[FairfieldLife] Haggar the Horrible: s-1568786

2014-09-26 Thread Jason jedi_sp...@yahoo.com [FairfieldLife]





http://www.arcamax.com/thefunnies/hagarthehorrible/s-1568786

[FairfieldLife] Revolver Tatoo

2014-09-26 Thread Jason jedi_sp...@yahoo.com [FairfieldLife]


Revolver Tatoo



http://growabrain.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/revolver_1.jpg

http://www.noguchi.no/storage/beatles_revolver_green.jpg?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1283110106107

https://i.imgur.com/2xgyzcC.jpg

[FairfieldLife] Abbey Road Tattoo

2014-09-26 Thread Jason jedi_sp...@yahoo.com [FairfieldLife]


Abbey Road Tattoo


http://www.hypesm.com/images/blogs/uploads/images/original.jpg

http://cdn.buzznet.com/assets/users16/hannahrjones13/default/abbey-road--large-msg-134244965508.jpg

http://artetattoo.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/tiago-tatoo03.jpg

https://i3.ytimg.com/vi/ZHnQC3yQneQ/hqdefault.jpg

http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr03/2013/3/7/5/enhanced-buzz-5269-1362652697-7.jpg

[FairfieldLife] Beatles; The White Album

2014-09-26 Thread Jason jedi_sp...@yahoo.com [FairfieldLife]


The White Album

http://www.cavernbeats.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/the-beatleswhitealbum.jpg


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71NyDOQ%2BgoL._SL1500_.jpg

[FairfieldLife] Sgt Pepper's tattoo

2014-09-26 Thread Jason jedi_sp...@yahoo.com [FairfieldLife]


Sgt Pepper's Loney hearts club band


https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8330/8080402458_f724f36796_z.jpg

http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/cms/binary/7492420.jpg

http://media.canada.com/idl/vapr/20121121/VAPR_20121121_FinalB3_75462_I001.jpg

https://d817ypd61vbww.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/media_responsive_widest/public/tile/image/SgtPepper.jpg?itok=mqi475Zr

[FairfieldLife] Davidson Diagram - Chart

2014-02-23 Thread Jason
Davidson Diagram



http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/scharp1/Davidson%20Diagram.jpg

[FairfieldLife] East - West -philosophy chart

2014-02-23 Thread Jason


East - West -philosophy chart




http://sloclassicalacademy.com/site/assets/blogphotos13-14/philosophychart.jpg

[FairfieldLife] Dr. Robert Lanza ; Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to Understanding the Nature of the Universe

2014-02-15 Thread Jason


Dr. Robert Lanza ; Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to 
Understanding the Nature of the Universe


http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/scientists-claim-that-quantum-theory-proves-consciousness-moves-to-another-universe-at-death/

[FairfieldLife] The Yin and Yang relationship of Socialism and Capitalism

2014-02-14 Thread Jason



The Yin and Yang relationship of Socialism and Capitalism
 





https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-U8Ujb0oDMcM/Uv4SLw0FJQI/A3o/2GO6_2OKIoA/s844/Socialism_Capitalism_YinYang_44.png

chart charts diagram


[FairfieldLife] Freewill-determinism map - chart

2014-02-02 Thread Jason


A freewill-determinism map - chart


 
[https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-5fvLzyAtPcc/Uu5KFPmJPoI/A3M/\
IZzPXprCyNA/s606/FREEWILL_22.png]

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-5fvLzyAtPcc/Uu5KFPmJPoI/A3M/I\
ZzPXprCyNA/s606/FREEWILL_22.png
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-5fvLzyAtPcc/Uu5KFPmJPoI/A3M/\
IZzPXprCyNA/s606/FREEWILL_22.png





Sorry I previously posted smaller size charts, by mistake.

Here are the actual, original size Charts - maps.


https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/M\
Szeg8LhvGc/s740/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/\
MSzeg8LhvGc/s740/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif




https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p0lXZRbIm6g/Us0kJ_uJo5I/A0w/P\
a6dBQMP64o/s600/Rough_Chart.gif
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p0lXZRbIm6g/Us0kJ_uJo5I/A0w/\
Pa6dBQMP64o/s600/Rough_Chart.gif




https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kM7UUDe2hWY/Uu1cBoV0IFI/A1g/Q\
6qTb8pvcPI/s785/Circle_of_Philosophy_1.jpg
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kM7UUDe2hWY/Uu1cBoV0IFI/A1g/\
Q6qTb8pvcPI/s785/Circle_of_Philosophy_1.jpg





Chart  map  diagram







[FairfieldLife] Complex phil chart - history tree

2014-02-02 Thread Jason


A complex phil chart - history tree



  [http://freespace.virgin.net/g.ramos-poqui/Philosophy/WPhiloChart.GIF]

http://freespace.virgin.net/g.ramos-poqui/Philosophy/WPhiloChart.GIF
http://freespace.virgin.net/g.ramos-poqui/Philosophy/WPhiloChart.GIF







[FairfieldLife] Science Philosophy Circle chart

2014-02-02 Thread Jason


A Science Philosophy Circle chart


 
[https://koppa.jyu.fi/avoimet/hum/menetelmapolkuja/en/methodmap/philosop\
hy-of-science/images/circle_phil.gif]

https://koppa.jyu.fi/avoimet/hum/menetelmapolkuja/en/methodmap/philosoph\
y-of-science/images/circle_phil.gif
https://koppa.jyu.fi/avoimet/hum/menetelmapolkuja/en/methodmap/philosop\
hy-of-science/images/circle_phil.gif







[FairfieldLife] Philosophy Questions - Chart - map

2014-02-02 Thread Jason

Philosophy  Questions - Chart - map


  [http://staffweb.hkbu.edu.hk/ppp/tp4/top01_files/image003.gif]

http://staffweb.hkbu.edu.hk/ppp/tp4/top01_files/image003.gif
http://staffweb.hkbu.edu.hk/ppp/tp4/top01_files/image003.gif







[FairfieldLife] The US foreign policy flow chart

2014-02-02 Thread Jason

The US foreign policy flow chart


 
[http://tellitlikeitis.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/us-foreign-policy-flo\
w-chart.gif%3Fw%3D426%26h%3D538]

http://tellitlikeitis.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/us-foreign-policy-flow\
-chart.gif%3Fw%3D426%26h%3D538
http://tellitlikeitis.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/us-foreign-policy-flo\
w-chart.gif%3Fw%3D426%26h%3D538







[FairfieldLife] Wiccan circle of Philoshophy - map-chart

2014-02-01 Thread Jason

The Wiccan circle of Philoshophy - map-chart



 
[https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kM7UUDe2hWY/Uu1cBoV0IFI/A1g/\
Q6qTb8pvcPI/s785/Circle_of_Philosophy_1.jpg]

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kM7UUDe2hWY/Uu1cBoV0IFI/A1g/Q\
6qTb8pvcPI/s785/Circle_of_Philosophy_1.jpg
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kM7UUDe2hWY/Uu1cBoV0IFI/A1g/\
Q6qTb8pvcPI/s785/Circle_of_Philosophy_1.jpg







[FairfieldLife] Re: Deploying Meditators for Peace

2014-01-31 Thread Jason


 ---  salyavin808  wrote:
 
   Perhaps but maybe having such a mythos also helps keep people
 together in one place where they can reinforce each others beliefs. If
 everyone is spread out it gets hard to keep reality at bay. I remember
 moving into an academy and it was a rapid and steep lesson in the TM
 language and customs. Probably something about it in Cults 101, which
 doesn't mean it was done deliberately to brainwash the newbies, but
 living with others in a strong belief system does have the effect of
 making you conform or be cast out.
 
   And if everyone shares a town and worldview, what better way to
keep
 the money coming in! Very easy to frame world events through your own
 prism and have everyone see the rainbow the same way.
 
   And people are less likely to raise tricky questions if their
social
 and family life depends on staying part of the herd.
 
   It's all jolly clever.
 

---  TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Especially if you've created a myth -- pretty much since Day One -- of
 the terrible things that will happen to you if you ever leave the
 herd. Think about the phrases Off The Program and off the path
and
 losing one's way that we heard so often. Think of the *shunning*
that
 took place whenever someone left. Think how they were treated, and
 referred to: Someday he/she will realize his/her mistake and 'come
 back'.

 This mindset is part and parcel of Buck's whole schtick. It feels
weird
 to those of us who no longer think that way because it's based in
fear:
 Never leave the herd.



There were two big lies.

Lie no 1), This is the highest path, purest path, the
supreme path, the most sublime path, and also the easiest
and effortless path.

Lie no 2), The eastern version of the 'hell fire and
brimstone' scare.  What will happen to you if you stray off
the path, be off the program etc.  This 'fear and scare'
tactic works because fear is the most primitive and
primordial emotions.






 
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, salyavin808 wrote:
   
   Why not just be happy that you've got a nice little technique that
 makes you feel happy and relaxed, why does it have to be the most
 ultimate thing of any kind ever?
 
  ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb@ wrote:
 
  In one phrase, because Maharishi's idea of enlightenment was always
 my enlightenment.
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: The Historic Meissner-like Effect [ME] of Peace:

2014-01-31 Thread Jason

 ---  anartaxius@... wrote:

 Science moves on but pseudoscience does not. The Meissner
 effect currently requires very low temperatures (like
 -187°C) to work. This whole thing with the Meissner
 effect was an analogy. The attempt to explain (assuming it
 were true) meditators etc., doing a group program by using
 the analogy of the Meissner effect. Meditation etc., is a
 whole other system. If it has rules they are not the same
 rules as in low temperature superconducting physics. You
 are mistaking the use of an analogy for reality rather
 than noticing it as an attempt at an explanatory device.
 That the Meissner effect works in physics does not mean
 that its effects carry over into meditative systems. That
 would have to be demonstrated by whole other means, and
 this has not been done, not even close, in a way that
 would satisfy most scientists. Science does not even have
 any agreement as to what consciousness is. We intuitively
 have some sense of that, but defining it in a way that
 makes it scientifically respectable subject matter is
 something else altogether.


  People practicing spiritual techniques may go through
 many stages of experiential transformation in which the
 sense of what consciousness changes (you know, like TC, CC
 etc.) and it is difficult to get a handle on just what it
 going on from a scientific point of view. Frankly I think
 the mystery of conscious experience will never be solved
 scientifically even if we humans manage to make conscious
 machines someday. It is absolutely paradoxical. You can
 live the paradox, but an explanation that is really
 satisfactory may never come.


One reason it looks paradoxical is because a lot of
philosophical positions seems to have some logical basis,
even if it's not complete logic.

The phenomenon called noise in biology. When they tried to
clone animals, geneticaly identical clones manifested
differences in appearance.

The enigmatic puzzle of the structure of the benzene
molecule. It has neither single bond nor double bond.  A
highly advance mathematics is used to explain the half
bonds.

And then, the wave-particle duality in physics.  If you see
the wave, you don't see the particle.  If you see the
particle, you can't see the wave.

And then, Cantor's proof in mathematics that some infinities
are greater than some infinities, and Godels incompleteness
theorum.

The paradox simply doesn't stop there. It goes all the way
to the Unified Field itself.  It is silent and dynamic at
the same time, simultaneously.  It's Shiva, empty void,
static, and yet it's Vishnu, totality, vibrant, full of
potentalities.

As Paligap mentioned, Mysterianism rules.!




  I have no objection to people learning to meditate or
 practicing their techniques in groups, but fraudulent
 explanations and rigged science is not in the end a means
 to truth.


  --- dhamiltony2k5@ wrote:
 
  Dear Anartaxius, Yes, we are talking history here and
  what a crock you trot out here.  Science moves on and
  you are out of date with this old saw of an argument.
  It was only valid in context of time.  But time has
  moved on.  That guy is dead and long gone. Anartaxius,
  did you happen to catch the interview John Hagelin gave
  with Rick Archer. That had a very good summary update of
  where science currently is with consciousness. See
  Buddha at the Gas Pump, http://batgap.com/
  http://batgap.com/
  

  Anartaxius writes:
  
  
   Heinz Rudolf Pagels, Ph.D. (1939-1988) Physicist. Was
   executive director and CEO of New York Academy of
   Sciences; President of the International League for
   Human Rights
  
   My summary opinion, as a theoretical physicist
   specializing in the area of quantum field theory, is
   that the views expressed in the literature issued by
   the Maharishi International University, and appearing
   in the World Government News and other publications
   associated with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi that purport
   to find a connection between the recent ideas of
   theoretical physics--unified field theory, the vacuum
   state and collective phenomena--and states of
   consciousness attained by transcendental meditation
   are false and profoundly misleading. No qualified
   physicist that I know would claim to find such a
   connection without knowingly committing fraud.
  
   Individuals not trained professionally in modern
   physics could easily come to believe, on the basis of
   the presentations in the Maharishi literature, that a
   large number of qualified scientists agree with the
   purported connection between modern physics and
   meditation methods. Nothing could be further from the
   truth. What was especially interesting to me, in
   reviewing this literature, is the claim put forth by
   the Maharishi and his followers, that transcendental
   meditation and 'The Science of Creative Intelligence'
   qualify as a science. Although the word 'science' is
   much abused, it continues to imply an adherent to
   logic, the 

[FairfieldLife] A philosophy circle chart (kslinker)

2014-01-31 Thread Jason


A philosophy circle chart   (kslinker)


  [http://kslinker.com/PHI_MAP1.jpg]




http://kslinker.com/PHI_MAP1.jpg http://kslinker.com/PHI_MAP1.jpg






[FairfieldLife] Brown's bootcamp chart

2014-01-31 Thread Jason

Brown's bootcamp chart


 
[http://www.employeefactor.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/AlfredLin.jpg]

http://www.employeefactor.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/AlfredLin.jpg
http://www.employeefactor.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/AlfredLin.jpg







[FairfieldLife] Re: The Historic Meissner-like Effect [ME] of Peace:

2014-01-31 Thread Jason


What exactly do you mean by different sizes?  infinity is an
infinity.

How do grok an infinity? Your answer puzzles me. Cantor
himself went mad during his latter days, trying to resolve
this issue.


---  Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 Jason, it's quite easy to grok different sizes of infinities. Think
about all the integers: 1, 2, 3...Now think about all the even integers:
2, 4, 6...Are they not both infinite? Yet which is necessarily bigger?!
Thus we have different sizes of infinity! Kind of mind blowing. Yay!



 On Friday, January 31, 2014 8:15 AM, Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:



  ---  anartaxius@ wrote:
 
  Science moves on but pseudoscience does not. The Meissner
  effect currently requires very low temperatures (like
  -187°C) to work. This whole thing with the Meissner
  effect was an analogy. The attempt to explain (assuming it
  were true) meditators etc., doing a group program by using
  the analogy of the Meissner effect. Meditation etc., is a
  whole other system. If it has rules they are not the same
  rules as in low temperature superconducting physics. You
  are mistaking the use of an analogy for reality ratherÂ
  than noticing it as an attempt at an explanatory device.
  That the Meissner effect works in physics does not mean
  that its effects carry over into meditative systems. That
  would have to be demonstrated by whole other means, and
  this has not been done, not even close, in a way that
  would satisfy most scientists. Science does not even have
  any agreement as to what consciousness is. We intuitively
  have some sense of that, but defining it in a way that
  makes it scientifically respectable subject matter is
  something else altogether.
 
 
   People practicing spiritual techniques may go through
  many stages of experiential transformation in which the
  sense of what consciousness changes (you know, like TC, CC
  etc.) and it is difficult to get a handle on just what it
  going on from a scientific point of view. Frankly I think
  the mystery of conscious experience will never be solvedÂ
  scientifically even if we humans manage to make conscious
  machines someday. It is absolutely paradoxical. You canÂ
  live the paradox, but an explanation that is reallyÂ
  satisfactory may never come.
 

 One reason it looks paradoxical is because a lot of
 philosophical positions seems to have some logical basis,
 even if it's not complete logic.

 The phenomenon called noise in biology. When they tried to
 clone animals, geneticaly identical clones manifested
 differences in appearance.

 The enigmatic puzzle of the structure of the benzene
 molecule. It has neither single bond nor double bond.  A
 highly advance mathematics is used to explain the half
 bonds.

 And then, the wave-particle duality in physics.  If you see
 the wave, you don't see the particle.  If you see the
 particle, you can't see the wave.

 And then, Cantor's proof in mathematics that some infinities
 are greater than some infinities, and Godels incompleteness
 theorum.

 The paradox simply doesn't stop there. It goes all the way
 to the Unified Field itself.  It is silent and dynamic at
 the same time, simultaneously.  It's Shiva, empty void,
 static, and yet it's Vishnu, totality, vibrant, full of
 potentalities.

 As Paligap mentioned, Mysterianism rules.!



 
   I have no objection to people learning to meditate or
  practicing their techniques in groups, but fraudulent
  explanations and rigged science is not in the end a means
  to truth.
 

   --- dhamiltony2k5@ wrote:
  
   Dear Anartaxius, Yes, we are talking history here and
   what a crock you trot out here.  Science moves on and
   you are out of date with this old saw of an argument.
   It was only valid in context of time.  But time hasÂ
   moved on.  That guy is dead and long gone. Anartaxius,
   did you happen to catch the interview John Hagelin gave
   with Rick Archer. That had a very good summary update of
   where science currently is with consciousness. SeeÂ
   Buddha at the Gas Pump, http://batgap.com/
   http://batgap.com/
  

   Anartaxius writes:
   
   
Heinz Rudolf Pagels, Ph.D. (1939-1988) Physicist. Was
executive director and CEO of New York Academy ofÂ
Sciences; President of the International League for
Human Rights
   
My summary opinion, as a theoretical physicistÂ
specializing in the area of quantum field theory, is
that the views expressed in the literature issued by
the Maharishi International University, and appearing
in the World Government News and other publications
associated with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi that purport
to find a connection between the recent ideas of
theoretical physics--unified field theory, the vacuum
state and collective phenomena--and states of
consciousness attained by transcendental meditation
are false and profoundly misleading. No qualified
physicist that I know would claim to find such a
connection without

[FairfieldLife] Phil map-chart in flash

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

This seems to be a philosophy map-chart in flash or Java.

http://www.mindmeister.com/23290325/western-philosophy
http://www.mindmeister.com/23290325/western-philosophy

You can drag the page around with your cursor.

BTW, if I post a pic in base64 format, the post doesn't even
show up in mail-archives.

Hey Rick, can you tell the mail-archives owner to support
graphics?





[FairfieldLife] Yahoo truncates posts with base64 pics

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

I think yahoo truncates the post if you post pictures in
base64 format.

I wonder what is the overload limit?






http://cmapspublic3.ihmc.us/rid%3D1187291914862_268305868_41
25/Stefanie%20philosophy%20map.cmap%3Frid%3D1187291914862_26
8305868_4125%26partName%3Dhtmljpeg?rid=1187291914862_2683058
68_4125partName=htmljpeg
http://cmapspublic3.ihmc.us/rid%3D1187291914862_268305868_4125/Stefanie\
%20philosophy%20map.cmap%3Frid%3D1187291914862_268305868_4125%26partName\
%3Dhtmljpeg?rid=1187291914862_268305868_4125partName=htmljpeg







[FairfieldLife] Aaron Gusman's map-chart - Teaching

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

I wonder how many teachers in MUM or teachers in general
follow the concepts in the chart?





http://computingteacher.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/my-teaching-philosop\
hy-concept-map1.jpg
http://computingteacher.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/my-teaching-philoso\
phy-concept-map1.jpg







[FairfieldLife] A food chart

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

 A food Chart



 
[http://ranjanarnair.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/food-pyramid-with-a-min\
d-map.png]

http://ranjanarnair.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/food-pyramid-with-a-mind\
-map.png
http://ranjanarnair.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/food-pyramid-with-a-min\
d-map.png







[FairfieldLife] An ontology map-chart.

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

An ontology map-chart.

I wonder what Robin would think of it?



 
[http://accuracyandaesthetics.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/ontology_di\
mensions_map_20070423b1.jpg]

http://accuracyandaesthetics.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/ontology_dim\
ensions_map_20070423b1.jpg
http://accuracyandaesthetics.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/ontology_di\
mensions_map_20070423b1.jpg

















  [http://www.mc.maricopa.edu/~barsp59601/graph/charts/philchart.jpg]

http://www.mc.maricopa.edu/~barsp59601/graph/charts/philchart.jpg







[FairfieldLife] Re: Yahoo truncates posts with base64 pics

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

Yes, I read it and have a fair idea of it.

In firefox 'inspect element' there is one more tag called
IMG class=... I assume this is not as essential as IMG
src= and alt= width and height?


---  Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

 I assume you've read the information here regarding using the img tag?
 https://help.yahoo.com/kb/groups/SLN2506.html

 On 01/30/2014 12:16 PM, Jason wrote:
 
 
 
  Yeah, it seems to work only for small images.
 
 
  ---  Bhairitu noozguru@ wrote:
  
   You have a 319K image.  The limit is supposedly 64K. Just try a
small
   image and see if it works.
  
   On 01/30/2014 11:00 AM, Jason wrote:
   
   
I think yahoo truncates the post if you post pictures in
base64 format.
   
I wonder what is the overload limit?
   
  
 
 
http://cmapspublic3.ihmc.us/rid%3D1187291914862_268305868_4125/Stefanie%\
20philosophy%20map.cmap%3Frid%3D1187291914862_268305868_4125
%26partName%3Dhtmljpeg?rid=1187291914862_268305868_4125partName=htmljpe\
g
 
 




[FairfieldLife] A Tao and Buddha enlightenment map-chart.

2014-01-30 Thread Jason


Tao and Buddha enlightenment map-chart.




  [http://personaltao.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Enlightenment.png]

http://personaltao.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Enlightenment.png
http://personaltao.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Enlightenment.png







[FairfieldLife] Tao and Buddha enlightenment map-chart

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

Tao and Buddha enlightenment map-chart



  [http://personaltao.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Enlightenment.png]

http://personaltao.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Enlightenment.png
http://personaltao.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Enlightenment.png







[FairfieldLife] A chart by Gillikin

2014-01-30 Thread Jason


A chart by Gillikin


  [http://www.gillikin.org/wp-content/uploads/philosophy-taxonomy.jpg]

http://www.gillikin.org/wp-content/uploads/philosophy-taxonomy.jpg
http://www.gillikin.org/wp-content/uploads/philosophy-taxonomy.jpg







[FairfieldLife] Branches of philosophers chart

2014-01-30 Thread Jason

Branches of philosophers chart



  [http://riemed.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/new-sheet_4380m.jpg]

http://riemed.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/new-sheet_4380m.jpg







[FairfieldLife] Re: This is the fellow who contested the will of Guru Dev

2014-01-29 Thread Jason

I don't think anybody in the west supported this 
Shankaracharya of Dwarka, Swaroopanand Saraswati.

He seems to be greedy for all the four seats.! He is close 
to the secular Congress party.

