OK, Bhairitu, I'm going to take pity on you.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Take pity on you, that's hilarious.  I don't need no stinkin' pity. :-D 
 
 You assumed my remark--that the shooting incident was carefully planned to 
distract attention from the food stamp cuts--was serious.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 No, I didn't think it was serious.  That's why I kidded you back.  Sometimes 
you really are dense.
 
 
 
 It wasn't. I was making fun of your tendency to see conspiracies everywhere.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 That's your misperception of me.  I don't see conspiracies everywhere but they 
do happen a lot more frequently than the public thinks.  Those in power think 
the public is too stupid to catch on and those who do they make sure that their 
shills discredit them with the label conspiracy theorists.
 
 
 
 That's why your retort was hilarious. You fell for it hook, line, and 
sinker. You are so GULLIBLE.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Who's gullible? :-D 
 
 
 
 
  Yes it did distract.  No we don't know if it was a planned incident or not.
 
 
 Here's a hint: It wasn't planned, except by the shooter.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Given how corrupt this country and government is it could have been a 
planned incident.   Here's an LA TV news report with a guy who was there.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY
 
 On 11/03/2013 11:38 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Bhairitu, why would you make fun of me for suggesting that the shooting 
incident was carefully planned to distract attention from the food stamp cuts? 
I mean, it did, did it not? You yourself commented on that.
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
 I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails and web 
site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or something people are 
somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they are confused about my joke of 
calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an fun retort given her first response to my 
post.  Or maybe you all think you are screwing with my but then you're wasting 
your time.
 
 On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@... wrote:
 
   It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?   
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing to do with 
the details of the story, either. Try again. 
 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
 You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on the web 
site.  The is no gaffe in this line:
 
 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and White.
 
 But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA agents that's 
what the news outlets were saying when I posted it.  They later recanted.
 
 There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and random 
these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really cares about that on 
a message board anyway?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too difficult. 
Mike Dixon got it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  And exactly what gaffe might that be?
 
 On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't see it. 
 
 Bhairitu wrote:
 
  Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  Must be a sign 
  of her advancing old age.
 
 On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Er, Bhairitu...
 
 
 No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to snicker at: 
 
 
 Bhairitu bumbled:
 
 
  Judy, the conspiracy theorist.
 
 On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
   Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to distract 
attention from the food stamp cuts. 
 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA agents 
 seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead article on the 
 news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how convenient).
 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/
 

[FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
 
 




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.
 
 On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Yes.
 
 
 It's called Peoples Justice.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
sharelong60@... mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... 
emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-03 Thread s3raphita
Re According to John Lennon, Cliff Richard's hit 'Move It',1958, was the first 
authentic rock and roll song. According to John, before Cliff and the Shadows, 
there had been nothing worth listening to in British music.:
 Yes, that's right - nothing worth listening to in the rock'n'roll genre 
anyway. Move It is a neat song but it's crying out for someone with more 
charisma than Cliff Richard to sell it.
 

 The Brand New Cadillac song I linked to is closer in feel to a genuine rock 
classic. I mentioned that Vince Taylor's decline into drug paranoia (speed and 
LSD) was the model for David Bowie's fictional rock star Ziggy Stardust. 
Bowie's album came out in 1972. Here's Vince Taylor singing Brand New 
Cadillac in 1979. He carries the song with a certaim amphetamine cool but you 
can see he's on the highway to hell.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNHXbTL7Oc 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNHXbTL7Oc

 

 


[FairfieldLife] NPD

2013-11-03 Thread dhamiltony2k5
NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower who showed up in town in the 
last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells a good story, really smart but 
incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive with the younger follower. Lot 
like that other guy that used to post here. I sent this new guy on to find the 
afternoon Fairfield illumined experience banana-gram group. I think they have 
the resources to deal with him safely and will appreciate him a lot. 
 -Buck   


[FairfieldLife] RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-03 Thread s3raphita
Re The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle 
between the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the 
material world darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in a 
battle for power. There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of both 
good and evil. Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, 
and Cathars. It's not complicated. Adepts in China and the Far East would 
probably relate to this with their own notions of Yin and Yang.: 

 The Yin and Yang concepts point to a Tao that includes the opposites. 
Imagining that one side of a pair of opposites could gain the upper hand over 
the other would be a vulgar error.
 As the little we know about Manichaeism and similar dualist 
religions/philosophies comes to us from hostile sources isn't it possible that 
these beliefs weren't as dualist as they've been painted but perhaps also had 
the idea of a Transcendence that reconciled the positive and negative aspects 
of life?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 So, let's review what we know about the prophet Mani. 
 
 The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle between 
the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the material world 
darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in a battle for power. 
There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of both good and evil. 
Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, and Cathars. It's 
not complicated.
 
 Adepts in China and the Far East would probably relate to this with their own 
notions of Yin and Yang, which is probably derived from the Indian Sankhya, a 
radical dualism, and later tantra- a theory of polarity which posits male and 
female energies. 
 
 The name 'Mani' is Sanskrit. Mani traveled and lived in India for several 
years, visiting  Buddhist lands such as Bamiyan in Afghanistan, so it is not 
surprising that Buddhist influences would be apparent. Mani apparently adopted 
his theory of the reincarnation (transmigration of souls) from the Buddhists. 
Mani's sect structure was apparently based on the Buddhist Sangha, that is, 
Arhants and the lay follower community. 
 
 
 On 11/2/2013 11:31 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   
  
 No wonder the Near-Eastern realm got so mixed up.   
 It seems that as Manichean ideology spread to the East it incorporated 
Buddhist concepts along the way in a effort to show the superiority of the 
Religion of Light. Mani lived during the third century of the current era. 
Mani used the epitaph Buddha of Light and identified himself as Maitreya. He 
and his followers specifically borrowed from early Pure Land Sutras and 
Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka philosophy. As it entered the region of Gandhara and 
spread to China it used the Buddhist Hinayana tradition to support its views of 
matter, the body and the world.
 MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM
 
 
 David A. Scott 
 
 Christ Church College of Higher Education 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Information on Narcissistic Personality Disorder

