[FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson  wrote:

 that's funny! and probably true!

Yup. I'd bet that there is a lot more interest in the
world in what the various gurus and spiritual
teachers used for whack-off material than there
is in nobodies like Robin Carlsen and the soap
opera dramas of the TM movement.

I mean, what DO they visualize when they whack
off? (And remember, there is a word for those who
claim that they don't do it, one that should spring
easily to someone's lips here: LIARS.)

Would they fantasize about goddesses like Parvati
and Saraswati, or about that girl back in high
school they had a crush on but were too shy to
ever talk to? My bet is on the latter.

Here's one for those gurus who would prefer to
pretend they were visualizing Ganesha and not
Marilyn:



  On Mon, 11/4/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
   Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with
  the Science of Being...on ABC news

   On ABC TV news this morning (Nov. 4), a Pamela
   Anderson photo was shown, of her resting after
  Sunday's NYC marathon.
  
  On her twitter account, click on the photo of the
   ice on her knee, and you see that she has a Maharishi
  book, Science of Being and Art of Living, next to
  the ice on her hip..

  I figure it's just a case of tit (so to speak) for tat.

  She found out Maharishi used to have photos
  of her on his bedside table.  :-)




[FairfieldLife] Computer Ram in the Human Brain

2013-11-05 Thread jr_esq
Bill Donohue explains that the Pyramid of Giza represents a part of the human 
brain that needs to be opened to become enlightened.  And all of these are 
shown in your birth chart since all of the zodiac signs represent the various 
parts of your brain.   
 

 By analogy, we as humans are destined to resurrect from death since the Sun 
becomes exalted in Aries when the spring starts to resurrect life here on earth 
once again from the death of the winter.
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZCR4wEbkeI 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZCR4wEbkeI



[FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic.
Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
and a few others here would be in different places, too.

Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever. :-)

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map\






[FairfieldLife] What time would Jesus run in a marathon?

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
Real photos from the recent NYC marathon. No wonder Pamela Anderson is
icing down afterwards...she OD'd on darshan:

  [jesus]

  [marathon jesus]

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/marathon-jesus-new-york_n_42123\
29.html?utm_hp_ref=ukir=UK
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/marathon-jesus-new-york_n_4212\
329.html?utm_hp_ref=ukir=UK



[FairfieldLife] RE: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread doctordumbass
Brings up a number of interesting questions, for instance:
 

 1. What do you think Robin Carlsen uses for whack-off material?
 

 2. Who is the guy looking up at Marilyn, in the picture?
 

 3. Do you use Marilyn, for whack-off material?
 

 4. Does anyone *else* know, besides this entire forum, that you think about 
Gurus whacking-off?
 

 5. Is that a white elephant, or a grey elephant, and flash overexposure, in 
the photo?
 

 6. Do Gurus ever think of you, thinking of them, while they whack-off?
 

 7. Did Marilyn ever think about the whack-off materials that Gurus use?
 

 8. How many times has Robin C. attended the circus? 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
 that's funny! and probably true!

 Yup. I'd bet that there is a lot more interest in the
world in what the various gurus and spiritual
teachers used for whack-off material than there
is in nobodies like Robin Carlsen and the soap
opera dramas of the TM movement. 

I mean, what DO they visualize when they whack
off? (And remember, there is a word for those who
claim that they don't do it, one that should spring
easily to someone's lips here: LIARS.) 

Would they fantasize about goddesses like Parvati
and Saraswati, or about that girl back in high 
school they had a crush on but were too shy to 
ever talk to? My bet is on the latter. 

Here's one for those gurus who would prefer to 
pretend they were visualizing Ganesha and not 
Marilyn:



   On Mon, 11/4/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with 
  the Science of Being...on ABC news
  
  On ABC TV news this morning (Nov. 4), a Pamela
  Anderson photo was shown, of her resting after 
  Sunday's NYC marathon.
  
  On her twitter account, click on the photo of the
  ice on her knee, and you see that she has a Maharishi 
  book, Science of Being and Art of Living, next to 
  the ice on her hip..

 I figure it's just a case of tit (so to speak) for tat.
 
 She found out Maharishi used to have photos
 of her on his bedside table. :-)

 
 


[FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, doctordumbass@...  wrote:

 Brings up a number of interesting questions, for instance:

  1. What do you think Robin Carlsen uses for whack-off material?

Well, if he's really NPD, probably his groupies:


  [Barry's fantasy image of Judy] [raunchydog] [Ann courtesy of
Dennis] [jim_flanegin and his daughter]

:-)





[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
As to your last question, Robin doesn't need to attend the circus; he has a 
permanent circus of his very own in his head.
 

 And with regard to your first and sixth questions, remember that Barry thought 
Robin was cruising Curtis when they were having their extended discussions 
before they came to verbal fisticuffs. So if Barry was right, he might well 
imagine that Robin thinks of Barry thinking of him when he's whacking off.
 

 

Doc wrote:

 Brings up a number of interesting questions, for instance:
 

 1. What do you think Robin Carlsen uses for whack-off material?
 

 2. Who is the guy looking up at Marilyn, in the picture?
 

 3. Do you use Marilyn, for whack-off material?
 

 4. Does anyone *else* know, besides this entire forum, that you think about 
Gurus whacking-off?
 

 5. Is that a white elephant, or a grey elephant, and flash overexposure, in 
the photo?
 

 6. Do Gurus ever think of you, thinking of them, while they whack-off?
 

 7. Did Marilyn ever think about the whack-off materials that Gurus use?
 

 8. How many times has Robin C. attended the circus? 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
 that's funny! and probably true!

 Yup. I'd bet that there is a lot more interest in the
world in what the various gurus and spiritual
teachers used for whack-off material than there
is in nobodies like Robin Carlsen and the soap
opera dramas of the TM movement. 

I mean, what DO they visualize when they whack
off? (And remember, there is a word for those who
claim that they don't do it, one that should spring
easily to someone's lips here: LIARS.) 

Would they fantasize about goddesses like Parvati
and Saraswati, or about that girl back in high 
school they had a crush on but were too shy to 
ever talk to? My bet is on the latter. 

Here's one for those gurus who would prefer to 
pretend they were visualizing Ganesha and not 
Marilyn:



   On Mon, 11/4/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with 
  the Science of Being...on ABC news
  
  On ABC TV news this morning (Nov. 4), a Pamela
  Anderson photo was shown, of her resting after 
  Sunday's NYC marathon.
  
  On her twitter account, click on the photo of the
  ice on her knee, and you see that she has a Maharishi 
  book, Science of Being and Art of Living, next to 
  the ice on her hip..

 I figure it's just a case of tit (so to speak) for tat.
 
 She found out Maharishi used to have photos
 of her on his bedside table. :-)

 
 




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-05 Thread Richard J. Williams

Obamacare is a transfer of wealth. It's not complicated.

On 11/3/2013 2:34 PM, Bhairitu wrote:


What's the alternative? Fascism?  We have that now.  You are mistaking 
Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.


On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


Yes.


It's called Peoples Justice.


Uncle Obama's Health-O-Rama cartoon




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? 
The patients? Everybody?



On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... emptybill@... 
wrote:



  Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare
  And Medicaid Patients

http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html









[FairfieldLife] RE: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
 that's funny! and probably true!

 Yup. I'd bet that there is a lot more interest in the
world in what the various gurus and spiritual
teachers used for whack-off material than there
is in nobodies like Robin Carlsen and the soap
opera dramas of the TM movement. 

I mean, what DO they visualize when they whack
off? (And remember, there is a word for those who
claim that they don't do it, one that should spring
easily to someone's lips here: LIARS.) 
 

 Why Barry, when I whack off I only think of you. Add that to all my dreams I 
have about you and my life is one big whack job.

Would they fantasize about goddesses like Parvati
and Saraswati, or about that girl back in high 
school they had a crush on but were too shy to 
ever talk to? My bet is on the latter. 

Here's one for those gurus who would prefer to 
pretend they were visualizing Ganesha and not 
Marilyn:



   On Mon, 11/4/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with 
  the Science of Being...on ABC news
  
  On ABC TV news this morning (Nov. 4), a Pamela
  Anderson photo was shown, of her resting after 
  Sunday's NYC marathon.
  
  On her twitter account, click on the photo of the
  ice on her knee, and you see that she has a Maharishi 
  book, Science of Being and Art of Living, next to 
  the ice on her hip..

 I figure it's just a case of tit (so to speak) for tat.
 
 She found out Maharishi used to have photos
 of her on his bedside table. :-)

 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
FWIW Marilyn looks absolutely terrified in this picture. I can tell a clutch 
when I see one; I've seen it many times teaching riding. She would much rather 
have her two dainty little feet on the ground at that moment. But Doc brings up 
an interesting point, what is the man thinking as he is looking up, it is the 
most interesting aspect of the photo and makes it more than surreal (beyond the 
fact that MM is actually sitting on top of an elephant that has been covered in 
white gunk and she is supposed to look like her boobs are not about to fall out 
in terror at any moment).
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson wrote:
 
 that's funny! and probably true!

 Yup. I'd bet that there is a lot more interest in the
world in what the various gurus and spiritual
teachers used for whack-off material than there
is in nobodies like Robin Carlsen and the soap
opera dramas of the TM movement. 

I mean, what DO they visualize when they whack
off? (And remember, there is a word for those who
claim that they don't do it, one that should spring
easily to someone's lips here: LIARS.) 

Would they fantasize about goddesses like Parvati
and Saraswati, or about that girl back in high 
school they had a crush on but were too shy to 
ever talk to? My bet is on the latter. 

Here's one for those gurus who would prefer to 
pretend they were visualizing Ganesha and not 
Marilyn:



   On Mon, 11/4/13, TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:
  Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with 
  the Science of Being...on ABC news
  
  On ABC TV news this morning (Nov. 4), a Pamela
  Anderson photo was shown, of her resting after 
  Sunday's NYC marathon.
  
  On her twitter account, click on the photo of the
  ice on her knee, and you see that she has a Maharishi 
  book, Science of Being and Art of Living, next to 
  the ice on her hip..

 I figure it's just a case of tit (so to speak) for tat.
 
 She found out Maharishi used to have photos
 of her on his bedside table. :-)

 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: What time would Jesus run in a marathon?