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2014-01-24/india
/46561766_1_narendra-modi-shankaracharya-swami-swaroopanand


---  nablusoss1008 no_reply@... wrote:

 
  Long championed by the Maharishi-denouncers in the West to be entitled to 
 not only 1 but 2 Shankaracharya seats ! 
  
 
  As the Americans say: Go figure ! :-)
  
 
  
 http://ibnlive.in.com/news/senior-priest-slaps-journalist-on-being-asked-about-narendra-modi/447283-37-64.html
  
 http://ibnlive.in.com/news/senior-priest-slaps-journalist-on-being-asked-about-narendra-modi/447283-37-64.html





[FairfieldLife] Re: Pictures in mail-archive??

2014-01-29 Thread Jason

I don't think pics show up in the off-site mail-archive.



http://www.concertposterart.com/images/posters/detail/Beach-
Boys-with-Maharishi-Mahesh-Yogi-1968-Concert-Poster-Type-Ad.
jpg
http://www.concertposterart.com/images/posters/detail/Beach-Boys-with-M\
aharishi-Mahesh-Yogi-1968-Concert-Poster-Type-Ad.jpg

 Is it possible to make pictures appear in mail-archive?







https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p0lXZRbIm6g/Us0kJ_uJo5I/A0w/P
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p0lXZRbIm6g/Us0kJ_uJo5I/A0w/\
Pa6dBQMP64o/s512/Rough_Chart.gif
 a6dBQMP64o/s512/Rough_Chart.gif
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p0lXZRbIm6g/Us0kJ_uJo5I/A0w/\
Pa6dBQMP64o/s512/Rough_Chart.gif





[FairfieldLife] A bubble pebble Chart - Philosophy

2014-01-29 Thread Jason


Another philosophy chart.














[FairfieldLife] Re: A bubble pebble Chart - Philosophy

2014-01-29 Thread Jason





http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/t_original/17rvsifz65in\
qjpg.jpg
http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/t_original/17rvsifz65i\
nqjpg.jpg


 Another philosophy chart.






http://www.mc.maricopa.edu/~barsp59601/graph/charts/philchart.jpg
http://www.mc.maricopa.edu/~barsp59601/graph/charts/philchart.jpg







[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-22 Thread Jason


  Barry Wrote:
 But then AIDS came along. And suddenly the old fears came with them.
And the world changed again, but this time in a more restrictive, more
fearful direction.


---  awoelflebater@... wrote:

  I think much of the fear around AIDS has faded away and I think a lot
of this has to do with the passage of time, the fact that there exist
more effective HIV drugs and because many straight people still think
of it as a gay disease. I think the gay disease opinion is the result
of not only ignorance but of  a 'holier-than-thou' attitude that these
people think will somehow keep them safe from contracting the HIV virus.
My observationis that the average person under the age of 30 really
doesn't think about AIDS as a real threat to them.


In the 1920's, a french scientist Serge Voronoff believed
that chimps were more virile and started taking tissue
strips from chimp testes and grafted them onto the testes of
men.

Some scientists say that this might have been the route HIV
took to enter into humans.

http://www.coastalpost.com/99/6/9.htm
http://www.coastalpost.com/99/6/9.htm

This world is simply unpredictable and there is no telling
what unintended consequences might be.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/365287
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/365287

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/365293
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/365293





[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-22 Thread Jason

---  doctordumbass@... no_reply@... wrote:

 I think absent any social codes, the difference in sexual promiscuity
between males and females comes down to consequences. Prior to birth
control, if a female had sex with a male, she could be literally
burdened with offspring. Not so for the male. Add in the greater
physical strength of the male, and you have all the seeds for the
difference in attitudes.
 The Pill greatly eliminated the risk factor of pregnancy, for women,
and certainly in the West, physical strength is no longer a guarantee of
greater economic power. So attitudes are changing too. Regarding the
60's, I saw a lot of sexual expression, but also a lot of conventional
sex roles between men and women, simply dressed up in strange clothing
and fashion.


---  s3raphita@... wrote:

 Marriage is for women the commonest mode of livelihood, and the total
amount of undesired sex endured by women is probably greater in marriage
than in prostitution. - Bertrand Russell


  The human race has emerged from prehistory and has developed its
culture for millennia but we're still confused about sex. I mean what
could be simpler? Boy meets girl. Then . . . well you know what.

  Why is something as elementary and essential as the attraction
between the sexes still a battlefield and the source of constant
disputes (the War of the Sexes)? I've sometimes wondered if the
problem is equality - the idea that men and women must be regarded as
equal in all respects. If we allow ourselves to generalise, men do
*seem* to be more promiscuous than women; women do *seem* to be looking
for a permanent partner. (Proof? Gay males have far more partners and
far more sex than straight men. Lesbians have far less sex than any
other group. Heterosexuals lie between those two figures.) This
difference was recognised in the Victorian period when a marriage
between a man and woman was assumed to be permanent (and divorces were
regarded as scandalous) but at the same time there was an army of
prostitutes to satisfy the novelty-seeking desires of the male
population. I don't have an answer to the discrepancy - I just think we
should look at the issue with wide-open eyes.

 Maybe it is just a result of women having being controlled by men for
centuries; men who had their supremacy recognised by law. Now that that
patriarchy is breaking down the differences between the sexual habits of
men and women *may* vanish completely. But I certainly don't rule out
the idea that such differences are rooted in biology.

  There are some wonderful ironies here. Is putting women on a pedestal
(as happened in the 19th century with the cult of the lady an
acknowledgment of women's superiority (or at least equality) or is it a
cunning (probably subconscious) put down?

  I've quoted Malcolm Muggeridge twice before on FFL. Here it is again:
It's impossible to string together three consecutive sentences about
sex without making a complete hypocrite of yourself. This post must
make me guilty as charged. One thing is for sure: the sexual utopia
envisaged by the sixties revolutionaries has failed to materialise. On
the other hand the days when a woman could die from sexual hysteria
(it really did happen - see Ruskin's infatuation with Rose La Touche)
are long gone!



The difference in physical size in genders is called
dimorphism.  In gorrilas where male is almost twice the size
of the female, the male is highly polygamus.

In species where there is no dimorphism at all, ie male and
female look identical, the male is monogamus.

We humans are slightly dimorphic. So the human male has some
polygamic tendencies.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_dimorphism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_dimorphism





[FairfieldLife] Re: Advaita is about inherent freedom

2014-01-22 Thread Jason

Emptybill, there was a two way, crossflow of influence between
Hinduism and Buddhism, for thousands of years. Thus there
are some similarities.

According to Nagarjuna of the Mahayana school, Nothing can
arise independently on its own. Everything arose
co-dependently along with you. Therefore, the phenomenal
world around has no independent existence of it's own. So
they are empty (sunyata), not real.

Nagarjuna in Mulamadhyamaka karika, understands the world's
transient and impermanent nature to mean that nothing has
its own essence or independent existence. Everything is
'empty' (sunyata), in so far as it depends on other things
in order to exist. For example, a table can only be said to
exist in so far as four pieces of wood are connected to a
base. If the legs are taken off, it is no longer a table.
Therefore, it has no independent existence.

A candle is burning because it is lit. It's not that
lighting the candle caused it to burn, but rather that the
candle's burning is the result of the condition of it being
lit. Likewise, the candle is burning because it is made out
of wax. The candle is burning because of a number of
different conditions which together allow us to understand
it in this way.


In the Mandukya Karika, Gaudapada's commentary on the
Mandukya Upanishad,  Brahman cannot undergo any alteration.
The Brahman is unchanging, (changeless). If no change can
happen in the Brahman, nothing can arise from Brahman. Thus,
the phenomenal world around has no underlying cause.
Therefore it is not real, it's maya.

There is no real origination or destruction, only apparent
origination or destruction. From the level of ultimate truth
(paramarthata) the phenomenal world is Maya.

  Ajatavada is proved by the reasoning that anything that has
  a beginning must have an end. Anything that has no
  beginning, has no end either. The consciousness therefore,
  is only reality, but appears as objects like a burning
  stick swung about appears to be continuous.


---  emptybill@... wrote:

 I have already provided a scholarly synopsis of the real differences
between Shankara's Advaita and Vijñanavada Buddhism. Many times I
have also explained how and why Shankara refuted the same.


  You answer has always been the same - Yeah, but ... and then you
continue onward without considering it at all. You only want to appear
as Mr. Professor so you continue to repeat stuff you read that was
written 10-20 years ago.


  You simply waste my time. Therefore I don't want to waste more with
your b.s. and your it is all about Prof..Willy P-Dog.


  This is apparently how you understand both Advaita and Trika:

  I am the Universe. It's all about Me. It's my Maya.


  --- punditster@ wrote:
 
   There is nothing absurd about any of my citations and they have not
been refuted by any scholars that I know of. If you have any sources
you'd like to cite, please list them so we can read them for ourselves.
 
   mAyA - illusion , unreality , deception , fraud , trick , sorcery ,
witchcraft magic RV; an unreal or illusory image, phantom , apparition
ib. (esp. ibc= false, unreal, illusory; duplicity (with Buddhists one of
the 24 minor evil passions) Dharmas. Illusion (identified in the Samkhya
with Prakriti or Pradha1na and in that system, as well as in the
Vedanta, regarded as the source of the visible universe.
 
 
   Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon:
   http://www.sanskrit-lexicon.uni-koeln.de/cgi-bin/tamil/recherche
  http://www.sanskrit-lexicon.uni-koeln.de/cgi-bin/tamil/recherche
  

On Tue, Jan 21, 2014 at 8:46 PM, emptybill@... wrote:
  
  All of these absurd assertions have long ago been refuted by
excellent scholars. You simply don't know what you are talking about -
to put it quite plainly.
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-18 Thread Jason

   
   --- s3raphita wrote:
   
The line I am a great believer in the uni-sex dress-code was
copied over (by Yahoo not me!) from a post by Jason. I don't
advocate any dress
codes. Jason can defend that view if he wishes.
  
  --- TurquoiseB turquoiseb@ wrote:
  
   Just in case you were wondering, I understood that, and so my rap
this
   morning was a reply to Jason as much as it was Buck, who tried to
   springboard off of it with more of his gotta keep the sinners in
line
   any way we can horseshit.
  
   I don't advocate any kind of dress code, but *especially* one that
   tries to make women or men look sexless. I, for one, would love to
   hear Jason defend that idea, and doubt that he could.
  
   I extended my rap to cover the uniforms worn by various religious
   groups and cults. Historically, such uniforms (special dress for
priests,
   monks, or nuns, or even recommended dress for lay people) are
about
   mind control more than anything else. The priesthood always needed
   something to *make themselves seem better or more special, and
   wearing
   certain robes that no one else was able to wear was one way to
achieve
   that, and thus achieve the control they wanted to maintain over
their
   flocks. Note that in most cults or religious orders, the
   robes/costumes worn by lower class monks are usually different
and
   less ornate and special than those worn by people higher up in
the
   hierarchy. (Think the ludicrous costumes worn by TMO Rajas) This
is
   also about control.
  
   Making the monks and nuns wear costumes, period, is also an aspect
of
   control freakdom, because the higher-ups want to remind them at
all
   times that they are part of an org that is better and more
powerful
   than they are, and to remind them of their vows, meaning their
   willingness to follow rules laid on them by other people.
  
   One thing I think you'll find if you look into it is that those on
   this
   forum recommending uniforms for monks, nuns, and other members
of
   religious or spiritual organizations have in most cases never been
   actual *members* of such organizations. In other words, they're
trying
   to justify rules they never followed.
  
   Similarly, when people like Jason mouth off about unisex
clothing, I
   think you'll find that they're always talking about making the
women
   look more like men. That was the point of me posting my photo of
the
   guy from Rocky Horror wearing a corset, garter belt, stockings,
and high
   heels. If ALL men and women dressed like that, that would be
unisex.
   But I think we all know that's not exactly what Jason had in mind.
I
   kinda doubt he's going to be the first in line to get his dress
and
   high heels and wear them everywhere. :-)

  Jason wrote:
 
  That is exactly the point. You wouldn't dress like a woman
  when you go to work. Your employer just wouldn't accept it.
 
  My point is that it perpetuates gender related prejudices
  and bias on a very subtle level.
 
  People can dress as they want in their private spaces
  (homes). In public spaces, some degree of conservative
  uni-dress-code will enable women to break glass ceilings. It
  also encourages comradeship and makes them feel that they
  are part of the 'family'.
 
  It's important to make that distinction between private
  spaces and public spaces, on this dress-code issue.

 --- turquoiseb@ wrote:

  Bullshit. And furthermore, bullshit written by a man who has no
experience being a woman, and probably no experience breaking through
ceilings in the workplace, glass or otherwise.

 I, on the other hand, have known a number of women who have not only
disproved the glass ceiling myth, they have done so while retaining
their individuality, their personalities, and their chosen mode of
dress.


---  awoelflebater@... wrote:

  This always says it all when it comes to Bawwy. Still laughing...

You know Ann, deification of women by asymmetric
dress-codes, or putting them on a pedestal, inversely
stereotypes them and puts severe limitations on them. It's
almost a form of reverse slavery.

In other words, hyper-sexualisation of women is as bad as
de-sexualisaton of women.  Western society is as imbalanced
as eastern societies.

 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424462/France-bans-girls-beaut\
y-contests-bid-stop-hyper-sexualisation-children.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424462/France-bans-
girls-beauty-contests-bid-stop-hyper-sexualisation-children.
html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424462/France-bans-girls-beaut\
y-contests-bid-stop-hyper-sexualisation-children.html

http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/sexualisation-of-t
he-western-woman/article4414595.ece
http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/sexualisation-of-the-western-\
woman/article4414595.ece

Where is Judy when I need her? Barry is too naive to
understand the implications of this.



 For example, the woman who originally helped to get me my job at ILOG.
I had

[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-18 Thread Jason

It's a paradox. Capitalism drives innovation and works well
for the economic system.

But, the same capitalism also has a destructive effect on
the Political system and a destructive effect on the
Cultural system.

One of the major challenges for any modern civilisation is
to insulate and protect the 'political system' and the
'cultural system' from the deleterious effects of capitalism
and crass commercialism, while ensuring that the economic
system functions in capitalism.


---  dhamiltony2k5@... wrote:

 Yep, out of balance fucking and gone fucking too far
Over-Secularization; Heck, we're talking bad upbringing that allows for
all this destructive spirituality of ill-disciplined over-sexualization.
What are parents thinking when they let their offspring dress like they
do? A lot of children will spend the rest of their adult lives in
recovery straightening out their subtle-energy bodies for all the
spiritual negligence of their parents and the predatory nature of modern
societal spirituality over the modern family unit. Such materialism in
exploitation on such early ages is completely appalling and demoralizing
spirituality.   Firstly, in public policy we certainly need a lot more
meditation everywhere to bring better coherence to everyone everywhere.
Git thee to a group meditation near you and nurture spiritual Nature for
a change. Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité, long live the French
and their high-mindedness in looking after the welfare of their children
if the parents of these exploited children will not do it.  Spiritually
criminal parents subjecting their children to the exploitation of
adolescent beauty-pageant-ing should certainly have their children taken
away from them and have them be sent directly to the care of
consciousness-based schools in the hopes of reforming any moral damage
from such adolescent pageantry forced upon these children.  We all
should have a large public interest in protecting the welfare of
children this way,

  -Buck


  jedi_spock wrote:


  deification of women by asymmetric
 dress-codes, or putting them on a pedestal, inversely
 stereotypes them and puts severe limitations on them. It's
 almost a form of reverse slavery.

 In other words, hyper-sexualisation of women is as bad as
 de-sexualisaton of women.  Western society is as imbalanced
 as eastern societies.



 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424462/France-bans-girls-beauty\
-contests-bid-stop-hyper-sexualisation-children.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424462/France-bans-
girls-beauty-contests-bid-stop-hyper-sexualisation-children. html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424462/France-bans-girls-beaut\
y-contests-bid-stop-hyper-sexualisation-children.html  

 http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/sexualisation-of-t
he-western-woman/article4414595.ece
http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/sexualisation-of-the-western-\
woman/article4414595.ece
http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/sexualisation-of-the-western-\
woman/article4414595.ece  



 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, jedi_spock@ wrote:


 
--- s3raphita wrote:

 The line I am a great believer in the uni-sex dress-code was
 copied over (by Yahoo not me!) from a post by Jason. I don't
 advocate any dress
 codes. Jason can defend that view if he wishes.
   
   --- TurquoiseB turquoiseb@ wrote:

 Just in case you were wondering, I understood that, and so my
rap this
morning was a reply to Jason as much as it was Buck, who tried
to
springboard off of it with more of his gotta keep the sinners
in line
any way we can horseshit.
   
I don't advocate any kind of dress code, but *especially* one
that
tries to make women or men look sexless. I, for one, would love
to
hear Jason defend that idea, and doubt that he could.
   
I extended my rap to cover the uniforms worn by various
religious
groups and cults. Historically, such uniforms (special dress
for priests,
monks, or nuns, or even recommended dress for lay people) are
about
mind control more than anything else. The priesthood always
needed
something to *make themselves seem better or more special, and
wearing
certain robes that no one else was able to wear was one way to
achieve
that, and thus achieve the control they wanted to maintain over
their
flocks. Note that in most cults or religious orders, the
robes/costumes worn by lower class monks are usually different
and
less ornate and special than those worn by people higher up in
the
hierarchy. (Think the ludicrous costumes worn by TMO Rajas)
This is
also about control.
   
Making the monks and nuns wear costumes, period, is also an
aspect of
control freakdom, because the higher-ups want to remind them at
all
times that they are part of an org that is better and more
powerful
than they are, and to remind them of their vows, meaning their
willingness to follow rules laid on them

[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-13 Thread Jason


 ---   s3raphita wrote:
 
  The line I am a great believer in the uni-sex dress-code was
copied
 over (by Yahoo not me!) from a post by Jason. I don't advocate any
dress
 codes. Jason can defend that view if he wishes.

---  TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Just in case you were wondering, I understood that, and so my rap this
 morning was a reply to Jason as much as it was Buck, who tried to
 springboard off of it with more of his gotta keep the sinners in line
 any way we can horseshit.

 I don't advocate any kind of dress code, but *especially* one that
tries
 to make women or men look sexless. I, for one, would love to hear
Jason
 defend that idea, and doubt that he could.

 I extended my rap to cover the uniforms worn by various religious
groups
 and cults. Historically, such uniforms (special dress for priests,
 monks, or nuns, or even recommended dress for lay people) are about
 mind control more than anything else. The priesthood always needed
 something to *make themselves seem better or more special, and
wearing
 certain robes that no one else was able to wear was one way to achieve
 that, and thus achieve the control they wanted to maintain over their
 flocks. Note that in most cults or religious orders, the
 robes/costumes worn by lower class monks are usually different and
 less ornate and special than those worn by people higher up in the
 hierarchy. (Think the ludicrous costumes worn by TMO Rajas) This is
 also about control.

 Making the monks and nuns wear costumes, period, is also an aspect of
 control freakdom, because the higher-ups want to remind them at all
 times that they are part of an org that is better and more powerful
than
 they are, and to remind them of their vows, meaning their
willingness
 to follow rules laid on them by other people.

 One thing I think you'll find if you look into it is that those on
this
 forum recommending uniforms for monks, nuns, and other members of
 religious or spiritual organizations have in most cases never been
 actual *members* of such organizations. In other words, they're trying
 to justify rules they never followed.

 Similarly, when people like Jason mouth off about unisex clothing, I
 think you'll find that they're always talking about making the women
 look more like men. That was the point of me posting my photo of the
guy
 from Rocky Horror wearing a corset, garter belt, stockings, and high
 heels. If ALL men and women dressed like that, that would be unisex.
 But I think we all know that's not exactly what Jason had in mind. I
 kinda doubt he's going to be the first in line to get his dress and
high
 heels and wear them everywhere. :-)


That is exactly the point. You wouldn't dress like a woman
when you go to work.  Your employer just wouldn't accept it.

My point is that it perpetuates gender related prejudices
and bias on a very subtle level.

People can dress as they want in their private spaces
(homes).  In public spaces, some degree of conservative
uni-dress-code will enable women to break glass ceilings. It
also encourages comradeship and makes them feel that they
are part of the 'family'.

It's important to make that distinction between private
spaces and public spaces, on this dress-code issue.





[FairfieldLife] Re: Jason's barbell chart

2014-01-12 Thread Jason



Hey Bhairitu, and Alex, I think something is wrong with my
Firefox.  The image sails through when I use Explorer.

I wonder if Firefox has any imagepaste addon or something
like that?

I have a feeling the base64 encoding has to be pasted in IMG
alt=..command? I wonder what tags has to be added?







---  Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

 It shows up in email. Like I said the only sure way I've ever been
 able to embed an image is with Base64 code.  It's not rocket science
but
 you do need to be able to insert it as HTML.  Also I did this on the
 classic or old interface as when I log in the interface goes from
Neo
 to the old site.  I haven't checked lately to see if that is the case
as
 I actually like Neo for Yahoo News because they finally are getting my
 location right and the local news setup is much better.  So I don't
know
 if it will work with Neo but I assume it will.

 To convert an image to Base64 you can use one of the online sites. 
Here
 is one:
 http://www.base64decode.org/ http://www.base64decode.org/

 Some folks have no problem though just dropping an image in the form
on
 the FFL web site.

 On 01/09/2014 11:11 AM, Jason wrote:
 
 
  I guess i have to stick with links now.
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-12 Thread Jason

Seraph, Yoga is essentially balance, ie life within
parameters.  Tolstoy gave the right advice.

The prostitution industry is dangerous because it is
one-sided and has nothing to do with egalitarian sexuality.
There is something called 'financial-economic differential'.
Wherever such a differential exists, there is always the
possibility of exploitation and abuse of rights.

Nature hates imbalances. Nature always tries to reach an
equilibrium.  Any society that is imbalanced will eventually
destroy itself.

The Yin-Yang balance is dharmic.  Strictly speaking only
egalitarian sexuality is dharmic. All other sexuality are
adharmic or against dharma.

An asymmetric dress-code is bad because it is one-sided and
has nothing to do with egalitarian sexuality. It promotes
prejudice and bias on a very subtle level.

I am a great believer in the uni-sex dress-code.


---  s3raphita@... wrote:

 Tolstoy could well be the greatest writer in world literature. Bearing
in mind I've only read him in English translation, his novels and
stories are perfection. But - and it's a very big but indeed - he
suffered from old-man syndrome. When he was a young nobleman the serfs
on his estates brought their young daughters to him to be enjoyed by
Tolstoy as a part of his privileges. When he went on to become a student
and young man-about-town he frequented prostitutes and had many
mistresses.
  The trouble is that when he hit late middle age (and declining
potency) he had a change of heart and decided that sex was the root of
all evil and railed against the permissive society he lived in (and
Russian society in his day was very decadent indeed).
  He then penned a lot of puritanical stories and Christian propaganda
taking aim at the pleasures of the flesh. I really hate that. Leave the
young to enjoy their pleasures and make their own mistakes say I.





