Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-07 Thread Richard J. Williams

It didn't take long for this thread to turn into shit. Go figure.

On 11/6/2013 6:30 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:


The California dreamin' scene we both liked was maybe a false dawn? 
The paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree lifestyle that 
appealed to me was given the lie by the sordid revelations of the 
antics of Papa John Phillips of The Mamas  the Papas. Turns out he 
was a fully-paid-up sleazeball. And Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys 
spent his life tormented by his personal demons and his musical vision 
could take a very dark turn.



The superficial gloss of that Californian sound is probably what made 
some of the other FFL posters find more satisfaction in sardonic Dylan 
songs or the hard-edged Detroit scene. (Way, way too hard edged for 
me. Listening to MC5 playing Kick Out the Jams has always been a 
consciousness-lowering endurance test.)  So the Wuthering Heights 
gothic, doomed-romanticism vibe with its perverse appeal is maybe a 
safer route to take. At least life won't disappoint you.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UI5qEQAvOcY



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

Seraphita, I chuckled at your comment because I've been experiencing 
exactly what you're writing about. Why? Because of the weather! 
October was mostly glorious here, moderate temps, golden sunlight 
pouring down day after day, gentle breezes, blue skies, the leaves on 
trees bursting in crimson, peachy orange and saffron yellow. I reveled 
in walking around town, drinking in all of it.


Now November is happening with rain and gusty winds, both of which 
have torn hundreds of leaves from trees. The bare branches are wet and 
loamy brown. I find myself drowning willingly in heavy, dark, gray 
clouds that sit swollen in the sky. They have their own kind of beauty 
which nourishes my soul.


I may prefer sunny skies but I also love cloudy ones. Just grateful 
for that polarity, for being human, for being alive.




On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 10:26 PM, s3raphita@... s3raphita@... 
wrote:
Re And how about the California Dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, 
Beach Boys, etc:


Yes. As a Brit they were the acts that most impressed me. They 
conjured up a paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree 
lifestyle very, very far removed from the cold, wet, repressed north 
east of England where I was growing up. I'm not complaining though, as 
I went to school a few miles from Haworth where Emily Brontë wrote 
Wuthering Heights and that kind of doomed-romanticism vibe has a 
perverse appeal of its own.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach 
Boys, etc.



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, 
Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune 
Walk Don't Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the 
Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they did).  There was also an 
east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene. These 
were often regional because the labels were regional without national 
distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes 
The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin 
offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:


 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-07 Thread Richard J. Williams
How dare you , Share, butting into the conversation abut early British 
rock music and posting about the weather and those California bands - 
like Crosby, Stills, and Nash and Young! This is just outrageous! LoL!


On 11/6/2013 6:30 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:


The California dreamin' scene we both liked was maybe a false dawn? 
The paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree lifestyle that 
appealed to me was given the lie by the sordid revelations of the 
antics of Papa John Phillips of The Mamas  the Papas. Turns out he 
was a fully-paid-up sleazeball. And Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys 
spent his life tormented by his personal demons and his musical vision 
could take a very dark turn.



The superficial gloss of that Californian sound is probably what made 
some of the other FFL posters find more satisfaction in sardonic Dylan 
songs or the hard-edged Detroit scene. (Way, way too hard edged for 
me. Listening to MC5 playing Kick Out the Jams has always been a 
consciousness-lowering endurance test.)  So the Wuthering Heights 
gothic, doomed-romanticism vibe with its perverse appeal is maybe a 
safer route to take. At least life won't disappoint you.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UI5qEQAvOcY



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

Seraphita, I chuckled at your comment because I've been experiencing 
exactly what you're writing about. Why? Because of the weather! 
October was mostly glorious here, moderate temps, golden sunlight 
pouring down day after day, gentle breezes, blue skies, the leaves on 
trees bursting in crimson, peachy orange and saffron yellow. I reveled 
in walking around town, drinking in all of it.


Now November is happening with rain and gusty winds, both of which 
have torn hundreds of leaves from trees. The bare branches are wet and 
loamy brown. I find myself drowning willingly in heavy, dark, gray 
clouds that sit swollen in the sky. They have their own kind of beauty 
which nourishes my soul.


I may prefer sunny skies but I also love cloudy ones. Just grateful 
for that polarity, for being human, for being alive.




On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 10:26 PM, s3raphita@... s3raphita@... 
wrote:
Re And how about the California Dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, 
Beach Boys, etc:


Yes. As a Brit they were the acts that most impressed me. They 
conjured up a paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree 
lifestyle very, very far removed from the cold, wet, repressed north 
east of England where I was growing up. I'm not complaining though, as 
I went to school a few miles from Haworth where Emily Brontë wrote 
Wuthering Heights and that kind of doomed-romanticism vibe has a 
perverse appeal of its own.