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
I hope that cross is balsa wood and someone offered him some Gatorade. The poor 
guy looks spent.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Real photos from the recent NYC marathon. No wonder Pamela Anderson is icing 
down afterwards...she OD'd on darshan:





 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/marathon-jesus-new-york_n_4212329.html?utm_hp_ref=ukir=UK
 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/marathon-jesus-new-york_n_4212329.html?utm_hp_ref=ukir=UK
 


 


[FairfieldLife] RE: NPD

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
I'd have to agree with Judy that Robin's little activities in the even littler 
burg of Fairfield Iowa hardly register as noteworthy in any grand scheme of 
things, especially as a subject for scholarly treatises. I was approached and 
interviewed by a number of journalists, masters students and the CBC for 
interviews about my cult experience when I first left WTS back in 1986-87. But 
these various people were more interested in the subject of cults than they 
were about TM or Robin. 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Not sure what, if anything, this has to do with the post of mine you're 
responding to, but you need to get your facts straight: Robin wasn't trying to 
take over the TM movement; rather, he wanted Maharishi's approval to make 
some reforms and additions/modifications to the TM teaching (including the 
TM-Sidhi techniques). Ann could tell you more about that; but what I understand 
from his own writings is that he felt Maharishi's knowledge wasn't being 
presented effectively at MIU. Robin was certain Maharishi would back him up (as 
he's explained here in some detail), but that didn't happen, and Robin had to 
get out of Dodge.
 

 I never made any objections to studying Robin's interactions with the TMO, 
BTW. But it doesn't seem to me that they'd be of more than mild interest even 
to cult scholars  Don't know how much of the court transcripts would be that 
fascinating either. Again as I understand it, the lawsuits had to do primarily 
with Robin's claim that MIU's actions in excommunicating or otherwise 
sanctioning the students who became involved with his group, and prohibiting 
him and his group from proselytizing on campus, were detrimental to his 
business.
 

 Much more interesting than the legal wrangling, I should think, would be the 
content of the proselytizing and Robin's tactics in implementing it.
 

 Frankly, I don't think you've paid enough attention to what Robin (and Ann and 
a couple of others) wrote on FFL about those days to have a clear idea of 
what's worth studying and what isn't. I seriously doubt any academic theses 
will be written on the court transcripts.
 

 But my real objection, as I thought I'd made clear, was to the application of 
mental health diagnoses to Robin, as he was then and is now (but especially 
now), by folks who are eminently unqualified to do so.
 
Buck wrote:

  The TM-Robin Carlsen court 

transcripts are proly someone's academic thesis in the future for modern 
example of someone by personality coming broadside to try to take over an 
existing group or movement. Historically sort of like Count Leon did with 
George Rapp and the experience of fragmentation in the Harmonists where you get 
the battle of character playing out in a spiritual group by personality. It is 
really interesting story that one can see in life and also learn to recognize 
as you go along. Seems very much part of any of our adaptation in doing groups 
and dealing with the aspect of charismatic leadership of whatever personality. 

  Practically this is sort of like, how far do you let someone run on with 
  their seeming mystical associations before you pull them up short?
 

 Is that even up to you? (Unless the person is interfering with your rights to 
live your life as you choose.) I might remind you that there's more than one 
FFL participant who thinks you need to be pulled up short.
 

  Like this guy who evidently is extremely clever showing up last week in 
  Fairfield trying to figure things out and get a foothold. It's noteworthy in 
  the field of study of mysticism and communal spiritual movements. What is 
  reality and what is mental illness in the range of things? Engraved gold 
  plates and angels?
 -Buck in the Dome 
 

 That question is way premature given the very little you've told us about this 
guy and how recently this has come up.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

  
 Buck wrote:
  Whatutalking about? Robin Carlsen is a very interesting chapter in TM. He 
  and TM are going to be studied 
  by historical and social-science scholars for a long time to come.
 

 Maybe, maybe not. This was 30 years or so ago now, and there has been hardly 
any evidence of any such studying of Robin in connection with TM so far.
 
 
   I guess that makes you and some others 
   who went off with him part of TM that way too. That is okay. If nothing 
   else the court transcripts will 
   always be part of the study of TM. No need to get defensive.  I am glad 
   you turned up here on FFL to 
   share your experience with it too.  It is very interesting,  -Buck
 

 What's most interesting, it seems to me, is the difference between what we 
know of Robin in his cult days, from Ann and a couple of others who were around 
him then, and what we know of Robin firsthand from his presence on FFL in the 
past couple of years. No study of Robin's psychopathology, such as it may have 
been 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard J. Williams
Some rock historians believe that Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock, 
recorded on April 12, 1954, was the first rock song, followed by That's 
All Right by Elvis Presley, which was was recorded on July 5, 1954. Go 
figure.


Bill Haley  His Comets - Rock Around The Clock Bandstand 1960
http://youtu.be/N-qjc17KEsc

Elvis Presley - That's All Right (Comeback Special '68):
http://youtu.be/zVaBVZaS7So

On 11/3/2013 3:40 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:


Re According to John Lennon, Cliff Richard's hit 'Move It',1958, was 
the first authentic rock and roll song. According to John, before 
Cliff and the Shadows, there had been nothing worth listening to in 
British music.:


Yes, that's right - nothing worth listening to in the rock'n'roll 
genre anyway. Move It is a neat song but it's crying out for someone 
with more charisma than Cliff Richard to sell it.



The Brand New Cadillac song I linked to is closer in feel to a 
genuine rock classic. I mentioned that Vince Taylor's decline into 
drug paranoia (speed and LSD) was the model for David Bowie's 
fictional rock star Ziggy Stardust. Bowie's album came out in 1972. 
Here's Vince Taylor singing Brand New Cadillac in 1979. He carries 
the song with a certaim amphetamine cool but you can see he's on the 
highway to hell.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNHXbTL7Oc








Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-05 Thread Richard J. Williams

Anyone who meditates with the aim of samadhi is a Buddhist.

On 11/3/2013 4:42 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:


*Is it possible to be a Buddhist and practice meditation effortlessly?*


Yes, according to MMY.



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com 
wrote:


*Should TM'er Buddhists even be allowed to have a Dome badge? Is it 
possible to be a buddhist and practice meditation effortlessly?*


*-Buck*



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

Re The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a 
struggle between the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light 
versus the material world darkness. Humans are composed of two 
opposing elements in a battle for power. There is a soul, but it is 
influenced by elements of both good and evil. Manichaeism is similar 
to the dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, and Cathars. It's not 
complicated. Adepts in China and the Far East would probably relate to 
this with their own notions of Yin and Yang.:



The Yin and Yang concepts point to a Tao that includes the 
opposites. Imagining that one side of a pair of opposites could gain 
the upper hand over the other would be a vulgar error.


As the little we know about Manichaeism and similar dualist 
religions/philosophies comes to us from hostile sources isn't it 
possible that these beliefs weren't as dualist as they've been painted 
but perhaps also had the idea of a Transcendence that reconciled the 
positive and negative aspects of life?




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

So, let's review what we know about the prophet Mani.

The Gnostic prophet Mani taught radical dualist cosmology; a struggle 
between the opposing forces of good and evil, spiritual light versus 
the material world darkness. Humans are composed of two opposing 
elements in a battle for power. There is a soul, but it is influenced 
by elements of both good and evil. Manichaeism is similar to the 
dualistic Bogomils, Paulicians, and Cathars. It's not complicated.


Adepts in China and the Far East would probably relate to this with 
their own notions of Yin and Yang, which is probably derived from the 
Indian Sankhya, a radical dualism, and later tantra- a theory of 
polarity which posits male and female energies.


The name 'Mani' is Sanskrit. Mani traveled and lived in India for 
several years, visiting Buddhist lands such as Bamiyan in Afghanistan, 
so it is not surprising that Buddhist influences would be apparent. 
Mani apparently adopted his theory of the reincarnation 
(transmigration of souls) from the Buddhists. Mani's sect structure 
was apparently based on the Buddhist Sangha, that is, Arhants and the 
lay follower community.



On 11/2/2013 11:31 AM, emptybill@...
mailto:emptybill@... wrote:


No wonder the Near-Eastern realm got so mixed up. *//*

It seems that as Manichean ideology spread to the East it 
incorporated Buddhist concepts along the way in a effort to show the 
superiority of the Religion of Light. Mani lived during the third 
century of the current era. Mani used the epitaph Buddha of Light 
and identified himself as Maitreya. He and his followers specifically 
borrowed from early Pure Land Sutras and Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka 
philosophy. As it entered the region of Gandhara and spread to China 
it used the Buddhist Hinayana tradition to support its views of 
matter, the body and the world.


MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM


*/David A. Scott /*
*//*

*/Christ Church College /**/of /**/Higher Education/*









[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Pamela Anderson...shown with the Science of Being...on ABC news

2013-11-05 Thread doctordumbass
At least I distracted you for a few moments from your Guru whack-off fantasies. 
You are welcome! 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
 Brings up a number of interesting questions, for instance: 
 
 1. What do you think Robin Carlsen uses for whack-off material? 

 Well, if he's really NPD, probably his groupies:


 

:-)






[FairfieldLife] One for the movie freaks -- Unscripted

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
Someone's supercut of their 25 top moments that weren't in the
scripts, but improvised by the actors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE





[FairfieldLife] RE: One for the movie freaks -- Unscripted

2013-11-05 Thread doctordumbass
Better not be any Gurus whacking off on that Youtube! 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Someone's supercut of their 25 top moments that weren't in the scripts, but 
improvised by the actors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE 






[FairfieldLife] RE: NPD

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower
 

 This is so funny, a guy and a follower. Doesn't sound like this guy is too 
charismatic if he has one lonely follower in his retinue.
 

  who showed up in town in the last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells 
a good story, really smart but incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive 
with the younger follower. Lot like that other guy that used to post here. I 
sent this new guy on to find the afternoon Fairfield illumined experience 
banana-gram group. I think they have the resources to deal with him safely and 
will appreciate him a lot. 
 -Buck   

 


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: It#39;s starting already. We gonna line #39;em up on the wall!

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu

From the public to the insurance companies?

On 11/05/2013 06:17 AM, Richard J. Williams wrote:


Obamacare is a transfer of wealth. It's not complicated.

On 11/3/2013 2:34 PM, Bhairitu wrote:


What's the alternative? Fascism?  We have that now.  You are 
mistaking Obamacare for socialism.  It's fascism.


On 11/03/2013 10:47 AM, emptyb...@yahoo.com wrote:


Yes.


It's called Peoples Justice.