2013-11-03 Thread dhamiltony2k5
 
 Yep, thanks. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Definitions
 Narcissism, as in excessive or erotic interest in oneself and one's physical 
appearance. noun (See egotism) definition:
 • Psychology; extreme selfishness, with a grandiose view of one's own talents 
and a craving for admiration, as characterizing a personality type.
 • Psychoanalysis; self-centeredness arising from failure to distinguish the 
self from external objects, either in very young babies or as a feature of 
mental disorder.
 Someone with Narcissistic Personality disorder (NPD) has at least 5 of these 
symptoms:
 has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and 
talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate 
achievements) is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, 
brilliance, beauty, or ideal love believes that he or she is special and 
unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special 
or high-status people (or institutions) requires excessive admiration has a 
sense of entitlement, i.e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable 
treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations is 
interpersonally exploitative, i.e., takes advantage of others to achieve his or 
her own ends lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the 
feelings and needs of others is often envious of others or believes that others 
are envious of him or her shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes 
Associated Features: Depressed Mood, Dramatic or Erratic or Antisocial 
Personality
 Differential Diagnosis. Not everyone who acts like a narcissist is one. 
 Some disorders have similar or even the same symptoms such as: 
http://www.narcissism101.com/Beginning/personalitydisor.html
 
 http://www.narcissism101.com/Beginning/personalitydisor.htmlHistrionic 
Personality Disorder;
 Antisocial Personality Disorder; 
Borderline 
Personality Disorder;
 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder;
S 
chizotypal Personality Disorder;
 Paranoid Personality Disorder;
 Manic 
Episodes;
 Hypomanic Episodes;
 Personality Change Due to a General Medical 
Condition;
 Symptoms that may develop in association with chronic substance 
use.
 Psychology Today: A Field Guide To Narcissism Link 
http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20051209-05.html
 Here are some more signs of Narcissistic Personality Disorder to look out for:
 Jealousy and possessiveness Excessive need to feel special, adored, loved, 
appreciated, or admired Rage attacks when you do not sufficiently meet his/her 
needs Controlling behaviors (trying to control how you spend your time, who you 
talk to, how you dress, etc.) Inflated self-esteem, or grandiosity (bragging, 
fishing for compliments) Dramatic, insecure behaviors Expecting you to take 
responsibility for making him/her feel better about him/herself Blaming you for 
behaviors or feelings (i.e., YOU made me do this, or YOU made me feel this 
way.) Not taking responsibility for angry behavior and justifying angry 
outbursts An attitude that demonstrates the world revolves around me and you 
need to cater to my ideas, opinions, thoughts, and feelings. An unwillingness 
to reflect on his/her own behaviors
  
Half the harm that is done in this world
Is due to people who want to feel important
They don't mean to do harm ­ 
But the harm does not interest them.
Or they do not see it, or they justify it
Because they are absorbed in the endless struggle 
To think well of themselves.
 T. S. Eliot
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: NPD

2013-11-03 Thread s3raphita
NPD = narcissistic personality disorder ?
 

 How come he homed in on you? You looking lost and confused?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower who showed up in town in the 
last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells a good story, really smart but 
incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive with the younger follower. Lot 
like that other guy that used to post here. I sent this new guy on to find the 
afternoon Fairfield illumined experience banana-gram group. I think they have 
the resources to deal with him safely and will appreciate him a lot. 
 -Buck   

 


[FairfieldLife] RE: NPD

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
Buck wrote:
 
  NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower who showed up in town in 
  the last few days with these 
  kinds of traits. Tells a good story, really smart but incredibly 
  manipulative and evidently abusive with the 
  younger follower. Lot like that other guy that used to post here.
 

 Are you referring to Robin? Because he didn't have narcissistic personality 
disorder. That was a story Barry made up and kept pushing because he was 
jealous of the attention Robin got and the fact that a lot of folks liked him. 
Remember that Barry insists Maharishi had NPD. As far as Barry is concerned, 
anyone who claims to be enlightened (or to have been enlightened--although it 
took Barry awhile to recognize that Robin was very clear that he was no longer 
enlightened) has NPD (and is not or was not enlightened).
 

 Ironically, if anyone here has NPD, it would be Barry.
 

 

 

 

 

 I sent this new guy on to find the afternoon Fairfield illumined experience 
banana-gram group. I think they have the resources to deal with him safely and 
will appreciate him a lot. 
 -Buck   




[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Information on Narcissistic Personality Disorder

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
Interesting that this reply to Buck didn't appear on the Web site, nor in FFL 
email.
 

 Of all these listed characteristics, this is the only one that Robin 
exhibited, and then only (and only sometimes) when he was being attacked.
 Dramatic, insecure behaviors  
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  
 Yep, thanks. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Definitions
 Narcissism, as in excessive or erotic interest in oneself and one's physical 
appearance. noun (See egotism) definition:
 • Psychology; extreme selfishness, with a grandiose view of one's own talents 
and a craving for admiration, as characterizing a personality type.
 • Psychoanalysis; self-centeredness arising from failure to distinguish the 
self from external objects, either in very young babies or as a feature of 
mental disorder.
 Someone with Narcissistic Personality disorder (NPD) has at least 5 of these 
symptoms:
 has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and 
talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate 
achievements) is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, 
brilliance, beauty, or ideal love believes that he or she is special and 
unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special 
or high-status people (or institutions) requires excessive admiration has a 
sense of entitlement, i.e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable 
treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations is 
interpersonally exploitative, i.e., takes advantage of others to achieve his or 
her own ends lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the 
feelings and needs of others is often envious of others or believes that others 
are envious of him or her shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes 
Associated Features: Depressed Mood, Dramatic or Erratic or Antisocial 
Personality
 Differential Diagnosis. Not everyone who acts like a narcissist is one. 
 Some disorders have similar or even the same symptoms such as: 
http://www.narcissism101.com/Beginning/personalitydisor.html
 
 http://www.narcissism101.com/Beginning/personalitydisor.htmlHistrionic 
Personality Disorder;
 Antisocial Personality Disorder; 
Borderline 
Personality Disorder;
 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder;
S 
chizotypal Personality Disorder;
 Paranoid Personality Disorder;
 Manic 
Episodes;
 Hypomanic Episodes;
 Personality Change Due to a General Medical 
Condition;
 Symptoms that may develop in association with chronic substance 
use.
 Psychology Today: A Field Guide To Narcissism Link 
http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20051209-05.html
 Here are some more signs of Narcissistic Personality Disorder to look out for:
 Jealousy and possessiveness Excessive need to feel special, adored, loved, 
appreciated, or admired Rage attacks when you do not sufficiently meet his/her 
needs Controlling behaviors (trying to control how you spend your time, who you 
talk to, how you dress, etc.) Inflated self-esteem, or grandiosity (bragging, 
fishing for compliments) Dramatic, insecure behaviors Expecting you to take 
responsibility for making him/her feel better about him/herself Blaming you for 
behaviors or feelings (i.e., YOU made me do this, or YOU made me feel this 
way.) Not taking responsibility for angry behavior and justifying angry 
outbursts An attitude that demonstrates the world revolves around me and you 
need to cater to my ideas, opinions, thoughts, and feelings. An unwillingness 
to reflect on his/her own behaviors
  
Half the harm that is done in this world
Is due to people who want to feel important
They don't mean to do harm ­ 
But the harm does not interest them.
Or they do not see it, or they justify it
Because they are absorbed in the endless struggle 
To think well of themselves.
 T. S. Eliot
 







[FairfieldLife] RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-03 Thread dhamiltony2k5
 Should TM'er Buddhists even be allowed to have a Dome badge? Is it possible to 
be a buddhist and practice meditation effortlessly?
 -Buck
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle 
between the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the 
material world darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in a 
battle for power. There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of both 
good and evil. Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, 
and Cathars. It's not complicated. Adepts in China and the Far East would 
probably relate to this with their own notions of Yin and Yang.: 

 The Yin and Yang concepts point to a Tao that includes the opposites. 
Imagining that one side of a pair of opposites could gain the upper hand over 
the other would be a vulgar error.
 As the little we know about Manichaeism and similar dualist 
religions/philosophies comes to us from hostile sources isn't it possible that 
these beliefs weren't as dualist as they've been painted but perhaps also had 
the idea of a Transcendence that reconciled the positive and negative aspects 
of life?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 So, let's review what we know about the prophet Mani. 
 
