Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-10 Thread Richard J. Williams
On 1/8/2014 9:58 AM, authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:

I knew without a doubt that it was all a lie. Similar
   to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan
  
  I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie...
 
So, you're thinking that John Kerry and Hillary Clinton were lying about 
the reasons for invading Afghanistan and Iraq? If they lied back then, 
why would anyone believe anything they say now?

 From what I've read, John Kerry has been lying for decades; Hillary 
Clinton lied as recently as the Benghazi massacre; and Barack Obama lies 
almost every single day. Go figure.


[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-09 Thread doctordumbass
Your wish is my command.:-)
 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Please do call them assholes!
 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Ah, Judy - I appreciate your precision. True...though I think I can still call 
them 'assholes' (biased artist). :-)
 

 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 OK. I don't think it was deliberate, though, just incompetent. They'd 
apparently taken some care to avoid bombing heritage sites, and when Iraqi 
troops holed up inside the museum and shot at them from there, they didn't 
return fire for fear of damaging the artifacts (this was before the looting 
started). It just seems not to have occurred to them that looting would be a 
major problem.
 

 Which was incredibly STOOOPID but not likely malicious.
 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I should have mentioned that I was aware of that [no direct looting, that we 
know of, by US forces]. However, the invaders, with the might of countless 
soldiers, and weapons, did absolutely *nothing* to prevent it - even though 
other strategic targets were protected for their contents. Assholes.


 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie, but I'm missing the 
connection with the looting of the museum. It wasn't the U.S. invaders who 
dunnit:
 

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html

 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum
 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum

The early reporting was sensationalized and wildly exaggerated. Not that it 
wasn't a catastrophe for the museum, but it wasn't as bad as at first thought.

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 ...the cultural loss I was referring to was the looting of the Iraqi 
National Museum during the 2003 invasion...

I recall during that time - despite all of the national rhetoric and will, 
being at its peak, with everybody screaming to save Iraq from itself - when I 
heard that their national museum had been looted, I knew without a doubt that 
it was all a lie. Similar to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan, with its now 
flourishing more than ever, opium trade. 
 

















[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-08 Thread authfriend
I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie, but I'm missing the 
connection with the looting of the museum. It wasn't the U.S. invaders who 
dunnit:
 

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html

 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum
 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum

The early reporting was sensationalized and wildly exaggerated. Not that it 
wasn't a catastrophe for the museum, but it wasn't as bad as at first thought.

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 ...the cultural loss I was referring to was the looting of the Iraqi 
National Museum during the 2003 invasion...

I recall during that time - despite all of the national rhetoric and will, 
being at its peak, with everybody screaming to save Iraq from itself - when I 
heard that their national museum had been looted, I knew without a doubt that 
it was all a lie. Similar to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan, with its now 
flourishing more than ever, opium trade. 
 







[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-08 Thread doctordumbass
I should have mentioned that I was aware of that [no direct looting, that we 
know of, by US forces]. However, the invaders, with the might of countless 
soldiers, and weapons, did absolutely *nothing* to prevent it - even though 
other strategic targets were protected for their contents. Assholes.


 
---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie, but I'm missing the 
connection with the looting of the museum. It wasn't the U.S. invaders who 
dunnit:
 

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html

 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum
 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum

The early reporting was sensationalized and wildly exaggerated. Not that it 
wasn't a catastrophe for the museum, but it wasn't as bad as at first thought.

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 ...the cultural loss I was referring to was the looting of the Iraqi 
National Museum during the 2003 invasion...

I recall during that time - despite all of the national rhetoric and will, 
being at its peak, with everybody screaming to save Iraq from itself - when I 
heard that their national museum had been looted, I knew without a doubt that 
it was all a lie. Similar to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan, with its now 
flourishing more than ever, opium trade. 
 









[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-08 Thread authfriend
OK. I don't think it was deliberate, though, just incompetent. They'd 
apparently taken some care to avoid bombing heritage sites, and when Iraqi 
troops holed up inside the museum and shot at them from there, they didn't 
return fire for fear of damaging the artifacts (this was before the looting 
started). It just seems not to have occurred to them that looting would be a 
major problem.
 

 Which was incredibly STOOOPID but not likely malicious.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I should have mentioned that I was aware of that [no direct looting, that we 
know of, by US forces]. However, the invaders, with the might of countless 
soldiers, and weapons, did absolutely *nothing* to prevent it - even though 
other strategic targets were protected for their contents. Assholes.


 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie, but I'm missing the 
connection with the looting of the museum. It wasn't the U.S. invaders who 
dunnit:
 

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html

 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum
 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum

The early reporting was sensationalized and wildly exaggerated. Not that it 
wasn't a catastrophe for the museum, but it wasn't as bad as at first thought.

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 ...the cultural loss I was referring to was the looting of the Iraqi 
National Museum during the 2003 invasion...

I recall during that time - despite all of the national rhetoric and will, 
being at its peak, with everybody screaming to save Iraq from itself - when I 
heard that their national museum had been looted, I knew without a doubt that 
it was all a lie. Similar to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan, with its now 
flourishing more than ever, opium trade. 
 











