Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-11 Thread Ann Woelfle Bater
This is totally the wrong video. That one sucks. This is the one I wanted to 
link to:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVI4fyXo9cYamp;list=TLEr2mTnD_hFczwf7HOR6ut8p0FNSGtcaM




On Friday, October 11, 2013 7:12:41 AM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  


I ran a tea house wrote:

Thanks Ann for your answer. My fist thought was, that I was a bit too snarky, 
sarcastic, so whatever I wrote - don't take it personal - but I think you 
already got that. Of course I have nothing against horses, they are beautiful 
animals, and even though I don't really ride horses, I still meet them when I 
run out, as they are here in the fields, and many people in the area where I 
live ride horses, there are horse races in the next village, where people come 
from the whole county. So, again sorry for the sometimes overly snarky tone. 

No problem, I like dialoguing here on this forum. What we have been talking 
about interests me. 

Regarding you, I take it that meditation is not really for you, I don't want 
you to be anybody else than you are. I don't want to persuade you to either do 
2 x 20, or take up the dome program, or anything else.

You are correct, up to this point in my life I simply find activity far more 
desirable in my life then sitting with eyes closed. I began meditating at the 
age of 14 and did so without fail until I was 30 or so. I rounded, I did the 
siddhis. The best meditations I ever had were when I was being checked. The 
combination of the teacher being present with quiet instructions to open and 
close the eyes was very soothing and the resulting meditations deep and 
nurturing. However, virtually every meditation in the afternoons resulted in 
sleep.

But there are people who are inclined to having long meditations, who are 
lovers of meditation, you may find them on Purusha, or also in many other 
spiritual groups, or they are simply on their own. To think that they do this, 
because they have nothing else to do is rubbish. To think that they just sit 
around and let time pass is equally rubbish. 

I actually never really meant that completely seriously. But how this 
conversation started was when Share claimed those who meditated for 7.5 hours 
per day were spiritual warriors. She never replied concerning why she feels 
this but I certainly don't agree. People meditate for themselves, for their own 
ends (no problem) and one is hardly a warrior doing that nor is it 
particularly gruelling in any way to sit on your ass for hours on end unless 
you are me who would find it tortuous.

It makes me feel you don't know meditation very well, it's okay you have an 
active life and enjoy it.

Meditation is something I did for 16 years every day, twice a day. I know it 
well enough. I still occasionally practice TM.

I also think that those who pursue a Purusha type lifestyle should do so, 
because it is an urge from within, because there is a real calling, not because 
they want to 'achieve' something, or they have to force themselves.

No argument here. But my point was that these people have nothing else pressing 
in their lives so they can have that 'luxury' of basically living their lives 
with eyes closed repeating some mantra (or not). Going on purusha, spending all 
that time would not be possible if they were Olympic hopefuls, great scientists 
or had three children to feed. 

Also, I am very active myself, I have to do many things, so I cannot afford to 
meditate 7 1/2 hours,

Exactly part of my point.

 and since much of the effect of meditation has spread into activity, I also 
don't need so much meditation anymore. But I still like it, and meditate every 
day - and I never regret doing a single meditation. Meditation has always been 
my best friend. (and that's not because I have no other friends ;-))

Good one.

One thing more I like to mention: With meditation there comes a deep sense of 
detachment. That's obviously diametrically opposed to the sense of passion and 
interest, you may get with other things. That means you can't love the world 
anymore, but your love and sense of passion will be different.

And to Judy: she doesn't know me at all, the life that I am leading, she just 
tries to take an easy shot at me.


I don't think Judy takes easy shots. She considers carefully. She is not a 
careless person. Whether she is correct in her assessment about you or not only 
you can really know, if you are open enough to really evaluate what she has to 
say about you. If she is wrong she is wrong but I don't think she says what she 
says here without good reason - from her perspective.

I have included a link that is hopefully clickable (based on your instructions 
the other day). It is kind of a cool video about equestrians. It doesn't say 
it all nor does it say it perfectly but it does touch on a bit of what I was 
talking about in my other post to you. It is only a couple of minutes long.Take 
a look:
 



Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread Share Long
Ann, what would happen if the entire human population did the same activity all 
day long?! 