 The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle between 
the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the material world 
darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in a battle for power. 
There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of both good and evil. 
Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, and Cathars. It's 
not complicated.
 
 Adepts in China and the Far East would probably relate to this with their own 
notions of Yin and Yang, which is probably derived from the Indian Sankhya, a 
radical dualism, and later tantra- a theory of polarity which posits male and 
female energies. 
 
 The name 'Mani' is Sanskrit. Mani traveled and lived in India for several 
years, visiting  Buddhist lands such as Bamiyan in Afghanistan, so it is not 
surprising that Buddhist influences would be apparent. Mani apparently adopted 
his theory of the reincarnation (transmigration of souls) from the Buddhists. 
Mani's sect structure was apparently based on the Buddhist Sangha, that is, 
Arhants and the lay follower community. 
 
 
 On 11/2/2013 11:31 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   
  
 No wonder the Near-Eastern realm got so mixed up.   
 It seems that as Manichean ideology spread to the East it incorporated 
Buddhist concepts along the way in a effort to show the superiority of the 
Religion of Light. Mani lived during the third century of the current era. 
Mani used the epitaph Buddha of Light and identified himself as Maitreya. He 
and his followers specifically borrowed from early Pure Land Sutras and 
Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka philosophy. As it entered the region of Gandhara and 
spread to China it used the Buddhist Hinayana tradition to support its views of 
matter, the body and the world.
 MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM
 
 
 David A. Scott 
 
 Christ Church College of Higher Education 
 
 
 
 
 

 


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Information on Narcissistic Personality Disorder

2013-11-03 Thread s3raphita
Some disorders have similar or even the same symptoms as Narcissistic 
Personality Disorder, such as: 
 Histrionic Personality Disorder
 Antisocial Personality Disorder
 Borderline Personality Disorder
 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder
 Schizotypal Personality Disorder
 Paranoid Personality Disorder
 . . . 

 

 Wow! If you're a psychiatrist you get lots of chances to change your diagnosis 
don't you? And even when you've gone through the alphabet you still haven't 
cured your patient.
 

 The existence of a book like Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental 
Disorders makes me nostalgic for the days of R.D. Laing and anti-psychiatry. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  
 Yep, thanks. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Definitions
 Narcissism, as in excessive or erotic interest in oneself and one's physical 
appearance. noun (See egotism) definition:
 • Psychology; extreme selfishness, with a grandiose view of one's own talents 
and a craving for admiration, as characterizing a personality type.
 • Psychoanalysis; self-centeredness arising from failure to distinguish the 
self from external objects, either in very young babies or as a feature of 
mental disorder.
 Someone with Narcissistic Personality disorder (NPD) has at least 5 of these 
symptoms:
 has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and 
talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate 
achievements) is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, 
brilliance, beauty, or ideal love believes that he or she is special and 
unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special 
or high-status people (or institutions) requires excessive admiration has a 
sense of entitlement, i.e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable 
treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations is 
interpersonally exploitative, i.e., takes advantage of others to achieve his or 
her own ends lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the 
feelings and needs of others is often envious of others or believes that others 
are envious of him or her shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes 
Associated Features: Depressed Mood, Dramatic or Erratic or Antisocial 
Personality
 Differential Diagnosis. Not everyone who acts like a narcissist is one. 
 Some disorders have similar or even the same symptoms such as: 
http://www.narcissism101.com/Beginning/personalitydisor.html
 
 http://www.narcissism101.com/Beginning/personalitydisor.htmlHistrionic 
Personality Disorder;
 Antisocial Personality Disorder; 
Borderline 
Personality Disorder;
 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder;
S 
chizotypal Personality Disorder;
 Paranoid Personality Disorder;
 Manic 
Episodes;
 Hypomanic Episodes;
 Personality Change Due to a General Medical 
Condition;
 Symptoms that may develop in association with chronic substance 
use.
 Psychology Today: A Field Guide To Narcissism Link 
http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20051209-05.html
 Here are some more signs of Narcissistic Personality Disorder to look out for:
 Jealousy and possessiveness Excessive need to feel special, adored, loved, 
appreciated, or admired Rage attacks when you do not sufficiently meet his/her 
needs Controlling behaviors (trying to control how you spend your time, who you 
talk to, how you dress, etc.) Inflated self-esteem, or grandiosity (bragging, 
fishing for compliments) Dramatic, insecure behaviors Expecting you to take 
responsibility for making him/her feel better about him/herself Blaming you for 
behaviors or feelings (i.e., YOU made me do this, or YOU made me feel this 
way.) Not taking responsibility for angry behavior and justifying angry 
outbursts An attitude that demonstrates the world revolves around me and you 
need to cater to my ideas, opinions, thoughts, and feelings. An unwillingness 
to reflect on his/her own behaviors
  
Half the harm that is done in this world
Is due to people who want to feel important
They don't mean to do harm ­ 
But the harm does not interest them.
Or they do not see it, or they justify it
Because they are absorbed in the endless struggle 
To think well of themselves.
 T. S. Eliot
 







[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-03 Thread s3raphita
Is it possible to be a Buddhist and practice meditation effortlessly?
 

 Yes, according to MMY. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Should TM'er Buddhists even be allowed to have a Dome badge? Is it possible 
to be a buddhist and practice meditation effortlessly?
 -Buck
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle 
between the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the 
material world darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in a 
battle for power. There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of both 
good and evil. Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, 
and Cathars. It's not complicated. Adepts in China and the Far East would 
probably relate to this with their own notions of Yin and Yang.: 

 The Yin and Yang concepts point to a Tao that includes the opposites. 
Imagining that one side of a pair of opposites could gain the upper hand over 
the other would be a vulgar error.
 As the little we know about Manichaeism and similar dualist 
religions/philosophies comes to us from hostile sources isn't it possible that 
these beliefs weren't as dualist as they've been painted but perhaps also had 
the idea of a Transcendence that reconciled the positive and negative aspects 
of life?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 So, let's review what we know about the prophet Mani. 
 