[FairfieldLife] Re: Religion that doesn't take itself deadly seriously

2014-01-12 Thread Jason

Something like this might be better?








 ---  Jason  wrote:
 
  An asymmetric dress-code is bad because it is one-sided and
  has nothing to do with egalitarian sexuality. It promotes
  prejudice and bias on a very subtle level.
 
  I am a great believer in the uni-sex dress-code.

---  TurquoiseB turquoiseb@... wrote:

 Jason, I think you still must be having trouble posting graphics to
FFL.
 This arrived in my email just now, labeled jedi_spock's idea of a
 uni-sex dress-code.


 :-)







[FairfieldLife] Re: Jason's barbell chart

2014-01-12 Thread Jason




Angry birds and scared pigs





 
[http://a4.mzstatic.com/us/r30/Purple/v4/d4/86/70/d48670b7-92e9-61e4-fa2\
a-9386f3547d21/screen800x500.jpeg]



---  Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

 You need to additionally add the picture width and height at the end
 when using Base64.  It's in the instructions for using HTML that
 YahooGroups provides. The format is:
 pimg src=data:image/jpeg;base64,/9j/4AAQSk [lots of Base64 data] 
 width=267 height=400 //p

 There may be some sites that will encode a picture and add the width
and
 height at the end. I wrote my own app that does that.


 On 01/12/2014 04:13 AM, Jason wrote:
 
  Hey Bhairitu, and Alex, I think something is wrong with my
  Firefox.  The image sails through when I use Explorer.
 
  I wonder if Firefox has any imagepaste addon or something
  like that?
 
  I have a feeling the base64 encoding has to be pasted in IMG
  alt=..command? I wonder what tags has to be added?
 
 
  ---  Bhairitu noozguru@ wrote:
  
   It shows up in email. Like I said the only sure way I've ever
been
   able to embed an image is with Base64 code.  It's not rocket
science
  but
   you do need to be able to insert it as HTML.  Also I did this on
the
   classic or old interface as when I log in the interface goes
from Neo
   to the old site.  I haven't checked lately to see if that is the
  case as
   I actually like Neo for Yahoo News because they finally are
getting my
   location right and the local news setup is much better.  So I
don't
  know
   if it will work with Neo but I assume it will.
  
   To convert an image to Base64 you can use one of the online sites.
  Here
   is one:
   http://www.base64decode.org/
  
   Some folks have no problem though just dropping an image in the
form on
   the FFL web site.
  
   On 01/09/2014 11:11 AM, Jason wrote:
   
   
I guess i have to stick with links now.
   
 




[FairfieldLife] Richard Wolff - Tussle between Socialism and Capitalism makes the System Work

2014-01-08 Thread Jason
Books » Reviews
December 9, 2013

DEMOCRACY AT WORK — A Cure for Capitalism-Richard Wolff;

Working to rehumanise work
- Arvind Sivaramakrishnan


A study that has the courage to say ordinary people must be
trusted to organise their own work


We have been here before, most notably during the Great
Depression, and for similar reasons, with an unregulated
financial sector inflating itself to near-insane levels
before the bubble burst. Helpless politicians, apparently
unable to comprehend the nature or scale of this global
stupidity, are no better at conceiving a political response
now than they were then, and political dysfunction
exacerbates economic dysfunction. Richard Wolff brilliantly
identifies the reasons for our paralysis, and in an age
permeated by a fear of decisive proposals he has the courage
to say that ordinary people must be trusted to organise
their own work.


Wolff starts with the fact that the state is in the
corporate grip. In 2007-08, banks which owed hundreds of
billions as a result of their own frenzied borrowing from
other banks which had themselves borrowed colossally were
fed trillions in taxpayers' money; they were neither allowed
to collapse, nor nationalized wholesale, nor prosecuted for
almost certain criminality. They are confident that new
regulations will not be introduced and that old ones will
not be revived, and they remain the biggest welfare
scroungers in history. The CEOs who have long supplanted
even the tiny cabals of institutional shareholders nominally
in charge led the post-crash rush for Washington handouts,
and the neoliberal politicians whose campaigns they funded
were furious that President Barack Obama's stimulus package
was too small. If the corporate banks now lend at all, they
lend to bodies like the United States and German
governments, not to the small and medium-sized businesses
which account for the great bulk of economic activity; their
alleged ideological hatred of all things public conveniently
vanishes, as it does in India, where gigantic and multiple
corporate failures are concealed by endless refinancing at
public expense.


Meanwhile, the U.S. corporate sector contributes under a
fifth of the country's total tax revenues. Ordinary people
pay the rest. They have increased their productivity sharply
in the last three decades, but with real wages held flat the
only way they can consume enough to keep the system from
collapsing is to live on their credit cards, and to do this
more and more, as the state directs its -- their --
resources increasingly towards the corporates and away from
public services and public infrastructure.


Keynesian remedies


Our political bankruptcy is worsened by the apparent
untenability of responses which have rescued us in previous
crises. A predictable revival of Keynesian formulae, whereby
states would disregard budget deficits and spend to keep
money circulating by getting people back into work, seems to
have lost its earlier appeal. According to Wolff, the public
-- who pay the price for decades of an economic crisis they
did not cause -- fear that the initially increased budget
deficits would mean even worse austerity for them. Secondly,
Keynesian dispensations are inherently unstable. They are
systematically evaded and destroyed by private corporations,
often with the aid of an increasingly conglomerate-owned
press, and in any case Keynes himself saw his remedies as
temporary, not as structural defences against the inherent
self-destructiveness of capitalism.


There is also good evidence for the impact of the corporate
press; between 1960 and 1967, three flourishing British
social-democratic papers, the Daily Herald, the News
Chronicle, and the Sunday Citizen, were all destroyed by
advertiser boycotts; their readerships totalled 9.3 million
out of a total population of about 55 million, and they were
highly respected by their readers. The Herald, which was
funded by trade unions, had a readership of 4.7 million in
the last year of its existence -- more than twice the
combined readership of the broadsheets the Times, the
Financial Times, and the Guardian, but its 8.1 per cent of
national daily newspaper circulation got it only 3.5 per
cent of net advertising revenue per thousand copies. In face
of access to such a huge readership, the advertiser boycotts
amounted to gross economic irrationality. They were nothing
other than ideologically-driven class warfare; today, even
public-service broadcasters increasingly resemble the
corporate press in tone and content.


Highly significant truths are therefore obliterated from
public discourse. The absence of systemic critique means
that sticking-plaster measures are messianically proclaimed
as promises of imminent deliverance, and the
corporate-driven destruction of mass labour organisations
has all but ended any serious political pressure to regulate
corporations or to hold major industries and services in
public hands. In addition, it is almost never said that the

[FairfieldLife] The Barbell Chart - Can you see it?

2014-01-08 Thread Jason


The barbell strategy should be simple.

Give state-funding for political parties, but at the same 
time ban bail-outs and subsidies for corporates.

Give state-funding for trade unions, but at the same time 
give companies freedom to hire and fire.

Make tight and strict regulations for the banking sector, 
but at the same time make interests rates appealing to the 
public so that they put their money in banks.



https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/MSzeg8LhvGc/s640/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif

[FairfieldLife] Re: The Barbell Chart - Can you see it?

2014-01-08 Thread Jason

Bhairitu, most people don't understand that they are dealing
with two completely different systems. (economic and
political)

They see things either, totally through the lens of
capitalism, or totally through the lens of Socialism. They
are too uni-dimensional.

It's dangerous to get strait-jacketed by any rigid ideology.

The partnership between De Beers and the south african govt
is one of the most successful and profitable partnerships.

In india, the cooperative entity called Amul, (Gujarat
Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation) is one of the most
successful producers of milk products in asia.

Nature itself uses the barbell strategy.  Everywhere in
nature you see two opposing forces balancing each other to
lend stability.  The stability you see is not static
stability, it's a dynamic stability.

Take for instance the human body itself.  Too much sodium
depresses potassium and vice versa.  Too much Calcium
depresses magnesium, and too much magnesium depresses
calcium.


--- Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

 Mikey won't like it.  You have to break up the old banks though.  They
 reek of gangsterism.  Need more than two political parties.  Watch out
 for union abuse.  The strategy seems to be a bit too
institutionalized.
 What about the small guy?

 On 01/08/2014 03:58 AM, Jason wrote:
 
 
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/\
MSzeg8LhvGc/s640/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif
  The barbell strategy should be simple.
 
  Give state-funding for political parties, but at the same
  time ban bail-outs and subsidies for corporates.
 
  Give state-funding for trade unions, but at the same time
  give companies freedom to hire and fire.
 
  Make tight and strict regulations for the banking sector,
  but at the same time make interests rates appealing to the
  public so that they put their money in banks.
 
 
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/\
MSzeg8LhvGc/s640/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif
 
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/\
MSzeg8LhvGc/s640/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif
 
 
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-YV4ZRAsQNJY/Us0jYnJS3_I/A0Q/M\
Szeg8LhvGc/s640/Barbell%2520Strategy.gif
 
 





[FairfieldLife] Re: Space and Time Not Real?

2013-12-14 Thread Jason

Gravity is basicaly the warping of space-time around a
massive object.  In that sense it's more of a mechanical
force rather than a fundamental force. It's space trying to
bounce back into shape.

Some scientists say that time also has three dimensions,
just as space has three dimensions.  IOW, three temporal
dimensions along with three spatial dimensions might explain
the quantum world better.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_time_dimensions
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_time_dimensions

http://paradigm-update.blogspot.in/2012/07/three-dimensional
-tme-in-twelve.html
http://paradigm-update.blogspot.in/2012/07/three-dimensional-tme-in-twe\
lve.html

http://multisenserealism.com/2013/02/11/three-dimensions-of-
time/
http://multisenserealism.com/2013/02/11/three-dimensions-of-time/


---  anartaxius@... wrote:

 1. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that
dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and
challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of
reality.



https://www.simonsfoundation.org/quanta/20130917-a-jewel-at-the-heart-of\
-quantum-physics/
https://www.simonsfoundation.org/quanta/20130917-a-jewel-at-the-heart-of\
-quantum-physics/


  2. In publishing a story regarding work reported by Japanese
physicists last month, Nature News has set off a bit of a tabloid
firestorm by describing an obscure bit of physics theory as the
clearest evidence yet that our Universe could be just one big
projection. In two papers uploaded to the preprint server arXiv,
Yoshifumi Hyakutake and colleagues from Ibaraki University in Japan
offer evidence that supports a theory that suggests that a universe as
we conceive of it could actually be a hologram of another
two-dimensional space.


  http://phys.org/news/2013-12-credence-theory-universe-hologram.html
http://phys.org/news/2013-12-credence-theory-universe-hologram.html





[FairfieldLife] Re: Big Bang totally unnecessary

2013-12-13 Thread Jason

John, it's known for decades that pairs of particles called
virtual particles pop into existence from nothingness in
vacuum, and then immediately annihilate each other.

In fact, Stephen Hawking found out about the emission of
black holes using this phenomenon.

It's quite possible that our bubble universe has a negative
mirror bubble universe. They may annihilate each other.  I
remember one lady scientist on the discovery channel stating
that there are indications of a parallel universe lurking
close to our universe and it's gravity is pulling galaxies
to one side of the universe.  They call the region cold
spot.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CMB_cold_spot
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CMB_cold_spot

However, please note that there is a huge difference between
an actual parallel universe and alternate reality.  They
are two different things altogether.

Dr. David Deutch's universes are alternate realities
existing simultaneously with our universe.  Imagine our
universe as a quantum particle having many states.  Each
state represents a reality or history.

Dr. Micho Kaku's parallel universes are the actual parallel
universes, infinite bubble universes floating in a sea of
nothing.

In actual parallel universes, each universe would have its
own laws of physics and completely different particles. Even
the structure of space would be different.  The particles in
our universe cannot even exist in that other universe.  If
you step into that universe, you would simply disintegrate.

However, alternate universes are different.  They are
actually our own universe, existing in many quantum states.
Each state is an alternate history.

Thus, maintain that distinction between 'parallel universe'
and 'alternate universe'.

Now coming to the big bang, if we can find out how all these
'virtual particles' pop into existence from nothingness, I
am sure we can get vital clues from it.

Einstein proved that space and time are interlinked in a
space-time continuum.  If time is an illusion, space too has
to be an illusion.

We know the universe is finite for a number of reasons.  If
it's infinite, there will be an infinite number of stars in
the sky. The sky would appear white in color. The radiation
levels would be so high that the earth would be vaporised in
seconds.  An infinite universe would also mean that the
universe is eternal, ie never created.

An infinite universe would also bring in infinite
possiblities, ie after a particular distance another
identical earth would exist and everything that happened
here would also happen there and after another particular
distance, yet another identical earth with same history and
so on ad infinitum.

Fortunately, the universe is finite, which means there is
only one earth.  The chances of another identical earth
existing on our own space is implausible.


---  jr_esq@... wrote:

 Xeno,


  You stated that:


Scientists on the other hand, with the Big Bang,
  think that time also began with the Big Bang, that is,
  nothing came before the Big Bang because that is a
  meaningless question to ask. It just happened. Nothing
  made the universe, it just happened. There are other
  conceptions, such as multiverses, etc., which I am not
  going to wade into.


  There are actually some scientists who are trying to prove that they
know what happened before the Big Bang.  There's a research group called
the Perimeter Institute in Canada which is proposing the Brane Theory. 
This is alternately called the Big Bump.  Essentially, the theory
states that the universe began due to the collision of two membranes in
the 11th dimension.  However, most of the scientific circles have not
accepted this idea to be plausible.


  Also, your statement that the universe just happened raises some
questions for logical and scientific reasons.  As stated in the Kalam
Cosmological Argument, your statement cannot stand further logical
scrutiny.  Basically, the KCA states that the Prime Mover is the cause
of the universe.


  In science, Roger Penrose, the professor-emiritus from Oxford
University, believes that the universe is a product of endless
explosions that occur after eons of time.  However, he has not been able
to produce a scientific paper to prove that this idea is true.





[FairfieldLife] Re: Jesuit Trained Pope Trashes Capitalism in Call for Worldwide Socialism

2013-12-09 Thread Jason

Thanks for raising this issue Bhairitu.

Right now, patent period for patent holders is 20 years,
which IMO is too long.  This is one of the reasons why new
inventions take too long to become cheap.

Take for instance the Compact-Disk developed by Philips and
Sony. It took 20 years for CD's to become cheap.

A shorter patent term of say, 8 years is quite enough for
the patent holder to recover his costs.

Secondly patents should be managed by a UN based body. This
will bring global uniformity regarding patent rights.


---  Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

 The country needs to be about 90% socialist and 10% capitalist
(actually
 free enterprise).  The latter would take care of the folks who want to
 work for themselves and the former the majority who don't want to
worry
 about running a company.  You would need to limit the size of
companies
 though.  Allowing for mega corporations has proven to be a real
problem.

 Government needs to be transparent and transcendental or not in your
 face.  A lot of laws on US books (including copyright) need to be
 thrown out and about the only way that will ever happen is for the US
to
 collapse as the former Soviet Union did.  The problem is there will be
a
 struggle as those who are so mentally imbalanced that they feel the
need
 to be king  of the hill will try to grab up everything they can.

 On 12/08/2013 02:22 AM, Jason wrote:
 
 
  Hey Bhairitu, the first thing that needs to be done is to
  de-link the 'political-system' from the economic-system.
 
  Of course, you can't ban private donations. That would go
  against the very spirit of democracy and freedom.
 
  However, you can create a situation in which there is no
  incentive for political parties to seek private donations.
  Besides, you can add a law that bars corporations from
  donating more that 10% percent of their profits to political
  parties.
 
  Capitalism works very well for the economic system.
 
  Capitalism works very badly for the political system.
 
  Capitalism works very badly for the cultural systems.
 
  Both, political system and cultural systems need to be based
  on Socialism.  Consider all the three systems as three
  corners of a triangle.
 
 
  ---  Bhairitu noozguru@ wrote:
  
   The point is Mike that the Santa Clara vs Southern Pacific
Railroad
  case
   was the end of the more restrictive rules on corporations.  It was
the
   first step toward corporate personhood.  What it seemed to bring
were
   many states limitations on the life span of a corporation which
back
   then was around 40 years.  I'm going to provide some good articles
here
   analyzing it's effects for you and others who are interested.
  
   History of regulations on corporations:
  
 
http://reclaimdemocracy.org/corporate-accountability-history-corporation\
s-us/
  
   Long excerpt from Thom Hartmann's book:
   http://www.thomhartmann.com/unequal-protection/excerpt-theft
  
   Surely you don't think that mega-corporations are good for the
  world, do
   you?  I've heard arguments that big corporations make new
technologies
   possible.  But that is not true.  Big corporations buy up little
   companies who create new technologies. IBM, Microsoft, Apple and
Google
   have done that for years. Android was developed by a small company
that
   Google bought.
  
   Surely you don't think that wealth inequality is a good thing, do
you?
   Shouldn't there be a cap on salaries?  It seems to me the planet
is
   being raided by a bunch of mobsters masquerading as corporations. 
This
   was more blatant in the former Soviet Union after it fell and
oligarchs
   popped up raiding what they could.
  
   Wouldn't you like your dollar to go a lot farther than it does
now?
   This is NOT a partisan issue.
  
  
   On 12/06/2013 10:30 AM, Mike Dixon wrote:
Share I was asking Bharitu what his point was,regarding that
court
case he was sighting.
   
   
On Friday, December 6, 2013 7:18 AM, Share Long
sharelong60@ wrote:
   
Mike, my point was and is: it's all pretty funny so I hope you
can
just enjoy the humor of it all (-:
   
   
On Friday, December 6, 2013 8:52 AM, Mike Dixon
mdixon.6569@ wrote:
   
So , what was your point?
   
   
On Thursday, December 5, 2013 10:05 AM, Share Long
sharelong60@ wrote:
I think we got a barbell situation right here on FFL!
   
   
On Thursday, December 5, 2013 12:02 PM, Jason jedi_spock@
wrote:
   
You don't understand. It's called the barbell strategy. You
create a system which has some positives and drawbacks. You
again create another reverse mirror image system. The two
systems balance each other out.
   
A 'socialistic political system' will balance out a
'capitalistic economic system'.
   
Political subsidies for political parties will ease the
pressure off the parties and prevent them from playing to
the gallery. They will stop worrying about funds and start
focussing on real policies

[FairfieldLife] Re: Jesuit Trained Pope Trashes Capitalism in Call for Worldwide Socialism

2013-12-08 Thread Jason

Hey Bhairitu, the first thing that needs to be done is to
de-link the 'political-system' from the economic-system.

Of course, you can't ban private donations. That would go
against the very spirit of democracy and freedom.

However, you can create a situation in which there is no
incentive for political parties to seek private donations.
Besides, you can add a law that bars corporations from
donating more that 10% percent of their profits to political
parties.

Capitalism works very well for the economic system.

Capitalism works very badly for the political system.

Capitalism works very badly for the cultural systems.

Both, political system and cultural systems need to be based
on Socialism.  Consider all the three systems as three
corners of a triangle.


---  Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

 The point is Mike that the Santa Clara vs Southern Pacific Railroad
case
 was the end of the more restrictive rules on corporations.  It was the
 first step toward corporate personhood.  What it seemed to bring were
 many states limitations on the life span of a corporation which back
 then was around 40 years.  I'm going to provide some good articles
here
 analyzing it's effects for you and others who are interested.

 History of regulations on corporations:

http://reclaimdemocracy.org/corporate-accountability-history-corporation\
s-us/

 Long excerpt from Thom Hartmann's book:
 http://www.thomhartmann.com/unequal-protection/excerpt-theft

 Surely you don't think that mega-corporations are good for the world,
do
 you?  I've heard arguments that big corporations make new technologies
 possible.  But that is not true.  Big corporations buy up little
 companies who create new technologies. IBM, Microsoft, Apple and
Google
 have done that for years. Android was developed by a small company
that
 Google bought.

 Surely you don't think that wealth inequality is a good thing, do you?
 Shouldn't there be a cap on salaries?  It seems to me the planet is
 being raided by a bunch of mobsters masquerading as corporations. 
This
 was more blatant in the former Soviet Union after it fell and
oligarchs
 popped up raiding what they could.

 Wouldn't you like your dollar to go a lot farther than it does now?
 This is NOT a partisan issue.


 On 12/06/2013 10:30 AM, Mike Dixon wrote:
  Share I was asking Bharitu what his point was,regarding that court
  case he was sighting.
 
 
  On Friday, December 6, 2013 7:18 AM, Share Long
  sharelong60@... wrote:
 
  Mike, my point was and is: it's all pretty funny so I hope you can
  just enjoy the humor of it all (-:
 
 
  On Friday, December 6, 2013 8:52 AM, Mike Dixon
  mdixon.6569@... wrote:
 
  So , what was your point?
 
 
  On Thursday, December 5, 2013 10:05 AM, Share Long
  sharelong60@... wrote:
  I think we got a barbell situation right here on FFL!
 
 
  On Thursday, December 5, 2013 12:02 PM, Jason jedi_spock@...
  wrote:
 
  You don't understand. It's called the barbell strategy. You
  create a system which has some positives and drawbacks. You
  again create another reverse mirror image system. The two
  systems balance each other out.
 
  A 'socialistic political system' will balance out a
  'capitalistic economic system'.
 
  Political subsidies for political parties will ease the
  pressure off the parties and prevent them from playing to
  the gallery. They will stop worrying about funds and start
  focussing on real policies for growth.
 
  It also prevents crony capitalism and promotes real
  pro-market capitalism.
 
 
  --- s3raphita@ wrote:
  
   Re At least, 3% of the total budget should be allocated to
  political parties as subsidies.:
  
  
WTF! I don't want one cent of my money to go to a political
party.
  Let them pay for their own propaganda.
   Extremist parties wouldn't arise if mainstream parties actually
  pursued policies that were in the interests of the voters. How hard
  can it be?
  
  
 --- s3raphita@ wrote:

 Re Capitalist governments shouldn't be bailing anybody out .
. . If
 the government takes the risk out of the equation by offering
a
  bailout,
 any fool could run a business and risk everyone's investments
in
  it with
 no lessons learned.:



 Precisely my point. You can argue that we should move towards
a more
 Ayn Rand set-up and get governments off our backs. It's states
  offering
 bailouts that has encouraged the banks to take idiotic risks.


 You could argue the opposite though - financial institutions
should
 come under more strenuous oversight from financial regulators
  with the
 state limiting bonuses and having a veto on risky investments.


 It's the current mixed-economy model that isn't fit for
purpose.
 Bankers socialism pisses off everyone.


--- Jason jedi_spock@ wrote:
   
The 'capitalistic political system' is the greatest dogma of
the 20th century.
   