[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-08 Thread doctordumbass
Ah, Judy - I appreciate your precision. True...though I think I can still call 
them 'assholes' (biased artist). :-)
 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 OK. I don't think it was deliberate, though, just incompetent. They'd 
apparently taken some care to avoid bombing heritage sites, and when Iraqi 
troops holed up inside the museum and shot at them from there, they didn't 
return fire for fear of damaging the artifacts (this was before the looting 
started). It just seems not to have occurred to them that looting would be a 
major problem.
 

 Which was incredibly STOOOPID but not likely malicious.
 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I should have mentioned that I was aware of that [no direct looting, that we 
know of, by US forces]. However, the invaders, with the might of countless 
soldiers, and weapons, did absolutely *nothing* to prevent it - even though 
other strategic targets were protected for their contents. Assholes.


 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie, but I'm missing the 
connection with the looting of the museum. It wasn't the U.S. invaders who 
dunnit:
 

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html

 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum
 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum

The early reporting was sensationalized and wildly exaggerated. Not that it 
wasn't a catastrophe for the museum, but it wasn't as bad as at first thought.

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 ...the cultural loss I was referring to was the looting of the Iraqi 
National Museum during the 2003 invasion...

I recall during that time - despite all of the national rhetoric and will, 
being at its peak, with everybody screaming to save Iraq from itself - when I 
heard that their national museum had been looted, I knew without a doubt that 
it was all a lie. Similar to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan, with its now 
flourishing more than ever, opium trade. 
 













[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2014-01-08 Thread authfriend
Please do call them assholes!
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Ah, Judy - I appreciate your precision. True...though I think I can still call 
them 'assholes' (biased artist). :-)
 

 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 OK. I don't think it was deliberate, though, just incompetent. They'd 
apparently taken some care to avoid bombing heritage sites, and when Iraqi 
troops holed up inside the museum and shot at them from there, they didn't 
return fire for fear of damaging the artifacts (this was before the looting 
started). It just seems not to have occurred to them that looting would be a 
major problem.
 

 Which was incredibly STOOOPID but not likely malicious.
 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 I should have mentioned that I was aware of that [no direct looting, that we 
know of, by US forces]. However, the invaders, with the might of countless 
soldiers, and weapons, did absolutely *nothing* to prevent it - even though 
other strategic targets were protected for their contents. Assholes.


 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 I agree the rationale for the invasion was a lie, but I'm missing the 
connection with the looting of the museum. It wasn't the U.S. invaders who 
dunnit:
 

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/monument-sidebar.html

 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum
 
https://www.stanford.edu/group/chr/drupal/ref/the-2003-looting-of-the-iraq-national-museum

The early reporting was sensationalized and wildly exaggerated. Not that it 
wasn't a catastrophe for the museum, but it wasn't as bad as at first thought.

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 ...the cultural loss I was referring to was the looting of the Iraqi 
National Museum during the 2003 invasion...

I recall during that time - despite all of the national rhetoric and will, 
being at its peak, with everybody screaming to save Iraq from itself - when I 
heard that their national museum had been looted, I knew without a doubt that 
it was all a lie. Similar to our 'liberation' of Afghanistan, with its now 
flourishing more than ever, opium trade. 
 















Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2013-12-23 Thread Richard J. Williams

On 12/22/2013 10:49 PM, bobpri...@yahoo.com wrote:


---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, punditster@... wrote:

On 12/21/2013 10:56 PM, bobpriced@... mailto:bobpriced@... wrote:


Judy in black, me in red---with my latest contribution in bold. I
think we're pushing the limits of NEO

So, why would need NEO when you can create macros in a word processor?

/Richard Macro (#5):/

/Have you thrown that load of laundry in yet? /

/Rita is waiting./


So, you do need NEO.


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2013-12-23 Thread Richard J. Williams

On 12/22/2013 10:53 PM, bobpri...@yahoo.com wrote:


---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, punditster@... wrote:

On 12/21/2013 10:56 PM, bobpriced@... mailto:bobpriced@... wrote:

NEO also does not seem to like text combined with too many YOUTUBE 

You can use Google Chrome to post links to YouTube - this makes
sense when you think about it, since Google owns YouTube, which
uses Adobe Flash Video and HTML5 technology. You can see an
example of this in my music posts abut 100 Great Rock Artists. It
would be my suggestion that you try to get way from using NEO and
get yourself a news reader like Chrome or Thunderbird. This has
already been discussed by Barry 2, but I guessed you missed his
post, since you were so busy calling my wife at her place of
employ. Go figure.

/Richard Macro (#10)/

//

/Why do you call the Whole Body department of WFM, the vitamin
section? Go figure./


Why don't you post a YouTube video? It's not complicated.


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2013-12-22 Thread Richard J. Williams

On 12/21/2013 10:56 PM, bobpri...@yahoo.com wrote:
Judy in black, me in red---with my latest contribution in bold. I 
think we're pushing the limits of NEO

So, why would need NEO when you can create macros in a word processor?


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2013-12-22 Thread Richard J. Williams

On 12/21/2013 10:56 PM, bobpri...@yahoo.com wrote:
NEO also does not seem to like text combined with too many YOUTUBE 
You can use Google Chrome to post links to YouTube - this makes sense 
when you think about it, since Google owns YouTube, which uses Adobe 
Flash Video and HTML5 technology. You can see an example of this in my 
music posts abut 100 Great Rock Artists. It would be my suggestion that 
you try to get way from using NEO and get yourself a news reader like 
Chrome or Thunderbird. This has already been discussed by Barry 2, but I 
guessed you missed his post, since you were so busy calling my wife at 
her place of employ. Go figure.