 The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle between 
the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus the material world 
darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing elements in a battle for power. 
There is a soul, but it is influenced by elements of both good and evil. 
Manichaeism is similar to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, and Cathars. It's 
not complicated.
 
 Adepts in China and the Far East would probably relate to this with their own 
notions of Yin and Yang, which is probably derived from the Indian Sankhya, a 
radical dualism, and later tantra- a theory of polarity which posits male and 
female energies. 
 
 The name 'Mani' is Sanskrit. Mani traveled and lived in India for several 
years, visiting  Buddhist lands such as Bamiyan in Afghanistan, so it is not 
surprising that Buddhist influences would be apparent. Mani apparently adopted 
his theory of the reincarnation (transmigration of souls) from the Buddhists. 
Mani's sect structure was apparently based on the Buddhist Sangha, that is, 
Arhants and the lay follower community. 
 
 
 On 11/2/2013 11:31 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   
  
 No wonder the Near-Eastern realm got so mixed up.   
 It seems that as Manichean ideology spread to the East it incorporated 
Buddhist concepts along the way in a effort to show the superiority of the 
Religion of Light. Mani lived during the third century of the current era. 
Mani used the epitaph Buddha of Light and identified himself as Maitreya. He 
and his followers specifically borrowed from early Pure Land Sutras and 
Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka philosophy. As it entered the region of Gandhara and 
spread to China it used the Buddhist Hinayana tradition to support its views of 
matter, the body and the world.
 MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM
 
 
 David A. Scott 
 
 Christ Church College of Higher Education 
 
 
 
 
 

 




[FairfieldLife] RE: NPD

2013-11-03 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower who showed up in town in the 
last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells a good story, really smart but 
incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive with the younger follower. Lot 
like that other guy that used to post here. I sent this new guy on to find the 
afternoon Fairfield illumined experience banana-gram group. I think they have 
the resources to deal with him safely and will appreciate him a lot. 
 

 I would think FF would be used to all sorts of crazy pseudo gurus making their 
way around the town square. Probably a good portion of residents there figured 
themselves some sort of teacher or capable of some special ability like 
speaking to animals, channeling angels or otherwise having their enlightened 
fingers on the pulse of what's-happenin'-now. Just one more of these dudes 
hitching his cow pony to the tie-up rail in front of Revelations surely is not 
cause for concern. Of course, a rousing game of Bananagrams always did separate 
the men from the boys (or the avatars from the plebs).
 

 Now on the subject of NPD and Robin I think this subject has been bandied 
about long enough. Neither you nor Barry has the beginnings of an inkling of 
what makes that man tick and most of us here would appreciate it if you would 
leave the negative and inappropriate labels where they belong - in the 
textbooks or in the hands of those who might have a clue.
 -Buck   

 


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: All About Mantra and Japa

2013-11-03 Thread Richard J. Williams
The word 'mantra' is an Indian term, from Sanskrit man, 'to think', and 
tra, 'a tool'. So, mantra means in Sanskrit 'a tool for thinking'. 
According to Brooks, the Srividya, because it consists of 
indestructible seed syllables (bijaksara) rather than words, transcends 
such mundane considerations as semantic meaning. A bija-only is not only 
esoteric but inherently superior.

So, let's sum up what we know.

In Buddhism and Hinduism the Sanskrit term bija literally means 'seed' 
and is used as a mental mnemonic tool. In Vajrayana Buddhism and 
Hinduism, the term bija is used for mystical 'seed syllables'. These 
seeds do not have precise meanings. They are not the names of the Hindu 
Gods of the Vedas, such as Vishnu or Indra. According to Swami Rama of 
the Himalayas, SBS was a proponent of the Sri Vidya, and that SBS used 
to worship a ruby-encrusted Sri Yantra with the TM bijas mantras 
inscribed on it.

All Indian mantric practices stem from the ancient shamanistic practice 
of Oddiyana, that is, Buddhists of the Trans-Himalya, hence to India. 
The Mantrayna was adopted, with modifications, by the Shiva and 
Vaishanava sects as Hindu tantricism following the Gupta Age. Apparently 
the practice of 'Mantrayana' was introduced into Tibet by Shenrab, who 
came over from the Swat Valley almost 100 years before the arrival of 
Guru Padmasambhava. In a bizzare 'reverse Tibet' effect, the Mantrayana 
Buddhism that Shenrab estabished in Shang Shung came to be called 'Bon' 
while the same practice established by Guru Rinpoche came to called 
'Chos'. The Siddha Naropa journeyed to Kashmir in order to obtsain the 
tantras from Tilopa. It should be noted that the historical Buddha was 
born in the Gharwal Himalaya.

Appendix I:

Excerpt from Living With the Himalayan Masters
by Swami Rama of the Himalayas:

During our conversation he started talking to me about Sri Vidya, the 
highest of paths, followed only by accomplished Sanskrit scholars of 
India. It is a path which joins raja yoga, kundalini yoga, bhakti yoga, 
and advaita Vedanta. There are two books recommended by the teachers of 
this path: The Wave of Bliss and The Wave of Beauty; the compilation of 
the two books is called Saundaryalahari in Sanskrit. There is another 
part of this literature, called Prayoga Shastra, which is in manuscript 
form and found only in the Mysore and Baroda libraries. No scholar can 
understand these spiritual yoga poems without the help of a competent 
teacher who himself practices these teachings.

Later on I found that Sri Vidya and Madhu Vidya are spiritual practices 
known to a very few-only ten to twelve people in all of India. I became 
interested in knowing this science, and whatever little I have today is 
because of it. In this science the body is seen as a temple and the 
inner dweller, Atman, as God. A human being is like a miniature 
universe, and by understanding this, one can understand the whole of the 
universe and ultimately realize the absolute One. Finally, after 
studying many scriptures and learning various paths, my master helped me 
in choosing to practice the way of Sri Vidya.

Work cited:

'The Secret of the Three Cities'
An Introduction to Hindu Sakta Tantrism
by Douglas Renfrew Brooks
University Of Chicago Press, 1998
p. 95

'Living with the Himalayan Masters'
by Swami Rama
Himalayan Institute Press, 2007
p. 245

Other titles of interest:

'Buddhist Masters of Enchantment: The Lives and Legends of the Mahasiddhas'
by Keith Dowman
Inner Traditions, 1998

'Indo-Tibetan Buddhism'
Indian Buddhists  Their Tibetan Successors
by David Snellgrove
Shambhala, 2003

'The Alchemical Body'
Siddha Traditions in Medieval India
by David Gordon White
University Of Chicago Press, 1998



[FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread awoelflebater
Can you spell F-E-A-R  M-O-N-G-E-R-I-N-G?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:

  
 




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.
 