On Wednesday, October 9, 2013 10:58 PM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, no_re...@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Hey Share, if a person is established in silence all the time, they no longer 
need to round seven and a half hours a day. It continues 24/7. So, there is not 
really a correlation between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's 
ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of noise.


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Ann, there were 2 posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a 
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from Seraphita:We understand 
what you're saying but it is a common belief in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together practising 
silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even 
though to practical, common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. 
Indeed, even the very recollection that there are men and women 
who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people induces a 
feeling of calm!

So in what way do you see those that round 7.5 hours a day as spiritual 
warriors. What is a spiritual warrior? In what way are those who sit with 
their eyes closed for so many hours per day living full lives? Is the person 
who jumps head first into life and activity any less warrior-like than those 
who sit in a room and meditate? Is the person who sits alone and inert living a 
full life as a human with a physical body? What would happen if the entire 
population sat for 7.5 hours per day with their eyes closed doing nothing?





On Wednesday, October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@... awoelflebater@... 
wrote:
 
  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.

My point, though, was not so much about spouses but more about the fact that 
people who meditate for 7.5 hours a day are not, in my opinion, spiritual 
warriors and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more desirable or 
pressing in their lives to apply themselves to. I would have to question their 
interestingness as human beings let alone their productiveness and ability to 
take advantage of all of the richness this waking life has to offer.
 

On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@... wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
















 









Share wrote:



 Ann, I think many spouses who work

 outside the home are separated from each other from
most of

 the day.



When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an

important insight. 




RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread Share Long
Doc, I think it's a win win. Either the person is calm and radiates that; or 
they're releasing stress and thus becoming more calm. BTW, I had to reply from 
Basic because the list in Full Featured did not have your post!

On Wed, 10/9/13, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com doctordumb...@rocketmail.com 
wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative 
to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Hey Share,
 if a person is established in silence all the time, they no
 longer need to round seven and a half hours a day. It
 continues 24/7. So, there is not really a correlation
 between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's
 ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of
 noise. 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Ann, there were 2
 posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a
 response to the other, I refer you to this comment from
 Seraphita: We
  understand what you're saying but it is a common belief
 in all 
 contemplative traditions that communities joined together
 practising 
 silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect
 on the world
  even though to practical, common-sense types they seem to
 be a waste of
  space. Indeed, even the very recollection that there are
 men and women 
 who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people
 induces a 
 feeling of calm!
 
  
  
  On Wednesday,
 October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@...
  awoelflebater@... wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
     
 
 ---In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Now
 this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO.
 Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were
 thus separated from their spouses. I responded reasonably
 noting that spouses who work away from home are also
 separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
 My point, though, was not so much about spouses but
 more about the fact that people who meditate for 7.5 hours a
 day are not, in my opinion, spiritual warriors
 and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more
 desirable or pressing in their lives to
  apply themselves to. I would have to question their
 interestingness as human beings let alone their
 productiveness and ability to take advantage of all of the
 richness this waking life has to offer.
 
 
 
  
 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
 wrote:
 
 
 
  Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
 alternative to TM?
 
  To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
  Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   
 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 
  
 
  
 
  
 

 

 
Share wrote:
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
   Ann, I think many spouses who work
 
  
 
   outside the home are separated from each other from
 
  most of
 
  
 
   the day.
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
 
  
 
  important insight.
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Re: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread Share Long
Ann, it's just fun to wonder about the effect of all humans engaging in the 
same activity for 7.5 hours per day. I mean other than breathing in which we 
all engage 24 hours per day. What would happen to our little spaceship Earth if 
we all for example, laughed for 7.5 hours per day? Or sang? Or danced? Or rode 
horses? My bottom line is that it's a huge universe and there's plenty of room 
IMO for people who want to meditate for 7.5 hours per day and also for people 
who want to engage in other activities.


On Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:23 AM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com wrote:
 Doc, I think it's a win win. Either the person is calm and radiates that; or 
they're releasing stress and thus becoming more calm. BTW, I had to reply from 
Basic because the list in Full Featured did not have your post!