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2013-12-22 Thread bobpriced


 

---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, punditster@... wrote:

 On 12/21/2013 10:56 PM, bobpriced@... mailto:bobpriced@... wrote:
 
 Judy in black, me in red---with my latest contribution in bold. I think we're 
pushing the limits of NEO So, why would need NEO when you can create macros in 
a word processor?

 Richard Macro (#5):
 Have you thrown that load of laundry in yet? 
 Rita is waiting.
 



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un

2013-12-22 Thread bobpriced


 

---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, punditster@... wrote:

 On 12/21/2013 10:56 PM, bobpriced@... mailto:bobpriced@... wrote:
 
 NEO also does not seem to like text combined with too many YOUTUBE You can use 
Google Chrome to post links to YouTube - this makes sense when you think about 
it, since Google owns YouTube, which uses Adobe Flash Video and HTML5 
technology. You can see an example of this in my music posts abut 100 Great 
Rock Artists. It would be my suggestion that you try to get way from using NEO 
and get yourself a news reader like Chrome or Thunderbird. This has already 
been discussed by Barry 2, but I guessed you missed his post, since you were so 
busy calling my wife at her place of employ. Go figure. 

 Richard Macro (#10)
  
 Why do you call the Whole Body department of WFM, the vitamin section? Go 
figure.

  
 

 



[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread authfriend
I wrote:
 

 Ick. Sorry, I couldn't listen to more than about 30 seconds of this. I seem to 
be one of the only people in the world who isn't a Leonard Cohen fan.


 

 Ann wrote:

 

Nope, I'm with you on that one, Judy. Can't stand listening to that guy and 
Robin loved him. We would have to listen to his mournful, tuneless, drudging 
music during seminars while the other Canadians positively swooned with delight.
 


Good to know I'm not alone. How about Keith Jarrett? He's another one who seems 
to be an object of near-worship in some quarters here. I haven't heard that 
much of him, but what I have heard reminds me of myself tinkling aimlessly on 
the piano when I was around six years old.
 

 (Sorry, didn't mean to interrupt here. I am loving this conversation.)
 

 Nay, nay, please jump in whenever you feel like it.
 

 







 




[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread authfriend
Ann wrote:
 
  That Bach Fugue made my morning so far. Much better than Leonard (sorry 
bOb). 
 

 Ain't that something? I swear, if I get to choose my next incarnation, it'll 
be as an organist so I can play that piece.
 

 But I want to play it in a church on a real organ. Listen to a little of this 
(the organ was built in the 15th century):
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DavkEOQ_hco 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DavkEOQ_hco

 

 Note that the low notes are played with the feet! See here:
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QpwDHOfZeg 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QpwDHOfZeg

 Music is such a sublime mystery, and it makes such a mockery of materialism. 
Anybody who can fit music into a materialist framework simply isn't really 
listening to it.
 

 Case in point:
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WhPUqpaRp4 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WhPUqpaRp4

 

 

 







 




[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread awoelflebater


 

---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, authfriend@... wrote:

 I wrote:
 

 Ick. Sorry, I couldn't listen to more than about 30 seconds of this. I seem to 
be one of the only people in the world who isn't a Leonard Cohen fan.


 

 Ann wrote:

 

Nope, I'm with you on that one, Judy. Can't stand listening to that guy and 
Robin loved him. We would have to listen to his mournful, tuneless, drudging 
music during seminars while the other Canadians positively swooned with delight.
 


Good to know I'm not alone. How about Keith Jarrett? He's another one who seems 
to be an object of near-worship in some quarters here. I haven't heard that 
much of him, but what I have heard reminds me of myself tinkling aimlessly on 
the piano when I was around six years old.
 

 Not possessing the musical knowledge and background that you do I am no expert 
to comment on Jarrett's expertise although that was another one we were 
subjected to; I think it was the Koln Concert or some album of that name. I 
didn't mind it as much as Cohen, however. I found myself actually wanting to 
react quite vehemently when he was played which I did not feel when listening 
to Keith. Luckily, Robin started to also play a lot of Police, Springsteen and 
even Michael Jackson (Thriller and Billy Jean) so at least it got a little 
livelier in there and a couple of the Canadians even tapped a toe or two - 
which was astonishing. Most of them were a rather quiet, conservative and 
proper lot compared to us uncouth Yanks.
 

 (Sorry, didn't mean to interrupt here. I am loving this conversation.)
 

 Nay, nay, please jump in whenever you feel like it.
 

 







 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread awoelflebater
That is wonderful, wonderful. I am not sure why I find this sound, this music 
so expansive and exhilarating. Maybe it is a combination of the acoustics 
echoing off the beauty of the spires and around the intricate filligree of the 
cathedral screens and stonework. It all contributes to this timeless sort of 
forgotten memory feeling I get, as if this music, the nature of the this sound 
is really ancient and imbedded in my DNA. 
 