The 'socialistic economic system' is the second greatest

[FairfieldLife] Re: Jesuit Trained Pope Trashes Capitalism in Call for Worldwide Socialism

2013-12-05 Thread Jason

You don't understand. It's called the barbell strategy. You
create a system which has some positives and drawbacks. You
again create another reverse mirror image system. The two
systems balance each other out.

A 'socialistic political system' will balance out a
'capitalistic economic system'.

Political subsidies for political parties will ease the
pressure off the parties and prevent them from playing to
the gallery.  They will stop worrying about funds and start
focussing on real policies for growth.

It also prevents crony capitalism and promotes real
pro-market capitalism.


---  s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re At least, 3% of the total budget should be allocated to political
parties as subsidies.:


  WTF! I don't want one cent of my money to go to a political party.
Let them pay for their own propaganda.
  Extremist parties wouldn't arise if mainstream parties actually
pursued policies that were in the interests of the voters. How hard can
it be?


   ---  s3raphita@ wrote:
  
   Re Capitalist governments shouldn't be bailing anybody out . . .
If
   the government takes the risk out of the equation by offering a
bailout,
   any fool could run a business and risk everyone's investments in
it with
   no lessons learned.:
  
  
  
   Precisely my point. You can argue that we should move towards a
more
   Ayn Rand set-up and get governments off our backs. It's states
offering
   bailouts that has encouraged the banks to take idiotic risks.
  
  
   You could argue the opposite though - financial institutions
should
   come under more strenuous oversight from financial regulators with
the
   state limiting bonuses and having a veto on risky investments.
  
  
It's the current mixed-economy model that isn't fit for purpose.
   Bankers socialism pisses off everyone.
  
  
  ---  Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
 
  The 'capitalistic political system' is the greatest dogma of
  the 20th century.
 
  The 'socialistic economic system' is the second greatest
  dogma of the 20th century.
 
  A 'capitalistic political system' is tantamount to
  'corporate dictatorship'.
 
  Atleast, 3% percent of the total budget money should be
  allocated to political parties as political subsidies.
  These political subsidies should be distributed to parties
  on vote proportion basis.  This will force political parties
  to take a more centrist position and prevent extreme fringe
  ideologies from arising.
 




[FairfieldLife] Black Swan - Taleb thinks of new approach for Survival

2013-12-04 Thread Jason


Books » Reviews
August 13, 2013
Updated: August 23, 2013 12:58 IST
Life is long gamma
by Vaishna Roy


Nassim Nicholas Taleb specialises in statistics and 
probability.


How to Live in a World We Don’t Understand: Nassim Nicholas 
Taleb; Penguin Books India Pvt. Ltd., 11, 


Philosopher-author of The Black Swan asks us to embrace 
uncertainty as a survival tactic


I had just finished Taleb's latest book when Uttarakhand 
happened. And the phrase 'unprecedented tragedy' kept 
recurring like a bleak refrain. Nobody had been able to 
predict that the rainfall could be this heavy, the flooding 
this bad. Taro in Japan built a 34 ft sea wall the city 
called the Great Wall. It was swept away contemptuously by 
the 2011 tsunami.


This capriciousness -- whether of nature, humans, or 
man-made systems -- lies at the core of Taleb's book, as he 
passionately and provocatively argues for modern man to 
learn and use non-predictive decision making, which can be 
the only safeguard in a world where, and let me grasp at a 
cliché here, the only thing that's certain is uncertainty.


With the writer having made somewhat of a career in needling 
establishment gurus, the bankers, academics, economists and 
other suits, one might be tempted to dismiss the book as 
grandstanding from a favourite soapbox. But it's an 
eminently readable argument for a theory that can be 
intimidatingly rooted in complex math but is also at its 
basics just a product of old-fashioned nous. Take, for 
instance, Taleb's peeve with modern mollycoddling, which he 
says is producing a very fragile human being. Extreme 
hygiene, by destroying the body's natural hormetic 
reactions, becomes vulnerable. We counter it by ingesting 
probiotics, the good 'dirt' that we denied the body in the 
first place.


This is but one simple story. Taleb transposes it to 
politics, disaster management, urban planning, research, 
financial management and much more to propound his theory of 
antifragility. What he is saying is simple -- we don’t need 
more and more complex graphs and grids that attempt to 
'predict' what will come and thus build systems to face that 
supposed eventuality. The truth is we can never predict with 
any degree of accuracy a Black Swan event. It will always be 
sudden, random, huge, wildly destructive, and yes, totally 
unpredictable.


Managing risks


Risk management pros look to the past, using the worst known 
war, recession or tsunami to build the next higher sea wall. 
They don't realise that the worst event always exceeded the 
worst one before it. What we really need are systems that 
can regenerate by using such unpredictable shocks to their 
advantage. Not systems that can survive the shock to some 
extent but those that can actively use the shock to become 
stronger. In other words, 'antifragile' systems. Much like 
what nature does -- breeding the next gen mosquito to fight 
repellents. Nature works because evolution is antifragile. 
The gene pool uses periodic shocks to become more fit. In 
the tsunami example, thus, it makes more sense to put money 
into training people in survival and rebuilding tactics than 
to build higher and higher walls.


Taleb calls it learning to live in a world we must admit we 
don't understand. He asks that we modify man-made systems so 
that they allow natural events to take their course, instead 
of smoothing out every little bump -- Prozac for the 
smallest attack of the blues, warnings on coffee cups that 
tell you it might be hot enough to scald, hormone therapy 
for menopause. While the smoothening is done with the best 
of intent, it's the classic soccer mom syndrome -- the quest 
for a perfect, crisis-free world. Guess what, it doesn't 
exist. Some discomfort makes us tough; removing every 
discomfort makes the species fragile.


That's where the heading of this piece comes from -- in 
trading jargon, when someone holds a 'long gamma' position, 
any movement in price is good news. In other words, long 
gamma means that which benefits from volatility or the 
non-linear. Excessive planning and smoothening are attempts 
to force something that's predominantly non-linear into an 
easy linear graph, a simplification that distorts 
dangerously.


Taleb thus argues that depriving political and economic 
systems of natural volatility (non-linearity) -- that is, 
making things artificially smooth -- harms them more by 
leaving them unprepared when the biggie strikes. Take the 
turkey example. A turkey fattened for 1000 days imagines 
that life and the butcher love it. The turkey, its friends 
and family have absolutely no reason for 1000 days to doubt 
this. On the 1001 day, the Black Swan strikes. The most 
dangerous mistake the turkey made was to believe that the 
absence of evidence of harm meant the absence of harm.


The writer argues that the 2007 financial crisis was caused 
to a large extent because Alan Greenspan and his ilk wanted 
to iron out the boom-bust cycle and allowed small 

[FairfieldLife] Black Swan - Taleb tells us to factor uncertainty

2013-12-04 Thread Jason


BOOKS

Model uncertainty
by TAPEN SINHA

The author makes the valuable contribution of making us 
aware of black swans that could be lurking in the 
financial market.


NASSIM NICHOLAS TALEB'S book (The Black Swan: The Impact of 
the Highly Improbable), analysing financial systems, has 
become a bestseller. In the process, it has also become a 
must-read for financial analysts of Wall Street. Taleb, who 
hails from a highly respectable Lebanese Christian family 
and whose grandparents and great-great grandparents were 
high government officials in various regimes, saw his entire 
family fortune vanish practically overnig ht in the Lebanese 
civil war of 1975. One suspects that memories of this trauma 
have influenced his views.


What is a black swan? If you had lived all your life in the 
northern hemisphere, all you would have seen were white 
swans. You would conclude that all swans are white. This is 
exactly what the Europeans of the 18th century concluded 
before they went to Australia where they found only black 
swans. Thus, the metaphor of the black swan is used to 
denote anything that appears impossible on the basis of a 
limited number of observations.


In modern statistical parlance, it would be called a model 
uncertainty. More precisely, it is what happens when we use 
a model to predict some future events but the underlying 
model is wrong and we do not even know that the model is 
wrong. To paraphrase Mark Twain: It's what you don't know 
you don't know that gets you into trouble.


In January 1995, the Barings Bank lost £827 million ($1.4 
billion), twice the bank's available trading capital. It 
went bankrupt in February that year. The architect of that 
failure was a rogue trader named Nick Leeson. Since he 
operated as a trader in the front office and was the person 
who processed the trade in the back office, he was able to 
hide his activities from his superiors. At first, he took 
several uncovered positions and lost a few million pounds. 
Then he took bigger bets to recover the losses.


However, the Kobe earthquake of January 1995 produced a 
figurative earthquake in the Japanese futures market that 
amplified the loss to the billion-dollar range. This was an 
unexpected event in the market. Nobody expected Kobe to be 
so badly damaged, given that all possible measures had been 
taken to ensure that the city would be able to withstand 
such an earthquake. And nobody expected that an earthquake 
in Kobe could ruin a British bank that had been in 
continuous operation since 1762. This was a black swan.


Most large banks take measures to stop trading that allows 
both the front and the back office to be controlled by the 
same person. This is supposed to be a standard risk 
management practice. Societe Generale, France's second 
largest bank, took such practices seriously. In fact, the 
magazine Risk declared early this year that among the large 
banks in the world, Societe Generale had the best risk 
management process in place. Yet, this did not stop Jerome 
Kerviel, a trader at Societe Generale, from taking an 
unhedged unauthorised bet in the European futures markets. 
Once again, it turns out that he had control of both the 
back office and the front office. This time, the undoing 
came about when the Federal Reserve of the United States 
unexpectedly dropped its official interest rate in late 
January. In the end, Kerviel caused a €4.9-billion 
($7.2-billion) trading loss to Societe Generale, which could 
spell its end.


These are examples of operational risk gone spectacularly 
wrong. They are black swans. Where are these black swans in 
our lives? According to Taleb, they are everywhere. In 
particular, there are black swans in financial markets. The 
standard statistical models (the bell-shaped curve of the 
normal, or Gaussian, distribution) used in standard 
financial models underestimate the chances of high-risk 
events.


Events that actually occur once every decade are often 
modelled as if they occur once in 100 years. This creates 
the false impression that we can ignore events that should 
not be ignored. Black swans are real. They are even more 
real in developing countries such as India where the 
financial market is inherently much more volatile than its 
counterparts in the developed world.


Indians have two bad habits. First, we consider 
Western-trained Indians to be superior to home-grown ones. 
Western-trained financial experts acquire a Western mindset. 
They tend to ignore problems that typically arise in markets 
that are thin -- most of the companies listed in Indian 
stock exchanges hardly ever have any trade. Thus, their 
training does not prepare them to spot black swans. They are 
like the 18th century English who had never seen a black 
swan. 


Business
Chennai, April 25, 2010
Updated: April 25, 2010 12:32 IST
Stocks and swans
D. Murali 


 A black swan is an outlier


One of Taleb's earliest Wall Street mentors was 
Jean-Patrice, who had an 

[FairfieldLife] Re: Jesuit Trained Pope Trashes Capitalism in Call for Worldwide Socialism

2013-12-04 Thread Jason

---  s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re Capitalist governments shouldn't be bailing anybody out . . . If
the government takes the risk out of the equation by offering a bailout,
any fool could run a business and risk everyone's investments in it with
no lessons learned.:



  Precisely my point. You can argue that we should move towards a more
Ayn Rand set-up and get governments off our backs. It's states offering
bailouts that has encouraged the banks to take idiotic risks.


  You could argue the opposite though - financial institutions should
come under more strenuous oversight from financial regulators with the
state limiting bonuses and having a veto on risky investments.


  It's the current mixed-economy model that isn't fit for purpose.
Bankers socialism pisses off everyone.


The 'capitalistic political system' is the greatest dogma of
the 20th century.

The 'socialistic economic system' is the second greatest
dogma of the 20th century.

A 'capitalistic political system' is tantamount to
'corporate dictatorship'.

Atleast, 3% percent of the total budget money should be
allocated to political parties as political subsidies.
These political subsidies should be distributed to parties
on vote proportion basis.  This will force political parties
to take a more centrist position and prevent extreme fringe
ideologies from arising.





[FairfieldLife] Re: Pope Francis technique

2013-10-20 Thread Jason

The story of the fallen angel is figurative, metaphorical
story.

It's the process of creation itself, the bigbang.  The
spirit became matter, or fell into matter.

Long long ago, we were one with the word. We lost our
oneness with the word as soon as we bit the apple. The
entire sprititual journey or evolution is to regain that
oneness again.

I remember reading this in one of Blavatsky's book
(theosophical society) many years ago.

http://davidpratt.info/spir-mat.htm
http://davidpratt.info/spir-mat.htm


 --- s3raphita s3raphita@... wrote:

 Re And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every
 tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat; But of the
 tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not
 eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou
 shalt surely die (Genesis 2:16-17). :

 Precisely! Man didn't die so God was telling porkies!
 (Spare me the bollocks of saying man dying spiritually.)

 The early Gnostics were right in seeing the Serpent as the
 true friend of mankind. The Serpent wanted us to see that
 we are immortal (we're *really* the One Self  - Christ
 Consciousness) but God wants us to remain slaves. Of
 course, we're using mythological language here, but the
 God of present-day Christians still doesn't want people to
 become seers - ie, those who see clearly.


  --- punditster punditster@... wrote:
 
  The Fall of Man myth is a universal story that teaches
  by means of a confidence trick.
 
  And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one
  of us, to know good and evil; and now, lest he put forth
  his hand, and take also of the Tree of Life, and eat,
  and live for ever... therefore the Lord God sent him
  forth from the garden of Eden ... (Genesis 3:22-3).
 
  And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every
  tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat; But of the
  tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not
  eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou
  shalt surely die (Genesis 2:16-17).
 
  Clearly, humankind did not die on that day of the Fall,
  but instead became mortal.
 
  We can see how the creation of man from clay, as related
  in the Jehovistic account of Genesis, belonged to one
  branch of the world's universal clay-man myths springing
  from Southeast Asia. According to Oppenhiemer: In these
  stories a malign creature, originally either a devil or
  snake, interfered with the attempted animation of the
  clay models by the creator. A a clear reference to human
  creation is in the Austronesian cultures of Southeast
  Asia as totemic props for mythic drama (Oppenheimer
  356).
 
  Work Cited:
 
  Eden in the East
  The Drowned Continent of Southeast Asia.
  By Stephen Oppenheimer, M.D.
  Phoenix 1998
  p. 355-382
 


  On 10/19/2013 2:14 PM, Share Long wrote:

Richard, do other cultures have a myth about the fall of humanity
that centers around acquiring some forbidden knowledge? And in other
cultures is the fall blamed on the women?




  On Saturday, October 19, 2013 2:04 PM, Richard J. Williams
punditster@ mailto:punditster@ wrote:


  It seems obvious that the stories and myths gathered in the Bible
were assembled from immortality and fertility myths which were in common
circulation at that time, that is, about 3000 years ago. Stephen
Oppenheimer, writing in Eden in the East notes that many of these same
mythic elements are still to be found in lands stretching from Egypt to
India, Southwest Asia, Melanesia, and America.

  This Levantine creation myth is closely allied to other older myths
concerning creation, and as Harris points out, every known culture
expresses social values and religious views through myth (Harris 101). A
clear reference to human creation is in the Austronesian cultures of
Southeast Asia where the idea of creation from clay or red earth is also
used as totemic prop for mythic drama (Oppenheimer 356).

  Work Cited:

  Oppenhiemer, Stephen, M.D., Eden in the East. London: Phoenix, 1998

  On 10/19/2013 11:56 AM, emptybill@ mailto:emptybill@ wrote:

According to the Orthodox, Ancestral Sin caused the reversal of
paradisaical deathlessness by creating the consequential mortality that
we all inherited. Obviously a mythologized explanation but this is how
they explain why humans are prone to concupiscence and deviance of will.



  Better yet is this explanation of the Orthodox view of original
sin.



  http://oca.org/questions/teaching/st.-augustine-original-sin



  ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@ mailto:authfriend@
wrote:

  Thanks, this is great. For the moment, one question: The expulsion
from the Garden and from the Tree of Life was an act of love and not
vengeance so that humanity would not 'become immortal in sin.' What
does immortal in sin mean, and how would that happen?


  emptybill wrote:
  Read this and then see if you have questions.


 
http://www.stmaryorthodoxchurch.org/orthodoxy/articles/ancestral_versus_\

[FairfieldLife] Re: Americans need to know exactly how backwards they are

2013-10-17 Thread Jason

This is exactly the reason he hates you, and moreover, Xeno,
WillyTex, iranitea and wayback71 also pointed out to you
once.

He probably meant the term uncivilised.  If he did mean
backwards, he probably meant it in the social sense.

Do you have to pounce on every single semantic vagueness and
ambiguity he makes on the net? What are you exactly trying
to say in this post? Can't you ask him what exactly he is
trying to say?

Have you ever wondered why he loves Lawson inspite of all
the disagreements he had with him?


 --- authfriend authfriend@... wrote:

 Thank you, Barry, for letting Americans in on this
 disgraceful secret. We here on FFL have been wondering how
 to get the word out, but we never thought of just putting
 it in a post so all Americans could read it. You're a
 genius.

  Now that they all know how backwards [sic] they are,
 maybe they'll all just leave America and go to one of
 those other countries to live.


  (guffaw)

  Barry wrote:
 
  https://scontent-a-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1385414_101
  51915751529805_1134352580_n.png

 




[FairfieldLife] Re: So You Can All Relax Now

2013-10-11 Thread Jason

 ---awoelflebater , awoelflebater@... wrote:

 Typical, I add a link and it clicks but takes you nowhere.
 You'll have to just do it the hard way:

 http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders
http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders+exist/90111\
20/story.html
 +exist/9011120/story.html
http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders+exist/90111\
20/story.html

 BTW, I was given a preview of some new 'look' on neo today
 on my computer at work. It is quite different from the one
 we have all been using the last few weeks. It seems much
 better...but we'll see.

 http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Dozens+mental
http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders+exist/90111\
20/story.html
 +disorders+exist/9011120/story.html
http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders+exist/90111\
20/story.html


It's now viewed in scientific circles, that Psychiatry is
going through the same stage of development as physics
before Newton or biology before Darwin.

IMO, a lot of breakthroughs are needed in the future, get a
clear understanding of the mechanics of mind-brain interface
and its functioning.

Dr. V.S. Ramachandran says the next step is to map the
mental illness onto the neural pathways of the brain itself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tell-Tale_Brain
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tell-Tale_Brain

   ***

Above all, psychiatrists need to be more honest with their
patients, he believes. They shouldn't tell people their
illness is caused by a chemical imbalance when there is no
evidence this exists. Psychiatry has little knowledge of the
underlying processes governing mental health and it should
not pretend otherwise.

 
http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders%20+exist/901\
1120/story.html
http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders
http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders%20+exist/901\
1120/story.html
+exist/9011120/story.html
http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Dozens+mental+disorders+exist/901112\
0/story.html




[FairfieldLife] Re: They want your attention because they feed off of you

2013-10-10 Thread Jason

But somebody said this

  PPS: Bubbles, be careful about twisting your neck into a
  pretzel pretending you don't spend your life reading
  everything posted on FFL; the chiropractor was right,
  you're not exactly a spring chicken. I hadn't realized how
  much Willy was upsetting you with those photos of Rama,
  those Dutch people are pretty tolerant, why don't you try
  telling the waitress what's upsetting you so much.


---  turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 Just as a followup, because I did feel that this was a
thought-provoking
 article, as an example of the cost of the Internet and our
 we-only-want-30-seconds-of-your-attention-for-a-soundbyte media, how
 many of you found that you no longer had the attention span to read
the
 entire article? No need to reply...you know who you are.  :-)

 Attention -- the nature of it, the seeking of it, and the cost of
giving
 it out indiscriminately -- is obviously a fascination of mine, so this
 article appealed to me. It made me think about the very nature of the
 Internet and its economic underpinnings, and why all of my browsers
are
 equipped with add-ons like Adblock Plus. I don't see ads -- even
 subliminally, in the margins or in the top banner -- when reading this
 forum, and I never have to wait through a commercial when watching a
 YouTube video. I consider those things an intrusion into my life that
is
 unacceptable in terms of cost, so I've found a way to block them.

 I'm going into this because some on this forum take the fact that I
have
 set up less automated, manual blocks of *them* and their posts
 personally, as if it's some kind of attack against them. It's not.
 It's the consequence of sussing out that I have a limited amount of
time
 left on this rock, and I don't want to piss it away with people or
 things that will simply waste it. It's not necessarily personal; it's
 the result of a cost/benefit analysis. Long experience has taught me
 that some subjects and some people are going to be *by definition* a
 waste of my time, and time is the one resource I cannot get back. So
 I've downloaded the EgoBlock Plus add-on, and installed it on my
 internal wetware browser. I recommend it highly.  :-)

 And it's even free, so Alex doesn't have to worry about this post
being
 spam. :-) All you need to run this add-on is free will, and the
 discrimination to use it.


 ---  turquoiseb  wrote:
 
  This subject line is a test, written after reading the article at
the
  link below. Despite what some here might have thought when they
 clicked
  on it, neither the article nor the subject line is a reference to
  Fairfield Life or the characters who populate it and often vie for
 your
  attention. But both could be. The subject line is a very literal
  description of the Internet and how it works. And the article is
about
  attention, period, how we live in a world that is nickle-and-dimeing
 us
  to death by stealing tiny slices of our attention, and what the
  cumulative cost of pissing away all that attention might be.
 
  It's also a little about people's goals when they desire to attract
 the
  attention of others, and about goals, period. I loved the G.K.
  Chesterton story from Tremendous Trifles about the two kids; it
 finally
  made me understand why TMers want to fly.
 
  Anyway, enjoy:
 
 

http://www.aeonmagazine.com/world-views/does-each-click-of-attention-co\
\
 st-a-bit-of-ourselves/

http://www.aeonmagazine.com/world-views/does-each-click-of-attention-cos\
\
 t-a-bit-of-ourselves /

http://www.aeonmagazine.com/world-views/does-each-click-of-attention-co\
\
 st-a-bit-of-ourselves/

http://www.aeonmagazine.com/world-views/does-each-click-of-attention-co\
\
 st-a-bit-of-ourselves/
 





[FairfieldLife] Re: A cafe in the rain, redux

2013-10-06 Thread Jason

 Correction below:


   --- turquoiseb turquoiseb  wrote:
  
   Had an interesting sensation tonight, real déja vu all over
again
   stuff. I'm living this week near where I was staying when I first
   started coming to Paris for this gig. While here, I developed an
   affection for a certain writing café/restaurant in this 'hood,
so
   tonight I decided to have dinner there again.
  
   When I first arrived in Paris back in March, it was rainy. So I'd
sit on
   the patio of that café, which was outdoors but covered by an
awning,
   and listen to the music of the rain on the canvas. I always found
that
   sound soothing, and felt that it provided a cool background drone
to the
   music of café conversation, and served as an admirable source
of
   inspiration for writing.
  