On Wed, 10/9/13, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com doctordumb...@rocketmail.com 
wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative 
to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:08 PM
















 



  


    
      
      
       Hey Share,
if a person is established in silence all the time, they no
longer need to round seven and a half hours a day. It
continues 24/7. So, there is not really a correlation
between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's
ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of
noise. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Ann, there were 2
posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from
Seraphita: We
  understand what you're saying but it is a common belief
in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together
practising 
silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect
on the world
  even though to practical, common-sense types they seem to
be a waste of
  space. Indeed, even the very recollection that there are
men and women 
who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people
induces a 
feeling of calm!

  
  
      On Wednesday,
October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@...
  awoelflebater@... wrote:
    
 



  


    
      
      
         

---In
FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Now
this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO.
Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were
thus separated from their spouses. I responded reasonably
noting that spouses who work away from home are also
separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
My point, though, was not so much about spouses but
more about the fact that people who meditate for 7.5 hours a
day are not, in my opinion, spiritual warriors
and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more
desirable or pressing in their lives to
  apply themselves to. I would have to question their
interestingness as human beings let alone their
productiveness and ability to take advantage of all of the
richness this waking life has to offer.



  
On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
wrote:



  Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
alternative to TM?

  To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

  Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

   

  

  

  

    

  

  

      

        

        

        Share wrote:

  

  

  

   Ann, I think many spouses who work

  

   outside the home are separated from each other from

  most of

  

   the day.

  

  

  

  When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an

  

  important insight.


    
      

    
    




      

    
      

    
     

RE: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread doctordumbass
Hi Share - who said anything about a win-win? I was making the point that one 
can be doing far more [for the world] than someone engaged in the TMSP for 7 
and 1/2 hrs. per day, although no explicit signs are there. That is all. If 
people want to sit around in the dome, that is fine. Recognize though, that it 
is not the ne plus ultra it is made out to be. 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Doc, I think it's a win win. Either the person is calm and radiates that; or 
they're releasing stress and thus becoming more calm. BTW, I had to reply from 
Basic because the list in Full Featured did not have your post!
 
 On Wed, 10/9/13, doctordumbass@... mailto:doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... 
mailto:doctordumbass@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative 
to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:08 PM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Hey Share,
 if a person is established in silence all the time, they no
 longer need to round seven and a half hours a day. It
 continues 24/7. So, there is not really a correlation
 between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's
 ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of
 noise. 
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Ann, there were 2
 posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a
 response to the other, I refer you to this comment from
 Seraphita: We
 understand what you're saying but it is a common belief
 in all 
 contemplative traditions that communities joined together
 practising 
 silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect
 on the world
 even though to practical, common-sense types they seem to
 be a waste of
 space. Indeed, even the very recollection that there are
 men and women 
 who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people
 induces a 
 feeling of calm!
 
 
 
 On Wednesday,
 October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@...
 awoelflebater@... wrote:
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 ---In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com mailto:fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Now
 this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO.
 Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were
 thus separated from their spouses. I responded reasonably
 noting that spouses who work away from home are also
 separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
 My point, though, was not so much about spouses but
 more about the fact that people who meditate for 7.5 hours a
 day are not, in my opinion, spiritual warriors
 and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more
 desirable or pressing in their lives to
 apply themselves to. I would have to question their
 interestingness as human beings let alone their
 productiveness and ability to take advantage of all of the
 richness this waking life has to offer.
 
 
 
 
 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
 wrote:
 
 
 
 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
 alternative to TM?
 
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Share wrote:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Ann, I think many spouses who work
 
 
 
  outside the home are separated from each other from
 
 most of
 
 
 
  the day.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
 
 
 
 important insight. 



Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread Share Long
Doc, I said something about win win! Anyway, I think people do best for the 
world when they're doing their dharma whatever that might be (-: 




On Thursday, October 10, 2013 10:21 AM, doctordumb...@rocketmail.com 
doctordumb...@rocketmail.com wrote:
 
  
Hi Share - who said anything about a win-win? I was making the point that one 
can be doing far more [for the world] than someone engaged in the TMSP for 7 
and 1/2 hrs. per day, although no explicit signs are there. That is all. If 
people want to sit around in the dome, that is fine. Recognize though, that it 
is not the ne plus ultra it is made out to be. 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Doc, I think it's a win win. Either the person is calm and radiates that; or 
they're releasing stress and thus becoming more calm. BTW, I had to reply from 
Basic because the list in Full Featured did not have your post!