 I thought you might find this interesting. A very close and dear family friend 
of ours has an organ installed in his townhouse in Portland Maine. Here are 
some links to his home and instrument:
 

 
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/gallery/us_northeast/maine/portland_plumb_hope-jones.shtml
 
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/gallery/us_northeast/maine/portland_plumb_hope-jones.shtml
 

 

 Go to photo 18 for more info:
 

 
http://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/187/slideshow/221/display?format=listamp;prev_object_id=446amp;prev_object=pageamp;slide_num=1
 
http://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/187/slideshow/221/display?format=listamp;prev_object_id=446amp;prev_object=pageamp;slide_num=1



[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread awoelflebater


 

---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, awoelflebater@... wrote:

 That is wonderful, wonderful. I am not sure why I find this sound, this music 
so expansive and exhilarating. Maybe it is a combination of the acoustics 
echoing off the beauty of the spires and around the intricate filligree of the 
cathedral screens and stonework. It all contributes to this timeless sort of 
forgotten memory feeling I get, as if this music, the nature of the this sound 
is really ancient and imbedded in my DNA. 
 

 I thought you might find this interesting. A very close and dear family friend 
of ours has an organ installed in his townhouse in Portland Maine. Here are 
some links to his home and instrument:
 

 
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/gallery/us_northeast/maine/portland_plumb_hope-jones.shtml
 
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/gallery/us_northeast/maine/portland_plumb_hope-jones.shtml
 

 

 Go to photo 18 for more info:
 

 
http://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/187/slideshow/221/display?format=listamp;prev_object_id=446amp;prev_object=pageamp;slide_num=1
 
http://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/187/slideshow/221/display?format=listamp;prev_object_id=446amp;prev_object=pageamp;slide_num=1

 

 Correction: maybe acoustics are the result of a combination of the notes 
played, the vibration of the sound through air, hitting the various 
architectural elements of the Cathedral or other enclosure thus creating the 
culmination of all of this as the final sound, the acoustic. Nevertheless, 
I'm diggin' those big organs right now - just add a little frankincense and a 
Christmas choir and I'm right in my element. Leonard Cohen just ain't cuttin' 
it for me.




[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread emilymaenot


 

---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, authfriend@... wrote:

 I wrote:
 

 Ick. Sorry, I couldn't listen to more than about 30 seconds of this. I seem to 
be one of the only people in the world who isn't a Leonard Cohen fan.


 

 Ann wrote:

 

Nope, I'm with you on that one, Judy. Can't stand listening to that guy and 
Robin loved him. We would have to listen to his mournful, tuneless, drudging 
music during seminars while the other Canadians positively swooned with delight.
 


Good to know I'm not alone. How about Keith Jarrett? He's another one who seems 
to be an object of near-worship in some quarters here. I haven't heard that 
much of him, but what I have heard reminds me of myself tinkling aimlessly on 
the piano when I was around six years old.
 

 (Sorry, didn't mean to interrupt here. I am loving this conversation.)
 

 Nay, nay, please jump in whenever you feel like it.
 

 Hey there, we have something not in common - smile.  I first heard Leonard 
in my 20's; loved the song Suzanne.  A few years ago, I caught the televised 
show on public television of his Live in London concert and fell madly in 
love with his music and lyrics and bought the DVD and his Book of Longing, 
which includes drawings he has done and which I also love.  This Christmas 
season, I have gone on a book buying binge (not as sustainable as using a 
Kindle or the library, so I feel a bit guilty) and one book I bought was I'm 
Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons.  Haven't read it yet.  
Here is a good review for those that might like old Leonard.
 

 
http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2012/09/im-your-man-the-life-of-leonard-cohen-by-sylvie-si.html
  
http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2012/09/im-your-man-the-life-of-leonard-cohen-by-sylvie-si.html
 
 

 I first heard Keith Jarrett here on FFL; Robin posted a link as I remember.  
I've since listened to (on you tube) him on and off and I confess to liking him 
as well; I like the quietness of what he plays.  Of course, he's no Gould.  
Smile.   
 

 

 

 

 







 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread emilymaenot


 

---In FairfieldLife@{{emailDomain}}, authfriend@... wrote:
 

 All hail to the animation of organ music!  I love the Bach Fugue and also 
loved the Beethoven Fugue that Bob posted (thank you bOb). I have never seen 
organ footwork like this before; amazing. 

 Ann wrote:
 
  That Bach Fugue made my morning so far. Much better than Leonard (sorry 
bOb). 
 

 Ain't that something? I swear, if I get to choose my next incarnation, it'll 
be as an organist so I can play that piece.
 

 But I want to play it in a church on a real organ. Listen to a little of this 
(the organ was built in the 15th century):
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DavkEOQ_hco 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DavkEOQ_hco

 

 Note that the low notes are played with the feet! See here:
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QpwDHOfZeg 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QpwDHOfZeg

 Music is such a sublime mystery, and it makes such a mockery of materialism. 
Anybody who can fit music into a materialist framework simply isn't really 
listening to it.
 

 Case in point:
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WhPUqpaRp4 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WhPUqpaRp4

 

 

 







 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread authfriend
I'm not sure what the difference is between your initial reaction just below 
and your subsequent correction; both sound right to me. The pipe organ is a 
mighty instrument that seems to have been designed for elaborately resonant 
spaces like churches to evoke powerful feelings, and composers have taken 
advantage of that.
 

 But I'm sure it's a great delight to have a pipe organ in one's home, as your 
friend does!
 