   Tonight it wasn't raining when I walked over, but then it started,
in
   earnest. That same rain-drone was back, as if it had reappeared to
   welcome me back. Cool.
  
   Dinner was great, too. Chèvre chaud (warm goat cheese) on
toast with
   honey, served on a bed of Caesar salad. With a nice glass of wine.
I ate
   it and chatted with some people at the café, and then I wrote
a few
   pages I actually liked for a piece I've been working on, suitably
   inspired to do so by the sound of the rain on the canvas. Then I
walked
   home in the rain, doing my best Fred Astaire imitation all the
way.
  
   All of this adds up to an excellent night out in my book. How was
yours?
  

  --- awoelflebater awoelflebater@... wrote:
 
  Not bad, thanks for asking.
 
  I returned to my place of residence after an extremely
  satisfying day at my business that I own and run and
  which the local community loves. I handle fragrant
  leather, fit gorgeous equestrian-inspired fashion on
  women who are having the time of their lives visiting
  one of their favourite places on the planet  - their
  local tack store. I drive a mere 12 minutes back to my
  home on five gorgeous acres that comprise a wild fruit
  orchard - figs, peaches, blackberries, apples (including
  many heritage varieties), pears and cherries - and is
  home to six gorgeous horses, three dogs and my husband.
  The brick house and barn that we designed and built is
  homey and attractive and we live in one of the most
  beautiful places on the planet where I can hear barred
  owls, doves and tree frogs from my bedroom window as I
  lay in the quiet of the night. My dog Jesse lies
  directly beneath my body underneath the bed all night
  and the border collie pads restlessly from the warmth of
  her bed to the cool of the marble bathroom floor; she is
  the fidgety one. My other SPCA rescue loves to lie on
  her sheepskin bed with her head hanging over the edge
  all night long. She is the first to jump on the bed at
  6am each morning. She is he snuggler.
 
  Then there is that wonderful feeling, after you hay and
  grain the horses and make sure their blankets are
  straight and their beds picked, that all is well in the
  world because these few creatures that are in your care
  are feeling safe and content and you have contributed to
  that in some small way. When I leave the barn and walk
  toward the house where my husband is already preparing
  dinner, which he does every night, I know that I have
  made sure the animals have been looked after first. This
  is important.
 
  I could go on and on about the wonderfulness of my life
  and I am sure each and every one of those who post here
  have greater or smaller miracles that they live with. It
  is great that you love what you do Barry. But why is
  your pleasure always salted with the hope, the false
  assertion, that others live a more diminished, poorer
  life than you claim you do?

 --- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:

 Ann, thank you for this, I'm always moved when you speak
 of your obvious love of animals. I bet your husband is a
 wonderful cook, myself I'm limited to a mean stir fry the
 Wife and Daughter (and Jack Russell) can't seem to get
 enough of.

 I think Barry is one of those unusual people with a talent
 for looking down on others from the gutter.

 http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x301yx_dylan-all-the-tired-
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x301yx_dylan-all-the-tired-
horses-in-the-s_videogames 
 horses-in-the-s_videogames 
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x301yx_dylan-all-the-tired-
horses-in-the-s_videogames 


Some people use the public forum as their personal blog. In
that sense he is a prima donna.

I think he just can't stand the fact that a lot of people in
the TM-mov't are quite happy with their lives.

If Judy ever moves to Fairfield, or to some community in the
country-side, he is sure to throw a hissy fit. These kind of
posts are basicaly a taunt to Judy.

Some people are rolling stones. But to crow about it over
and over again is funny.




[FairfieldLife] Re: One Outlaw's View Of The Laws Of Nature

2013-10-05 Thread Jason

   
s3raphita replies:
   
snippus interruptus
   
Your question also touches on the issue of the fine-tuning of
the
various constants of physics. It's too improbable that these
values were an accident that just happened to benefit the
creation of intelligent life (in the long run). Alternatives
are:
1) it's a set-up : step forward God; 2) there are an infinite
or very large number of universes : where's the evidence?;
3) there's a feedback mechanism at a subtle level we've yet
to discover.

   --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
  
   Interesting speculations, but you'll have to forgive me if I
don't
   pile on. I don't find myself very interested in theoretical
discus-
   sions for which no answer can ever be found. It's probably a
   Buddhist/Taoist thang -- we don't spend time pondering why
   the world seems to be the way that it is or coming up with
   made-up explanations for why it is the way that it is. That
   is seen as a waste of time and life. The only thing that matters
   is how to DEAL with the world the way it is.

 below:

 Barry, go all intellectual on us:


  Just to explain a bit further, I see ALL systems proposed
  to explain the how and why of things as human constructs,
  driven by humans' seeming need to feel as if they're on top of
  things and understand them, and to make them feel as if they
  can to some extent predict and/or control them. In other words,
  fantasies.
 
  In this category of fantasies I class all religious explanations
  for the world and how/whether/why it was created, all
  supposed descriptions of karma or the equally-supposed
  Laws Of Nature, all predictive systems such as astrology or
  Jyotish, and all prescriptive systems such as Ayurveda,
  Sthapatya Veda, food trips or fad diets, various healing
  methods, etc.
 
  I have seen ZERO evidence that ANY of these systems --
  including science -- can adequately cover all possible events
  and scenarios, or that they can be relied on to work in all
  cases or for all people. I see them as best guesses, driven
  in many cases by the egos of their proponents, and being
  of (at best) questionable use in the real world.
 
  Therefore I can't justify spending any of the remaining time
  of my life investigating or even discussing any of them, as
  if they mattered.

 --- bobpriced bobpriced@.. wrote:

 Have I got this Wright, according to you, there are no
 laws of: thermodynamics, cosmic expansion, gravitation,
 motion, buoyancy, natural selection; and no proof that:
 fire is hot, water is wet, ice is solid, and, most
 importantly, that you come across like you're as dumb as a
 bag of rocks; this could explain how Winthrop  and Albert
 worked on the non weapon part of an exclusively weapon
 project, when one of them could not get security
 clearance. I'm beginning to think Jason is on to something
 that you have no idea how vacuous you sound: have you ever
 considered the possible link between dementia and
 excessive television viewing (I'm sure the grainy
 production values---of your pirated copies, can't be
 helping)?

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOw8aiyMUAU  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOw8aiyMUAU  


The posts of Bob Price have a laser like precision. He also
fires those lasers in a wide range of colors, colored beyond
the wildest hues of the rainbow.

Barry is like a rabbit caught in a headlights of a car.

Imagine what happens when the driver is Judy.

There are definite laws of nature. The proper methodology of
science was developed by Galileo, by conducting the first
true experiment. The Scientific methodology is comparatively
recent and before that there was no real science at all.




  As noted above, I tend to have a more
  pragmatic approach to spirituality. Theory -- whether
  spouted by scientists or supposed seers -- will always be
  theory, and nothing more. What's the point of arguing
  about that which can never be proven one way or another?
 
  The world is and will always be a constant field of change.
  Humans who believe they've got a handle on that change
  have a really terrible track record of being correct. So
  why bother with them? Why not focus on ways to become
  more capable of DEALING WITH constant, unpredictable
  change, rather than trying (ineffectively) to predict or
  explain it?
 
  Just my opinion...




[FairfieldLife] Re: The Theology of Breaking Bad

2013-09-25 Thread Jason

Could you name a few countries?

IMHO, dress diferences actually perpetuate, bias, prejudices
and discriminations, on a very subtle level, deep  in the
subconscious.

Where is Ann when I need her?

Nothing in the universe is static. We evolve and adapt to
everchanging conditions. Stasis means sure extinction. The
universe is an extremely dynamic place.  This is really a
survival issue.


 --- sharelong60 sharelong60@... wrote:

 Jason, there are countries where men and women dress in
 very similar ways. But those countries don't seem very
 egalitarian to me!

  From: Jason jedi_spock@...
 
  Share, discrimination, bias, prejudices continue to exist on
  very subtle levels.  There are invisible glass ceilings.  It
  can take generations to wipe them out.
 
  An unisex dress code (specialy for children) in public
  spaces, I believe can play a role in creating a truly
  egalitarian society.
 
   --- sharelong60 sharelong60@.. wrote:
  
   Jason, your comment about unisex dress code kind of jumped
   out at me as did your linking that to an egalitarian
   society. Actually I'm still kind of baffled by it so don't
   even know what to ask except: can you say more?
  
From: Jason jedi_spock@...
   
The Chinese philosophy which speaks of Yin-Yang, two
equal energies mutually balancing each other is a far
superior philosophy to western philosophy and certain
aspects of indian philosophy.
   
Science itself says that male and female are equals but
different.
   
Yoga is essentialy balance, ie life within parameters.
   
Any society or culture that is imbalanced will
eventually destroy itself.  Nature hates imbalances and
always tries to reach an equilibrium.  I have always
believed that an unisex dresscode in public spaces, is
an important way to bring in a truly egalitarian
society.
   
If a republic is small, it is destroyed by a foreign
force; if it is large, it is destroyed by an internal
vice.
   
~French philosopher, Montesquieu
   

 --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:

 Ah, yes! C.S. Lewis and Mere Christianity. The book was
 originally a series of talks Lewis gave on BBC Radio in
 the 1940s. At one point he brought up the delicate topic
 of sex. Lewis maintained that in his youth he had been all
 in favour of a naturalattitude towards sexual matters
 but - he said - surely contemporary attitudes towards sex
 were anything but natural. There was something
 positively diseased about them. As an example, Lewis asked
 us to consider a striptease show. What are we make of such
 an exhibition? Well, he said, imagine you had arrived in a
 strange country where you discovered that the inhabitants
 were in the habit of paying to gather in front of a
 display of food that was hidden from view. Then, slowly,
 the appetising meal was revealed to the gaze of the
 citizens. Wouldn't you then conclude that something had
 gone seriously wrong with the appetites of the denizens of
 this imaginary nation? Well, isn't the same true of our
 attitudes towards sex? We have a diseased approach, he
 concluded.

 A listener to the programme later wrote in to say: if I
 came across a country such as you describe I would assume
 that the people were starving. What a splendid response!
 The implication being that men frequent strip shows
 because they are sex-starved.

 Now take a look around you at the 24/7 porn culture we
 inhabit. Was Lewis right or the anonymous listener?




[FairfieldLife] Projecting (Re: Surviving Whole Foods)

2013-09-24 Thread Jason

Judy, it's precisely this kind of statements you make that I
and WillyTex were refering to.

To put it bluntly, you are abrasive.

If you had diplomacy, if you let the conversations flow in a
natural and fluid way, you would be certainly a brilliant
poster. As Xeno pointed out, you as much as Barry, shift
contexts in arguments.

Barry is an emotional psychopath, and an emotional sadist.

You, on the other hand is an intellectual psychopath.

Ravi told a plain lie to Curtis that he bought drink to a
minor. You tried to justifiy it by saying, Curtis was
projecting.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/300480
  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/300480
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/300544
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/300544



 --- authfriend authfriend@.. wrote:

 Good lord, (E)hare, don't humiliate yourself by invoking
 Mr. Spock's logic. You wouldn't recognize logic if it
 stuck its fingers up your nose.

  --- sharelong60 sharelong60@... wrote:
 
  (D)udy, you told ME not to waste YOUR time! Duh! How can
  I  possibly waste YOUR time?! As Spock would say: your
  logic is weak.
 
   From: authfriend@... authfriend@...
  
   Share tried a blather instead of a blither:
  
   I have no control over which posts of mine you read,
   Judy, ergo I have no control over how you spend your
   time on FFL.
  
   I don't believe I said you did, Share.
  
   What you do have control over is whether you ask
   stupid questions.
  
   Oh, wait...
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: The Theology of Breaking Bad

2013-09-24 Thread Jason

The Chinese philosophy which speaks of Yin-Yang, two equal
energies mutually balancing each other is a far superior
philosophy to western philosophy and certain aspects of
indian philosophy.

Seience itself says that male and female are equals but
different.

Yoga is essentialy balance, ie life within parameters.

Any society or culture that is imbalanced will eventually
destroy itself.  Nature hates imbalances and always tries to
reach an equilibrium.  I have always believed that an unisex
dresscode in public spaces, is an important way to bring in
a truly egalitarian society.

If a republic is small, it is destroyed by a foreign force;
if it is large, it is destroyed by an internal vice.

~French philosopher, Montesquieu


 --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:

 Ah, yes! C.S. Lewis and Mere Christianity. The book was
 originally a series of talks Lewis gave on BBC Radio in
 the 1940s. At one point he brought up the delicate topic
 of sex. Lewis maintained that in his youth he had been all
 in favour of a naturalattitude towards sexual matters
 but - he said - surely contemporary attitudes towards sex
 were anything but natural. There was something
 positively diseased about them. As an example, Lewis asked
 us to consider a striptease show. What are we make of such
 an exhibition? Well, he said, imagine you had arrived in a
 strange country where you discovered that the inhabitants
 were in the habit of paying to gather in front of a
 display of food that was hidden from view. Then, slowly,
 the appetising meal was revealed to the gaze of the
 citizens. Wouldn't you then conclude that something had
 gone seriously wrong with the appetites of the denizens of
 this imaginary nation? Well, isn't the same true of our
 attitudes towards sex? We have a diseased approach, he
 concluded.

 A listener to the programme later wrote in to say: if I
 came across a country such as you describe I would assume
 that the people were starving. What a splendid response!
 The implication being that men frequent strip shows
 because they are sex-starved.

 Now take a look around you at the 24/7 porn culture we
 inhabit. Was Lewis right or the anonymous listener?

  --- Pundister punditster@... wrote:
 
  In Mere Christianity, C.S. Lewis calls pride 'The Great
  Sin' for it 'has been the chief cause of misery in
  every nation and every family since the world began'¦ it
  was through Pride that the devil became the devil: Pride
  leads to every other vice.' We see in Walter' case that
  it is his pride' 'an unwillingness to accept normal
  treatment, a refusal to be a charity case even when
  faced with his own impending death' that starts him on
  the path toward manufacturing meth. Pride is the
  catalyst that leads to all of Walter's other sins.
 
  Read more:
 
  'The Theology of Breaking Bad'
  http://www.fare-forward.com/the-theology-of-breaking-bad/




[FairfieldLife] Re: Einstein for Dummies (was: On Being An Eagle)

2013-09-24 Thread Jason

Bob, hope you'll drop by often.  IMO, your intellect is far
sharper than anybody here, even Judy.

Barry is just woefully ill informed.  He imagines a lot, and
sometimes loses objectivity.  He is not a deliberate liar.
His errors are delusionary.


 --- bobpriced bobpriced@.. wrote:

 My last post snipped one of Barry's paragraphs, which I
 have restored below:

 Regret I only have time for this drive by, but I wanted to
 let everyone know how much I've enjoyed the traffic on FFL
 this past week; at times its been hard to keep up (the
 Wife says its amazing how much I expect to get paid
 considering how much I need to keep up) with all the posts
 of my favourite contributors, but I think I finally
 managed it this morning. It's been a particular pleasure
 watching Judy, once again, hand the heads, and in Barry's
 case---the balls, to the growing list of FFL
 misogynist's---who are not unlike watching a group of
 Swiss dance instructors trying to out run an avalanche on
 the Jungfrau they caused with their excessive yodelling; I
 hesitate to suggest, they might try loosening their
 lederhosen; can anyone doubt that the contributions of
 these gentlemen have nothing to do with accuracy and
 everything to do with the fact Judy is a woman and so much
 more intelligent and talented then they are? So as not to
 be taken for a taker, I thought I might add to everyone's
 edification by pointing out one of Pinocchio's bigger
 whoppers this past week (just to remind us what a liar
 looks like). More below.

 Sorry to nit pick Barry, but, as I've told you in the
 past, name dropping about people nobody knows (or cares
 about) is pretty much an open road, but when you bullshit
 about the famous you need to tack a little closer to the
 truth. As someone who peed on his lap should know,
 Einstein never worked on the Manhattan project with
 Winthrop, or anyone else for that matter, as he was denied
 a security  clearance due to his pacifist leanings, and
 *all scientists* working on the Manhattan Project were
 forbidden by the government to consult with him because of
 this perceived security risk. So unless you want to leave
 old Winthrop out on a ledge, you may want to consider
 changing your story to Oppenheimer, although that won't
 cover you for future stories about the hydrogen bomb (he
 was also considered a  security risk by the time that went
 into development), or, better still, just use Edward
 Teller---that will get you all the way to the neutron
 bomb; and don't forget you'll need to get him from Chicago
 to Priceton  somehow (opps my fingers slipped).

 http://tinyurl.com/Einstein-For-Dummies   
http://tinyurl.com/Einstein-For-Dummies  

 http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/einstein
http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/einstein/peace-and-war\
/the-manhattan-project
 /peace-and-war/the-manhattan-project
http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/einstein/peace-and-war\
/the-manhattan-project

  ---turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
 
  Judy posted an interesting question for a change:

   I wonder if it's possible for two philosophers to
   have an argument (or just a conversation) using
   only mathematical formulations, no words.

  I can cast third-hand hearsay evidence on this
  question. At least on the having a conversation
  issue.
 
  My grandfather worked with Albert Einstein on the
  Manhattan Project, as did most of the other high-
  level physicists in the US at the time. They would
  occasionally get together in one of the classrooms
  of Princeton University, alone, and just jackpot
  ideas. My father describes my grandfather describing
  hours-long conversations in which neither of them
  said a word.
 
  One would just scribble an unfinished equation on
  one of the many blackboards in the room, and then
  step back and wait for the other to comment on it.
  Sometimes the comment was another, slightly differ-
  ent equation. Sometimes it was a correction to a
  mistake in the original equation. Rarely -- and to
  be celebrated -- there was a solution to the
  equation.
 
  They celebrated by going out for ice cream. Sure
  sounds like a conversation to me, but not much of
  an argument.
 
  There's a difference.
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: Surviving Whole Foods

2013-09-24 Thread Jason

Listen to me carefully, Uncle Tantra.  It took years for
Judy and et all, to find out your true colors.

Bob Price found that out in just a few minutes time.!!

Would you admit that the intellect of Bob Price is far
superior to anybody else here?  You got what you deserved
Unc.

Bob Price would outwit Rama Lenz in an intellectual argument
any day.

Please don't fudge the issue at hand by calling him a troll.
He isn't one. Everybody knows that.  I want you to look at
him in the eye, and admit your error.


  Ann opines:
 
  Bob Prices' later post which I just read before
  bothering to respond to you is FUN. Maybe you
  better go and read that a few times, Pinocchio.
  Now that man can deliver and he often has his
  facts straight. You don't want to mess with him,
  and you know it. If you want to give me some
  real FUN, I would love to see you engage him
  one on one - go ahead, I really, really dare you.
 
 --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@... writes:

 Not gonna happen. Bob's a troll, and a grudge-
 holding one at that. If you're looking for
 someone to knock you out of the #2 Bitch position,
 he *is* a likely candidate, but I'm not gonna
 interact with him. If that's your idea of fun,
 you go for it. :-)





[FairfieldLife] Re: On Being An Eagle

2013-09-24 Thread Jason

  Jason wrote:
 
  You state that Kelvin's statement is inherently
   self-invalidating?

 --- waspaligap waspaligap@.. wrote:

 Well, yes. He makes a claim (an epistemological claim).
 Let's call that claim K. According to K,  when you
 cannot express it (i.e. some claim) in precise
 mathematical  terms, your knowledge of it, is of a meagre
 and unsatisfactory kind.

 But as is obvious, K is not expressed in mathematical
 terms. From which it follows that according to K, K is of
 a meagre and unsatisfactory kind (whatever that means -
 but it seems unlikely to allow for K being true).

  If mathematics is the language of the universe, even
  that can't explain the Qualia aspect of the universe.
  Judy posted a youtube link on this a while back.

 I'd agree with you there.


  Which means Maths is a process and not the end in
  itself?

 I'm not sure what you mean. Does anyone think that Maths
 is an end in itself? However what does interest me very
 much is the mystery of mathematics. We live in an age of
 science. For many it is a substitute for religion. It's
 true that some sciences are more equal than others. So the
 iffy ones such as economics, climate science, and
 psychology bask in reflected glory from physics and
 chemistry. Yet the foundation of it all seems to be
 mathematics. But do we even know what mathematics is? What
 are mathematical discoveries? What are we discovering?
 Where does the necessity of mathematical truth come from?


  Could you rephrase Godel in a little more easier way?

 I doubt it! Godel's proof, like quantum indeterminacy,
 seems to point to something most peculiar, but no one can
 quite agree about what that is (or means). But perhaps we
 can just return to the logical positivists that were
 referred to earlier in the thread...

 I'd suggest that many folks who idealise science have in
 their mind some loose form of logical positivism (either
 explicit or implicit). Like this:

 Q: What makes science work?

 A: The experimental method

 Q: But why does the experimental method work?

 A: Because we test our theories against experience

 Q: What do you mean by experience?

 A: The evidence of our senses

 Q: What is sense data?

 A: The images in our brain

 Q: What other types of knowledge are there?

 A: That's all there is

 Q: So what about Logic and Mathematics? They're not sense
 data!

 A: They just describe the relations between the concepts
 and symbols we use to refer to sense data.

Thanks Paligap. Sorry for the delayed reply. My gardener who
worked for me for more than 15 years died. The very next day
a 27 year old widow with 3 small children arrived to work.
She is a total orphan with nobody in the world.  Her husband
died in a mining accident.

Anyway coming to the thread, Your point is brilliant. So
Logic and Mathematics are both abstract intangibles. They
only describe the relationship between concepts and symbol.

I remember physicist Max Tegmark stating that at the most
fundamental level, there are only numbers. Does that mean
the unified field is something intangible?  Nirguna means
no qualities whatsoever.

Would you call Buddhism, a 'solipsistic reductionism' or
lets say 'nihilistic reductionism'?



 The trouble with this idea is that the work of Russell and
 Frege in the twentieth century seemed to show that
 mathematics could not be reduced to logic (simple,
 self-evident tautologies). Furthermore, maths seems to
 result in bizarre, counter-intuitive discoveries (such
 as Cantor's proof that some infinities are larger than
 others). So the point of Godel is that he appears to add
 more spice to this pot with his incompleteness theorem.

 If Cantor's discovery does not come from the evidence of
 his (our) senses, and if it doesn't simply represent the
 manipulation of self-evident axioms. what on earth's going
 on?

 Mysterianism rules!





[FairfieldLife] Re: The Theology of Breaking Bad

2013-09-24 Thread Jason

Share, discrimination, bias, prejudices continue to exist on
very subtle levels.  There are invisible glass ceilings.  It
can take generations to wipe them out.

An unisex dress code (specialy for children) in public
spaces, I believe can play a role in creating a truly
egalitarian society.