On Wed, 10/9/13, doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative 
to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:08 PM
















 









Hey Share,
if a person is established in silence all the time, they no
longer need to round seven and a half hours a day. It
continues 24/7. So, there is not really a correlation
between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's
ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of
noise. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Ann, there were 2
posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from
Seraphita: We
understand what you're saying but it is a common belief
in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together
practising 
silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect
on the world
even though to practical, common-sense types they seem to
be a waste of
space. Indeed, even the very recollection that there are
men and women 
who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people
induces a 
feeling of calm!



On Wednesday,
October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@...
awoelflebater@... wrote:

 









  

---In
FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Now
this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO.
Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were
thus separated from their spouses. I responded reasonably
noting that spouses who work away from home are also
separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
My point, though, was not so much about spouses but
more about the fact that people who meditate for 7.5 hours a
day are not, in my opinion, spiritual warriors
and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more
desirable or pressing in their lives to
apply themselves to. I would have to question their
interestingness as human beings let alone their
productiveness and ability to take advantage of all of the
richness this waking life has to offer.




On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
wrote:



Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
alternative to TM?

To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM

































 



















Share wrote:







 Ann, I think many spouses who work



 outside the home are separated from each other from

most of



 the day.







When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an



important insight. 


Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread Share Long
Ann, I don't remember when I first heard the word dharma, but safe to say over 
35 years ago. I would say that a person in their dharma has an ease and flow 
about them, active without being frantic, calm without being dull. I'd say 
further that the ultimate dharma is to realize and live, on the physical, 
mental and emotional levels that one is in harmony with everyone and everything 
else.




On Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:08 AM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Doc, I said something about win win! Anyway, I think people do best for the 
world when they're doing their dharma whatever that might be (-: 

Is this actually saying anything? What is your dharma? How can we tell what our 
dharma is or that dharma actually exists? Do you always speak in such 
generalities? Is this your dharma? Can you tell when someone is living their 
dharma? Is there a chance there is no such thing as dharma and would your life 
be less rich if this was some made up idea? What percentage of the things you 
say have you actually analyzed and thought deeply about? 



On Thursday, October 10, 2013 10:21 AM, doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... 
wrote:
 
  
Hi Share - who said anything about a win-win? I was making the point that one 
can be doing far more [for the world] than someone engaged in the TMSP for 7 
and 1/2 hrs. per day, although no explicit signs are there. That is all. If 
people want to sit around in the dome, that is fine. Recognize though, that it 
is not the ne plus ultra it is made out to be. 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Doc, I think it's a win win. Either the person is calm and radiates that; or 
they're releasing stress and thus becoming more calm. BTW, I had to reply from 
Basic because the list in Full Featured did not have your post!

Isn't life simple? Just meditate and no matter what happens or how someone is 
acting they are evolving to a better, calmer place. 


On Wed, 10/9/13, doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an 
alternative to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:08 PM
















 









Hey Share,
if a person is established in silence all the time, they no
longer need to round seven and a half hours a day. It
continues 24/7. So, there is not really a correlation
between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's
ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of
noise. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Ann, there were 2
posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from
Seraphita: We
understand what you're saying but it is a common belief
in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together
practising 
silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect
on the world
even though to practical, common-sense types they seem to
be a waste of
space. Indeed, even the very recollection that there are
men and women 
who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people
induces a 
feeling of calm!



On Wednesday,
October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@...
awoelflebater@... wrote:

 









  

---In
FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Now
this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO.
Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were
thus separated from their spouses. I responded reasonably
noting that spouses who work away from home are also
separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
My point, though, was not so much about spouses but
more about the fact that people who meditate for 7.5 hours a
day are not, in my opinion, spiritual warriors
and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more
desirable or pressing in their lives to
apply themselves to. I would have to question their
interestingness as human beings let alone their
productiveness and ability to take advantage of all of the
richness this waking life has to offer.