 One of the many interesting things about pipe organs is that they're all 
different--much more so than, say, pianos or violins. The late organist E. 
Power Biggs made a recording in which he played the same Bach organ piece on 14 
different European church organs, made from the 15th century to the 20th 
century, to show off the characteristics of each one.
 

 More info about pipe organs:
 

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ

 

 Wikipedia says that from the 17th to the late 19th centuries, the pipe organ 
was the most complex man-made device in existence. As such, it was ultimately 
displaced by the telephone exchange.
 

 Ann wrote:
  That is wonderful, wonderful. I am not sure why I find this sound, this 
music so expansive and exhilarating. Maybe it is a combination of the acoustics 
echoing off the beauty of the spires and around the intricate filligree of the 
cathedral screens and stonework. It all contributes to this timeless sort of 
forgotten memory feeling I get, as if this music, the nature of the this sound 
is really ancient and imbedded in my DNA. 
 

 I thought you might find this interesting. A very close and dear family friend 
of ours has an organ installed in his townhouse in Portland Maine. Here are 
some links to his home and instrument:
 

 
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/gallery/us_northeast/maine/portland_plumb_hope-jones.shtml
 
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/gallery/us_northeast/maine/portland_plumb_hope-jones.shtml
 

 

 Go to photo 18 for more info:
 

 
http://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/187/slideshow/221/display?format=listamp;prev_object_id=446amp;prev_object=pageamp;slide_num=1
 
http://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/187/slideshow/221/display?format=listamp;prev_object_id=446amp;prev_object=pageamp;slide_num=1

 

 Correction: maybe acoustics are the result of a combination of the notes 
played, the vibration of the sound through air, hitting the various 
architectural elements of the Cathedral or other enclosure thus creating the 
culmination of all of this as the final sound, the acoustic. Nevertheless, 
I'm diggin' those big organs right now - just add a little frankincense and a 
Christmas choir and I'm right in my element. Leonard Cohen just ain't cuttin' 
it for me. 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread authfriend
That's quite a review of the Cohen bio. I might read it just because it should 
be interesting.
 

 I have to admit to a limited ability to appreciate popular-type music. In 
general, I just don't find it as interesting as serious/classical music. There 
are exceptions, but Cohen ain't one of them, nor is Jarrett (yes, I know he's 
written music in a quasi-classical mode). Obviously music is a very personal 
taste; I'm not saying Cohen and Jarrett aren't fine musicians.
 
Emily wrote:
  Hey there, we have something not in common - smile.  I first heard 
Leonard in my 20's; loved the song Suzanne.  A few years ago, I caught the 
televised show on public television of his Live in London concert and fell 
madly in love with his music and lyrics and bought the DVD and his Book of 
Longing, which includes drawings he has done and which I also love.  This 
Christmas season, I have gone on a book buying binge (not as sustainable as 
using a Kindle or the library, so I feel a bit guilty) and one book I bought 
was I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons.  Haven't read 
it yet.  Here is a good review for those that might like old Leonard.
 

 
http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2012/09/im-your-man-the-life-of-leonard-cohen-by-sylvie-si.html
  
http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2012/09/im-your-man-the-life-of-leonard-cohen-by-sylvie-si.html
 
 

 I first heard Keith Jarrett here on FFL; Robin posted a link as I remember.  
I've since listened to (on you tube) him on and off and I confess to liking him 
as well; I like the quietness of what he plays.  Of course, he's no Gould.  
Smile.   
 

 

 

 

 







 








[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread emilymaenot
I liked the review as well.  I totally agree that music is a personal taste; 
since I've been off and have discovered youtube (smile) I have re-discovered 
and expanded my exposure to music and genres, in general, which has been 
nothing but fun.  


[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-21 Thread authfriend
You've put up some great stuff. I wouldn't know where to look.
 

 I gave YouTube a pass for quite awhile because I thought it was only stupid 
selfie videos and pop. I couldn't believe it when I discovered it was a 
treasure trove of my type of music too. What an extraordinary resource.
 

 Emily wrote:
 
  I liked the review as well.  I totally agree that music is a personal 
taste; since I've been off and have discovered youtube (smile) I have 
re-discovered and expanded my exposure to music and genres, in general, which 
has been nothing but fun. 




[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, Part Un (clickable link)

2013-12-21 Thread bobpriced


 Not sure why this link below is broken when in the post I just sent, I'll try 
it again:
 

 http://www.pbs.org/howartmadetheworld/episodes/once/attenborough/ 
http://www.pbs.org/howartmadetheworld/episodes/once/attenborough/
 

 If it still doesn't work you could likely find the page by googling: How Art 
Made The World, David Attenborough. 

 










[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-12 Thread authfriend
Thanks very much, Emily, I will do that shortly. The weird thing is that the 
embedded videos didn't show up in Bob's posts, just the URLs. And when I 
checked my latest post last night just after sending it, they didn't show up in 
mine either. But this morning they do.
 

 Emily wrote:

  Judy I am watching/reading this.  FYI, the embedded videos at the bottom 
  appear to cut off your response here (below).  I'm a few or more hours away 
  from finishing the full content, but when you get a chance, would love it 
  if you would post the rest of your reply.  [ I also read the Wikipedia 
  level last night - :) ] 
 

 Wow, really? Well, by all means jump in the conversation whenever you feel 
like it.
 