 On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Yes.
 
 
 It's called Peoples Justice.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
sharelong60@... mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... 
emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Abandon Antiquated Notions Of Liberty

2013-11-03 Thread authfriend
empty, are you aware that several of your most recent posts have been, er, 
empty--literally--no words, no graphics, no nuttin', including this one? 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 



[FairfieldLife] RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
 
 The Mahasiddha Tilopa’s six essential points of
 meditation contain the basic principles of placement
 meditation. 
  
 1. The first point is not to be distracted
 by, dwell upon, get involved
 in, get lost in, nourish, encourage,
 or follow thoughts about the past.
 Anything that arises concerning
 anything that occurred or one
 thought prior to the current moment,
 one should simply let go of it.
 Ultimately,one should develop the
 discipline or the automatic habit of
 letting go of such thoughts instantly,
 on the spot, and one should
 learn to remain in such a state of
 .permanent let-go..
  
 2. The second point is not to be distracted by,
 dwell upon, get involved in, get lost in, nourish,
 encourage, get fixated on, or follow thoughts about
 the present. In particular, one should not fixate on
 either outer phenomena or inner experiences.
  
 3. The third point is not to be distracted by, dwell
 upon, get involved in, get lost in, nourish, encourage,
 or speculate about the future or thoughts of the future, 

 but to let go of them instantly as well.
  
 4. The fourth point is not to meditate. One should
 resist, or let go of the temptation, which at some
 point always arises in the experience of beginning
 meditators, to improve or make better one’s meditation 

 by meditating on tranquility, or on the experience of 

 openness or on clarity or on bliss or by fabricating or
 contriving any strategy to improve one’s meditation. 

 All such attempts to improve one’s meditation by meditating are cul-de-
 sacs, and, as such, obstacles to meditation.
  
 5. The fifth point is not to analyze. Although there
 are other forms of meditation that teach one to
 analyze one’s experience, the ultimate goal of such
 analysis is to transcend analytical and conceptual
 impositions upon one’s experience altogether, so that 

 one will finally experience directly the true nature of mind, 

 the true nature of experience, the true nature of reality. 

 So in this approach, according to the fifth point, one 

 should not analyze; one should not engage in the asking 

 of such questions as … What is its nature? Where does 

 it really reside? How does appear here? Why is it at all?
 Does it exist outside or inside the mind? What are its other characteristics?. 
One should let go of all tendencies to 

 analyze one’s experience.
  
 So, then, if one is not to be distracted by thoughts of past,
 present, or future; and if one is not to meditate and not to 

 analyze,then what should one be doing? What is one’s mind 

 to hang on to? The answer is “nothing”. Tilopa's sixth point 

 is just to “leave it to itself”. Whatever arises in the mind, 

 one should neither welcome nor reject, neither encourage nor
 suppress, nor should one get lost in thoughts. In the words 

 of Bokar Rinpoche there is “nothing to do”; nothing to do
 beyond resting in the awareness of the freshness of 

 whatever arises.
  
 The style of breathing meditation that many of
 us in the Kagyu and Nyingma schools of Tibetan
 Buddhism begin with combines shamatha with the
 placement meditation style of vipashyana. When
 we are going out with the out-breath, which involves 

 the sense of uniting mind and breath, and mind and 

 breath with space, we are practicing shamatha.
  
 When we abandon this discipline at the end of the
 out-breath and simply rest in the space between the
 end of the out-breath and the beginning of the next
 out-breath, without any particular attention to the
 in-breath, we are practicing placement meditation.
  
 If, in our practice of this discipline, we find
 our experience during the “gap” has the
 quality of Tilopa’s six points of meditation, 

 then it is no longer necessary to make a point of 
following the breath. It can drop away just as a leaf
 drops off of a tree. 

 

 However, if any form of mental dullness is
not dissolved co-emergently as it arises, 

 or if one becomes distracted by or lost in 

 thoughts, one should return to one’s shamatha 

 discipline of following the breath.
 
 


 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  Should TM'er Buddhists even be allowed to have a Dome badge? Is it possible 
to be a buddhist and practice meditation effortlessly?
 -Buck
 






 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Abandon Antiquated Notions Of Liberty

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
Yep, it's stuff I got from the Karl Marx Treatment Center. 

 I guess it lacks substance ...
 

 Here ... let me make something out of nothing (ex-nihil).
 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 empty, are you aware that several of your most recent posts have been, er, 
empty--literally--no words, no graphics, no nuttin', including this one? 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 


 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Abandon Antiquated Notions Of Liberty

2013-11-03 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:

 Yep, it's stuff I got from the Karl Marx Treatment Center. 

 I guess it lacks substance ...
 

 Here ... let me make something out of nothing (ex-nihil).
 

 
 

 Damned if you do an damned if you don't...
 


 

 


[FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
It's actually spelled E.A.R. M.O.N.I.T.O.R.I.N.G.
 Don't you read anything about the NSA? 
 

 Oh, I forgot ... you don't read.

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 Can you spell F-E-A-R  M-O-N-G-E-R-I-N-G?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:

  
 




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.
 
 On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Yes.
 
 
 It's called Peoples Justice.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
sharelong60@... mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... 
emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: It's starting already. We gonna line 'em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread Ann Woelfle Bater
I read alright, I just don't overreact.



On Sunday, November 3, 2013 4:00:18 PM, emptyb...@yahoo.com 
emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
It's actually spelled E.A.R. M.O.N.I.T.O.R.I.N.G.
Don't you read anything about the NSA? 

Oh, I forgot ... you don't read.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:


Can you spell F-E-A-R  M-O-N-G-E-R-I-N-G?


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:


 





---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:


What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.


On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... wrote:

  
Yes.


It's called Peoples Justice.






---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?




On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... emptybill@... wrote:
 
  
Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html





[FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread emptybill
A good horse gallops at even the shadow of the whip.
  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 I read alright, I just don't overreact.
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 4:00:18 PM, emptybill@... emptybill@... wrote:
 
   It's actually spelled E.A.R. M.O.N.I.T.O.R.I.N.G.
 Don't you read anything about the NSA? 
 

 Oh, I forgot ... you don't read.

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 Can you spell F-E-A-R  M-O-N-G-E-R-I-N-G?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:

  
 




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.
 
 On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Yes.
 