On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
wrote:



Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
alternative to TM?

To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM

































 



















Share wrote:







 Ann, I think many spouses who work



 outside the home are separated from each other from

most of



 the day.







When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an



important insight. 




Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-10 Thread Ann Woelfle Bater





On Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:17:23 AM, Share Long sharelon...@yahoo.com 
wrote:
 
  
Ann, I don't remember when I first heard the word dharma, but safe to say over 
35 years ago. I would say that a person in their dharma has an ease and flow 
about them, active without being frantic, calm without being dull. I'd say 
further that the ultimate dharma is to realize and live, on the physical, 
mental and emotional levels that one is in harmony with everyone and everything 
else.




On Thursday, October 10, 2013 11:08 AM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Doc, I said something about win win! Anyway, I think people do best for the 
world when they're doing their dharma whatever that might be (-: 

Is this actually saying anything? What is your dharma? How can we tell what our 
dharma is or that dharma actually exists? Do you always speak in such 
generalities? Is this your dharma? Can you tell when someone is living their 
dharma? Is there a chance there is no such thing as dharma and would your life 
be less rich if this was some made up idea? What percentage of the things you 
say have you actually analyzed and thought deeply about? 



On Thursday, October 10, 2013 10:21 AM, doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... 
wrote:
 
  
Hi Share - who said anything about a win-win? I was making the point that one 
can be doing far more [for the world] than someone engaged in the TMSP for 7 
and 1/2 hrs. per day, although no explicit signs are there. That is all. If 
people want to sit around in the dome, that is fine. Recognize though, that it 
is not the ne plus ultra it is made out to be. 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Doc, I think it's a win win. Either the person is calm and radiates that; or 
they're releasing stress and thus becoming more calm. BTW, I had to reply from 
Basic because the list in Full Featured did not have your post!

Isn't life simple? Just meditate and no matter what happens or how someone is 
acting they are evolving to a better, calmer place. 


On Wed, 10/9/13, doctordumbass@... doctordumbass@... wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an 
alternative to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:08 PM
















 









Hey Share,
if a person is established in silence all the time, they no
longer need to round seven and a half hours a day. It
continues 24/7. So, there is not really a correlation
between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's
ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of
noise. 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Ann, there were 2
posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from
Seraphita: We
understand what you're saying but it is a common belief
in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together
practising 
silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect
on the world
even though to practical, common-sense types they seem to
be a waste of
space. Indeed, even the very recollection that there are
men and women 
who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people
induces a 
feeling of calm!



On Wednesday,
October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@...
awoelflebater@... wrote:

 









  

---In
FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Now
this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO.
Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were
thus separated from their spouses. I responded reasonably
noting that spouses who work away from home are also
separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
My point, though, was not so much about spouses but
more about the fact that people who meditate for 7.5 hours a
day are not, in my opinion, spiritual warriors
and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more
desirable or pressing in their lives to
apply themselves to. I would have to question their
interestingness as human beings let alone their
productiveness and ability to take advantage of all of the
richness this waking life has to offer.




On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
wrote:



Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
alternative to TM?

To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM

































 



















Share wrote:







 Ann, I think many spouses who work



 outside the home are separated from each other from

most of



 the day.







When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an



important insight. 






RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread Share Long
Ann, I think many spouses who work outside the home are separated from each 
other from most of the day.
PS This is a test. Yahoo changed the format of my email inbox yesterday. Is 
this Neo too?!

On Tue, 10/8/13, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 11:29 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
     
 
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 3 people in this situation that I
 know best are all married.
 Well, that's one good way
 to be able to ignore your spouse. Honey, I'll be
 in the Absolute for the next 7.5 hours if you need me, where
 I can neither see or hear you and I sure as hell don't
 have to talk to you or do any household chores so have fun
 with that and see in when it's time to go to
 sleep.
 
 From:
 s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
  To:
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent:
 Tuesday, October 8, 2013 11:09 AM
  Subject: RE:
 Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to
 TM?

 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Re But I am in awe of people who are
 doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. And have been doing so
 for 7 years!:7 1/2 hours per day! They've
 moved on from being householders and are well on their way
 to being recluses by the sound of it! 
 