[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape, part deux

2013-12-12 Thread authfriend
Continuing with what got cut off:
 

 Starts on page 3 of the Scribd pagination. It's long--he's pretty
 wordy--but he goes well beyond the Wikipedia level. He also wrote
 a book called The Darkness of God: Negativity in Christian 
 Mysticism, which I haven't read but plan to. (By negativity, he
 means apophaticism.)
 

 Is it possible to be apophatically inclined--not the right word,
 but it'll have to do--and not know it, and thereby mistake the 
 lack of a sense of a God with attributes for God's absence? That's 
 the connection I was stumbling toward with gnosticism, and also
 with Robin's theories. (Oh, and with the Beckett quote above.) Would an 
 apophatic-type God seem too much like Brahman for someone who had 
 come to perceive Impersonal God as a snare and a delusion? Am I
 making any sense here?
 

 I never really found the Monte Cassino notion to be convincing, to be
 honest. But it didn't seem to be up for argument. And Pope Francis has
 made me wonder about whether Roman Catholicism might be getting
 its power back. Would have loved to ask Robin about that. What's
 your take on this, if I may ask? (You are, or were, Catholic, as I recall,
 right?)
 

  For some reason, it reminded me of Colin McCann's idea that homo 
  sapiens have not evolved biologically enough (yet?) to understand 
  their unique self awareness.
 

 Colin McGinn, he of the recent sexual harassment scandal. 
 

  In Last Ape Standing Chip Walter uses a 365 day calendar to 
  create understandable scale to the seven million year journey of 
  hominids; beginning on January 01: human self awareness dawns on 
  December 19th, the tribe of 100---we all appear related to---
  exists Africa on December 27th, cultivation at Gobekli Tepe begins 
  New Years Eve---early afternoon, hierarchy---caused by surpluses 
  from cultivation---appears around supper time, and human history 
  begins around 10:30pm. My question would be, with the speed we've 
  been moving the past 12,000 years why wouldn't there be more steps 
  of evolution for hominids in our future, and possibly a step where 
  understanding of self awareness is obvious to us (assuming some of 
  us survive, and we're not just the bottle neck or dead end).
 

 Seems like an awfully big leap, and survival is pretty iffy at this 
 point. I'm not sure either that biological evolution per se would
 help.
 

 Someone once said (badly paraphrased) that the secret of the universe
 is like a safe with the key locked inside. That seems to apply to where
 we are now with understanding self-awareness. We can't see what
 we're seeing with.
 

 But I remember some time ago having a sort of epiphany reading the
 first chapters of Science of Being and Art of Living. The solution
 to the safe paradox had to something to do with Self-reference, as I
 recall, but  it's foggy now. I'll have to go back and see if I can recapture 
it.
 

 Jeepers. Enough! Go to bed, Judy. Good night, Bob.
 

 snip
 

  Great to hear from you as well.
 
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpKZBr-YGv4
 

 As Emily would say, Tee hee...
 

 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-12 Thread emilymaenot
Re: Wow, really? Well, by all means jump in the conversation whenever you feel 
like it.
 

 Yes, really.  Funny.  I won't be jumping in however; it's new to me and way 
out of my league.  I'm practicing listening, although I could probably tell you 
how I'm *feeling* about it. Oh dear.  Smile.  
 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Thanks very much, Emily, I will do that shortly. The weird thing is that the 
embedded videos didn't show up in Bob's posts, just the URLs. And when I 
checked my latest post last night just after sending it, they didn't show up in 
mine either. But this morning they do.
 

 Emily wrote:

  Judy I am watching/reading this.  FYI, the embedded videos at the bottom 
  appear to cut off your response here (below).  I'm a few or more hours away 
  from finishing the full content, but when you get a chance, would love it 
  if you would post the rest of your reply.  [ I also read the Wikipedia 
  level last night - :) ] 
 
 

 Wow, really? Well, by all means jump in the conversation whenever you feel 
like it.
 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-12 Thread authfriend
Just for the record, I meant that I'm surprised anyone was interested enough! I 
don't think it's out of your league at all, but stick to what you're 
comfortable with. Don't be hesitant to ask questions if you have them. Whether 
either Bob or I will be able to answer them is a different matter. ;-)
 
Emily wrote:

 Re: Wow, really? Well, by all means jump in the conversation whenever you feel 
like it.
 

 Yes, really.  Funny.  I won't be jumping in however; it's new to me and way 
out of my league.  I'm practicing listening, although I could probably tell you 
how I'm *feeling* about it. Oh dear.  Smile.  
 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 Thanks very much, Emily, I will do that shortly. The weird thing is that the 
embedded videos didn't show up in Bob's posts, just the URLs. And when I 
checked my latest post last night just after sending it, they didn't show up in 
mine either. But this morning they do.
 

 Emily wrote:

  Judy I am watching/reading this.  FYI, the embedded videos at the bottom 
  appear to cut off your response here (below).  I'm a few or more hours away 
  from finishing the full content, but when you get a chance, would love it 
  if you would post the rest of your reply.  [ I also read the Wikipedia 
  level last night - :) ] 
 
 

 Wow, really? Well, by all means jump in the conversation whenever you feel 
like it.
 








[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread emilymaenot
I am not replying to this but I must say that a paranoid optimist are 
the funniest three words I've heard in a long time.  Ah ha...smile.  