Uncle Obama's Health-O-Rama cartoon




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

Yikes, emptybill, who are we lining up against the wall? The docs? 
The patients? Everybody?



On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:16 AM, emptybill@... 
emptybill@... wrote:



  Virginia Democrat Calls For Forcing Doctors To Accept Medicare
  And Medicaid Patients

http://masonconservative.typepad.com/the_mason_conservative/2013/11/virginia-democrat-calls-for-forcing-doctors-to-accept-medicare-and-medicaid-patients.html











[FairfieldLife] RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Augustine of Hippo, who claimed to have been a dualistic Manichaen for ten 
years. The radical dualism of Manichaeism is evident in many Gnostic sects: 
Isn't the vulgar notion of Christianity held by most believers radically 
dualist? (Which isn't surprising as western Christianity flows from Augustine.) 
Your standard Christian believes God is good and Satan is evil and History will 
end with a stand-up fight between the angels of light and the demons with the 
good angels destined to prevail. 
 A non-dualist sees that the world is perfect as it is right now. If people 
don't see that it's because their ignorant minds project on to what they 
experience human ideas of what's good and what's bad.
 
So, the dualism of Gnosticism has been pretty much established. Manichaeism is 
based on the doctrine that the entire world of material bodies are all 
constructions of Satan. 
 In Vedanta, Maya is the deity that perpetuates the illusion of duality in the 
phenomenal Universe. One has to see through the illusion and so break the 
spell. Isn't that view on a continuum with Gnostic dualism? I'm sure you'd find 
lots of Vedantists and Buddhists with a life-hating, body-despising approach 
and I'm betting you could have found some Gnostics with a more relaxed attitude 
to the material world. 
 

 Yin and Yang are complimentary forces rather than opposing forces:
 In Taoist metaphysics, good-bad distinctions are perceptual, not real. As they 
are not real what we think are opposing forces are in opposition at a 
superficial level only. At a deeper level they're engaged in a dance. 
Tweedledum and Tweedledee *agreed* to have a battle.

   
---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 

 
 



[FairfieldLife] Lenz's cousin disappears

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
 From SiriusXM that is.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/art-bell-resigns-from-sirius-xm-radio_n_4215776.html

For those that don't get it, Art Bell was Turq's cult leader's cousin.  
Bell announced it on his radio show when Lenz committed suicide.  I'm 
sure there are some here who missed the angel train listening to his show.




[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Some rock historians believe that Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock, 
recorded on April 12, 1954, was the first rock song, followed by That's All 
Right by Elvis Presley, which was was recorded on July 5, 1954.:
 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so Vince Taylor and 
Cliff Richard are two important pioneers in the UK. I'm guessing one reason 
they never made a name for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't 
need second-rate copies of their own stars. The Beatles probably made it 
because they came along after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original 
touches of their own to make it more appealing than the saccharine-sweet pop 
that had by then become the norm.
 

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 Some rock historians believe that Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock, 
recorded on April 12, 1954, was the first rock song, followed by That's All 
Right by Elvis Presley, which was was recorded on July 5, 1954. Go figure.
 
 Bill Haley  His Comets - Rock Around The Clock Bandstand 1960 
 http://youtu.be/N-qjc17KEsc http://youtu.be/N-qjc17KEsc
 
 Elvis Presley - That's All Right (Comeback Special '68): 
 http://youtu.be/zVaBVZaS7So http://youtu.be/zVaBVZaS7So
 
 On 11/3/2013 3:40 PM, s3raphita@... mailto:s3raphita@... wrote:
 
   Re According to John Lennon, Cliff Richard's hit 'Move It',1958, was the 
first authentic rock and roll song. According to John, before Cliff and the 
Shadows, there had been nothing worth listening to in British music.:
 Yes, that's right - nothing worth listening to in the rock'n'roll genre 
anyway. Move It is a neat song but it's crying out for someone with more 
charisma than Cliff Richard to sell it.
 
 
 The Brand New Cadillac song I linked to is closer in feel to a genuine rock 
classic. I mentioned that Vince Taylor's decline into drug paranoia (speed and 
LSD) was the model for David Bowie's fictional rock star Ziggy Stardust. 
Bowie's album came out in 1972. Here's Vince Taylor singing Brand New 
Cadillac in 1979. He carries the song with a certaim amphetamine cool but you 
can see he's on the highway to hell.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNHXbTL7Oc 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNHXbTL7Oc
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
It must be melting faster because our sunny California weather is much 
colder than usual for this time of year.  A friend has a fishing boat 
and fishes up in Alaska and says the ice is really melting away.


On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic.
Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
and a few others here would be in different places, too.

Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever. :-)

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map







[FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,  s3raphita wrote:

  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor.  :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off.  :-)






Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics 
and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk 
Don't Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I 
played on a revival album they did).  There was also an east coast 
scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often 
regional because the labels were regional without national distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The 
Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs. 
Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:

 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)






Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Share Long
noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...





On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.

Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which
  includes The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once)
  and other spin offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the
  later 60s.

Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European
  country's and their own scenes.

Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the
  soft muzak rock those countries created.

On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:

 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock
  so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important
  pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a
  name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans
  didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that
  time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough
  original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)





RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread sharelong60
And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach Boys, etc. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.
 
 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The 
Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs. Those 
morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.
 
 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and 
their own scenes.
 
 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft muzak 
rock those countries created.
 
 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.
 
 Couldn't have said it better. :-)
 
 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.
 
 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)
 
  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.
 
 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.
 
 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.
 
 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.
 
 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)
 
 
 
 
 



Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard Williams
That all changed on January 13, 1965 when Dylan recorded Subterranean
Homesick Blues, released on the album Bringing It All Back Home as the
lead-off track, Dylan's first single to chart in the top 40 in the U.S.A.

Positively 4th Street, a tribute to Bob Dylan Subterranean Home Sick:
http://youtu.be/jNzv49cPde8  http://youtu.be/jNzv49cPde8

[image: Inline image 1]





On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 12:37 PM, TurquoiseB turquoi...@yahoo.com wrote:



 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.

 Couldn't have said it better. :-)

 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.

 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)


  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.

 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.

 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.

 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.

 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)

  



[FairfieldLife] Fwd: 4 More Days to Vote! Updated Link

2013-11-05 Thread Dick Mays


Begin forwarded message:

 From: Fairfield Arts and Convention Center i...@fairfieldacc.com
 Subject: 4 More Days to Vote! Updated Link
 Date: November 5, 2013 1:20:29 PM CST
 To: dickm...@lisco.com
 Reply-To: ma...@fairfieldacc.com
 
 
   
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 It's Election Day: Vote for FACC TODAY!  (Updated link) Click here to vote 
 now! 
 
 
 
   
 Don't forget to vote today, just 4 more days left! 
 
   
 MMNPRB FB Promo Video - Gift Certificate Possible
 Vote today, vote every day! Voting for Round 2 goes through Friday, Nov. 8 at 
 5 p.m. Let's win this competition!  
 
 Click here to vote - Bookmark this page and set reminders! 
 
 The amount of support we've received from our patrons already is 
 outstanding, said Cody Jones, Development and Public Relations Manager. 
 It's because of all of you that we've made it this far, but we need a strong 
 week of votes to compete! Remember to vote every day on as many computers or 
 mobile devices as you can. Let's show the bigger cities just what a small 
 town with a big heart can do! added Jones. 
 
 Plus, follow us on Facebook for funny videos like this! said Jones. We're 
 having fun and we hope you are too. Now, let's win this $15,000 technology 
 makeover contest!
 
 Don't forget to share our posts and videos on Facebook about the contest for 
 your chance to win some tickets! 
 
 From all of us at the Center, thank you for your votes and commitment to 
 helping us improve. We truly appreciate it; let's keep it going!   
 
 
 
 
 
 Fairfield Arts and Convention Center
 
 
 
 200 North Main Street - Fairfield, Iowa 52556
 Ticket Office: 641-472-2787 | www.FairfieldACC.com
 Visit us on Facebook and YouTube
 Copyright © 2013. All Rights Reserved.
 
 
 
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 IA | 52556



Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
The well known hit formula back then was to be a white group and write a 
Motown style tune.


On 11/05/2013 11:24 AM, Share Long wrote:

noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...



On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu 
noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US. There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, 
Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune 
Walk Don't Run). Then the northwest do-wap groups like the 
Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they did).  There was also an 
east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene.  These 
were often regional because the labels were regional without national 
distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes 
The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin 
offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:


 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)










[FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Barry wrote:
 (snip)
  Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-

  hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie)
 

 Um, just for the record, there was plenty of news on
 TV by 1963.
 

  of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.
 

 I don't think I'd ever heard of the Beatles before one 
 of my roommates brought home the 45 of She Loves
 You and I Want to Hold Your Hand sometime in the
 auturmn of 1963, which I and both my roommates 
 (college graduates all) instantly went nuts over.
 

 But of course that's because none of us had any
 taste in music...
 




[FairfieldLife] Tales of Many Affairs

2013-11-05 Thread jr_esq
If John F. Kennedy were president today, he would have been impeached by the 
Republicans for his many infidelities.   
 

 http://news.yahoo.com/complicated-many-women-jfks-life-114629594.html 
http://news.yahoo.com/complicated-many-women-jfks-life-114629594.html



[FairfieldLife] RE: Tales of Many Affairs

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Hey, I've got a bulletin for you, John. Clinton wasn't impeached for his 
infidelities; he was impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice. You 
can't impeach a president for infidelity because it isn't a crime. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 If John F. Kennedy were president today, he would have been impeached by the 
Republicans for his many infidelities.   

 http://news.yahoo.com/complicated-many-women-jfks-life-114629594.html 
http://news.yahoo.com/complicated-many-women-jfks-life-114629594.html





[FairfieldLife] Le Saint Regis

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
Back on the Ile Saint-Louis this week, before settling in for a few
weeks in the quartier I'd rather explore, the Butte aux Cailles. And
this week, I've managed to find an outside table at the closest Wifi Bar
to me. It was always so packed before -- during the less...uh...chilly
weather -- but tonight I am clearly one of the only patrons to realize
that it's really comfy sitting here under their terrace space heaters.

This is really a great sidewalk cafe, with a view looking out onto an
intersection of streets normally filled (in more clement weather) with
locals and tourists alike, but tonight largely empty. It also looks out
upon a bridge that sports one of The Great Views Of Paris.

Their loss, my gain.