 --- sharelong60 sharelong60@.. wrote:

 Jason, your comment about unisex dress code kind of jumped
 out at me as did your linking that to an egalitarian
 society. Actually I'm still kind of baffled by it so don't
 even know what to ask except: can you say more?

  From: Jason jedi_spock@...
 
  The Chinese philosophy which speaks of Yin-Yang, two
  equal energies mutually balancing each other is a far
  superior philosophy to western philosophy and certain
  aspects of indian philosophy.
 
  Science itself says that male and female are equals but
  different.
 
  Yoga is essentialy balance, ie life within parameters.
 
  Any society or culture that is imbalanced will
  eventually destroy itself.  Nature hates imbalances and
  always tries to reach an equilibrium.  I have always
  believed that an unisex dresscode in public spaces, is
  an important way to bring in a truly egalitarian
  society.
 
  If a republic is small, it is destroyed by a foreign
  force; if it is large, it is destroyed by an internal
  vice.
 
  ~French philosopher, Montesquieu
 

--- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:
  
   Ah, yes! C.S. Lewis and Mere Christianity. The book was
   originally a series of talks Lewis gave on BBC Radio in
   the 1940s. At one point he brought up the delicate topic
   of sex. Lewis maintained that in his youth he had been all
   in favour of a naturalattitude towards sexual matters
   but - he said - surely contemporary attitudes towards sex
   were anything but natural. There was something
   positively diseased about them. As an example, Lewis asked
   us to consider a striptease show. What are we make of such
   an exhibition? Well, he said, imagine you had arrived in a
   strange country where you discovered that the inhabitants
   were in the habit of paying to gather in front of a
   display of food that was hidden from view. Then, slowly,
   the appetising meal was revealed to the gaze of the
   citizens. Wouldn't you then conclude that something had
   gone seriously wrong with the appetites of the denizens of
   this imaginary nation? Well, isn't the same true of our
   attitudes towards sex? We have a diseased approach, he
   concluded.
  
   A listener to the programme later wrote in to say: if I
   came across a country such as you describe I would assume
   that the people were starving. What a splendid response!
   The implication being that men frequent strip shows
   because they are sex-starved.
  
   Now take a look around you at the 24/7 porn culture we
   inhabit. Was Lewis right or the anonymous listener?



  --- Pundister punditster@... wrote:
 
  In Mere Christianity, C.S. Lewis calls pride 'The Great
  Sin' for it 'has been the chief cause of misery in
  every nation and every family since the world began'¦ it
  was through Pride that the devil became the devil: Pride
  leads to every other vice.' We see in Walter' case that
  it is his pride' 'an unwillingness to accept normal
  treatment, a refusal to be a charity case even when
  faced with his own impending death' that starts him on
  the path toward manufacturing meth. Pride is the
  catalyst that leads to all of Walter's other sins.
 
  Read more:
 
  'The Theology of Breaking Bad'
  http://www.fare-forward.com/the-theology-of-breaking-bad/




[FairfieldLife] Re: On Being An Eagle

2013-09-22 Thread Jason

  Jason wrote:
  When you can measure what you are speaking about, and
  express it in numbers, you know something about it; but
  when you cannot express it in precise mathematical
  terms, your knowledge of it, is of a meagre and
  unsatisfactory kind
 
  ~ Lord Kelvin
 
  I like the way the thread has evolved, though paligap
  hasn't responded yet.
 
 
 --- waspaligap waspaligap@.. wrote:

 Yes, that was a very deft thread hijack on your part
 Jason. I have been enjoying it too in so far as I can keep
 up.

 For my part, I have been consigned to purgatory by Neo
 (for it is I PaliGap). Apparently PaliGap (or more
 exactly paligap - as Yahoo thinks we would all be
 better off in the world of lower case) is unavailable.
 I have been reserved for something else it seems (or by
 something else). This is traumatic to my sense of
 identity, as you can well imagine. I am struggling with my
 TM too. Looking through my checking notes, I
 fail to see a response to the meditator who has
 distracting sensations of being denied existence.

 No, not even the delights of logical positivism, and the
 taxonomy of reductionism can lay low this bad feeling.

 This thing with Neo may be the first sign of something
 being seriously rotten in the state of the Cloud - Cloud
 apps being something I have up until now embraced heartily
 (anything to escape from Microsoft). When you start to
 look, folks are getting Neo-ed all over the place. Look at
 the Gmail compose improvements. Something that took me
 one or two clicks at best, now takes half a dozen. Do
 these people think I have a limitless supply of clicks?
 Some iYogis say you are incarnated with a fixed supply of
 mouse clicks; once they're gone, that's it - you die

 Or take scrabble. (And why not?) It seems scrabble fans
 are struggling just like me (us?) with Neo:

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22905191

 But to return to the thread...

 Judy asks if philosophers might chat in mathematics only.
 But would that be desirable? After all we have a robust
 mathematical proof of the limitations of formal systems
 from Godel:

 The first incompleteness theorem states that no
 consistent system of axioms whose theorems can be listed
 by an effective procedure (e.g., a computer program, but
 it could be any sort of algorithm) is capable of proving
 all truths about the relations of the natural numbers
 (arithmetic). For any such system, there will always be
 statements about the natural numbers that are true, but
 that are unprovable within the system. The second
 incompleteness theorem, an extension of the first, shows
 that such a system cannot demonstrate its own
 consistency. (from Wiki)

 One must suppose that Philosophy, insofar as it is about
 anything, is about The Truth. So one would presumably wish
 to avoid any system that is demonstrably limited in that
 respect? In any case, is it not a vestige of logical
 positivism (and the first incarnation of Wittgenstein) to
 think that philosophy might best be expressed in
 equations?

 And, returning to the noble Lord Kelvin above, does the
 thought that he expresses survive self-reference?


You state that Kelvin's statement is inherently
self-invalidating?

If mathematics is the language of the universe, even that
can't explain the Qualia aspect of the universe.  Judy
posted a youtube link on this a while back.

Which means Maths is a process and not the end in itself?

Could you rephrase Godel in a little more easier way?





[FairfieldLife] Re: In belated celebration of Talk Like A Pirate Day

2013-09-22 Thread Jason


 ---  turquoiseb  wrote:
 
  To lay with pretty women
  To drink Madeira wine
  To hear the roller's thunder on a shore that isn't mine
 
  Privateering, we will go
  Privateering, yo! ho! ho!
  Privateering, we will go
  Yeah, oh! ho! ho!
 
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YT7Dit1qw24
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YT7Dit1qw24
 
 
---  turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 I always liked this song. It captures the FUN aspect of being
 a privateer -- a pirate. Privateers were necessary evils back in
 the day. Countries like Britain and Spain didn't have the
 money to back the kind of endless wars they liked to fight,
 so they contracted out the warfare to privateers, who were
 commissioned by the various kings to sink the ships of the
 country they were at war with. Good deal for the kings, good
 deal for the privateers -- they got to keep all the booty.

 Mark wrote this song with the life of a rock 'n roll artist in
 mind. The cover of the album (not released until recently in
 the US because of contract disputes) shows an old battered
 van used by a rock band to ferry them back and forth
 between gigs. He identified with the privateer lifestyle.

 Me, whenever I hear the song, I think about other work that
 is contracted out, for example, to me.

 I've worked as a contractor since 1983. Haven't been an
 employee of a company in all of that time. Pirate.

 And it's been FUN. Sure, you miss the supposed security
 of having a permanent job, but anyone reading the
 headlines knows that no job is permanent. Besides, like
 Mark's privateers, the life of a contractor gives you the
 opportunity to see the world.

 Companies willing to contract out their dirty work to
 me have enabled me to live in LA, Malibu, Palo Alto,
 New York City, Pound Ridge, NY, Hartford, CT, Boston,
 Santa Fe, Paris, the south of France, Spain, Holland,
 and now Paris again. Good for them. Because all of
 these places (well, Hartford kinda sucked) were pretty
 COOL, each in their own ways, and I really enjoyed
 being able to live there.

 Currently such a company is paying for me to sit in this
 sidewalk cafe in Paris and rap about the joys of piracy.
 Good for them.

 Ar.


Speaking of pirates, I think ThePirateBay.org was taken
off the grid.  All I get is this..

https://thepiratebay.sx/ https://thepiratebay.sx/




[FairfieldLife] Re: Surviving Whole Foods

2013-09-22 Thread Jason

Xeno, both Barry and Judy are equally at fault regarding
this highly dysfunctional relationship.  Barry teases,
taunts, insults and acts as the baiter.  Judy is rude,
abrasive, undiplomatic and acts as the avenger.

Barry and Judy are like the electron and proton in the
hydrogen atom.  In a certain dark way, they complete each
other.

Barry often talks about the motives others rather than
comment on the substance of the post.  Judy often talks
about the stupidity others rather than gently point out
the post.

Barry often calls people 'stalkers'.  Judy often calls
people 'liars'.


 --- anartaxius anartaxius@.. wrote:

 It is kind of a habit from reading scientific papers.
 Because scientists are uncertain, they always use language
 that waffles, using words like 'may', or 'perhaps', or
 'if'. You may notice I do that rather frequently. When I
 listen to politicians, I generally assume something is
 going to be lying, for example Obama's recent 'red line'
 backtracking. When it comes to politicians in the U.S.,
 Democrats and Republicans alike are pretty much equal
 opportunity liars. Maureen Murphy, an American politician
 said the reason there were so few femaile politicians was
 it was too much trouble to put makeup on two faces.


 Frankly, just as you seem to find my comments
 disingenuous, I find the way you generally respond to
 people also disingenuous, mostly combative. Presumably you
 are interested in spirituality. Who or what is being
 'insulted'? It is just that inbred pest called the ego.
 The ego always has an axe to grind and swing. The ego
 thinks it is a 'person', that it has rights, this is our
 biggest problem in spirituality. It is more of a process
 than a thing, it is not an entity. If a person's identity
 is pure consciousness, there is no one to be insulted. I
 am not saying I cannot take offense or be annoyed etc.,
 but those who repeated take offense at what the world
 throws at them are spiritual cretins, and I hope you are
 not one of those, but to me you do not speak like a person
 who is interested in the spiritual nature of life, and
 yet, you are apparently reading about it a lot, and in
 various kinds of discussions, but I simply do not see much
 spiritual depth in what you say (but it is a relief that
 you are not constantly saying what a great life you are
 leading and how many famous people have crossed your
 path).


 Your method of argumentation does not build, it takes
 down, much in the same way Barry's comments in reference
 to you are a take down. You two are a strange marriage
 made in heaven. I say heaven because if heaven makes
 people such snipers, it is certainly not such a great
 place to be.


 From my perspective, you basically engage in the same
 tactics as those you oppose. You shift context under the
 pretense of maintaining context; you snip relevant parts
 of arguments declaring them to be irrelevant. That is how
 it appears to me. Maybe you do not experience that you are
 doing these things at all. When I shift context, it is
 more inadvertent, because I really do not care that much
 about narrowly defined context. You might try spreading
 you wings and go off on tangents once in a while to see
 what comes up. I find it interesting to watch moths in
 flight - they never go in a straight line, in a world of
 predators, they deviate from directness. So it is on this
 thing we call the Internet, where trolls lie in wait.


 I am here being critical of you, whatever that 'you' is
 for you. If you would only apply your skills in a more
 uplifting way, and not be so critical of people's
 ineptness, minor mistakes, their opacity, and have if you
 had a more relaxed agenda, you would be a brilliant poster
 here, but for now, I think you use your skills in a rather
 dark way, so that brilliance has a tarnish to it. Your
 argument style has a strong polemical element, which is
 better suited to the political arena, where lairs lie,
 than in forums discussing knowledge. It is only when you
 are kissing up to someone like Robin that you go a bit
 squishy. A certain softness is required when dealing with
 people except in extreme circumstances.


 Perhaps both are perspectives are distorted. What do
 others think of this exchange? We are not always the best
 judge of our own behaviour.





[FairfieldLife] Re: Surviving Whole Foods

2013-09-22 Thread Jason

 
 authfriend:
  Thank you, Richard, you have provided a perfect demonstration 
  over the past few days for everyone to see that what I said 
  about you to Michael: you are a troll and a liar. 
 

---  punditster punditster@... wrote:

 If you don't like it, just ignore me like you've been
 doing since 1999. LoL!
 
 You don't have to respond to every single post here - if 
 you don't live near a Whole Foods just say so. Just cut 
 the crap, Judy, and stop the lying about it.
 
 And you don't need to put others down just for wanting to 
 eat a few organic oranges at a local health food store. 
 
 We're not all poor people and I don't spend my 'whole 
 paycheck' at the market - I probably earn more retired
 than you do working all day. Go figure.


Holy mother Ganges!! You must have really offended both of 
them (Barry  Judy).

I wonder what exactly you did, for both of them to shun you.




[FairfieldLife] Re: This is Earth

2013-09-22 Thread Jason

Do you use third party crosssite blocker?  If so, you have
to manually release the link everytime.


 --- authfriend authfriend@.. wrote:

 YOUR IMAGES AREN'T SHOWING UP ON THE WEBSITE, BARRY.

  --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
 
  It just doesn't look that way. It's an island where a
  third of its plant and animal life is found nowhere else
  on the planet. Cool.
 
  http://www.binscorner.com/pages/s/strange-plants-of-socotra-
http://www.binscorner.com/pages/s/strange-plants-of-socotra-
island.html?z=10  
  island.html?z=10 
http://www.binscorner.com/pages/s/strange-plants-of-socotra-
island.html?z=10  
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: Realizing that the same old same old never is

2013-09-21 Thread Jason

---  turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 Every  morning here in Paris I watch the florist across the street
bring
 out flowers and  arrange them in front of her shop. And every morning
 it's a different  arrangement, never the same. There is a certain Zen
 magic in this.


[https://scontent-a-cdg.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/q71/s720x720/67708_670
 89607469_580143832_n.jpg]


There is an old French saying, plus ça change, plus c'est
la même chose.  The more things change, the more they
remain the same.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Baptiste_Alphonse_Karr
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Baptiste_Alphonse_Karr




[FairfieldLife] Re: Louis C.K. explains why people post this much

2013-09-21 Thread Jason

 ---  Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:
  
  Interesting POV. I think people communicate to connect
  with others. Sometimes the connection doesn't happen
  and that can feel sad. But what would really be sad
  IMHO is to stop trying to connect.
  
  
 --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
 
 I'm commenting on those who seem to have a *need* to
 connect, which in my experience often reveals an
 inability to just be themselves, sitting with them-
 selves. They're constantly either trying to connect,
 via phone, or text, or the Internet, or trying to
 distract themselves from their lives with some form
 of electronic entertainment.
 
 I guess I'm saying that the FFL posters I have the
 most respect for are people like salyavin and meru,
 who only contribute when they have something *to*
 contribute. They don't post looking for attention,
 as if they're terrified that their egos/selves will
 dry up and blow away if they aren't constantly
 responded to.
 
 As a general rule on the Internet, those who post
 the most have the least to say. I see no reason to
 exempt FFL from that general rule.
 

This is fascinating.  For a guy who often boasts about what 
an interesting life he had, and what dull, drab lives others 
in the forum had, this is a new revelation.

I used to believe in that shit for a while, before I 
realised that it's just a schtick.




   
   From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com
   
   
   http://gawker.com/louis-c-k-s-explanation-of-why-he-hates-sm
   artphones-is-1354954\625 
  
  
   Fairfield Life Post Counter
   ===
   Start Date (UTC): 09/14/13 00:00:00
   End Date (UTC): 09/21/13 00:00:00
   777 messages as of (UTC) 09/20/13 16:14:54
   
   106 authfriend
   93 Share Long
   55 s3raphita
   




[FairfieldLife] Re: Louis C.K. explains why people post this much

2013-09-21 Thread Jason

I think you nailed it Jimmy.  Click below to see what the
most notorious attention troll in FFL had written.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/224700
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/224700



--- doctordumbass doctordumbass@.. wrote:

 Is this meant to be ironic?  C'mon Barry, there have been
 many, many times when you have posted, with the only
 intention to assuage your loneliness. Fuck dude, it is OK
 to admit it. Otherwise, it makes you look like a doofus,
 pointing fingers at others, for your own behavior. Not a
 pretty sight.



   ---  Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:
  
   Interesting POV. I think people communicate to connect
   with others. Sometimes the connection doesn't happen
   and that can feel sad. But what would really be sad
   IMHO is to stop trying to connect.
  
  
  
  --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
 
  I'm commenting on those who seem to have a *need* to
  connect, which in my experience often reveals an
  inability to just be themselves, sitting with them-
  selves. They're constantly either trying to connect,
  via phone, or text, or the Internet, or trying to
  distract themselves from their lives with some form
  of electronic entertainment.
 
  I guess I'm saying that the FFL posters I have the
  most respect for are people like salyavin and meru,
  who only contribute when they have something *to*
  contribute. They don't post looking for attention,
  as if they're terrified that their egos/selves will
  dry up and blow away if they aren't constantly
  responded to.
 
  As a general rule on the Internet, those who post
  the most have the least to say. I see no reason to
  exempt FFL from that general rule.


 
From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com
   
   
Louis C.K. explains why people post this much
   
   
http://gawker.com/louis-c-k-s-explanation-of-why-he-hates-sm
artphones-is-1354954625Â
   
   
Fairfield Life Post Counter
===
Start Date (UTC): 09/14/13 00:00:00
End Date (UTC): 09/21/13 00:00:00
777 messages as of (UTC) 09/20/13 16:14:54
   
106 authfriend
93 Share Long
55 s3raphita
   




[FairfieldLife] Re: On Being An Eagle

2013-09-21 Thread Jason

  Seraphita wrote:
 
  Like you, it's been decades since I read any logical
  positivism - Carnap and Wittgenstein - so I know where
  you're coming from. Have to say though that the
  austerity of their approach had a kind of chilling
  beauty to it.

  --- authfriend authfriend@... wrote:

 It certainly simplifies things! That was what appealed to
 me at the time.

  One of my problems with their ideas was that although
  they scorned any metaphysical baggage and looked to
  mathematics as their ideal, I'm damned sure that when a
  logical positivist closed his books at the end of a
  working day and headed home he immediately (and
  automatically and quite unconsciously) reverted to
  common-sense materialism in his approach to life.

 How could a logical positivist do otherwise? I mean, how
 could one live one's life according to logical positivism?

  One thing that appealed to me about them is that they
  (surprisingly) were heavily indebted to Bishop
  Berkeley's idealism (to be is to be perceived) but
  where the bishop discarded matter and opted for
  mind, they discarded both matter and mind.


 Heh. I haven't looked into how they arrived at their
 conclusions.


  My attitude is that all philosophical theories are
  doomed to eventual failure as what's real can't be
  captured by concepts, but each school that comes along
  has something to recommend it (Everything possible to
  be believed is an image of truth. - William Blake), so
  take what you need and leave the rest - and then move
  on.


 Seems to me the biggest problem with philosophy is that
 its concepts are formulated in language, the meaning of
 which is to a great extent subjective. Of course
 philosophers also use math to express concepts, but I'm
 skeptical as to how precisely math can be translated into
 language.


When you can measure what you are speaking about, and
express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when
you cannot express it in precise mathematical terms, your
knowledge of it, is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind

~ Lord Kelvin

I like the way the thread has evolved, though paligap hasn't
responded yet.






--- authfriend authfriend@... wrote:
  
   I took a required philosophy survey course in college
   at a time when I couldn't have been less interested in
   it. The prof was a reputedly brilliant and well-known
   philosopher, but he was also known by his students for
   his incomprehensible lectures. I couldn't follow a
   damn thing he said until he got to logical positivism,
   which suited me right down to the ground (I wasn't
   interested in metaphysics or spirituality at the time
   either). The grade for the course depended entirely on
   the final, and fortunately the final involved an essay
   on one's choice of philosophical school. I squeaked
   through with a C-minus, I think, because I had been
   able to make some sense of logical positivism and was
   able to write a semi-coherent essay on it. I promptly
   forgot about it, only to rediscover it to my horror
   decades later after I had gotten heavily into
   consciousness and metaphysics.
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: Are we living in the end times?

2013-09-20 Thread Jason

Serap, this two way traffic, (bi-directional) between past
and future happens only on the Quantum level.

On the Classical level, time flows in uni-directional way.
In fact, this is what gives the Classical universe it's
stability.

Scientists have known for quite some time now that evolution
is partially deterministic and partially random. My bet is
that it's just some kind of mathematical intelligence behind
this deterministic pattern.

Besides, a lot of scientists like Penrose have indeed
started taking consciousness seriously. This Dennett is
probably a fringe minority.

Consciousness is slowly taking the centerstage.  Besides,
the technological developments in observing the subjective
experiences using brain scans are rapidly progressing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FsH7RK1S2E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FsH7RK1S2E



 --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:

 I don't dispute that. The reason you and I are having a
 human, earthly, animal experience of awareness is owing
 to Darwinian evolution. Awareness itself though - the
 fact that right now I'm conscious of the sound of rain
 falling and the smell of my Nag Champa incense - can't be
 accounted for by the men in white coats. In fact they're
 close to giving up on pretending to have a solution,
 which is why Daniel Dennett and pals are trying to
 persuade us we're not actually conscious at all. Good
 luck with that one Danny boy!

 Of course we have to leave open the possibility that there
 are unknown factors guiding evolution. John Archibald
 (love it!) Wheeler's suggestion that quantum theory shows
 we can change the past leaves open the neat idea that the
 future, the present and the past are constantly tweaking
 each other (like two travelling waves moving down a sound
 tube in opposite directions) so maybe evolution isn't just
 about survival of the fittest . . .

 We are participators in bringing into being not only the
 near and here but the far away and long ago. We are in
 this sense, participators in bringing about something of
 the universe in the distant past and if we have one
 explanation for what's happening in the distant past why
 should we need more? - Wheeler.


 --- Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
 
  These consciousness theories and quantum theories, don't
  actually change the technical aspects of Darwin's
  evolution.
 
  Even if irreducible consciousness did exist, as you
  claim, Darwin's theory still remains the same,
  unchanged, as sound as ever.
 
  Many new-agers are so stupid that they think these new
  theories negate Darwin.  They don't.  Impersonal
  consciousness, impersonal creation, impersonal
  evolution.
 
 
  --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:
  
   The point of the Chinese Room thought experiment being
   to  show that consciousness can't be reduced to
   computation (as the advocates of AI like to pretend
   they believe).  Searle is right about that. What he
   wouldn't go on to see was that consciousness being
   irreducible it is also basic. All explanations of the
   Cosmos must come down to some element more essential
   than what is being explained.  That game can't go on
   for ever otherwise you have an infinite regress.
   Something has (or somethings have) to  be basic and
   consciousness [better awareness] being   that thing
   (or one of those things) it follows immediately that
   Darwinian Theory which postulates that  consciousness
   is a late development in evolutionary history is
   clearly wrong. Q.E.D.