---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:

And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach 
Boys, etc.



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, 
Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune 
Walk Don't Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the 
Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they did).  There was also an 
east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene. These 
were often regional because the labels were regional without national 
distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes 
The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin 
offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:


 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-07 Thread Share Long
Richard, sorr! But I think the thread had become 
about regional music scenes in the US, which I find fascinating. And I find 
weather fascinating too. Don't shoot me, ok? (-:





On Thursday, November 7, 2013 9:29 AM, Richard J. Williams 
pundits...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  
How dare you , Share, butting into the conversation abut early British rock 
music and posting about the weather and those California bands - like Crosby, 
Stills, and Nash and Young! This is just outrageous! LoL!

On 11/6/2013 6:30 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:

  
The California dreamin' scene we both liked was maybe a false dawn? The 
paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree lifestyle that appealed to 
me was given the lie by the sordid revelations of the antics of Papa John 
Phillips of The Mamas  the Papas. Turns out he was a fully-paid-up 
sleazeball. And Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys spent his life tormented by his 
personal demons and his musical vision could take a very dark turn.


The superficial gloss of that Californian sound is probably what made some of 
the other FFL posters find more satisfaction in sardonic Dylan songs or the 
hard-edged Detroit scene. (Way, way too hard edged for me. Listening to MC5 
playing Kick Out the Jams has always been a consciousness-lowering endurance 
test.)  So the Wuthering Heights gothic, doomed-romanticism vibe with its 
perverse appeal is maybe a safer route to take. At least life won't disappoint 
you.  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UI5qEQAvOcY 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Seraphita, I chuckled at your comment because I've been experiencing exactly 
what you're writing about. Why? Because of the weather! October was mostly 
glorious here, moderate temps, golden sunlight pouring down day after day, 
gentle breezes, blue skies, the leaves on trees bursting in crimson, peachy 
orange and saffron yellow. I reveled in walking around town, drinking in all 
of it. 

Now November is happening with rain and gusty winds,
  both of which have torn hundreds of leaves from trees.
  The bare branches are wet and loamy brown. I find
  myself drowning willingly in heavy, dark, gray clouds
  that sit swollen in the sky. They have their own kind
  of beauty which nourishes my soul. 

I may prefer sunny skies but I also love cloudy ones.
  Just grateful for that polarity, for being human, for
  being alive.






On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 10:26 PM, s3raphita@... s3raphita@... wrote:
 
  
Re And how about the California Dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach 
Boys, etc:


Yes. As a Brit they were the acts that most impressed me. They conjured up a 
paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree lifestyle very, very far 
removed from the cold, wet, repressed north east of England where I was 
growing up. I'm not complaining though, as I went to school a few miles from 
Haworth where Emily Brontë wrote Wuthering Heights and that kind of 
doomed-romanticism vibe has a perverse appeal of its own. 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach Boys, 
etc. 



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:


Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New 
Orleans scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional 
without national distribution.

Also before the Beatles
let's not forget folk
period which includes
The Kingston Trio,
Lamplighters (I backed
them up once) and other
spin offs. Those morphed
into folk rock groups in
the later 60s.

Regional music scenes in
the US would be a lot
like European country's
and their own scenes.

Romance languages didn't
translate well into rock
so you have the soft
muzak rock those
countries created.


 
On 11/05/2013 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-06 Thread Share Long
Seraphita, I chuckled at your comment because I've been experiencing exactly 
what you're writing about. Why? Because of the weather! October was mostly 
glorious here, moderate temps, golden sunlight pouring down day after day, 
gentle breezes, blue skies, the leaves on trees bursting in crimson, peachy 
orange and saffron yellow. I reveled in walking around town, drinking in all of 
it. 

Now November is happening with rain and gusty winds, both of which have torn 
hundreds of leaves from trees. The bare branches are wet and loamy brown. I 
find myself drowning willingly in heavy, dark, gray clouds that sit swollen in 
the sky. They have their own kind of beauty which nourishes my soul. 

I may prefer sunny skies but I also love cloudy ones. Just grateful for that 
polarity, for being human, for being alive.





On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 10:26 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com 
s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Re And how about the California Dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach 
Boys, etc:

Yes. As a Brit they were the acts that most impressed me. They conjured up a 
paradisiacal image of a sunny, optimistic, carefree lifestyle very, very far 
removed from the cold, wet, repressed north east of England where I was growing 
up. I'm not complaining though, as I went to school a few miles from Haworth 
where Emily Brontë wrote Wuthering Heights and that kind of doomed-romanticism 
vibe has a perverse appeal of its own. 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach Boys, etc. 