Tonight I get to sit here and rap about whatever I want, pretty much
free from attractive distractions. :-)

But about the only thing I can think to rap about is the book I'm
reading currently -- mainly on the train between the Netherlands and
here, but because it's really starting to grab me, also in the evenings,
after work. It's been a fun read, because I've been rediscovering a
writer I had enjoyed thoroughly in the past, but had lost track of.

Possibly my loss. The writer is Stephen King.

And the book is Doctor Sleep, his sequel to The Shining.

It really rocks. If you're into That Sorta Thing.

That Sorta Thing being great characterization, long and painstakingly
slow at times scene setting, and an incredible ability to make one's
readers CARE about the characters.

If you read The Shining, and even if you only saw the Kubrick movie,
Danny (the kid in the movie, the one who was tuned into the Shining), is
now grown up. And a recovering alcoholic, trying to get over decades of
trying to make his gift go away. It didn't go away.

Now he finds himself in a small New Hampshire town, working in a hospice
in conjunction with a cat who always knows when its guests are about to
die, and clues Danny so that he can use his gift to help them peacefully
pass over. You should also probably remember that Stephen King IS a
recovering alcoholic, and this is the first time he's dared to write
about that struggle.

Into this intrudes the worst, baddest-assed, most Pure Evil bunch of
people-who-do-not-deserve-to-be-called-human humans you've ever
encountered. I dare not even mention how they get their kicks and
prolong their miserable lifetimes, because Buck would faint.

But I sense Great Drama ahead, and because IMO King is at the top of his
form, Great Writing, so I'll keep reading...





[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Re Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place to allow for mass 
distribution of non-US acts at that time.: Good point. 

Re rock sounds *terrible* in French.:
 Yes, Johnny Hallyday certainly *looked* the part - but I can't recall a single 
song of his!
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.
 
 Couldn't have said it better. :-)
 
 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.
 
 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)
 
  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.
 
 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.
 
 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.
 
 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.
 
 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)
 

 The French did have some modest (home) success with those yé-yé girls like 
France Gall. 
 You must know the story of how Serge Gainsbourg cruelly set up France Gall 
with his composition Les Sucettes (Lollipops) with its (to us) blatant 
sexual innuendo. On the surface, the lyrics tell the innocent tale of a girl 
named Annie who enjoys lollipops. This is the stage show Gainsbourg also 
arranged. It shows what an innocent age it was that the 18-year-old Gall could 
perform on this set and still not realise she'd been well and truly pranked. A 
friend had to explain it to her later and Gall was mortified. Enjoy! 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ

 

 



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
Supposedly the first TV news broadcast was on November 21st, 1963.  But 
I recall CBS News had a report in December (much shorter).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeolhjIWPYs

On 11/05/2013 12:01 PM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:


Barry wrote:

(snip)

 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-

 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie)

Um, just for the record, there was plenty of news on
TV by 1963.

 of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.

I don't think I'd ever heard of the Beatles before one
of my roommates brought home the 45 of She Loves
You and I Want to Hold Your Hand sometime in the
auturmn of 1963, which I and both my roommates
(college graduates all) instantly went nuts over.

But of course that's because none of us had any
taste in music...






[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Re Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place to allow for mass 
distribution of non-US acts at that time.: Good point. 

Re rock sounds *terrible* in French.:
 Yes, Johnny Hallyday certainly *looked* the part - but I can't recall a single 
song of his!
 


 The French did have some modest (home) success with those yé-yé girls like 
France Gall. 
 You must know the story of how Serge Gainsbourg cruelly set up France Gall 
with his composition Les Sucettes (Lollipops) with its (to us) blatant 
sexual innuendo. On the surface, the lyrics tell the innocent tale of a girl 
named Annie who enjoys lollipops. This is the stage show Gainsbourg also 
arranged. It shows what an innocent age it was that the 18-year-old Gall could 
perform on this set and still not realise she'd been well and truly pranked. A 
friend had to explain it to her later and Gall was mortified. Enjoy! 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
 

 


[FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread TurquoiseB
Fascinating. Here I am in France, and I try the video you
posted, and I get:

This video contains content from INA - Institut National de
l'Audiovisuel, who has blocked it in your country on copyright
grounds.Sigh. I'm not really a Serge Gainsbourg buff, except for his
taste in women, so I must search further to find this...

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,  wrote:

 Re Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place to allow
for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.: Good point.

 Re rock sounds *terrible* in French.:
  Yes, Johnny Hallyday certainly *looked* the part - but I can't recall
a single song of his!

  The French did have some modest (home) success with those
yé-yé girls like France Gall.
  You must know the story of how Serge Gainsbourg cruelly set up France
Gall with his composition Les Sucettes (Lollipops) with its (to us)
blatant sexual innuendo. On the surface, the lyrics tell the innocent
tale of a girl named Annie who enjoys lollipops. This is the stage show
Gainsbourg also arranged. It shows what an innocent age it was that the
18-year-old Gall could perform on this set and still not realise she'd
been well and truly pranked. A friend had to explain it to her later and
Gall was mortified. Enjoy!
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ




[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Here's a corker of a song by France Gall giving it the full yé-yé treatment - 
Laisse tomber les filles (English: Leave the girls alone)
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVA670WKAQc 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVA670WKAQc

 (Recently April March covered the same song as Chick Habit.)
 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place to allow for 
mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.: Good point. 

Re rock sounds *terrible* in French.:
 Yes, Johnny Hallyday certainly *looked* the part - but I can't recall a single 
song of his!
 


 The French did have some modest (home) success with those yé-yé girls like 
France Gall. 
 You must know the story of how Serge Gainsbourg cruelly set up France Gall 
with his composition Les Sucettes (Lollipops) with its (to us) blatant 
sexual innuendo. On the surface, the lyrics tell the innocent tale of a girl 
named Annie who enjoys lollipops. This is the stage show Gainsbourg also 
arranged. It shows what an innocent age it was that the 18-year-old Gall could 
perform on this set and still not realise she'd been well and truly pranked. A 
friend had to explain it to her later and Gall was mortified. Enjoy! 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
 

 




[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Slow Blues

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Thank  you, Emily. Very glad it turned you on. Love your Thurston quotes. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, emilymaenot@... wrote:

 And its better the second timeShet, I gotta go take a cold shower.  
Thank you Judy!  “Love makes your soul crawl out from its hiding place.” 
 ― Zora Neale Hurston 
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15151.Zora_Neale_Hurston 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Turn on the AC before you watch this if you don't want to get heat stroke. 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embeddedamp;v=jBeuco0PgJs 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embeddedamp;v=jBeuco0PgJs







[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: RE: Slow Blues

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Uh, Hurston quotes! 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Thank  you, Emily. Very glad it turned you on. Love your Thurston quotes. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, emilymaenot@... wrote:

 And its better the second timeShet, I gotta go take a cold shower.  
Thank you Judy!  “Love makes your soul crawl out from its hiding place.” 
 ― Zora Neale Hurston 
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15151.Zora_Neale_Hurston 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Turn on the AC before you watch this if you don't want to get heat stroke. 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embeddedamp;v=jBeuco0PgJs 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embeddedamp;v=jBeuco0PgJs









Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread Share Long
The palm leaf reader who comes to FF twice a year has been known to say, What 
good is vastu if you're under water. He predicts that the Mississippi will 
flood all the way to FF. He advises one and all to move to a location 2,000 
above sea level or higher.





On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:14 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
It must be melting faster because our sunny California weather is much colder 
than usual for this time of year.  A friend has a fishing boat and fishes up in 
Alaska and says the ice is really melting away.

On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

  
Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic. 
Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
and a few others here would be in different places, too.

Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever.
  :-)

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map 






RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
FWIW, according to NatGeo, the map isn't going to look like what they published 
for probably another 5,000 years; it'll take that long for all the ice to melt. 
(Don't know about the Mississippi, though.)
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 The palm leaf reader who comes to FF twice a year has been known to say, What 
good is vastu if you're under water. He predicts that the Mississippi will 
flood all the way to FF. He advises one and all to move to a location 2,000 
above sea level or higher.
 

 
 
 On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:14 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:
 
   
 It must be melting faster because our sunny California weather is much 
colder than usual for this time of year.  A friend has a fishing boat and 
fishes up in Alaska and says the ice is really melting away.
 
 On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
   Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic. 
 Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
 and a few others here would be in different places, too.
 
 Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever. :-)
 
 http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 




 
 
 
 






[FairfieldLife] Dia de Los Muertos

2013-11-05 Thread Richard Williams
Dia de Los Muertos
http://youtu.be/7J8EQa5ST8o

[image: Inline image 1]


Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread Ann Woelfle Bater
Are there palm leaves to read in FF? It must be getting warmer there than I 
thought. I wonder how much money one can earn reading palm leaves. Sounds like 
this person would naturally be an expert on the flood plain tendencies of the 
Mississippi if all land ice were to melt. Definitely palm leaf reading and 
flood impact reports go hand in hand. I'll keep a close watch on said palm leaf 
reader, they really seem to have a handle on reality.





On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:39:04 PM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com 
wrote:
 
  
The palm leaf reader who comes to FF twice a year has been known to say, What 
good is vastu if you're under water. He predicts that the Mississippi will 
flood all the way to FF. He advises one and all to move to a location 2,000 
above sea level or higher.





On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:14 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
It must be melting faster because our sunny California weather is much colder 
than usual for this time of year.  A friend has a fishing boat and fishes up in 
Alaska and says the ice is really melting away.

On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

  
Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic. 
Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
and a few others here would be in different places, too.

Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever.
  :-)

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map 








Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard J. Williams
Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels, Jenny Take a Ride! recorded in 
1965 and Devil with a Blue Dress On 1966.


Mitch Ryder  The Detroit Wheels 1966
http://youtu.be/j9eWGdJIW74

Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels:
John Badanjek - drums
Joe Kubert - rhythm guitar
Jim McCarty - lead guitar
Jim McAllister - bass

On 11/5/2013 1:24 PM, Share Long wrote:

noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...



On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu 
noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US. There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, 
Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune 
Walk Don't Run). Then the northwest do-wap groups like the 
Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they did).  There was also an 
east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene.  These 
were often regional because the labels were regional without national 
distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes 
The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin 
offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:


 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)










[FairfieldLife] RE: Le Saint Regis

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
I hadn't read any King for a very long time. After The Shining there wasn't 
going to be any of his offerings that could be better. But that was a long time 
ago, in fact I was living in FF at the time, that's how long ago I read that. I 
remember sitting on the floor of the bathroom finishing the damn thing at 2 in 
the morning not wanting to keep my then boyfriend awake until all hours with 
the light on. 