[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread authfriend
Paradoxical Bob, we call him...
 

 (My response coming later, Mr. Price.)
 
Emily wrote:

   I am not replying to this but I must say that a paranoid 
   optimist are the funniest three words I've heard in a long time.  Ah 
   ha...smile.   




[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread doctordumbass
That's why his first name is an anagram - is he, Bob, or, boB??

[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread authfriend
Or perhaps BoB.
 
DoctorDumbass wrote:

   That's why his first name is an anagram - is he, Bob, or, boB??   



[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread doctordumbass
or, bOb. OK stop, we're scaring me.

[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread emilymaenot
Judy I am watching/reading this.  FYI, the embedded videos at the bottom appear 
to cut off your response here (below).  I'm a few or more hours away from 
finishing the full content, but when you get a chance, would love it if you 
would post the rest of your reply.  [ I also read the Wikipedia level last 
night - :) ]
 

 Starts on page 3 of the Scribd pagination. It's long--he's pretty
 wordy--but he goes well beyond the Wikipedia level. He also wrote  (cuts off 
here)


[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-11 Thread emilymaenot
The scary part was that it made perfect sense to me. :)  I left for the Y to go 
for a swim, and was sitting in the hot tub trying to convince myself that I 
really *wanted* to get in the 20 degree cooler pool and do laps, and I 
inadvertently laughed out loud, this time imagining Bill Murray delivering that 
line (sorry Bob).  A guy who was also in the hot tub looked at me and said is 
this a private joke?  I thought, hshould I try and explain this idea 
of paranoid optimism..and that Murphy was an optimist, did you know?  So, I 
told him that I was aspiring to be a paranoid optimist (I've got the paranoid 
part down) and he laughed and said he was a pragmatic idealist, which I also 
liked.  


[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-08 Thread bobpriced


 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, authfriend@... wrote:

 One-act play by Samuel Beckett, performed by Harold Pinter 

 In five parts:
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKteoIGbF0Q 

 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGrfzhOaMkk 
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY4ibYIWSss 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY4ibYIWSss
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0WRyORtU6A 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0WRyORtU6A
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KxQaQM2004s 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KxQaQM2004s
 

 Although I don't believe a Beckett play can ever be reduced to a single 
interpretation, Spoiler Alert.
 

 Judy,
 

 Thank you for posting this, I found it compelling to watch. 
 

 It's not easy to admit that we're all Krapp (smile), and, in the end, alone.
 

 I liked the way the monologue, and silence, framed and accentuated what was 
not said. I thought Pinter's characterization---much of the time using nothing 
more than facial expressions---was transporting. 
 

 Everything in the room seemed burnt, possibly from a blaze caused by the 
narcissism of Krapp's younger years (alcohol adding fuel to the fire of his 
self absorption); even his wheelchair seemed scorched, I could almost smell the 
smoke hanging stale in the air.
 

 It's been said that Beckett's choice of structure* was influenced by 
Manichaean (Gnostic) doctrine, which teaches, among other things, that the 
world has been ruled by evil since God lost control of his creation. I think 
this could explain the choreography. 
 

 At about 42:40 of this clip there is a short piece on the Yazidis, a sect in 
Kurdistan who were influenced by the Gnostics; I was reminded of it when I 
read* about the possible influence of the Manichaeans on the structure of the 
play, the burns on the walls of the temple are reminiscent of Krapps burnt wall 
paper (i loved the wallpaper pattern underneath the smoke damage, I could see 
the flames of his life licking up the wall).
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Wu0CTPeQjA 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Wu0CTPeQjA  
 

 As dark as the play is, I found hope in the fact that Krapp seems to have no 
time for his intellectual insights as a younger man, but is drawn to his past 
failures in love; it seems to be dawning on him that in these previous 
experiences of love he may find some purpose to his existence. 
 

 We lay there without moving, but under us all moved and moved us gently up 
and down and side to side.
 

 I think spool is a wonderful metaphor for life and I enjoyed the way Pinter 
played with the word. I thought the choice of the word last*, which could 
mean previous or final, was brilliant.
 

 *  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krapps_Last_Tape  
 

 Here's a link to a small European film (Nothing Personal) I enjoyed watching 
recently. For me, it's about reconciling the desire to be alone with 
loneliness, and love, and the oh so human need to be with someone else.
 

 http://tinyurl.com/m5l24wu http://tinyurl.com/m5l24wu   

 

 Thanks again Judy. I try to read all your posts, but unfortunately my other 
commitments keep me from posting as often as I'd like to. Is it possible The 
Holy Spirit became a gnostic when she left the world after the bombing of Monte 
Cassino; another question to ask Robin if he ever returns. 
 

 ***I make this burnt offering to the god Neo, ruler of FFL and provider of 
crops of words without the fertility of his name; oh great Neo, I bow down to 
you---the antonym of Nemo---and beseech you to deliver this post to FFL as 
close as possible to my intentions (the fruit, flowers, hanky and donation are 
in the mail).
 






[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-08 Thread authfriend
 Although I don't believe a Beckett play can  
  ever be reduced to a single interpretation,  
  Spoiler Alert.
 

  Judy, 
 
  Thank you for posting this, I found it 
  compelling to watch. 
 
  It's not easy to admit that we're all Krapp 
  (smile), and, in the end, alone.
 