 ---In
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com,
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:
 
 Uh oh, now I'm in trouble!
 Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a small rural town.
 So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10
 minutes and only if I've had insomnia the night before,
 so not every day. My asanas don't take very long, nor
 does my pranayama. I prefer activity to sitting so my whole
 TMSP is about the minimum. But I am in awe of people who are
 doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. And have been doing so
 for 7 years!
 Spiritual warriors IMHO!
 
 

 From:
 s3raphita@...
  s3raphita@...
  To:
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Tuesday, October
 8, 2013 10:37 AM
  Subject:
 [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Re I like power naps. But
 before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see
 research that indicates that the nap was contributing to
 whole brain enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling
 refreshed.:Yes indeed. How do you find time to fit in two
 meditation sessions a day AND power naps? (And are you also
  yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing ever
 day?)  
 
 ---In
 fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@...
 wrote:
 
 Seraphita, I like power naps. But
 before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see
 research that indicates that the nap was contributing to
 whole brain enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling
 refreshed, though that is a
  good thing too. And I mean whole brain enlivening and
 coherence as indicated by an fMRI or EEG not
  just subjective report. 
 
 

 From:
 s3raphita@...
  s3raphita@...
  To:
 FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Tuesday, October
 8, 2013 9:42 AM
  Subject:
 [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an alternative to TM?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   A power
 nap is a short sleep which terminates before the
 occurrence of deep sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to
 quickly revitalize the subject. Various
 durations are recommended for power naps, which are very
 short compared to regular sleep. The short duration of a
 power nap is designed to prevent nappers from sleeping so
 long that they enter a normal sleep cycle without being able
 to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I and
 II but failing
 to complete a full sleep cycle, can result in
  a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, where one
  feels groggy, disoriented,
  and even more sleepy than before beginning the nap. Brief
 naps (10–15 minutes) can improve alertness directly after
 awakening.Scientific
 experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average
 power nap duration of around 30 minutes is most
 effective. Any more time, and the body enters
 into its usual sleep cycle. People who regularly take power
 naps may develop a good idea of what duration works best for
 them, as well as what tools, environment, position, and
 associated factors help induce the best results. Mitsuo
 Hayashi and Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap
 improves mental performance even after a full night's
  sleep.Power naps of less
 than 30 minutes—even those as brief as 6 and 10
 minutes—restore wakefulness and promote performance and
 learning. (Copied from Wiki)
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
   
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread judy stein
Share wrote:

 Ann, I think many spouses who work
 outside the home are separated from each other from most of
 the day.

When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
important insight.



RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread Share Long
Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.

On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   Share wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I think many spouses who work
 
  outside the home are separated from each other from
 most of
 
  the day.
 
 
 
 When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
 
 important insight.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread authfriend
It was the I think that cracked me up, as if you might not be quite sure 
about such a trivial and obvious fact. False humility on your part, in other 
words. You do it a lot; it's a function of the general inauthenticity of your 
FFL persona. 
Share wrote:
Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.

 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM

Share wrote:

  Ann, I think many spouses who work
  outside the home are separated from each other from
  most of the day.

 When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
 important insight.
  




RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread iranitea
Share, thanks for the answer. It also proves that you can read thoughts, 
because I was just about to ask Ann if this was an example of snarkiness. 
 

 Btw., for all Neo-fans, I think I discovered another feature, I haven't seen 
any of you talking about yet. But if I click on those three little dots, which 
are hiding the comments, in my composer window, I will do that now, wait,
 

 and then click on send, it will stay open in the post. Is that so?

 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
 
 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Share wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I think many spouses who work
 
  outside the home are separated from each other from
 most of
 
  the day.
 
 
 
 When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
 
 important insight. 



RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread Share Long
Judy, unlike you who simply asserts your opinions as facts, I say I think to 
designate that in this day and age of many working at home, my statement is 
qualified in that I don't know all the statistics involved.

On Wed, 10/9/13, authfri...@yahoo.com authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Subject: RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to 
TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 9:34 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
   
   It was the I
 think that cracked me up, as if you might not be quite
 sure about such a trivial and obvious fact. False
 humility on your part, in other words. You do it a lot;
 it's a function of the general inauthenticity of your
 FFL persona.
 