 

 Anyway, I picked up Dr Sleep about a month ago on a whim and I liked it. 
Then I thought maybe I should read Under The Dome which was interesting but 
Mr King can leave one with a weird sort of icky feeling after reading his stuff 
so I have taken a break for a while. I will most likely root out something else 
of his to read before too long as I love the macabre. Right now I am rather 
enjoying Ender's Game, it is a very interesting concept and well written.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Back on the Ile Saint-Louis this week, before settling in for a few
 weeks in the quartier I'd rather explore, the Butte aux Cailles. And
 this week, I've managed to find an outside table at the closest Wifi Bar
 to me. It was always so packed before -- during the less...uh...chilly
 weather -- but tonight I am clearly one of the only patrons to realize
 that it's really comfy sitting here under their terrace space heaters.
 
 This is really a great sidewalk cafe, with a view looking out onto an
 intersection of streets normally filled (in more clement weather) with
 locals and tourists alike, but tonight largely empty. It also looks out
 upon a bridge that sports one of The Great Views Of Paris.
 
 Their loss, my gain.
 
 Tonight I get to sit here and rap about whatever I want, pretty much
 free from attractive distractions. :-)
 
 But about the only thing I can think to rap about is the book I'm
 reading currently -- mainly on the train between the Netherlands and
 here, but because it's really starting to grab me, also in the evenings,
 after work. It's been a fun read, because I've been rediscovering a
 writer I had enjoyed thoroughly in the past, but had lost track of.
 
 Possibly my loss. The writer is Stephen King.
 
 And the book is Doctor Sleep, his sequel to The Shining.
 
 It really rocks. If you're into That Sorta Thing.
 
 That Sorta Thing being great characterization, long and painstakingly
 slow at times scene setting, and an incredible ability to make one's
 readers CARE about the characters.
 
 If you read The Shining, and even if you only saw the Kubrick movie,
 Danny (the kid in the movie, the one who was tuned into the Shining), is
 now grown up. And a recovering alcoholic, trying to get over decades of
 trying to make his gift go away. It didn't go away.
 
 Now he finds himself in a small New Hampshire town, working in a hospice
 in conjunction with a cat who always knows when its guests are about to
 die, and clues Danny so that he can use his gift to help them peacefully
 pass over. You should also probably remember that Stephen King IS a
 recovering alcoholic, and this is the first time he's dared to write
 about that struggle.
 
 Into this intrudes the worst, baddest-assed, most Pure Evil bunch of
 people-who-do-not-deserve-to-be-called-human humans you've ever
 encountered. I dare not even mention how they get their kicks and
 prolong their miserable lifetimes, because Buck would faint.
 
 But I sense Great Drama ahead, and because IMO King is at the top of his
 form, Great Writing, so I'll keep reading...



[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Hilarious! So having reminded myself about France Gall I just searched for her 
on YouTube and came upon the little French girl singing Computer Nr 3 in 
German at a music contest. Check out the German audience and thank the Lord 
these guys didn't win the war.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uf-n7YfRKqc 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uf-n7YfRKqc

 

 

 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

 Here's a corker of a song by France Gall giving it the full yé-yé treatment - 
Laisse tomber les filles (English: Leave the girls alone)
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVA670WKAQc 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVA670WKAQc

 (Recently April March covered the same song as Chick Habit.)
 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place to allow for 
mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.: Good point. 

Re rock sounds *terrible* in French.:
 Yes, Johnny Hallyday certainly *looked* the part - but I can't recall a single 
song of his!
 


 The French did have some modest (home) success with those yé-yé girls like 
France Gall. 
 You must know the story of how Serge Gainsbourg cruelly set up France Gall 
with his composition Les Sucettes (Lollipops) with its (to us) blatant 
sexual innuendo. On the surface, the lyrics tell the innocent tale of a girl 
named Annie who enjoys lollipops. This is the stage show Gainsbourg also 
arranged. It shows what an innocent age it was that the 18-year-old Gall could 
perform on this set and still not realise she'd been well and truly pranked. A 
friend had to explain it to her later and Gall was mortified. Enjoy! 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-iysdFu_TQ 
 

 



 


Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
Palm leaves as in bhrigu or nadi astrology.  These are horoscope 
predictions written on palm leaves for about every possible planetary 
combination.  I've heard some people get some rather astounding readings 
from those folks.  No they don't come from palm trees which don't exist 
in Fairfield. Palm leaves were more available than paper back then and 
palm leaves are even used in place of plates for food too.


On 11/05/2013 02:19 PM, Ann Woelfle Bater wrote:
Are there palm leaves to read in FF? It must be getting warmer there 
than I thought. I wonder how much money one can earn reading palm 
leaves. Sounds like this person would naturally be an expert on the 
flood plain tendencies of the Mississippi if all land ice were to 
melt. Definitely palm leaf reading and flood impact reports go hand in 
hand. I'll keep a close watch on said palm leaf reader, they really 
seem to have a handle on reality.




On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:39:04 PM, Share Long 
sharelon...@yahoo.com wrote:
The palm leaf reader who comes to FF twice a year has been known to 
say, What good is vastu if you're under water. He predicts that the 
Mississippi will flood all the way to FF. He advises one and all to 
move to a location 2,000 above sea level or higher.




On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:14 AM, Bhairitu 
noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
It must be melting faster because our sunny California weather is 
much colder than usual for this time of year.  A friend has a fishing 
boat and fishes up in Alaska and says the ice is really melting away.


On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic.
Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
and a few others here would be in different places, too.

Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever. :-)

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map













[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Le Saint Regis

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
I was a huge King fan--along with my mother and sister--for many years, read 
about every novel he wrote. (I never read the Dark Tower series because I don't 
care for that kind of fantasy.) Then I read two real duds (IMO), Duma Key and 
Under the Dome, and was so disappointed I gave up on him. The first half of 
Duma Key was brilliant, but the second half just disintegrated; Dome simply 
wasn't interesting enough to succeed at that absurd length, and the ending was 
unsatisfying. Not sure what you mean by icky, but for me it wasn't icky 
enough; aside from the outlandish premise, it was actually pretty mundane.
 

 It struck me that nobody was editing him any more, and for some reason he'd 
lost his sense of pacing; possibly he'd become short on self-discipline and 
ideas as well.
 

 Anyway, maybe I'll give him another chance and try Doctor Sleep. But it 
better be good, or I'm going to be mad.
 

 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 I hadn't read any King for a very long time. After The Shining there wasn't 
going to be any of his offerings that could be better. But that was a long time 
ago, in fact I was living in FF at the time, that's how long ago I read that. I 
remember sitting on the floor of the bathroom finishing the damn thing at 2 in 
the morning not wanting to keep my then boyfriend awake until all hours with 
the light on. 

 

 Anyway, I picked up Dr Sleep about a month ago on a whim and I liked it. 
Then I thought maybe I should read Under The Dome which was interesting but 
Mr King can leave one with a weird sort of icky feeling after reading his stuff 
so I have taken a break for a while. I will most likely root out something else 
of his to read before too long as I love the macabre. Right now I am rather 
enjoying Ender's Game, it is a very interesting concept and well written.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Back on the Ile Saint-Louis this week, before settling in for a few
 weeks in the quartier I'd rather explore, the Butte aux Cailles. And
 this week, I've managed to find an outside table at the closest Wifi Bar
 to me. It was always so packed before -- during the less...uh...chilly
 weather -- but tonight I am clearly one of the only patrons to realize
 that it's really comfy sitting here under their terrace space heaters.
 
 This is really a great sidewalk cafe, with a view looking out onto an
 intersection of streets normally filled (in more clement weather) with
 locals and tourists alike, but tonight largely empty. It also looks out
 upon a bridge that sports one of The Great Views Of Paris.
 
 Their loss, my gain.
 
 Tonight I get to sit here and rap about whatever I want, pretty much
 free from attractive distractions. :-)
 
 But about the only thing I can think to rap about is the book I'm
 reading currently -- mainly on the train between the Netherlands and
 here, but because it's really starting to grab me, also in the evenings,
 after work. It's been a fun read, because I've been rediscovering a
 writer I had enjoyed thoroughly in the past, but had lost track of.
 
 Possibly my loss. The writer is Stephen King.
 
 And the book is Doctor Sleep, his sequel to The Shining.
 
 It really rocks. If you're into That Sorta Thing.
 
 That Sorta Thing being great characterization, long and painstakingly
 slow at times scene setting, and an incredible ability to make one's
 readers CARE about the characters.
 
 If you read The Shining, and even if you only saw the Kubrick movie,
 Danny (the kid in the movie, the one who was tuned into the Shining), is
 now grown up. And a recovering alcoholic, trying to get over decades of
 trying to make his gift go away. It didn't go away.
 
 Now he finds himself in a small New Hampshire town, working in a hospice
 in conjunction with a cat who always knows when its guests are about to
 die, and clues Danny so that he can use his gift to help them peacefully
 pass over. You should also probably remember that Stephen King IS a
 recovering alcoholic, and this is the first time he's dared to write
 about that struggle.
 
 Into this intrudes the worst, baddest-assed, most Pure Evil bunch of
 people-who-do-not-deserve-to-be-called-human humans you've ever
 encountered. I dare not even mention how they get their kicks and
 prolong their miserable lifetimes, because Buck would faint.
 
 But I sense Great Drama ahead, and because IMO King is at the top of his
 form, Great Writing, so I'll keep reading...





Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread Michael Jackson
Goddamn!!! If this is the kind of crap the supposedly spiritually astute ( 
according to David) pay for in Fairfield, I should come today! I could make a 
fortune!

On Tue, 11/5/13, Ann Woelfle Bater awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] All the ice has melted...is your city still there?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Tuesday, November 5, 2013, 10:19 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Are there palm leaves to read in FF? It must be
 getting warmer there than I thought. I wonder how much money
 one can earn reading palm leaves. Sounds like this person
 would naturally be an expert on the flood plain tendencies
 of the Mississippi if all land ice were to melt. Definitely
 palm leaf reading and flood impact reports go hand in hand.
 I'll keep a close watch on said palm leaf reader, they
 really seem to have a handle on reality.
 