---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:


Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.

Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which
  includes The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once)
  and other spin offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the
  later 60s.

Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European
  country's and their own scenes.

Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the
  soft muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:

 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock
  so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important
  pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a
  name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans
  didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that
  time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough
  original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-06 Thread Richard J. Williams
Suzi Quatro was born in Detroit, MI, USA and grew up there - her father 
worked for General Motors. Quatro moved to England in 1971. In 2010 she 
was voted into the Michigan Rock and Roll Legends online Hall of Fame.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

On 11/5/2013 9:55 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:


Re Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major 
rock star.:



Yeah, I liked Can the Can. Quatro made it as a star in the UK (and 
*not* the USA) of course.




---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... wrote:

Detroit - Motor City Bands

Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major 
rock star.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

Suzi Quatro - Can The Can, 1973:
http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio

Inline image 1


On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Share Long sharelong60@...
mailto:sharelong60@... wrote:

noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...




On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozguru@...
mailto:noozguru@... wrote:
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were
the scene in the US. There was Northwest Rock which included
the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their
cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the northwest
do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album
they did). There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area
scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often regional
because the labels were regional without national distribution.

Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which
includes The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up
once) and other spin offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups
in the later 60s.

Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European
country's and their own scenes.

Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have
the soft muzak rock those countries created.

On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:

 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)











Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-06 Thread Richard Williams
Other early and notable Detroit bands:

The Stooges - Iggy Pop:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stooges

The Stooges performing in Austin, Texas, 2007:
http://youtu.be/XL22_2g-4O8

[image: Inline image 1]

Bob Seeger  The Silver Bullet Band:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Seger

Marshall Crenshaw:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Crenshaw

MC5 - Motor City 5:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MC5

Mitch Ryder  The Detroit Wheels:
http://youtu.be/j9eWGdJIW74

Suzi Quatro:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

SRC:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRC_(band)

The Amboy Dukes w/Ted Nugent:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Amboy_Dukes

Teaearden and van Winkle:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teegarden__Van_Winkle


On Wed, Nov 6, 2013 at 9:21 AM, Richard J. Williams pundits...@gmail.comwrote:

  Suzi Quatro was born in Detroit, MI, USA and grew up there - her father
 worked for General Motors. Quatro moved to England in 1971. In 2010 she was
 voted into the Michigan Rock and Roll Legends online Hall of Fame.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro


 On 11/5/2013 9:55 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:



 Re Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major
 rock star.:


  Yeah, I liked Can the Can. Quatro made it as a star in the UK (and
 *not* the USA) of course.


 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, punditster@... punditster@...wrote:

  Detroit - Motor City Bands

  Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major rock
 star.
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

  Suzi Quatro - Can The Can, 1973:
 http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio

  [image: Inline image 1]


  On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Share Long sharelong60@... wrote:


  noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...




   On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozguru@... wrote:

   Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene
 in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics
 and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't
 Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a
 revival album they did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago
 area scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often regional because the
 labels were regional without national distribution.

 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The
 Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs.
 Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.

 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and
 their own scenes.

 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft
 muzak rock those countries created.

 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.

 Couldn't have said it better. :-)

 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.

 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)

  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.

 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.

 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.

 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by 

Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard J. Williams
Some rock historians believe that Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock, 
recorded on April 12, 1954, was the first rock song, followed by That's 
All Right by Elvis Presley, which was was recorded on July 5, 1954. Go 
figure.


Bill Haley  His Comets - Rock Around The Clock Bandstand 1960
http://youtu.be/N-qjc17KEsc

Elvis Presley - That's All Right (Comeback Special '68):
http://youtu.be/zVaBVZaS7So

On 11/3/2013 3:40 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:


Re According to John Lennon, Cliff Richard's hit 'Move It',1958, was 
the first authentic rock and roll song. According to John, before 
Cliff and the Shadows, there had been nothing worth listening to in 
British music.:


Yes, that's right - nothing worth listening to in the rock'n'roll 
genre anyway. Move It is a neat song but it's crying out for someone 
with more charisma than Cliff Richard to sell it.



The Brand New Cadillac song I linked to is closer in feel to a 
genuine rock classic. I mentioned that Vince Taylor's decline into 
drug paranoia (speed and LSD) was the model for David Bowie's 
fictional rock star Ziggy Stardust. Bowie's album came out in 1972. 
Here's Vince Taylor singing Brand New Cadillac in 1979. He carries 
the song with a certaim amphetamine cool but you can see he's on the 
highway to hell.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvNHXbTL7Oc








Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics 
and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk 
Don't Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I 
played on a revival album they did).  There was also an east coast 
scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often 
regional because the labels were regional without national distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The 
Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs. 
Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:

 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)






Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Share Long
noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...