 
 It's called Peoples Justice.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
sharelong60@... mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... 
emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
 

 
 




 
 
 
 



 


[FairfieldLife] Post Count Mon 04-Nov-13 00:15:06 UTC

2013-11-03 Thread FFL PostCount
Fairfield Life Post Counter
===
Start Date (UTC): 11/02/13 00:00:00
End Date (UTC): 11/09/13 00:00:00
195 messages as of (UTC) 11/04/13 00:14:33

 31 authfriend
 19 Share Long 
 17 Bhairitu 
 16 emptybill
 13 wgm4u 
 12 doctordumbass
 11 s3raphita
 11 TurquoiseB 
 10 Richard J. Williams 
  9 awoelflebater
  8 sharelong60
  8 jr_esq
  7 dhamiltony2k5
  5 Michael Jackson 
  4 emilymaenot
  4 Richard Williams 
  3 Mike Dixon 
  3 Ann Woelfle Bater 
  2 j_alexander_stanley
  1 cardemaister
  1 anartaxius
Posters: 21
Saturday Morning 00:00 UTC Rollover Times
=
Daylight Saving Time (Summer):
US Friday evening: PDT 5 PM - MDT 6 PM - CDT 7 PM - EDT 8 PM
Europe Saturday: BST 1 AM CEST 2 AM EEST 3 AM
Standard Time (Winter):
US Friday evening: PST 4 PM - MST 5 PM - CST 6 PM - EST 7 PM
Europe Saturday: GMT 12 AM CET 1 AM EET 2 AM
For more information on Time Zones: www.worldtimezone.com 




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu

So you say.

On 11/03/2013 01:17 PM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


Bhairitu wrote:


 I disagree.  My information came from mainstream medical articles on both brittle 
diabetes and type 3.
 Judy just wants to be the center of attention and will knock down 
anyone who takes it from her (she will

 deny this of course).

Yes, I usually do deny it when people say things about me that aren't 
true. Duh. What a dumb remark. You are making me the center of 
attention by freaking out. If you'd kept your lip buttoned, my one 
post to Share about this would have been all there was to it.


 I often write about things from memory  because I'm not OCD about 
facts.  Exactism is a mental affliction
 in the Internet age.  In would be impolite if we all sat around a 
table discussing these things and pausing to
 check our facts on the Internet using our smart phones before saying 
anything.


Translation: Bhairitu admits he got the details wrong, despite his 
claims above.


Exactism is not an affliction when it comes to medical details. 
Share's problem is that she's as gullible as you are; she accepted 
what you had said without question. So I suggested she check up on the 
real story. So sorry that upsets you. Get over it.


On 11/03/2013 11:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

I would check out brittle diabetes if I were you, Share. What 
Bhairitu says doesn't quite match the standard definition:



http://www.diabeticlive.com/diabetes-101/understanding-brittle-diabetes/


Also, there's as yet no scientific consensus on whether there is such 
a thing as type 3 diabetes. Some claim it's Alzheimer's disease.



Share wrote:

Well, Bhairitu, it's always a good day when I learn something new and 
in this case it's 2 new bits of info. Have not heard of either of 
these kinds of diabetes and admit am horrified by the Type 3. I still 
think, and am hoping I'm right, that diet can go far in controlling it.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


My mother's twin sister was an RN and worked for several doctors.  
She told me once that she thought my mother was a brittle diabetic. 
I thought it was a term she made up and then looked it up.  That 
diagnosis fits me too.  Brittle diabetes never go full blown type one 
but have similar symptoms throughout life.


There is also the relatively recently discovered type three diabetes 
which is seen to be prevalent in folks who sit on their butts and use 
computers a lot.  The research on that suggests that the pancreas is 
not the only organ which secretes insulin but our brain as well.



On 11/03/2013 08:33 AM, Share Long wrote:

My Mom's doc is sending her to a nutritionist because her blood 
sugar is so high even though she injects insulin every day. She went 
from being normal to borderline to Type 2 and now, daily injections. 
A big problem is that she doesn't like traditional breakfast food. 
And I think she doesn't quite get that carbs contribute to high 
blood sugar. Anyway, I've got high hopes about this consult on Tuesday.




On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:27 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... 
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:

Isn't that why they call it break fast?

People who have experienced hypoglycemia get very paranoid about 
missing meals.   In the 1970s among TM'er hypoglycemia was rampant 
mainly due to eating bad vegetarian diets. Many went back to eating 
meat and felt better. Maybe some truth in MMY's eat what your 
mother puts before you?  We are essentially what our ancestors ate.


If one is paranoid about hypoglycemia the tendency is to overeat 
rather than do the anal and inconvenient small meals throughout the day.


On 11/03/2013 03:49 AM, Michael Jackson wrote:
what in the world are you all talking about? Who doesn't go for 
four or five hours without food or water?? People including me do 
that all the time.


On Sun, 11/3/13, jr_esq@... mailto:jr_esq@... jr_esq@... 
mailto:jr_esq@... wrote:


Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

Date: Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:17 AM


























Doc.
What
did you experience after four hours without food or water?
 Were you also meditating during the fast?



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com,

no_re...@yahoogroups.com mailto:no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

I did it, once, for *four*
solid hours. Two years ago, around Columbus Day.

Nothing - not even a peanut,
or half cup of tap water - zip. You probably don't
believe me, but its true. I think my years of TM helped, a
lot. I must have been in a trance or something, to withstand
it. I seriously thought I was going to pass out. Almost like
Richard Harris, in that scene, from, A Man Called
Horse.

Even so, I am working with a
teacher, 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Austerity for Americans begins today

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu

Don't be ridiculous!

On 11/03/2013 01:27 PM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


*LOL right back atcha. You got nailed fair and square. Of course 
you're not going to admit it, but it's transparently obvious.*




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


LOL! You are SO WRONG!

On 11/03/2013 01:08 PM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:


*Bhairitu wrote: *


 Because you always accuse me of being a conspiracy theorist.  So I 
joshed you back on it.


*OK, Bhairitu, I'm going to take pity on you.*
*
*


*Take pity on you, that's hilarious.  I don't need no stinkin' pity. 
:-D


*
*You assumed my remark--that the shooting incident was carefully 
planned to distract attention from the food stamp cuts--was serious.*


*No, I didn't think it was serious.  That's why I kidded you back.  
Sometimes you really are dense.


*

*
*
*It wasn't. I was making fun of your tendency to see conspiracies 
everywhere.*


*That's your misperception of me.  I don't see conspiracies everywhere 
but they do happen a lot more frequently than the public thinks.  
Those in power think the public is too stupid to catch on and those 
who do they make sure that their shills discredit them with the label 
conspiracy theorists.


*

*
*
*That's why your retort was hilarious. You fell for it hook, line, 
and sinker. You are so GULLIBLE.*


*Who's gullible? :-D

*


 Yes it did distract.  No we don't know if it was a planned incident 
or not.