  
  
  On Tuesday, November
 5, 2013 1:39:04 PM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com
 wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   The palm
 leaf reader who comes to FF twice a year has been known to
 say, What good is vastu if you're under
 water. He predicts that the Mississippi will flood all
 the way to FF. He advises one and all to move to a location
 2,000 above sea level or higher.
 
  
  
  On Tuesday, November
 5, 2013 11:14 AM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net
 wrote:

  
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
   
 It must
 be melting faster because our
   sunny California weather is much colder
 than usual for this time
   of year.  A friend has a fishing boat and fishes
 up in Alaska and
   says the ice is really melting away.
 
   
 
   On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
 
 
    
   
   
 Fascinating interactive map from National
 Geographic. 
 
   Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in
 the Netherlands,
 
   and a few others here would be in different
 places, too.
 
   
 
   Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and
 boring as ever.
   :-)
 
   
 
   
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
   
   
   
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Re: [FairfieldLife] Tales of Many Affairs

2013-11-05 Thread Michael Jackson
too bad Jerry, Neil and Bevan didn't do the same to Big Shot Marshy

On Tue, 11/5/13, jr_...@yahoo.com jr_...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Tales of Many Affairs
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Tuesday, November 5, 2013, 8:06 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   If John F. Kennedy were president today, he would
 have been impeached by the Republicans for his many
 infidelities.  
 http://news.yahoo.com/complicated-many-women-jfks-life-114629594.html
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Le Saint Regis

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 I was a huge King fan--along with my mother and sister--for many years, read 
about every novel he wrote. (I never read the Dark Tower series because I don't 
care for that kind of fantasy.) Then I read two real duds (IMO), Duma Key and 
Under the Dome, and was so disappointed I gave up on him. The first half of 
Duma Key was brilliant, but the second half just disintegrated; Dome simply 
wasn't interesting enough to succeed at that absurd length, and the ending was 
unsatisfying. Not sure what you mean by icky, but for me it wasn't icky 
enough; aside from the outlandish premise, it was actually pretty mundane.
 

 It struck me that nobody was editing him any more, and for some reason he'd 
lost his sense of pacing; possibly he'd become short on self-discipline and 
ideas as well.
 

 Anyway, maybe I'll give him another chance and try Doctor Sleep. But it 
better be good, or I'm going to be mad.
 

 Ha! I never would have pegged you for a Stephen King fan. Under the Dome was 
way too black and white; the bad guys were just so unrelentingly without virtue 
or redeeming qualities that it got very tiresome and very predictable. It was 
also not remotely believable although the disintegration of law and order was 
fascinating to watch but again,not all that realistic as it all happened in 
about six days. 

 

 Still, the guy is readable. I remember a long time ago he and his family 
wanted to rent my sister and brother in law's house up in Maine for the summer 
but Peter was still fully engaged in the TM thing then (teaching at MIU and 
initiating) and no way was he going to let a guy with a mind like SK rent his 
place - too creepy. I wonder if he would still feel that way not that he is out 
of the TM Movement.

 

 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 I hadn't read any King for a very long time. After The Shining there wasn't 
going to be any of his offerings that could be better. But that was a long time 
ago, in fact I was living in FF at the time, that's how long ago I read that. I 
remember sitting on the floor of the bathroom finishing the damn thing at 2 in 
the morning not wanting to keep my then boyfriend awake until all hours with 
the light on. 

 

 Anyway, I picked up Dr Sleep about a month ago on a whim and I liked it. 
Then I thought maybe I should read Under The Dome which was interesting but 
Mr King can leave one with a weird sort of icky feeling after reading his stuff 
so I have taken a break for a while. I will most likely root out something else 
of his to read before too long as I love the macabre. Right now I am rather 
enjoying Ender's Game, it is a very interesting concept and well written.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Back on the Ile Saint-Louis this week, before settling in for a few
 weeks in the quartier I'd rather explore, the Butte aux Cailles. And
 this week, I've managed to find an outside table at the closest Wifi Bar
 to me. It was always so packed before -- during the less...uh...chilly
 weather -- but tonight I am clearly one of the only patrons to realize
 that it's really comfy sitting here under their terrace space heaters.
 
 This is really a great sidewalk cafe, with a view looking out onto an
 intersection of streets normally filled (in more clement weather) with
 locals and tourists alike, but tonight largely empty. It also looks out
 upon a bridge that sports one of The Great Views Of Paris.
 
 Their loss, my gain.
 
 Tonight I get to sit here and rap about whatever I want, pretty much
 free from attractive distractions. :-)
 
 But about the only thing I can think to rap about is the book I'm
 reading currently -- mainly on the train between the Netherlands and
 here, but because it's really starting to grab me, also in the evenings,
 after work. It's been a fun read, because I've been rediscovering a
 writer I had enjoyed thoroughly in the past, but had lost track of.
 
 Possibly my loss. The writer is Stephen King.
 
 And the book is Doctor Sleep, his sequel to The Shining.
 
 It really rocks. If you're into That Sorta Thing.
 
 That Sorta Thing being great characterization, long and painstakingly
 slow at times scene setting, and an incredible ability to make one's
 readers CARE about the characters.
 
 If you read The Shining, and even if you only saw the Kubrick movie,
 Danny (the kid in the movie, the one who was tuned into the Shining), is
 now grown up. And a recovering alcoholic, trying to get over decades of
 trying to make his gift go away. It didn't go away.
 
 Now he finds himself in a small New Hampshire town, working in a hospice
 in conjunction with a cat who always knows when its guests are about to
 die, and clues Danny so that he can use his gift to help them peacefully
 pass over. You should also probably remember that Stephen King IS a
 recovering alcoholic, and this is the first time he's dared to write
 

[FairfieldLife] Post Count Wed 06-Nov-13 00:15:02 UTC

2013-11-05 Thread FFL PostCount
Fairfield Life Post Counter
===
Start Date (UTC): 11/02/13 00:00:00
End Date (UTC): 11/09/13 00:00:00
333 messages as of (UTC) 11/06/13 00:05:36

 50 authfriend
 32 Bhairitu 
 30 Share Long 
 21 awoelflebater
 21 TurquoiseB 
 19 wgm4u 
 19 s3raphita
 18 Richard J. Williams 
 17 emptybill
 17 doctordumbass
 16 dhamiltony2k5
 13 jr_esq
 13 emilymaenot
 12 sharelong60
 11 Michael Jackson 
  6 Richard Williams 
  4 Ann Woelfle Bater 
  3 Mike Dixon 
  3 Dick Mays 
  2 j_alexander_stanley
  2 cardemaister
  2 anartaxius
  2 Rick Archer 
Posters: 23
Saturday Morning 00:00 UTC Rollover Times
=
Daylight Saving Time (Summer):
US Friday evening: PDT 5 PM - MDT 6 PM - CDT 7 PM - EDT 8 PM
Europe Saturday: BST 1 AM CEST 2 AM EEST 3 AM
Standard Time (Winter):
US Friday evening: PST 4 PM - MST 5 PM - CST 6 PM - EST 7 PM
Europe Saturday: GMT 12 AM CET 1 AM EET 2 AM
For more information on Time Zones: www.worldtimezone.com 




Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard Williams
Detroit - Motor City Bands

Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major rock
star.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

Suzi Quatro - Can The Can, 1973:
http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio

[image: Inline image 1]


On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com wrote:



 noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...




   On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net
 wrote:

   Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene
 in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics
 and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't
 Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a
 revival album they did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago
 area scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often regional because the
 labels were regional without national distribution.

 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The
 Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs.
 Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.

 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and
 their own scenes.

 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft
 muzak rock those countries created.

 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.

 Couldn't have said it better. :-)

 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.

 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)

  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.

 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.

 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.

 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.

 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)








[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: Le Saint Regis

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Ann wrote:
 

 Ha! I never would have pegged you for a Stephen King fan.
 

 Oh, when he's in good form, he is (was?) a fabulous writer. He never really 
got the credit he deserved because horror fiction isn't considered 
literature. I'm actually not a horror fan, so you're not wrong to be 
surprised. I never really read King for the horror. Did you ever read his 
Dolores Claiborne? There's no horror (supernatural horror, at any rate) per 
se in that one, but it's a terrific plot and a marvelous character study. 
Misery as well, but the violence is so up-close-and-personal that I found it 
hard to read.
 

 Another one in which the horror is real-life is Cujo. But don't you EVER 
read it. It's brilliantly written (King was in the midst of his alcoholic 
period when he wrote it), but it would really be devastating to a dog lover (at 
least I think it would).
 

 Under the Dome was way too black and white; the bad guys were just so 
unrelentingly without virtue or redeeming qualities that it got very tiresome 
and very predictable.
 

 Yes, exactly, simplistic Central Casting-type villains.
 

  It was also not remotely believable although the disintegration of law and 
order was fascinating to watch but again,not all that realistic as it all 
happened in about six days. 

 

 Still, the guy is readable. I remember a long time ago he and his family 
wanted to rent my sister and brother in law's house up in Maine for the summer 
but Peter was still fully engaged in the TM thing then (teaching at MIU and 
initiating) and no way was he going to let a guy with a mind like SK rent his 
place - too creepy. I wonder if he would still feel that way not that he is out 
of the TM Movement.

 

 Far as I can tell--I've read a lot of interviews with him--he isn't a creepy 
person at all. At least the creepy stuff he writes doesn't seem to come out in 
his personality.
 

 

 

 I wrote:
 

 I was a huge King fan--along with my mother and sister--for many years, read 
about every novel he wrote. (I never read the Dark Tower series because I don't 
care for that kind of fantasy.) Then I read two real duds (IMO), Duma Key and 
Under the Dome, and was so disappointed I gave up on him. The first half of 
Duma Key was brilliant, but the second half just disintegrated; Dome simply 
wasn't interesting enough to succeed at that absurd length, and the ending was 
unsatisfying. Not sure what you mean by icky, but for me it wasn't icky 
enough; aside from the outlandish premise, it was actually pretty mundane.
 

 It struck me that nobody was editing him any more, and for some reason he'd 
lost his sense of pacing; possibly he'd become short on self-discipline and 
ideas as well.
 

 Anyway, maybe I'll give him another chance and try Doctor Sleep. But it 
better be good, or I'm going to be mad.
 

 

 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 I hadn't read any King for a very long time. After The Shining there wasn't 
going to be any of his offerings that could be better. But that was a long time 
ago, in fact I was living in FF at the time, that's how long ago I read that. I 
remember sitting on the floor of the bathroom finishing the damn thing at 2 in 
the morning not wanting to keep my then boyfriend awake until all hours with 
the light on. 