 
 
  --- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:
  
   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TryOC83PH1g
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: Spirit Guided Lucid Dreaming

2013-09-20 Thread Jason

---  turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 Lawson used 'science' like a sledgehammer again:
 
  Lucid dreamign is generally associated with higher gamma
  EEG during REM sleep.
 
  Witnessing sleep is associated with higher alpha during
  sleep, and witnessing dreaming is thought to be associated
  with higher alpha power during dreaming.
 
  In theory, one can have witnessing lucid dreaming also.
 
 
---  turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 Of course, *no one* knows what higher alpha or
 higher gamma actually MEAN. The people conducting
 the experiments project their own beliefs *onto*
 these waves, in most cases trying to make them
 conform to and substantiate their already-
 present theories. Just as you did above by
 assuming that higher gamma was somehow better
 than higher alpha, so of course, TM rules.  :-)

 That said, lucid dreaming, at which I used to be
 fairly proficient, is very different than the stuff
 TMers call witnessing sleep or witnessing dream-
 ing. I would not expect TMers to become very good
 at lucid dreaming, because doing so involves the use
 of will and intent. Many of them would not do well
 with that, because they've been subconsciously
 convinced by TM dogma for so long that any kind of
 intention or effort is bad or off the program.

 Lucid dreaming per se is *not* just waking up in
 the dream and realizing that you're dreaming. It's
 *taking control* of the dream, and being able to
 shape it and morph it however you want. If you don't
 like the dreamscape you're currently in, Zap! you
 just exert your will and move to another one. If
 you don't like the dreampeople or dreamcreatures
 you're hangin' with, Zap! you just leave them behind
 as easily as walking out of a boring cocktail party
 and into the more interesting one across the hall.
 YOU run a fully lucid dream; the dream doesn't.

 It can be a lot of fun, especially when you're
 practicing this stuff along with other people who
 are also proficient at it. You can arrange to get
 together in the dream plane, and do so. We used to
 have regular meetings in the dream plane, and then
 sit down together afterwards and compare notes. More
 often than not we would all report the same settings
 or dreamscapes, and relate the exact same events or
 conversations that we experienced while dreaming.

 It was fun, but after a while I grew bored with it
 and stopped trying to intend lucid dreaming. If it
 happens (and it still does, from time to time) and
 I wake up in the dream, I can still control it, and
 sometimes do, just for fun. But it's no longer a
 regular practice for me.

 As for its possible practical uses, the main one I've
 heard of is in the variant of lucid dreaming known
 as Tibetan dream yoga. Adepts of that practice feel
 that being able to control one's dreams is a valuable
 skill because it can then be used in the Bardo between
 death and rebirth. They see the Bardo as analogous to
 the dream plane, and subject to the same exercises
 in will and intent. If your goal is to move towards
 the Clear Light and thus (in their belief system)
 effect a higher rebirth, then the ability to avoid
 distractions and focus on the Clear Light is useful.

 As for the notion of paying attention to any spirit
 guides or anyone/anything you meet in dreaming, I have
 two words for you: DUMB IDEA. All *sorts* of critters
 live on the dream plane, and some of them are as good
 at morphing their appearance and hiding their real
 intent from you as the best human lucid dreamers. HOW
 do you know you can trust them?

 Let me put it this way. If you're comfortable with
 going to some urban city you've never been in before,
 like say, the Bronx or tough parts of Detroit, and
 then walking up to the first person you meet at random,
 listening to their advice, and then following it as
 if you'd found some kind of guru, by all means do
 the same thing in the dream plane. A fool and his
 body are soon parted.


Bad idea. Our world is an extremely irrational place.  What
makes you think the rest of the universe is rational and
noble?

BTW, heard of the DreamTime of the australian aborginals?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamtime
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamtime

http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/
dreaming
http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/dreaming



 ---  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 By the way, lucid dreaming is NOT the same as conscious awareness
during the deep sleep state (yoga nidra?) which even I used to
experience occasionally on rounding courses - an odd sensation that,
yes, you'd been in dreamless sleep but you were sure you'd maintained
awareness throughout. Never happened to me again after I settled for my
20 minutes twice a day.





[FairfieldLife] Re: So you think you've got troll problems on FFL...

2013-09-20 Thread Jason

He claims that I stalked him.  Ask him.


--- authfriend authfriend@.. wrote:

 Have you ever been stalked on the Internet, Barry? If so,
 why don't you tell us about it?

 I should think you'd revel in Reddit if, in fact, it's so
 universally low-vibe. Just your kinda folks.

 As I told Edg, I don't hang out at Reddit, but a sort of
 miscellany blog I do read has occasional posts about an
 interesting Reddit thread. I usually go take a look and
 have found threads that are heartwarming, deeply moving,
 highly creative, profound, and/or extremely witty.

 If you read the story Barry linked to, you'l find that
 while the writer had a bad time with some Redditors,
 others supported and defended him; some even apologized
 for having made a nasty comment.

 Ever seen Barry apologizing for making a nasty comment on
 FFL?

 Most of the story isn't about Reddit in any case, contrary
 to the impression Barry has tried to create..


 --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
 
  ...be thankful you're not on Reddit. I don't go near the
  place, because of the near-universal low-vibeness of it
  and the people who hang there. This guy's story affirms
  my decision in this regard.
 
  http://www.theawl.com/2013/09/i-was-a-hated-hipster-meme-and
  -then-it-got-worse
 
  I empathize with him. It's no fun to be stalked on the
  Internet, by deranged people who just want to yell at
  someone...anyone, and who glommed onto you because you
  were handy.
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: On Being An Eagle

2013-09-20 Thread Jason

Sorry to hijack the thread.  Tell me the differences
between,

'Phenomenological materialism', 'Mysterianistic materialism'
and 'reductionist materialism'.

Maybe, you and Judy have a better understanding of what
exactly Nagel meant.


--- waspaligap waspaligap@.. wrote:

 Love lift us up where we belong
 Where the eagles cry on a mountain high

 The real thing:
 http://youtu.be/G3QrhdfLCO8





[FairfieldLife] Re: Are we living in the end times?

2013-09-20 Thread Jason

DNA variations are caused by entropy, the nature of the
universe to go from order to disorder.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy_and_life
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy_and_life

Biologists say that some mutations are harmful, some are
beneficial and some are neutral. This is why the process is
wasteful and the casualties are high. But evolution manages
to go on.

The environment uses the natural selection process which has
a deterministic aspect and that balances the completely
random mutations.  The DNA replicates in a clumsy way and
errors creep in. Perhaps the perfectly replicating DNA got
booted out during the early days of evolution.

It's still not clear in what way the particle form the
future influences the DNA, and that is a matter of debate.
Perhaps more research is need before we jump to conclusions.

(My first reply went to the yahoo hibernation chamber, and I
don't know when it will manifest. This is kinda duplicate of
what I sent earlier.)



  --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:

 but DNA variations can be triggered from the quantum
 level. DNA variations = evolution (if you throw in teeth
 and claws and sexual selection).

 Wheeler's delayed-choice variation on the classic
 double-slit experiment has been experimentally verified
 and shows a scientist can effectively decide what happens
 (happened) to a photon billions of years ago.

 See here (apologies for the robotic-sounding commentary):

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3A6ageOaS-E


 --- Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
 
  Serap, this two way traffic, (bi-directional) between
  past and future happens only on the Quantum level.
 
  On the Classical level, time flows in uni-directional
  way. In fact, this is what gives the Classical universe
  it's stability.
 
  Scientists have known for quite some time now that
  evolution is partially deterministic and partially
  random. My bet is that it's just some kind of
  mathematical intelligence behind this deterministic
  pattern.
 
  Besides, a lot of scientists like Penrose have indeed
  started taking consciousness seriously. This Dennett is
  probably a fringe minority.
 
  Consciousness is slowly taking the centerstage.
  Besides, the technological developments in observing the
  subjective experiences using brain scans are rapidly
  progressing.
 
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FsH7RK1S2E
 
 
 --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:

   I don't dispute that. The reason you and I are having
   a human, earthly, animal experience of awareness is
   owing to Darwinian evolution. Awareness itself though
   - the fact that right now I'm conscious of the sound
   of rain falling and the smell of my Nag Champa incense
   - can't be accounted for by the men in white coats. In
   fact they're close to giving up on pretending to have
   a solution, which is why Daniel Dennett and pals are
   trying to persuade us we're not actually conscious at
   all. Good luck with that one Danny boy!
  
   Of course we have to leave open the possibility that
   there are unknown factors guiding evolution. John
   Archibald (love it!) Wheeler's suggestion that quantum
   theory shows we can change the past leaves open the
   neat idea that the future, the present and the past
   are constantly tweaking each other (like two
   travelling waves moving down a sound tube in opposite
   directions) so maybe evolution isn't just about
   survival of the fittest . . .
  
   We are participators in bringing into being not only
   the near and here but the far away and long ago. We
   are in this sense, participators in bringing about
   something of the universe in the distant past and if
   we have one explanation for what's happening in the
   distant past why  should we need more? - Wheeler.
  
  








  --- Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
  
   These consciousness theories and quantum theories, don't
   actually change the technical aspects of Darwin's
   evolution.
  
   Even if irreducible consciousness did exist, as you
   claim, Darwin's theory still remains the same,
   unchanged, as sound as ever.
  
   Many new-agers are so stupid that they think these new
   theories negate Darwin.  They don't.  Impersonal
   consciousness, impersonal creation, impersonal
   evolution.
  
  
   --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:
   
The point of the Chinese Room thought experiment being
to  show that consciousness can't be reduced to
computation (as the advocates of AI like to pretend
they believe).  Searle is right about that. What he
wouldn't go on to see was that consciousness being
irreducible it is also basic. All explanations of the
Cosmos must come down to some element more essential
than what is being explained.  That game can't go on
for ever otherwise you have an infinite regress.
Something has (or somethings have) to  be basic and
consciousness

[FairfieldLife] Re: Are we living in the end times?

2013-09-20 Thread Jason

Variations in the DNA occur due to entropy, the tendency of
order to become disorder.  Biologists themselves admit that
some mutations are harmful, some are beneficial and some are
neutral.

These variations are errors made during replication.  The
clumsy replication DNA leads to massive wastages and
casualities, however evolution moves on.

The environment which uses natural selection seems to have
some deterministic pattern, which balances out the random
mutations and capricious changes in the environment.

In what way the particle from the future influences the DNA
is matter of debate. More research needs to be done before
we jump to conclusions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy_and_life
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy_and_life



--- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:

 but DNA variations can be triggered from the quantum
 level. DNA variations = evolution (if you throw in teeth
 and claws and sexual selection).

 Wheeler's delayed-choice variation on the classic
 double-slit experiment has been experimentally verified
 and shows a scientist can effectively decide what happens
 (happened) to a photon billions of years ago.

 See here (apologies for the robotic-sounding commentary):

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3A6ageOaS-E


 --- Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
 
  Serap, this two way traffic, (bi-directional) between
  past and future happens only on the Quantum level.
 
  On the Classical level, time flows in uni-directional
  way. In fact, this is what gives the Classical universe
  it's stability.
 
  Scientists have known for quite some time now that
  evolution is partially deterministic and partially
  random. My bet is that it's just some kind of
  mathematical intelligence behind this deterministic
  pattern.
 
  Besides, a lot of scientists like Penrose have indeed
  started taking consciousness seriously. This Dennett is
  probably a fringe minority.
 
  Consciousness is slowly taking the centerstage.
  Besides, the technological developments in observing the
  subjective experiences using brain scans are rapidly
  progressing.
 
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FsH7RK1S2E
 
 

   --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:
   
I don't dispute that. The reason you and I are
having a  human, earthly, animal experience of
awareness is owing to Darwinian evolution.
Awareness itself though - the fact that right now
I'm conscious of the sound of rain falling and the
smell of my Nag Champa incense - can't be
accounted for by the men in white coats. In fact
they're close to giving up on pretending to have a
solution, which is why Daniel Dennett and pals are
trying to persuade us we're not actually conscious
at all. Good luck with that one Danny boy!
   
Of course we have to leave open the possibility
that there are unknown factors guiding evolution.
John Archibald (love it!) Wheeler's suggestion
that quantum theory shows  we can change the past
leaves open the neat idea that the future, the
present and the past are constantly tweaking each
other (like two travelling waves moving down a
sound tube in opposite directions) so maybe
evolution isn't just  about survival of the
fittest . . .
   
We are participators in bringing into being not
only the near and here but the far away and long
ago. We are in this sense, participators in
bringing about something of the universe in the
distant past and if we have one  explanation for
what's happening in the distant past why should we
need more? - Wheeler.
   
   







  --- Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
  
   These consciousness theories and quantum theories, don't
   actually change the technical aspects of Darwin's
   evolution.
  
   Even if irreducible consciousness did exist, as you
   claim, Darwin's theory still remains the same,
   unchanged, as sound as ever.
  
   Many new-agers are so stupid that they think these new
   theories negate Darwin.  They don't.  Impersonal
   consciousness, impersonal creation, impersonal
   evolution.
  
  
   --- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:
   
The point of the Chinese Room thought experiment being
to  show that consciousness can't be reduced to
computation (as the advocates of AI like to pretend
they believe).  Searle is right about that. What he
wouldn't go on to see was that consciousness being
irreducible it is also basic. All explanations of the
Cosmos must come down to some element more essential
than what is being explained.  That game can't go on
for ever otherwise you have an infinite regress.
Something has (or somethings have) to  be basic and
consciousness [better awareness] being   that thing

[FairfieldLife] Re: Are we living in the end times?

2013-09-18 Thread Jason

These consciousness theories and quantum theories, don't
actually change the technical aspects of Darwin's evolution.

Even if irreducible consciousness did exist, as you claim,
Darwin's theory still remains the same, unchanged, as sound
as ever.

Many new-agers are so stupid that they think these new
theories negate Darwin.  They don't.  Impersonal
consciousness, impersonal creation, impersonal evolution.


--- s3raphita s3raphita@.. wrote:
  
   The point of the Chinese Room thought experiment being to
   show that consciousness can't be reduced to computation
   (as the advocates of AI like to pretend they believe).
   Searle is right about that. What he wouldn't go on to see
   was that consciousness being irreducible it is also
   basic. All explanations of the Cosmos must come down to
   some element more essential than what is being explained.
   That game can't go on for ever otherwise you have an
   infinite regress. Something has (or somethings have) to
   be basic and consciousness [better awareness] being
   that thing (or one of those things) it follows
   immediately that Darwinian Theory which postulates that
   consciousness is a late development in evolutionary
   history is clearly wrong. Q.E.D.


 --- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:
 
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TryOC83PH1g
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: Are we living in the end times?

2013-09-18 Thread Jason

  ---  s3raphita s3raphita@... wrote:
 
  The point of the Chinese Room thought experiment being
  to show that consciousness can't be reduced to
  computation (as the advocates of AI like to pretend*
  they believe). Searle is right about that.
 
 
--- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:

 Did you mean to say that the advocates of AI are lying*
 about what they believe? If so, I thought your comment was
 interesting since *pretending* is the only way a computer
 program will ever pass The Turing Test (is it possible the
 programs are advocating for themselves); Eugene
 Goostman---to date, the computer program with the most
 successful attempt at The Turing Test (29%)---got as far
 as it did by *pretending* to be a 13 year-old Ukrainian
 male who spoke English as a second language (rumours that
 Share is related to Eugene are completely unfounded).


  What he wouldn't go on to see was that consciousness
  being irreducible it is also basic. All explanations of
  the Cosmos must come down to some element more essential
  than what is being explained. That game can't go on for
  ever otherwise you have an infinite regress.
 
  Something has (or somethings have) to be basic and
  consciousness [better awareness] being that thing (or
  one of those things) it follows immediately that
  Darwinian Theory which postulates that consciousness is
  a late development in evolutionary history is clearly
  wrong. Q.E.D.
 
 
--- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:

 If the use of adornment could be construed as an attempt
 to *pretend* to be something other than what we are, and
 if adornment is an important indicator used by
 archeologists to identify Homo sapiens (it takes human
 consciousness to understand we can influence the
 perception of others), when studying the fossils of
 hominids, is there still hope that computers will learn to
 lie better and eventually pass The Turing Test?



Computers today are savants with the intelligence of a
spider or a cockroach.  20 years in the future, they will
have the intelligence and the intuition of a two year old.

There are many facets of intelligence.  Memory power and
computing power are only one aspect of intelligence.

LQ - This is logic quotient. These people are good in
maths. logical steps for solutions.

CQ - Corelation Quotient. The ability to corelate diverse
factors and see how they fit.

MQ - Memory quotient. Ability to recall information is a
type of intelligence and plays a role in survival.

TQ - Tribulation quotient. the ability to deal with
stressfull and chaotic envionment.

EQ - Emotional quotient. The ability to handle emotions and
compartment them. Empathy the ability to put in other's
shoes and see their POV is a type of intelligence.


   --- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:
  
   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TryOC83PH1g
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: The Gate of Grief (was: This is what the sky looked like in Morocco in 1960)

2013-09-18 Thread Jason

 --- Jason jedi_spock@.. wrote:
 
  Thanks Bob, I did watch that show on BBC. I also watched
  Spencer Welles, Journey of man on National Geographic.
 
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBJDGzzrMyQ
 
 
--- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:

 Thanks Jason, I'll check out the Spencer Welles series; I
 also have a lot of time for Michael Wood, his Legacy
 series is excellent:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNSO9xKVcv8

 As is his Story of India:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DHhPvbaV68

 more below


   A huge eruption of a super volcano in indonesia
   clouded out the sun and caused a drop in temperatures
   by about 10 degrees. It caused a massive drought in
   Africa and pushed surviving humans to coastlines in
   search of fish.
  
   Human population plunged down to a few hundred.  We
   were on the brink of extinction.  It was then the
   'great coastal migration' began. At that time From the
   tip of south africa to india to australia was one
   unbroken coastline.
  
   The entire human population today decended from that
   population bottleneck.
  
We were hunter-gatherers.  This required foraging
   vast  areas for food.  That kind of foraging requires
   long-distance running.  That kind of running heats up
   the  body.  To cool the body, we developed sweating.
   To sweat,  our skins became softer and we lost a lot
   of hair.
  
  
 As someone comfortable with doubt (who believes in God
 more days than not) the theory that climate is responsible
 for the advent of consciousness in Homo sapiens---with
 their incredible dexterity with tools and facility for
 natural language---makes as much sense as anything else to
 me; to my mind this in no way precludes the possibility of
 a divine hand in our beginnings. What seems to have
 changed in the present is the velocity of change; IMO,
 what we become over the next 100 years could be as
 dramatic as what we became over the previous 10,000.



The environment is the prime force that shapes evolution.
There are of course other factors.

It's a paradox that the more technologicaly advanced a
civilisation becomes, the shorter it's lifespan.

The hunter-gatherer lifestyle, (zero wave) lasted for
250,000 years.

The agricultural civilisation, (first wave) lasted for
14,000 years.

The industrial civilisation, (second wave) lasted for barely
300 years. Now, we are moving into what is called the
post-industrial era.  Lasers, genetics, internet, 3D
printers, regenerative medicine, etc.

My guess is that the third wave will last for a even shorter
time.










---  bobpriced bobpriced@ wrote:

 Jason,

 This whole series (The Incredible Human Journey) is
 worth the time, but at around 38:00 min of this episode
 Dr. Roberts specifically discusses what you stated below.
 One of the things that struck me in my travels in this
 area was the number of dry riverbeds (there's an Arab myth
 that Bahrain was once the Garden of Eden, and we know from
 geology that much of the Arabian Gulf was fertile plain at
 one time; in a later episode she discusses when we first
 switched from hunting and gathering to cultivation in
 Mesopotamia---it was a woman's idea); I think I mentioned
 in another post to Emily that I was intrigued to learn in
 this series that when our likely ancestors made it out of
 Africa 70 thousand years ago (by way of The Gate of
 Grief)---with the help from the climate change you pointed
 out---the coast of The Yemen and Oman extended another
 50km into the Arabian Sea and the area had the abundant
 fresh water they needed for their journey---possibly on
 their way to India.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwa6o-s1Yvs



--- In  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  I wonder in what state of affairs Casablanca is now.
 
  Most of the Jewish community might have migrated to
  greener pastures??
 
  At present, we are in a dry period, but it is expected
  that the Sahara will become green again in 15000 years.
  This is due to a 41,000 year cycle in which the tilt of
  the earth changes between 22° and 24.5°.
 
  Sahara alternates between phases of rainforests and
  desert in cycles.
 
 
--- turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 
 
   Very cool - don't see a lot of stars here due to all the urban
light, but

   have seen that carpet before. Must've been pretty damned amazing
   to stand in the middle of the desert, with that above you.
 
That's why I posted the photo. Most people these days have no
idea.
   
This photo is the closest I have found to conveying what it
was
like to stand in the middle of the Sahara on a moonless night.
In
that era, in which global pollution had not become an issue,
and
in which light pollution (I lived 60 miles from the nearest
light-
emitting city, Marrakech) had not even been imagined.
   
Your term carpet is apt. I remember once taking a blanket
with
me out into the desert behind my house, away even from

[FairfieldLife] Re: Are we living in the end times?

2013-09-18 Thread Jason

The point is that, although they are just memory machines
parroting what is told to them, even that requires some
rudimentary intelligence.

But once we develop computers whose memory banks resemble
human brain neural network, they may start thinking for
themselves.

Ultimately in the end, whatever nature can create, man can
create.

Conversely, think of all the people on this planet who just
parrot what is told them, without thinking or having any
understanding about it.  Did your God programme them
badly?



--- jr_esq jr_esq@.. wrote:

 Jason,

 AI in computers are only mimicking the real consciousness
 of human beings.  Computer intelligence will only be as
 good as the human programmers who created it.  For
 example,  it is a fact that an IBM computer was able to
 beat Kasparov in a chess championship setting.  But it was
 programmed to calculate possibilities in chess moves by
 brute force.  The real consciousness comes from the humans
 who programmed the computer.

 IMO, this will hold true for any other developments in AI
 in the future.  In the end, computers will only be silicon
 chips (even quantum chips) pretending to have human
 consciousness.





  ---  s3raphita s3raphita@... wrote:
 
  The point of the Chinese Room thought experiment being
  to show that consciousness can't be reduced to
  computation (as the advocates of AI like to pretend*
  they believe). Searle is right about that.
 
 
--- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:

 Did you mean to say that the advocates of AI are lying*
 about what they believe? If so, I thought your comment was
 interesting since *pretending* is the only way a computer
 program will ever pass The Turing Test (is it possible the
 programs are advocating for themselves); Eugene
 Goostman---to date, the computer program with the most
 successful attempt at The Turing Test (29%)---got as far
 as it did by *pretending* to be a 13 year-old Ukrainian
 male who spoke English as a second language (rumours that
 Share is related to Eugene are completely unfounded).