*Here's a hint: It wasn't planned, except by the shooter.*





Given how corrupt this country and government is it could have been a 
planned incident.   Here's an LA TV news report with a guy who was there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osi0I9q0WmY

On 11/03/2013 11:38 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

*Bhairitu, why would you make fun of me for suggesting that the 
shooting incident was carefully planned to distract attention from 
the food stamp cuts? I mean, it /did/, did it not? You yourself 
commented on that.*


*
Bhairitu wrote:*

I don't get what people think they see.  I've checked both my emails 
and web site and see nothing unusual.  Perhaps there was an ad or 
something people are somehow confusing with my post?  Or maybe they 
are confused about my joke of calling Judy a conspiracy theorist an 
fun retort given her first response to my post.  Or maybe you all 
think you are screwing with my but then you're wasting your time.


On 11/03/2013 09:05 AM, emilymaenot@... mailto:emilymaenot@...
wrote:

It struck me as very funny personally coming from Bhairitu, perhaps 
inadvertently ironic?




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


*LOL. No, has nothing to do with punctuation or spelling. Nothing 
to do with the details of the story, either. Try again. *


*

Bhairitu wrote:
*
You and Dixon must be imagining something or it got screwed up on 
the web site.  The is no gaffe in this line:


Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

If you are talking about the comma then you need a new Strunk and 
White.


But if you are talking about the shooting was between two TSA 
agents that's what the news outlets were saying when I posted it. 
They later recanted.


There are no misspellings even though Thunderbird is fucked up and 
random these days about underlining misspellings.  But who really 
cares about that on a message board anyway?


On 11/02/2013 09:52 AM, authfriend@...
mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

*I'm just going to let you figure that out, Bhairitu. It's not too 
difficult. Mike Dixon got it. *


*
Bhairitu wrote:
*
 And exactly what gaffe might that be?

On 11/02/2013 09:17 AM, authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@...
wrote:

*Even when you call a gaffe to Bhairitu's attention, he doesn't 
see it. *



*Bhairitu wrote:*

 Be careful where you step.  Judy has lost her marbles again.  
Must be a sign of her advancing old age.


On 11/01/2013 03:13 PM, authfriend@...
mailto:authfriend@... wrote:


*Er, Bhairitu...*

*
*

*No, never mind, I'll just let this sit here for people to 
snicker at: *


*
*

*Bhairitu bumbled:*


 Judy, the conspiracy theorist.

On 11/01/2013 12:30 PM, authfriend@...
mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

Yes, clearly the shooting incident was carefully planned to 
distract attention from the food stamp cuts.




---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Well the TSA shooting at LAX which was between a couple of TSA 
agents
seems to have knocked off what should have been the lead 
article on the
news: the food stamp cuts that went into effect today (how 
convenient).


http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/01/food-stamps-snap-cuts-farm-bill/3346341/

The war on the poor by the rich ramps up. Time to organize and go
after the rich. Let's 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread Bhairitu
You didn't answer my question.  Maybe because you are incapable of 
answering?  What is your solution? Jingoism?  Or is there no solution?



On 11/03/2013 01:27 PM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


Obama brownshirts faceless bureaucrats






---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are 
mistaking Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.


On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:


Yes.


It's called Peoples Justice.


Uncle Obama's Health-O-Rama cartoon




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... 
mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:


Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? 
The patients? Everybody?



On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... 
mailto:emptybill@... emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:



  Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare
  And Medicaid Patients

http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html









[FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-03 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:

 A good horse gallops at even the shadow of the whip.
 

 Nice quote and mostly true. Sensitivity is not the same as fear, understanding 
is not the same as reacting and true intelligence is not the same as 
propaganda-fueled conditioning.
  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 I read alright, I just don't overreact.
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 4:00:18 PM, emptybill@... emptybill@... wrote:
 
   It's actually spelled E.A.R. M.O.N.I.T.O.R.I.N.G.
 Don't you read anything about the NSA? 
 

 Oh, I forgot ... you don't read.

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 Can you spell F-E-A-R  M-O-N-G-E-R-I-N-G?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, emptybill@... wrote:

  
 




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 What's the alternative?  Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.
 
 On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Yes.
 
 
 It's called Peoples Justice.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, 
sharelong60@... mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
 Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? The 
patients? Everybody?
 
 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... 
emptybill@... mailto:emptybill@... wrote:
 
   Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare And Medicaid 
Patients 
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
 

 
 




 
 
 
 



 

 


RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread anartaxius
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2008 November; 2(6): 1101–1113.
 Published online 2008 November.
 

 Alzheimer's Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed
 

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/



RE: RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Michelle Pfeiffer escaped from a cult

2013-11-03 Thread dhamiltony2k5
That is interesting,  Why the seemingly modern increase in AD incidence?  Too 
much wheat and sugar processed food western diet as trigger to type 3 diabetes? 
 Macaroni?  All that Mountain Dew piled high in Walmart grocery shopping carts? 
 What are we doing?  More meditation could proly be helpful.  
 -Buck 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2008 November; 2(6): 1101–1113.
 Published online 2008 November.
 

 Alzheimer's Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed
 

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/

 



[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: NPD

2013-11-03 Thread dhamiltony2k5
Whatutalking about? Robin Carlsen is a very interesting chapter in TM. He and 
TM are going to be studied by historical and social-science scholars for a long 
time to come. I guess that makes you and some others who went off with him part 
of TM that way too. That is okay. If nothing else the court transcripts will 
always be part of the study of TM. No need to get defensive.  I am glad you 
turned up here on FFL to share your experience with it too.  It is very 
interesting,  -Buck
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower who showed up in town in the 
last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells a good story, really smart but 
incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive with the younger follower. Lot 
like that other guy that used to post here. I sent this new guy on to find the 
afternoon Fairfield illumined experience banana-gram group. I think they have 
the resources to deal with him safely and will appreciate him a lot. 
 

 I would think FF would be used to all sorts of crazy pseudo gurus making their 
way around the town square. Probably a good portion of residents there figured 
themselves some sort of teacher or capable of some special ability like 
speaking to animals, channeling angels or otherwise having their enlightened 
fingers on the pulse of what's-happenin'-now. Just one more of these dudes 
hitching his cow pony to the tie-up rail in front of Revelations surely is not 
cause for concern. Of course, a rousing game of Bananagrams always did separate 
the men from the boys (or the avatars from the plebs).
 

 Now on the subject of NPD and Robin I think this subject has been bandied 
about long enough. Neither you nor Barry has the beginnings of an inkling of 
what makes that man tick and most of us here would appreciate it if you would 
leave the negative and inappropriate labels where they belong - in the 
textbooks or in the hands of those who might have a clue.
 -Buck   

 




RE: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Astrology and Daylight Savings

2013-11-03 Thread doctordumbass
Share, I think I read you sometimes for the shock factorthis...Also, as 
you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. ...is so amusing 
to me.
 