 

 Anyway, I picked up Dr Sleep about a month ago on a whim and I liked it. 
Then I thought maybe I should read Under The Dome which was interesting but 
Mr King can leave one with a weird sort of icky feeling after reading his stuff 
so I have taken a break for a while. I will most likely root out something else 
of his to read before too long as I love the macabre. Right now I am rather 
enjoying Ender's Game, it is a very interesting concept and well written.

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Back on the Ile Saint-Louis this week, before settling in for a few
 weeks in the quartier I'd rather explore, the Butte aux Cailles. And
 this week, I've managed to find an outside table at the closest Wifi Bar
 to me. It was always so packed before -- during the less...uh...chilly
 weather -- but tonight I am clearly one of the only patrons to realize
 that it's really comfy sitting here under their terrace space heaters.
 
 This is really a great sidewalk cafe, with a view looking out onto an
 intersection of streets normally filled (in more clement weather) with
 locals and tourists alike, but tonight largely empty. It also looks out
 upon a bridge that sports one of The Great Views Of Paris.
 
 Their loss, my gain.
 
 Tonight I get to sit here and rap about whatever I want, pretty much
 free from attractive distractions. :-)
 
 But about the only thing I can think to rap about is the book I'm
 reading currently -- mainly on the train between the Netherlands and
 here, but because it's really starting to grab me, also in the evenings,
 after work. It's been a fun read, because I've been rediscovering a
 writer I had enjoyed thoroughly 

[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Seraphita wrote:
 (snip)
  Isn't the vulgar notion of Christianity held by most believers radically 
  dualist? (Which 
  isn't surprising as western Christianity flows from Augustine.) Your 
  standard Christian 
  believes God is good and Satan is evil and History will end with a stand-up 
  fight 
  between the angels of light and the demons with the good angels destined to 
  prevail.
 

 Christianity is dualistic, yes, but what you describe above really isn't what 
the standard Christian believes (at least not in the U.S.). It's various 
fundamentalist-type denominations and sects that are preoccupied with the End 
Times and Armageddon and the Rapture and so on. Standard or mainline 
Christians don't necessarily disbelieve in the prophecies of Revelation, but 
they don't tend to take them literally, and they don't focus on them.
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: All the ice has melted...is your city still there?

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 Palm leaves as in bhrigu or nadi astrology.  These are horoscope predictions 
written on palm leaves for about every possible planetary combination.  I've 
heard some people get some rather astounding readings from those folks.  No 
they don't come from palm trees which don't exist in Fairfield.  Palm leaves 
were more available than paper back then and palm leaves are even used in place 
of plates for food too.
 

 Thanks for clarifying that Barry 2. I actually had looked it up but it was fun 
to play with it all. Sometimes I prefer the playful over the literal but you 
did teach me something - palm leaves as plates. I also saw on Edg's FB post 
that those takeaway Chinese food containers open up to serve as plates as well 
- the modern palm leaf version of the same. 
 
 On 11/05/2013 02:19 PM, Ann Woelfle Bater wrote:
 
   Are there palm leaves to read in FF? It must be getting warmer there than I 
thought. I wonder how much money one can earn reading palm leaves. Sounds like 
this person would naturally be an expert on the flood plain tendencies of the 
Mississippi if all land ice were to melt. Definitely palm leaf reading and 
flood impact reports go hand in hand. I'll keep a close watch on said palm leaf 
reader, they really seem to have a handle on reality.
 
 
 
 
 On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:39:04 PM, Share Long sharelong60@... 
mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
 
   The palm leaf reader who comes to FF twice a year has been known to say, 
What good is vastu if you're under water. He predicts that the Mississippi 
will flood all the way to FF. He advises one and all to move to a location 
2,000 above sea level or higher.
 
 
 
 
 On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:14 AM, Bhairitu noozguru@... 
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:
 
   
 It must be melting faster because our sunny California weather is much 
colder than usual for this time of year.  A friend has a fishing boat and 
fishes up in Alaska and says the ice is really melting away.
 
 On 11/05/2013 12:52 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
   Fascinating interactive map from National Geographic. 
 Suffice it to say I wouldn't still be in the Netherlands,
 and a few others here would be in different places, too.
 
 Fairfield would still be as high, dry, and boring as ever. :-)
 
 http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: One for the movie freaks -- Unscripted

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
I found these hard to discern since we, as the viewers, are not aware of what 
the real script was and so it is hard to appreciate the ad libbing. I assume 
the last lines spoken before the edit is the ad lib.  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Better not be any Gurus whacking off on that Youtube! 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Someone's supercut of their 25 top moments that weren't in the scripts, but 
improvised by the actors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE 





 


[FairfieldLife] RE: One for the movie freaks -- Unscripted

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
I saw the actor R. Lee Ermey in an interview and he mentioned that when his 
character, Gunnery Sergeant Hartman, said: I bet you're the kind of guy who 
would fuck a person in the ass and not even have the goddamn common courtesy to 
give him a reach-around Full Metal Jacket's director, Kubrick, asked him what 
that was supposed to mean! Ermey just rolled up his eyes in disbelief!  
 

 And the line where he says: Only steers and queers come from Texas . . . and 
you don't look much like a steer to me had me rolling in the aisle when I saw 
the movie at the cinema! 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 I found these hard to discern since we, as the viewers, are not aware of what 
the real script was and so it is hard to appreciate the ad libbing. I assume 
the last lines spoken before the edit is the ad lib.  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Better not be any Gurus whacking off on that Youtube! 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Someone's supercut of their 25 top moments that weren't in the scripts, but 
improvised by the actors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTFQBHBeleE 





 

 


[FairfieldLife] RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Should I assume that you are Roman Catholic? Or at least a fellow traveller? I 
understand Robin Carlsen became a Catholic convert - indeed a Catholic priest 
(?) after his adventures on the new-age circuit. Are you one of his former 
acolytes?
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Seraphita wrote:
 (snip)
  Isn't the vulgar notion of Christianity held by most believers radically 
  dualist? (Which 
  isn't surprising as western Christianity flows from Augustine.) Your 
  standard Christian 
  believes God is good and Satan is evil and History will end with a stand-up 
  fight 
  between the angels of light and the demons with the good angels destined to 
  prevail.
 

 Christianity is dualistic, yes, but what you describe above really isn't what 
the standard Christian believes (at least not in the U.S.). It's various 
fundamentalist-type denominations and sects that are preoccupied with the End 
Times and Armageddon and the Rapture and so on. Standard or mainline 
Christians don't necessarily disbelieve in the prophecies of Revelation, but 
they don't tend to take them literally, and they don't focus on them.
 




 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Re Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major rock 
star.:
 

 Yeah, I liked Can the Can. Quatro made it as a star in the UK (and *not* the 
USA) of course.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

 Detroit - Motor City Bands
 

 Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major rock star.
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro
 

 Suzi Quatro - Can The Can, 1973: 
 http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio
 

 
 

 

 On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Share Long sharelong60@... 
mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:
   noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene... 
 

 
 
 On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozguru@... 
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:
 
   
 Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.
 
 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The 
Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs. Those 
morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.
 
 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and 
their own scenes.
 
 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft muzak 
rock those countries created.
 
 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.
 
 Couldn't have said it better. :-)
 
 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.
 
 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)
 
  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.
 
 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.
 
 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.
 
 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.
 
 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 




 
 
 
 




 
 
 
 




 
 


[FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
Re And how about the California Dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach 
Boys, etc:
 

 Yes. As a Brit they were the acts that most impressed me. They conjured up a 
paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree lifestyle very, very far 
removed from the cold, wet, repressed north east of England where I was growing 
up. I'm not complaining though, as I went to school a few miles from Haworth 
where Emily Brontë wrote Wuthering Heights and that kind of doomed-romanticism 
vibe has a perverse appeal of its own. 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

 And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach Boys, 
etc. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.
 
 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The 
Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs. Those 
morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.
 
 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and 
their own scenes.
 
 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft muzak 
rock those countries created.
 
 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.
 
 Couldn't have said it better. :-)
 
 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.
 
 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)
 
  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.
 
 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.
 
 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.
 
 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.
 
 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)
 
 
 
 
 


 


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: NPD

2013-11-05 Thread dhamiltony2k5
 Awoelf, the leader seems is in to interpreting divine significations in things 
happening around him to make events and people seem extremely important to him 
and connect to larger things. He's an ultra religious guy. Has a lot of 
religious text in his head to draw on. The follower though is along for some 
kind of ride. I have run in to both around town now and had conversations 
letting them talk as I mostly asked questions and listened.
 This last weekend a clinical social worker was visiting town and ran in to 
these two around the square in Fairfield and talked with them a few times. The 
social worker by training and career clinical experience was appalled by what 
was publicly going on between the two. The leader being incredibly demeaning of 
the younger guy in front of other people, in front of public saying things 
extremely critical of the younger's dress, cleanliness and demeanor and then 
would do it in ways to get who ever was listening to him to agree and 
collaborate in the chastisement. The younger guy really was fine enough in 
dress, care and demeanor. 
 The social worker separately ran in to the younger person later and asked why 
he stayed around the leader[?]. The younger answered saying that, 'you get used 
to it'. Being squashed and humiliated? I talked with the younger guy 
independently at a different time and got a little of his story. Doesn't hold a 
bachelor degree but some college level study. Has worked doing some copy 
editing and in libraries and liked that. Might like to go to seminary. Says 
going back to family as an option is too complex. 
 
Follower is about 10 years younger than the leader. The follower evidently is 
estranged from family back home and has been with the leader for a while going 
to Jerusalem, Europe and some US places as they travel.

 

 
 The social worker was from out of town and only here in Fairfield attending a 
folk dance weekend for fun. The social worker by professional career experience 
was especially concerned by what was seen and heard. The older guy is really 
clever manipulative. 
 