  What he wouldn't go on to see was that consciousness
  being irreducible it is also basic. All explanations of
  the Cosmos must come down to some element more essential
  than what is being explained. That game can't go on for
  ever otherwise you have an infinite regress.
 
  Something has (or somethings have) to be basic and
  consciousness [better awareness] being that thing (or
  one of those things) it follows immediately that
  Darwinian Theory which postulates that consciousness is
  a late development in evolutionary history is clearly
  wrong. Q.E.D.
 
 
--- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:

 If the use of adornment could be construed as an attempt
 to *pretend* to be something other than what we are, and
 if adornment is an important indicator used by
 archeologists to identify Homo sapiens (it takes human
 consciousness to understand we can influence the
 perception of others), when studying the fossils of
 hominids, is there still hope that computers will learn to
 lie better and eventually pass The Turing Test?


 --- Jason jedi_spock@... wrote:
 
  Computers today are savants with the intelligence of a
  spider or a cockroach.  20 years in the future, they
  will have the intelligence and the intuition of a two
  year old.
 
  There are many facets of intelligence.  Memory power and
  computing power are only one aspect of intelligence.
 
  LQ - This is logic quotient. These people are good in
  maths. logical steps for solutions.
 
  CQ - Corelation Quotient. The ability to corelate
  diverse factors and see how they fit.
 
  MQ - Memory quotient. Ability to recall information is a
  type of intelligence and plays a role in survival.
 
  TQ - Tribulation quotient. the ability to deal with
  stressfull and chaotic envionment.
 
  EQ - Emotional quotient. The ability to handle emotions
  and compartment them. Empathy the ability to put in
  other's shoes and see their POV is a type of
  intelligence.
 


   --- bobpriced bobpriced@... wrote:
  
   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TryOC83PH1g
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: The Gate of Grief (was: This is what the sky looked like in Morocco in 1960)

2013-09-17 Thread Jason

Thanks Bob, I did watch that show on BBC. I also watched
Spencer Welles, Journey of man on National Geographic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBJDGzzrMyQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBJDGzzrMyQ

A huge eruption of a super volcano in indonesia clouded out
the sun and caused a drop in temperatures by about 10
degrees. It caused a massive drought in Africa and pushed
surviving humans to coastlines in search of fish.

Human population plunged down to a few hundred.  We were on
the brink of extinction.  It was then the 'great coastal
migration' began. At that time From the tip of south africa
to india to australia was one unbroken coastline.

The entire human population today decended from that
population bottleneck.

  We were hunter-gatherers.  This required foraging vast
  areas for food.  That kind of foraging requires
  long-distance running.  That kind of running heats up the
  body.  To cool the body, we developed sweating.  To sweat,
  our skins became softer and we lost a lot of hair.



---  bobpriced bobpriced@ wrote:

 Jason,

 This whole series (The Incredible Human Journey) is
 worth the time, but at around 38:00 min of this episode
 Dr. Roberts specifically discusses what you stated below.
 One of the things that struck me in my travels in this
 area was the number of dry riverbeds (there's an Arab myth
 that Bahrain was once the Garden of Eden, and we know from
 geology that much of the Arabian Gulf was fertile plain at
 one time; in a later episode she discusses when we first
 switched from hunting and gathering to cultivation in
 Mesopotamia---it was a woman's idea); I think I mentioned
 in another post to Emily that I was intrigued to learn in
 this series that when our likely ancestors made it out of
 Africa 70 thousand years ago (by way of The Gate of
 Grief)---with the help from the climate change you pointed
 out---the coast of The Yemen and Oman extended another
 50km into the Arabian Sea and the area had the abundant
 fresh water they needed for their journey---possibly on
 their way to India.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwa6o-s1Yvs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwa6o-s1Yvs



--- In  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
  I wonder in what state of affairs Casablanca is now.
 
  Most of the Jewish community might have migrated to
  greener pastures??
 
  At present, we are in a dry period, but it is expected
  that the Sahara will become green again in 15000 years.
  This is due to a 41,000 year cycle in which the tilt of
  the earth changes between 22° and 24.5°.
 
  Sahara alternates between phases of rainforests and
  desert in cycles.
 
 
--- turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:

 
 
   Very cool - don't see a lot of stars here due to all the urban
light, but

   have seen that carpet before. Must've been pretty damned amazing
   to stand in the middle of the desert, with that above you.
 
That's why I posted the photo. Most people these days have no
idea.
   
This photo is the closest I have found to conveying what it
was
like to stand in the middle of the Sahara on a moonless night.
In
that era, in which global pollution had not become an issue,
and
in which light pollution (I lived 60 miles from the nearest
light-
emitting city, Marrakech) had not even been imagined.
   
Your term carpet is apt. I remember once taking a blanket
with
me out into the desert behind my house, away even from the
lights of the Air Force base, and lying on it there just
staring up.
I tried to figure out how big the biggest black spot in the
sky
was, meaning the biggest area that did not contain any visible
stars. All that it took to cover that black spot was to hold
my arm
out at full length, and use the fingernail of my little
finger.
   
I have since gazed at the nighttime sky from the tops of the
Rockies, or from on top of Haleakala, in Maui. And from
deserts
and remote areas in the US, Canada, and Europe. In the last
twenty years, I have never seen even a third as many stars.
That's
why it's heartening to see this photo from South Australia.
Even
if the photographer had to use a long exposure to capture
this,
this many visible stars were there to be captured.
   
   
 --- fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Obviously, it still does in Lake Eyre, in remote South
Australia.
 The bright spot above the subject's hand is Venus.



[https://scontent-b-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/1236171_51757334832536
 2_1189026149_n.jpg]





[FairfieldLife] HELP.!! Alex, Rick, I am again in a pig muck pit...

2013-09-17 Thread Jason

Hey Alex, Rick, my reply to Bob Price took more than two days
to appear on the forum.

My post on sept 15 is now finally appearing on sept 17.

Grr.. that was an important post.

Is anybody else having problems with Yahoo?  I am still
struck with the classic format.  I hate delayed posts, it
disrupts the rhythm, frequency and harmony of the
conversations.



[FairfieldLife] Re: Utah Polygamous Family on Reality TV

2013-09-17 Thread Jason

Listen carefully John, just as Yoga is about balance, Nature
is also about balance.

The balance between 'individual and collective', the 'public
space and private space' is necessary for a proper society.
Maintain that distinction.

That is that guy's private space.  Nobody has the right to
prosecute him.  In a balanced society, there is a set of
norms in private places and a set of norms in public places.

Any place that has commercial activity, and pays commercial
taxes to the govt should be, by definition public space or
semi-public space.  You can even ban tobacco there.

However, if you try to poke your nose into his private
residence, you become a police state.  No country in the
world has the resources to become a police state. Even pot
should not be banned, if it's grown in a private residence
and as long as it's not brought outside.


--- jr_esq jr_esq@.. wrote:

 One wonders what the guy does to afford such a large
 family.  And, how can he avoid prosecution now that
 everyone knows where he lives?

 http://tv.yahoo.com/news/utah-polygamous-family-reality-tv-0
http://tv.yahoo.com/news/utah-polygamous-family-reality-tv-051209496.ht\
ml
 51209496.html
http://tv.yahoo.com/news/utah-polygamous-family-reality-tv-051209496.ht\
ml

 http://tv.yahoo.com/news/utah-polygamous-family-reality-tv-0
http://tv.yahoo.com/news/utah-polygamous-family-reality-tv-051209496.ht\
ml
 51209496.html
http://tv.yahoo.com/news/utah-polygamous-family-reality-tv-051209496.ht\
ml


 --- turquoiseb turquoiseb@.. wrote:
 
  This critique might hold more weight if it came from
  someone who had managed to get laid sometime within the
  last few decades.
  As it stands, it sounds to me a lot like envy. Just
  sayin'...  :-)
 




[FairfieldLife] Re: I stand with U Buck Col Leed

2013-09-17 Thread Jason

I don't understand this authbabe.

Just because the Colonel liked it, doesn't have anything to
do with integrity.  It's just Buck's playful twist on it.


--- authfriend authfriend@.. wrote:

 You like that he wrote something about the Unified Field
 and pretended it came from the Bible?

 Such integrity.


 --- leedwilliam leedwilliam@.. wrote:
 
  NICE, going Buck am with U in all
 
 
   dhamiltony2k5@... writes:
  
   In National unity of empathy and with great concern
   for the dead
  
   and their communities of families and friends,
  
   by the best of science
  
   I should like to see a National Day of meditation
   called
  
   for by the White House as a National coming together
  
   in a Unified Field.
  
   -Buck
  
  
   For,
  
   Where two or three are gathered in effective
   transcending meditation there the Unified Field will
   be found multiplied in effect -Matthew 18:20
  




[FairfieldLife] Re: The Gate of Grief (was: This is what the sky looked like in Morocco in 1960)

2013-09-16 Thread Jason





[FairfieldLife] Re: Why Breaking Bad is an All American series

2013-09-16 Thread Jason

Lawson-ji, if the economy really managed well, it can pay
for itself without govt intervention.  Two major reforms
should be taken into consideration.

Atleast, 1% percent of the total budget money should be
alloted to political parties as 'political funds'.  This
will take the pressure off the political parties.  Right now
the corporate entities hold the political parties by the
balls.  Nothing can be done unless that is corrected.

Secondly, if interest rates are low, there is simply no
incentive for any family to put their money in banks.  They
instread try to invest in other risky ventures.  The
interest rates should by high enough to attract the middle
class families to save their money in banks.

A country that does not save money is eventually doomed to
bankruptcy.

A 'progressive consumption tax' system in which people are
taxed according to the resources they consume and not the
income they earn, prevents people from splurging their
money.

It forces people to put their money in banks.  Banks can
lend that money to government, who in can invest in
infrastructure.


--- sparaig sparaig@.. wrote:

 Or almost any other industrialized country besides the
 USA. The USA is remarkably behind on so many levels these
 days that it is beyond pathetic.

 For example, last year, MIT didn't have a person with a
 Bachelor degree who happened to be an American citizen


  --- turquoiseb turquoiseb. wrote:
 
  Well, for one reason, the entire plot premise falls
  apart if you set it in Canada:
 
  http://media.salon.com/2013/09/BB-1024x384.jpg 
http://media.salon.com/2013/09/BB-1024x384.jpg 




[FairfieldLife] Re: Rules for Iowa

2013-09-15 Thread Jason

Yeah, and the same is also true for religions, cultures and 
countries.


--- authfriend authfriend@...
 
 This is an instance of what's known as false 
 equivalence, something people who don't think very deeply 
 frequently engage in.
 
 If Organization A is a mix of good and bad and 
 Organization B is also a mix of good and bad, it  
 suggests that there's not much difference between 
 Organization A and Organization B in terms of degrees of  
 goodness or badness. Therefore, the stunted thinking goes, 
 one shouldn't dump on Organization A, because it's no  
 worse than Organization B (or any other organization).
 
 But of course a mix of good and bad can be 90 percent  
 good, 10 percent bad; OR 90 percent bad, 10 percent  
 good--or anything in between. The fact that all  
 organizations have a mix of good and bad does not mean 
 that the proportions of the mix are equivalent in all  
 cases.

 The mix of good and bad meme is used as an excuse to  
 avoid the difficult process of evaluating each  
 organization (or person, or whatever) on its own terms, 
 and/or to invalidate criticisms of an organization one  
 happens to be fond of. It's lazy and fundamentally 
 intellectually dishonest.
 
 
 --- In  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
  
  Michael, I can't think of one person or organization or 
  whatever in this world that isn't a mix of good and bad. 
  Can you? I mean other than the Funny Farm Lounge which  
  is all good (-:
  
  
  --- Michael Jackson mjackson74@...
   
   I have had the same experience - if you are going to  
   deal with Yahoo, you are gonna have to take a ration  
   of crap, same as if you deal with the TMO (couldn't 
   resist!)




[FairfieldLife] Re: Rules for Iowa

2013-09-15 Thread Jason


Holy mother Ganges.  She used the word IF

Judy's post begins with the word IF, which is a hypothesis.


---  Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 Judy, saying that Organization A and B are both a mix of good and bad, 
 suggests, as you say that there's not much difference between them, is an 
 example of misinterpretation on your part. Attempting to mind read and in a 
 prejudiced and negative direction, is exemplified in the rest of your post.
 
 
 
 
 
  From: Jason jedi_spock@...
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Sunday, September 15, 2013 8:55 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Rules for Iowa
  
 
 
   
 
 Yeah, and the same is also true for religions, cultures and 
 countries.
 
 --- authfriend authfriend@
  
  This is an instance of what's known as false 
  equivalence, something people who don't think very deeply 
  frequently engage in.
  
  If Organization A is a mix of good and bad and 
  Organization B is also a mix of good and bad, it 
  suggests that there's not much difference between 
  Organization A and Organization B in terms of degrees of 
  goodness or badness. Therefore, the stunted thinking goes, 
  one shouldn't dump on Organization A, because it's no 
  worse than Organization B (or any other organization).
  
  But of course a mix of good and bad can be 90 percent 
  good, 10 percent bad; OR 90 percent bad, 10 percent 
  good--or anything in between. The fact that all 
  organizations have a mix of good and bad does not mean 
  that the proportions of the mix are equivalent in all 
  cases.
 
  The mix of good and bad meme is used as an excuse to 
  avoid the difficult process of evaluating each 
  organization (or person, or whatever) on its own terms, 
  and/or to invalidate criticisms of an organization one 
  happens to be fond of. It's lazy and fundamentally 
  intellectually dishonest.
  
  
  --- In  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
   
   Michael, I can't think of one person or organization or 
   whatever in this world that isn't a mix of good and bad. 
   Can you? I mean other than the Funny Farm Lounge which 
   is all good (-:
   
   
   --- Michael Jackson mjackson74@

I have had the same experience - if you are going to 
deal with Yahoo, you are gonna have to take a ration 
of crap, same as if you deal with the TMO (couldn't 
resist!)





[FairfieldLife] Re: Yeah, Baby! The Land of the Veda!

2013-09-15 Thread Jason

The National Crime Records Bureau, India's official source
of crime data, is systematically undercounting virtually
every crime in India on account of a statistical
shortcoming,

 
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-officially-undercounts-all-\
crimes-including-rape/article5121114.ece 
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-officially-undercounts-all-\
crimes-including-rape/article5121114.ece
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-officially-under
counts-all-crimes-including-rape/article5121114.ece
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-officially-undercounts-all-\
crimes-including-rape/article5121114.ece


--- Michael Jackson mjackson74@... wrote:


http://www.latimes.com/world/worldnow/la-fg-wn-india-dowry-deaths-201309\
04,0,7340130.story




[FairfieldLife] Re: This is what the sky looked like in Morocco in 1960

2013-09-15 Thread Jason


I wonder in what state of affairs Casablanca is now.

Most of the Jewish community might have migrated to greener
pastures??

At present, we are in a dry period, but it is expected that
the Sahara will become green again in 15000 years. This is
due to a 41,000 year cycle in which the tilt of the earth
changes between 22° and 24.5°.

Sahara alternates between phases of rainforests and desert
in cycles.


--- turquoiseb no_reply@... wrote:


  Very cool - don't see a lot of stars here due to all the urban
light, but
  have seen that carpet before. Must've been pretty damned amazing
  to  stand in the middle of the desert, with that above you.

 That's why I posted the photo. Most people these days have no idea.

 This photo is the closest I have found to conveying what it was
 like to stand in the middle of the Sahara on a moonless night. In
 that era, in which global pollution had not become an issue, and
 in which light pollution (I lived 60 miles from the nearest light-
 emitting city, Marrakech) had not even been imagined.

 Your term carpet is apt. I remember once taking a blanket with
 me out into the desert behind my house, away even from the
 lights of the Air Force base, and lying on it there just staring up.
 I tried to figure out how big the biggest black spot in the sky
 was, meaning the biggest area that did not contain any visible
 stars. All that it took to cover that black spot was to hold my arm
 out at full length, and use the fingernail of my little finger.

 I have since gazed at the nighttime sky from the tops of the
 Rockies, or from on top of Haleakala, in Maui. And from deserts
 and remote areas in the US, Canada, and Europe. In the last
 twenty years, I have never seen even a third as many stars. That's
 why it's heartening to see this photo from South Australia. Even
 if the photographer had to use a long exposure to capture this,
 this many visible stars were there to be captured.


 ---  fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Obviously, it still does in Lake Eyre, in remote South Australia.
 The bright spot above the subject's hand is Venus.



[https://scontent-b-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/1236171_51757334832536
 2_1189026149_n.jpg]






[FairfieldLife] Re: Warning FFL folks (Drink More Water)

2013-09-13 Thread Jason

Drinking too much water can kill you.  It strains the
kidneys, decreases the salinity in blood, which makes it
difficult for the kidneys to excrete the water out.

It leads to life threatening condition.

 
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-but-true-drin\
king-too-much-water-can-kill 
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-but-true-drin\
king-too-much-water-can-kill
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-bu
t-true-drinking-too-much-water-can-kill 
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-but-true-drin\
king-too-much-water-can-kill



---  Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 I agree John, I tend to drink less water on really humid days. From
the article: According to H.H. Mitchell, Journal of Biological Chemistry
158, the
 brain and heart are composed of 73% water, and the lungs are about 83%
 water. The skin contains 64% water, muscles and kidneys are 79%, and
 even the bones are watery: 31%.


 
  From: jr_esq@... jr_esq@...
 Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 2:46 PM


 Â Share,

 That's a lot of water to drink in one day, especially when it's foggy
in the Sunset District of SF.  Bhairitu's  idea sounds more
reasonable.


 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
wrote:


 That's a lot of water! However, I remember when driving for UPS and
drinking a gallon and a half of water a day, during the summer, I
did sleep a lot better. Nice *watery* dreams,(no... not wet)Â as if I
were swimming and floating in my sleep.

 From: Bhairitu noozguru@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 11:03 AM
 Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] Drink More Water

 Â
 As always: drink when thirsty, eat when hungry.  On 09/12/2013 10:20
AM, Share Long wrote:
 Â
 John, rule of thumb is divide your weight by 2 and that's how many
ounces of water you ideally drink per day. I was very motivated to do
this when the temps were in the 90s. But now that temps are dropping,
I'll have to be more conscious of it.  Sodas are killers! I'm so glad
you stopped drinking them.
 
 
 
 
 From: mailto:jr_esq@ mailto:jr_esq@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 12:14 PM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Drink More Water
 
 Â
 Michelle Obama says so for better health. Â I believe she's right.
 A few weeks ago I got carried away drinking cokes without watching
my weight. Â I then realized that I ballooned by about ten pounds in
a matter of weeks.Â
 
 
 I've been drinking more plain water and cut down my meals for about
two weeks now, and have returned to my regular weight. Â The one day
fast I did last Saturday helped too.
 
 

http://news.yahoo.com/first-lady-wants-people-drink-more-plain-water-10\
0616713--politics.html
 





[FairfieldLife] Re: Warning FFL folks (Drink More Water)

2013-09-13 Thread Jason

Drinking too much water can kill you.  It strains the
kidneys, decreases the salinity in blood, which makes it
difficult for the kidneys to excrete the water out.

It leads to life threatening condition.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-bu
t-true-drinking-too-much-water-can-kill
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-but-true-drin\
king-too-much-water-can-kill



---  Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:

 I agree John, I tend to drink less water on really humid days. From
the article: According to H.H. Mitchell, Journal of Biological Chemistry
158, the
 brain and heart are composed of 73% water, and the lungs are about 83%
 water. The skin contains 64% water, muscles and kidneys are 79%, and
 even the bones are watery: 31%.


 
  From: jr_esq@... jr_esq@...
 Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 2:46 PM


 Â Share,

 That's a lot of water to drink in one day, especially when it's foggy
in the Sunset District of SF.  Bhairitu's  idea sounds more
reasonable.


 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
wrote:


 That's a lot of water! However, I remember when driving for UPS and
drinking a gallon and a half of water a day, during the summer, I
did sleep a lot better. Nice *watery* dreams,(no... not wet)Â as if I
were swimming and floating in my sleep.

 From: Bhairitu noozguru@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 11:03 AM
 Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] Drink More Water

 Â
 As always: drink when thirsty, eat when hungry.  On 09/12/2013 10:20
AM, Share Long wrote:
 Â
 John, rule of thumb is divide your weight by 2 and that's how many
ounces of water you ideally drink per day. I was very motivated to do
this when the temps were in the 90s. But now that temps are dropping,
I'll have to be more conscious of it.  Sodas are killers! I'm so glad
you stopped drinking them.
 
 
 
 
 From: mailto:jr_esq@ mailto:jr_esq@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 12:14 PM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] Drink More Water
 
 Â
 Michelle Obama says so for better health. Â I believe she's right.
 A few weeks ago I got carried away drinking cokes without watching
my weight. Â I then realized that I ballooned by about ten pounds in
a matter of weeks.Â
 
 
 I've been drinking more plain water and cut down my meals for about
two weeks now, and have returned to my regular weight. Â The one day
fast I did last Saturday helped too.
 
 

http://news.yahoo.com/first-lady-wants-people-drink-more-plain-water-10\
0616713--politics.html
 





[FairfieldLife] Re: Chopra nothing without Maharishi

2013-09-12 Thread Jason

  Jason wrote
 
  'Quantum field', 'Scientific principles' and
  mathematical principles are in fact, abstract,
  intangible aspects of  nature.
 
  You are correct in saying that there is a worthwhile
  difference, between 'materialism' and 'naturalism'.
 
 
--- compost1uk compost1uk@ wrote:

 Which means that the so-called intangible is real, no?
 Perhaps *very* real? Perhaps even *more* real than some
 tangible stuff, such as a doorstop - against which you can
 certainly stub your toe. This is a funny concept to the
 modern (nominalistic) mind. But the Ancients would have
 had no trouble with it at all.

 http://www.dunelm-mill.com/shop/rugs/doorstops/
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/shop/rugs/doorstops/


There are clear, distinct, differences between 'materialism'
'naturalism' and 'reductionism'.

Nagel probably uses these terms interchangably and with some
ambiguity.

'Materialism' is a much more generic term and is used as an
opposite to 'spiritualism'.

'Naturalism' and 'Reductionism' are more specific terms,
relating to the methodology of Science.









After a carefull study of evolution, you will notice
that evolution is partially deterministic and
partially random.
   
There seems to be a deterministic pattern, and yet
within that deterministic pattern a lot of
randomness plays out.
   
The analogy given is that of a football game, where
there is a broad set of rules and yet every player
can express his creativity in his own unique way.
   
Researchers state that 50,000 basic organic
molecules, each can combine with each other in
thousands of different ways.  So there are thousands
of different ways to create life. Thus the chances
of life forming is quite probable.
   
A lot of Scientists now also say that the emergence
of life might be a natural consequence of the laws
of physics, and the laws of chemistry.
   




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