 

 Speaking of mental spheres, I was never much good with a Rubik's Cube, 
intuitive, or not.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Share, I think I read you sometimes for the shock factorthis...Also, as 
you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. ...is so amusing 
to me. It's the best rationalization ever, isn't it?  Sometimes I wish you 
could experience you the way I do smile.
 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Xeno, I think of jyotish as an ancient science whose practitioners have 
collected data for thousands of years. But like any science, just because x 
gave rise to y 100 times, isn't a guarantee that it will do so on the 101th 
time. Also, as you know, I tend to be more intuitive in the mental sphere. So I 
often go more by how something feels or what I sense about it. For example, 
some jyotishis gave me a birth time and I told them it did not feel right based 
on the dasha changes and when events occurred in my life. So they gave me a new 
birth time that felt more right to me. They were the jyotishis who looked at 
the time on my birth certificate and told me it couldn't be right because 
otherwise I would have been male! btw, I'm always testing jyotish and that's 
one of the aspects of it that I enjoy.
 

 
 
 On Sunday, November 3, 2013 10:48 AM, anartaxius@... anartaxius@... wrote:
 
   ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 
 Astrologers have methods for determining if the TOB recorded on the birth 
certificate is accurate. For example, by one's gender. Also by details of one's 
life. For example, a jyotishi looked at my birth time and asked if I had known 
my Dad's mother. I said yes and by using details of her life, he was able to 
determine my accurate birth time. Which was a few minutes before the time on my 
birth certificate so that made sense to me. I've been told that nurses back 
then, 1948, stepped out of the delivery room to record the time.
 

 I do not believe this has ever been tested, so it is a supposition that an 
astrologer, usinging whatever methods they use, can discover an actual birth 
time that is recorded inaccurately. My hypothesis is that rectification of 
times is a dodge developed to counteract the discrepancies that arise when 
astrology fails to predict events. By adjusting the time, the chart then 'works 
better'.
 

 If we had documented evidence of births with accurately recored times, then a 
double-blind study of astrologers trying to find those times when that 
information is withheld in various ways would be possible to see if they can 
really do that. My bet is they cannot because astrology is largely a matter of 
delusional thinking.
 

 Notice that the TMO has never published any study showing the scientific 
validity of astrology. There have been very few double-blind tests of any 
astrological system that have been well designed. There was one done at UC 
Berkeley some 25 years ago with Western astrology, and all the work was done by 
professional astrologers, and the result came out no better than chance. That 
study dealt with personality characteristics, which are difficult to define. 
The astrologers in that test were matching horoscopes with a standardised 
personality inventory. Documented evidence of birth times was required for the 
participants. The result was published in Science.
 

 Jyotish, which seems more event driven, would be easier to test. But because 
it has the same delusional underpinnings as Western astrology, I do not see how 
the results would be any better.
 

 There are questions here which seem impossible to parse. Why, for example, 
would the sex of a child have an effect on the birth time? What laws of nature 
would be invoked and how do they function?


 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 







[FairfieldLife] Alfred, Lord Tennyson stumbles across TM

2013-11-03 Thread s3raphita
The poet Tennyson (1809 – 1892) seemed to have had frequent experiences of 
transcending, starting from boyhood and lasting throughout his life. For 
example, he describes:  . . . a kind of waking trance — this for lack of a 
better word — I have frequently had, quite up from boyhood, when I have been 
all alone. . . . All at once, as it were out of the intensity of the 
consciousness of individuality, the individuality itself seemed to dissolve and 
fade away into boundless being, and this not a confused state but the clearest, 
the surest of the surest . . . utterly beyond words — where death was an almost 
laughable impossibility, the loss of personality (if so it were) seeming no 
extinction, but the only true life . . . I am ashamed of my feeble description. 
Have I not said the state is utterly beyond words? . . .  There is no delusion 
in the matter! It is no nebulous ecstasy, but a state of transcendent wonder, 
associated with absolute clearness of mind.   

 Tennyson offers a clear description of transcendence. When the mind dives 
within during the practice of the Transcendental Meditation technique, mental 
activity settles down, like waves settling on the ocean. We experience finer 
and finer levels of the thinking process, until we transcend, or go beyond, 
thinking altogether. What do we experience then? Consciousness itself — not 
consciousness of perceptions, thoughts, or feelings but pure consciousness, 
silent and unbounded. This is our innermost Self, the innermost reality of the 
universe. It is a field of pure Being, to use one of Maharishi’s early terms.
 
 So when Tennyson says, “Individuality itself seemed to dissolve and fade away 
into boundless being,” he is accurately describing the experience of 
transcending. He no longer experiences himself as a limited ego — he now 
experiences his true Self, infinite and unbounded.  Here, he tells us, “death 
was an almost laughable impossibility.” Quite right. Pure consciousness, 
Maharishi explains, is eternal, immortal. It lies beyond space, time, and 
causation. 
 Tennyson describes his experiences again in a poem called “The Ancient Sage.” 
 http://www.bartleby.com/236/98.html http://www.bartleby.com/236/98.html
 

 On a number of occasions while sitting alone, he says, The mortal limit of 
the Self was loosed, And passed into the Nameless, as a cloud Melts into 
Heaven. I touch’d my limbs, the limbs Were strange, not mine — and yet no shade 
of doubt, But utter clearness, and thro’ loss of Self The gain of such large 
life as match’d with ours Were Sun to spark — unshadowable in words, Themselves 
but shadows of a shadow-world.
 

 Here Tennyson describes experiences of his bounded self merging into “the 
Nameless, as a cloud / Melts into Heaven.” As in the first passage, he 
describes this as an experience of utter clearness. Unbounded awareness stands 
in the same relation to ordinary waking consciousness, Tennyson tells us, as 
a sun to a spark.

 

 No doubt Tennyson’s ability to have this profound experience enhanced his 
creative abilities and helped make him the great poet he was (he continued 
writing into his 80s). Scientific research shows that regular experience of 
transcending through the Transcendental Meditation technique leads to rapid and 
measurable growth of creativity and intelligence, among many other benefits.  
Throughout history people such as Tennyson glimpsed the fourth state of 
consciousness, Transcendental Consciousness, and described it with great beauty 
and precision. We are fortunate to have a simple, natural, effortless 
procedure, the Transcendental Meditation technique, to have this experience on 
a regular basis.

 

 Tennyson's own technique? This has often come upon me through repeating my 
own name to myself silently till, all at once, as it were, out of the intensity 
of the consciousness of individuality, the individuality itself seemed to 
dissolve and fade away into boundless being.
 

 Tennyson's Christian name was Alfred - so presumably Alfie for short. Now to 
me Aaall-fe sounds like a decent bija mantra for a novice.
 

 The experiences he had resulted in poems such as The Higher Pantheism (later 
mercilessly parodied by Swinburne!) which come close a mystical vision of our 
situation.
 http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174590 
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174590