 
 Awoelf, you evidently have had some experience with this. What would you tell 
the younger guy to do? There are resources that deal with this that he could 
turn to for extracting himself? It does not seem that he can just go back to 
family, friends or some place necessarily. Just wondering what you'd say to the 
follower.
 -Buck   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower
 

 This is so funny, a guy and a follower. Doesn't sound like this guy is too 
charismatic if he has one lonely follower in his retinue.
 

  who showed up in town in the last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells 
a good story, really smart but incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive 
with the younger follower. Lot like that other guy that used to post here. I 
sent this new guy on to find the afternoon Fairfield illumined experience 
banana-gram group. I think they have the resources to deal with him safely and 
will appreciate him a lot. 
 -Buck   

 




[FairfieldLife] RE: India#39;s Mission to Mars

2013-11-05 Thread s3raphita
The cost of the Indian Mars satellite is about $70 million. I know that would 
buy a lot of baked beans but for a satellite to Mars it's damned cheap. For 
comparison NASA expenditure runs at about $10 billion a year.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, jr_esq@... wrote:

 It appears that the mission controllers are using jyotish principles by 
launching their rocket on Tuesday, the day of Mars. 

 The mission is expensive and the costs could have been used for feeding the 
starving people in their country.  But it appears that the country wants to 
develop their space capability perhaps to retain their scientists in their 
country instead of letting them emigrate to the USA and other European 
countries.
 

 
http://news.yahoo.com/indias-first-mission-mars-launching-tuesday-233247300.html
 
http://news.yahoo.com/indias-first-mission-mars-launching-tuesday-233247300.html


 


[FairfieldLife] RE: RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-05 Thread authfriend
Seraphita wrote:
 
 Should I assume that you are Roman Catholic? Or at least a fellow traveller?
 

 No. I responded to an earlier question from you about my religious leanings a 
week or so ago; did you miss it?
 

 My family heritage is Christian (Presbyterian), but I didn't have a religious 
upbringing and am not a believer. You could say I'm sympathetic to religions 
generally; I've read a good bit of theology because it interests me, but that's 
about it.
 

  I understand Robin Carlsen became a Catholic convert - indeed a Catholic 
  priest (?) after his 
  adventures on the new-age circuit.
 

 He converted while he was still adventuring, actually. (Not sure I'd call 
those adventures New Age, unless you want to put TM in that category.) He 
convinced many of his followers to convert as well; a number of them are still 
devout Catholics. At the time, he thought Catholicism could be reconciled with 
TM.
 

 The group collapsed in chaos not long after that, and he went into seclusion 
for 25 years to sort himself out. He decided shortly after he began this 
recovery process that TM and Catholicism weren't compatible after all and 
rejected TM. A few years after that he decided the Church was no longer what it 
had been and had lost its divine authority with regard to salvation. At that 
point he rejected Catholicism as well.

 

 (Ann, I think I have the chronology straight here; if not, corrections are 
welcome.)
 

 He didn't become a priest. Not sure where you got that.
 

  Are you one of his former acolytes?

 

 Nope. I encountered him for the first time here on FFL, summer of 2011.
 



 Seraphita wrote:
 (snip)
  Isn't the vulgar notion of Christianity held by most believers radically 
  dualist? (Which 
  isn't surprising as western Christianity flows from Augustine.) Your 
  standard Christian 
  believes God is good and Satan is evil and History will end with a stand-up 
  fight 
  between the angels of light and the demons with the good angels destined to 
  prevail.
 

 Christianity is dualistic, yes, but what you describe above really isn't what 
the standard Christian believes (at least not in the U.S.). It's various 
fundamentalist-type denominations and sects that are preoccupied with the End 
Times and Armageddon and the Rapture and so on. Standard or mainline 
Christians don't necessarily disbelieve in the prophecies of Revelation, but 
they don't tend to take them literally, and they don't focus on them.
 




 




[FairfieldLife] RE: NPD

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
First of all Buck, it is great that you care and have evidently made some 
detailed observations of the situation. I think your instincts are on target 
with reference to the unhealthy relationship between leader and follower. 
Unfortunately there is probably nothing to be done. All you can do is what you 
do when there is someone dear to you who is either a drug addict or an 
alcoholic - you let them know you know what is going on and give them an 
opening to use you in some way that could free them from their predicament if 
they so wish. Obviously the hanger on doesn't feel there is anything that is 
more desirable in their lives to pursue than this manipulative religious guy. 
He wants to be with the stronger guy, he has chosen to put up with whatever his 
mentor wants to throw at him. He is getting some 'reward' for being abused 
and pushed around. Until he no longer feels good under this treatment he will 
stick around. 
 

 Frankly, from your description of this 'leader' guy, it appears he is under 
some delusion of knowing stuff others are not privy to. Therefore he is special 
and should be listened to. It is always the same, in one form or the other ; it 
is implied that 'if you follow me' you are special in some way and in contact 
with something, through me, that you would otherwise not have access to. It is 
tempting, heady and drug-like. I would like to meet this man, this prophet. I 
always enjoy seeing the trip these guys are on. I'm afraid I am a bit of a hard 
sell these days though. But you go ahead and see what you can learn Buck; human 
beings are infinitely varied and fascinating.
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

  Awoelf, the leader seems is in to interpreting divine significations in 
things happening around him to make events and people seem extremely important 
to him and connect to larger things. He's an ultra religious guy. Has a lot of 
religious text in his head to draw on. The follower though is along for some 
kind of ride. I have run in to both around town now and had conversations 
letting them talk as I mostly asked questions and listened.
 This last weekend a clinical social worker was visiting town and ran in to 
these two around the square in Fairfield and talked with them a few times. The 
social worker by training and career clinical experience was appalled by what 
was publicly going on between the two. The leader being incredibly demeaning of 
the younger guy in front of other people, in front of public saying things 
extremely critical of the younger's dress, cleanliness and demeanor and then 
would do it in ways to get who ever was listening to him to agree and 
collaborate in the chastisement. The younger guy really was fine enough in 
dress, care and demeanor. 
 The social worker separately ran in to the younger person later and asked why 
he stayed around the leader[?]. The younger answered saying that, 'you get used 
to it'. Being squashed and humiliated? I talked with the younger guy 
independently at a different time and got a little of his story. Doesn't hold a 
bachelor degree but some college level study. Has worked doing some copy 
editing and in libraries and liked that. Might like to go to seminary. Says 
going back to family as an option is too complex. 
 
Follower is about 10 years younger than the leader. The follower evidently is 
estranged from family back home and has been with the leader for a while going 
to Jerusalem, Europe and some US places as they travel.

 

 
 The social worker was from out of town and only here in Fairfield attending a 
folk dance weekend for fun. The social worker by professional career experience 
was especially concerned by what was seen and heard. The older guy is really 
clever manipulative. 
 

 
 Awoelf, you evidently have had some experience with this. What would you tell 
the younger guy to do? There are resources that deal with this that he could 
turn to for extracting himself? It does not seem that he can just go back to 
family, friends or some place necessarily. Just wondering what you'd say to the 
follower.
 -Buck   
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, awoelflebater@... wrote:

  
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 NPD Heads-up. Seems there is a guy and a follower
 

 This is so funny, a guy and a follower. Doesn't sound like this guy is too 
charismatic if he has one lonely follower in his retinue.
 

  who showed up in town in the last few days with these kinds of traits. Tells 
a good story, really smart but incredibly manipulative and evidently abusive 
with the younger follower. Lot like that other guy that used to post here. I 
sent this new guy on to find the afternoon Fairfield illumined experience 
banana-gram group. I think they have the resources to deal with him safely and 
will appreciate him a lot. 
 -Buck   

 



 


[FairfieldLife] RE: MANICHAEAN VIEWS OF BUDDHISM

2013-11-05 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Seraphita wrote:
 
  Should I assume that you are Roman Catholic? Or at least a fellow traveller?
 
 
 No. I responded to an earlier question from you about my religious leanings a 
week or so ago; did you miss it?
 

 My family heritage is Christian (Presbyterian), but I didn't have a religious 
upbringing and am not a believer. You could say I'm sympathetic to religions 
generally; I've read a good bit of theology because it interests me, but that's 
about it.
 
 
  I understand Robin Carlsen became a Catholic convert - indeed a Catholic 
  priest (?) after his 
  adventures on the new-age circuit.
 
 
 He converted while he was still adventuring, actually. (Not sure I'd call 
those adventures New Age, unless you want to put TM in that category.) He 
convinced many of his followers to convert as well; a number of them are still 
devout Catholics. At the time, he thought Catholicism could be reconciled with 
TM.
 

 The group collapsed in chaos not long after that, and he went into seclusion 
for 25 years to sort himself out. He decided shortly after he began this 
recovery process that TM and Catholicism weren't compatible after all and 
rejected TM. A few years after that he decided the Church was no longer what it 
had been and had lost its divine authority with regard to salvation. At that 
point he rejected Catholicism as well.

 

 (Ann, I think I have the chronology straight here; if not, corrections are 
welcome.)
 

 Sounds about right to me. Interestingly, I was the only one in the group who, 
having been raised Catholic, started to lose interest quite profoundly once RC 
began on his Catholic binge.  This was all known territory for me and the group 
started to lose its intensity and fascination for me. It was like they had 
arrived really late to a party I had already left hours before. Then all hell 
broke loose (ironically) and I was kicked out anyway. I guess maybe I wasn't 
showing enough devoutness to the cause. 
 

 He didn't become a priest. Not sure where you got that.
 
 
  Are you one of his former acolytes?
 
 

 Nope. I encountered him for the first time here on FFL, summer of 2011.
 



 Seraphita wrote:
 (snip)
  Isn't the vulgar notion of Christianity held by most believers radically 
  dualist? (Which 
  isn't surprising as western Christianity flows from Augustine.) Your 
  standard Christian 
  believes God is good and Satan is evil and History will end with a stand-up 
  fight 
  between the angels of light and the demons with the good angels destined to 
  prevail.
 

 Christianity is dualistic, yes, but what you describe above really isn't what 
the standard Christian believes (at least not in the U.S.). It's various 
fundamentalist-type denominations and sects that are preoccupied with the End 
Times and Armageddon and the Rapture and so on. Standard or mainline 
Christians don't necessarily disbelieve in the prophecies of Revelation, but 
they don't tend to take them literally, and they don't focus on them.
 




 



 


[FairfieldLife] Deepak Chopra - Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

2013-11-05 Thread Duveyoung
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW8X63TZ2-cfeature=c4-overviewlist=UUnlVpm_PkNiFlTWFb0sEUDg
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW8X63TZ2-cfeature=c4-overviewlist=UUnlVpm_PkNiFlTWFb0sEUDg

[FairfieldLife] Deepak Chopra - Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

2013-11-05 Thread Duveyoung
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW8X63TZ2-cfeature=c4-overviewlist=UUnlVpm_PkNiFlTWFb0sEUDg