On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
 
  
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.

Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which
  includes The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once)
  and other spin offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the
  later 60s.

Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European
  country's and their own scenes.

Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the
  soft muzak rock those countries created.

On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:

  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:

 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock
  so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important
  pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a
  name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans
  didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that
  time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough
  original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)





RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread sharelong60
And how about California dreamin music scene: Mamas and Papas, Beach Boys, etc. 

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, noozguru@... wrote:

 Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene in the 
US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics and way back 
the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't Run).  Then the 
northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they 
did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans 
scene.  These were often regional because the labels were regional without 
national distribution.
 
 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The 
Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs. Those 
morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.
 
 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and 
their own scenes.
 
 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft muzak 
rock those countries created.
 
 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
 
   --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, 
s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.
 
 Couldn't have said it better. :-)
 
 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.
 
 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)
 
  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.
 
 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.
 
 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.
 
 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.
 
 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)
 
 
 
 
 



Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard Williams
That all changed on January 13, 1965 when Dylan recorded Subterranean
Homesick Blues, released on the album Bringing It All Back Home as the
lead-off track, Dylan's first single to chart in the top 40 in the U.S.A.

Positively 4th Street, a tribute to Bob Dylan Subterranean Home Sick:
http://youtu.be/jNzv49cPde8  http://youtu.be/jNzv49cPde8

[image: Inline image 1]





On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 12:37 PM, TurquoiseB turquoi...@yahoo.com wrote:



 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.

 Couldn't have said it better. :-)

 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.

 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)


  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.

 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.

 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.

 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.

 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)

  



Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Bhairitu
The well known hit formula back then was to be a white group and write a 
Motown style tune.


On 11/05/2013 11:24 AM, Share Long wrote:

noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...



On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu 
noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US. There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, 
Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune 
Walk Don't Run). Then the northwest do-wap groups like the 
Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they did).  There was also an 
east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene.  These 
were often regional because the labels were regional without national 
distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes 
The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin 
offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:


 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)










Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard J. Williams
Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels, Jenny Take a Ride! recorded in 
1965 and Devil with a Blue Dress On 1966.


Mitch Ryder  The Detroit Wheels 1966
http://youtu.be/j9eWGdJIW74

Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels:
John Badanjek - drums
Joe Kubert - rhythm guitar
Jim McCarty - lead guitar
Jim McAllister - bass

On 11/5/2013 1:24 PM, Share Long wrote:

noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...



On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu 
noozg...@sbcglobal.net wrote:
Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene 
in the US. There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, 
Sonics and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune 
Walk Don't Run). Then the northwest do-wap groups like the 
Fleetwoods (I played on a revival album they did).  There was also an 
east coast scene, a Chicago area scene and New Orleans scene.  These 
were often regional because the labels were regional without national 
distribution.


Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes 
The Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin 
offs. Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.


Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's 
and their own scenes.


Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft 
muzak rock those countries created.


On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:


 Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
 Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
 in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
 for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
 need second-rate copies of their own stars.

Couldn't have said it better. :-)

Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
exist.

BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
Thor. :-)

 The Beatles probably made it because they came along
 after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
 touches of their own to make it more appealing than
 the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
 norm.

Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
pop.

Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
to love them when you see them live.

Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
listening to and performing the real music, folk
music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
so many were so gaga over them.

It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)










Re: [FairfieldLife] Re: Before the British Invasion

2013-11-05 Thread Richard Williams
Detroit - Motor City Bands

Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major rock
star.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

Suzi Quatro - Can The Can, 1973:
http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio

[image: Inline image 1]


On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com wrote:



 noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...




   On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu noozg...@sbcglobal.net
 wrote:

   Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene
 in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics
 and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune Walk Don't
 Run).  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a
 revival album they did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago
 area scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often regional because the
 labels were regional without national distribution.

 Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The
 Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs.
 Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.

 Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and
 their own scenes.

 Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft
 muzak rock those countries created.

 On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


 --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:
 
  Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
  Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
  in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
  for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
  need second-rate copies of their own stars.

 Couldn't have said it better. :-)

 Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
 to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
 There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
 exist.

 BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
 reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
 sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
 fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
 Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
 Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
 Thor. :-)

  The Beatles probably made it because they came along
  after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
  touches of their own to make it more appealing than
  the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
  norm.

 Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
 doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
 had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
 there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
 pop.

 Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
 hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
 tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
 talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
 stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
 your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
 impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
 to love them when you see them live.

 Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
 By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
 listening to and performing the real music, folk
 music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
 had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
 the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
 I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
 I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
 so many were so gaga over them.

 It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)