 I must confess my intention in posting it was fairly literalist. Don't know 
when you tuned in to FFL this time around, but there was a discussion of time 
travel to the past: When in history would you most like to go back to?
 

 Seraphita pondered:
 

 As your rules don't allow one to change the future, I wouldn't want to go 
back and meet an earlier version of myself. Not being able to offer advice or 
change the odds behind the scenes would be cruel.
 

 'If youth only knew: if age only could.' - Henri Estienne (1470 - 1520)
 

 I thought there was a resonance there with Krapp.
 

  I liked the way the monologue, and silence, 
  framed and accentuated what was not said. I 
  thought Pinter's characterization---much of 
  the time using nothing more than facial 
  expressions---was transporting.
 

 Definitive, IMHO. And much of the time you couldn't even see his eyes. I had 
no idea he did any acting. Sure gives you a new perspective on Pinter and his 
own plays. His Krapp was deeply felt.
 

  Everything in the room seemed burnt, 
  possibly from a blaze caused by the 
  narcissism of Krapp's younger years (alcohol 
  adding fuel to the fire of his self 
  absorption); even his wheelchair seemed 
  scorched, I could almost smell the smoke 
  hanging stale in the air.
 

 Ah, that must have been what I was smelling. I wasn't sure...
 

  It's been said that Beckett's choice of 
  structure* was influenced by Manichaean 
  (Gnostic) doctrine, which teaches, among 
  other things, that the world has been ruled 
  by evil since God lost control of his 
  creation. I think this could explain the 
  choreography.
 

 Could well be, but I'm a little skeptical. Light vs. dark, and the three seals 
cited by Cronin as evidence, seem to me too nonspecific.
 

  At about 42:40 of this clip there is a short 
  piece on the Yazidis, a sect in Kurdistan 
  who were influenced by the Gnostics;
 

 I watched all of this video, then wished I hadn't. So depressing.
 

  I was 
  reminded of it when I read* about the 
  possible influence of the Manichaeans on the 
  structure of the play, the burns on the 
  walls of the temple are reminiscent of 
  Krapps burnt wall paper (i loved the 
  wallpaper pattern underneath the smoke 
  damage, I could see the flames of his life 
  licking up the wall).
 

 Wow. I didn't pay all that much attention to the visuals, to be honest, but 
that's quite an observation.
 

  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Wu0CTPeQjA  
  
  As dark as the play is, I found hope in the 
  fact that Krapp seems to have no time for 
  his intellectual insights as a younger man, 
  but is drawn to his past failures in love; 
  it seems to be dawning on him that in these 
  previous experiences of love he may find 
  some purpose to his existence. 
 
  We lay there without moving, but under us 
  all moved and moved us gently up and down 
  and side to side.
 

 The images of the various women are so vivid because everything else is so 
drab. As you say, you can't pin down a single interpretation of the play, but I 
have to think it was intended to put an intense focus on those images and what 
they mean to Krapp. In any case, I'm pretty sure that was what Pinter and the 
director had in mind.
 

 The second-most vivid image, I thought, was in the play's present: his 
drinking.
 

 Terrific Beckett quote from the Wikipedia page on the play:
 

 I realised that Joyce had gone as far as one could in the direction of 
knowing more, [being] in control of one’s material. He was always adding to it; 
you only have to look at his proofs to see that. I realised that my own way was 
in impoverishment, in lack of knowledge and in taking away, in subtracting 
rather than in adding.
 

  I think spool is a wonderful metaphor for 
  life
 

 Be again...be again. All that old misery. Once wasn't enough for you.
 

  and I enjoyed the way Pinter played 
  with the word. I thought the choice of the 
  word last*, which could mean previous or 
  final, was brilliant.
 

 You *are* an optimist, aren't you? It could mean either, but I think it means 
final. I don't think Krapp has anywhere to go in this life. And at the end he's 
just sitting there listening to the blank tape at the end of the spol.
 

 * 
  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krapps_Last_Tape 
 
  Here's a link to a small European film 
  (Nothing Personal) I enjoyed watching 
  recently. For me, it's about reconciling the 
  desire to be alone with loneliness, and love, 
  and the oh so human need to be with someone 
  else.
 
  http://tinyurl.com/m5l24wu
 

 I watched this too. Just beautifully done, and a good complement to the 
Beckett.
 

  Thanks again Judy. I try to read all 

[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-07 Thread authfriend
Very funny. The URLs are in the correct order; the videos are not. If you watch 
them, do watch them in order.


[FairfieldLife] RE: Krapp#39;s Last Tape

2013-12-07 Thread s3raphita
Re The URLs are in the correct order; the videos are not. :
 

 One time a group of us went to see the French film Lacombe Lucien (director 
Louis Malle, 1974). Based on Malle's own experiences it tells the story of a 
teenage boy during the German occupation of France in World War II. He wanted 
to join the Resistance movement but they rejected him as he was too young. As 
he wanted to see action and not sit on the sidelines he decided to join the 
Gestapo and work for the collaborators. Brilliant study of the ambiguity of 
war. 
 

 The thing is, the art-house cinema mixed up the reels and we ended up seeing 
characters that had been murdered in previous scenes suddenly reappearing. 
Funny thing: my memory of the movie has everything in the correct sequence. A 
vindication of Burroughs' cut-up technique.