 Share wrote:
 Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of
 snarky IMO. Ann had criticized that people rounding for 7
 1/2 hours were thus separated from their spouses. I
 responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from
 home are also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
 
 
 
 
 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@...
 wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an
 alternative to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
 
 Share wrote:
 
   Ann, I think many spouses who work
   outside the home are separated from each other
 from
   most of the day.
 
  When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is
 an
  important insight.
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
 

 My point, though, was not so much about spouses but more about the fact that 
people who meditate for 7.5 hours a day are not, in my opinion, spiritual 
warriors and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more desirable or 
pressing in their lives to apply themselves to. I would have to question their 
interestingness as human beings let alone their productiveness and ability to 
take advantage of all of the richness this waking life has to offer.
 
 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote:
 
 Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Share wrote:
 
 
 
  Ann, I think many spouses who work
 
  outside the home are separated from each other from
 most of
 
  the day.
 
 
 
 When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an
 
 important insight. 



Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread Share Long
Ann, there were 2 posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a 
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from Seraphita:We understand 
what you're saying but it is a common belief in all 
contemplative traditions that communities joined together practising 
silent prayer (eg, monks and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even 
though to practical, common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. 
Indeed, even the very recollection that there are men and women 
who forsake the feverish ambitions of the mass of people induces a 
feeling of calm!





On Wednesday, October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelfleba...@yahoo.com 
awoelfleba...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
 


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.

My point, though, was not so much about spouses but more about the fact that 
people who meditate for 7.5 hours a day are not, in my opinion, spiritual 
warriors and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more desirable or 
pressing in their lives to apply themselves to. I would have to question their 
interestingness as human beings let alone their productiveness and ability to 
take advantage of all of the richness this waking life has to offer.
 

On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein authfriend@... wrote:

Subject: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM
















 









Share wrote:



 Ann, I think many spouses who work

 outside the home are separated from each other from
most of

 the day.



When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an

important insight. 


RE: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread judy stein
Share wrote:
 
 Judy, unlike you who simply asserts
 your opinions as facts, I say I think to designate that in
 this day and age of many working at home, my statement is
 qualified in that I don't know all the statistics involved.

Nope, sorry, you specified spouses who work *outside the home*:
I think many spouses who work outside the home are separated
from each other from [sic] most of the day. That isn't even an
opinion; it's a truism, verging on a tautology.

And your I think qualification didn't have a thing to do with
not knowing the statistics. Many was sufficiently vague to cover
any uncertainty about numbers.

  It was the I
  think that cracked me up, as if you might not be quite
  sure about such a trivial and obvious fact. False
  humility on your part, in other words. You do it a lot;
  it's a function of the general inauthenticity of your
  FFL persona.

As is your attempt here to dishonestly extricate yourself from
what I pointed out.



Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread Share Long
Judy, outside the home does not almost create a tautology because, as in my 
family, spouses work outside the home, but in the same place thus are not 
separated in the way that was being discussed. As for attempting to accurately 
read my mind regarding my use of I think, you failed IMO. As for my alleged 
attempt regarding my alleged dishonesty, keep projecting and Happy Mental 
Health Day tomorrow!




On Wednesday, October 9, 2013 11:03 AM, judy stein authfri...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
  
Share wrote:

 Judy, unlike you who simply asserts
 your opinions as facts, I say I think to designate that in
 this day and age of many working at home, my statement is
 qualified in that I don't know all the statistics involved.

Nope, sorry, you specified spouses who work *outside the home*:
I think many spouses who work outside the home are separated
from each other from [sic] most of the day. That isn't even an
opinion; it's a truism, verging on a tautology.

And your I think qualification didn't have a thing to do with
not knowing the statistics. Many was sufficiently vague to cover
any uncertainty about numbers.

  It was the I
  think that cracked me up, as if you might not be quite
  sure about such a trivial and obvious fact. False
  humility on your part, in other words. You do it a lot;
  it's a function of the general inauthenticity of your
  FFL persona.

As is your attempt here to dishonestly extricate yourself from
what I pointed out.




RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread authfriend
Oh, please, Share, your desperation is palpable. You just keep digging yourself 
in deeper. Most spouses who both work outside the home do not work in the same 
place. There are some who do, but, you know, that's why I said it was *verging 
on* a tautology, to leave room for those few.
  
 And in any case, that isn't why you said I think...
  
 See, there was nothing wrong with the point you made (although it didn't 
address what Ann was saying). You could have just made it straightforwardly, 
without the I think, and nobody would have said Boo. You'd have had no reason 
to defend it the way you're tying yourself into knots trying to do now.
  
  
 Share wrote:
  Judy, outside the home does not almost create a tautology because, as in my 
  family, 
  spouses work outside the home, but in the same place thus are not separated 
  in the way
  that was being discussed. As for attempting to accurately read my mind 
  regarding my use 
  of I think, you failed IMO.
  
 Your motives are deeply hidden from your conscious mind, Share. But they're 
pretty clear to most of the rest of us.
  
  As for my alleged attempt regarding my alleged dishonesty, keep projecting
  
 Nope, no projecting. I'm not dishonest, so no need. Your problem is that when 
other people recognize your motivations, you resort to dishonesty because 
they're hidden from you, so you have to make stuff up to explain them away.
  
  
  
  and Happy Mental Health Day tomorrow!

 

   Share wrote:  Judy, unlike you who simply asserts  your opinions as facts, 
I say I think to designate that in  this day and age of many working at home, 
my statement is  qualified in that I don't know all the statistics involved. 
Nope, sorry, you specified spouses who work *outside the home*: I think many 
spouses who work outside the home are separated from each other from [sic] most 
of the day. That isn't even an opinion; it's a truism, verging on a tautology. 
And your I think qualification didn't have a thing to do with not knowing the 
statistics. Many was sufficiently vague to cover any uncertainty about 
numbers.   It was the I   think that cracked me up, as if you might not 
be quite   sure about such a trivial and obvious fact. False   humility on 
your part, in other words. You do it a lot;   it's a function of the general 
inauthenticity of your   FFL persona. As is your attempt here to dishonestly 
extricate yourself from what I pointed out. 

 


 











RE: Re: RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-09 Thread doctordumbass
Hey Share, if a person is established in silence all the time, they no longer 
need to round seven and a half hours a day. It continues 24/7. So, there is not 
really a correlation between time explicitly spent meditating, and a person's 
ability to be a source of calm, vs a generator of noise.
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Ann, there were 2 posts and in one you focused on rounding spouses. As a 
response to the other, I refer you to this comment from Seraphita: We 
understand what you're saying but it is a common belief in all contemplative 
traditions that communities joined together practising silent prayer (eg, monks 
and nuns) have a beneficial effect on the world even though to practical, 
common-sense types they seem to be a waste of space. Indeed, even the very 
recollection that there are men and women who forsake the feverish ambitions of 
the mass of people induces a feeling of calm!
 

 

 
 
 On Wednesday, October 9, 2013 10:28 AM, awoelflebater@... 
awoelflebater@... wrote:
 

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote: 
Now this comment from Judy is a perfect example of snarky IMO. Ann had 
criticized that people rounding for 7 1/2 hours were thus separated from their 
spouses. I responded reasonably noting that spouses who work away from home are 
also separated for 7 1/2 hours or so.
 
 My point, though, was not so much about spouses but more about the fact that 
people who meditate for 7.5 hours a day are not, in my opinion, spiritual 
warriors and that they obviously have absolutely nothing more desirable or 
pressing in their lives to apply themselves to. I would have to question their 
interestingness as human beings let alone their productiveness and ability to 
take advantage of all of the richness this waking life has to offer. 
 On Wed, 10/9/13, judy stein 
authfriend@... mailto:authfriend@... wrote: Subject: RE: Re: Re: 
[FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM? To: 
FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com mailto:FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com Date: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 8:37 AM   Share wrote:  Ann, I think many spouses 
who work  outside the home are separated from each other from most of  the 
day. When you find out for sure, let us know, OK? This is an important insight. 

 
 

 
 



 
 
 
 





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread Share Long
Uh oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a small rural 
town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10 minutes and only 
if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every day. My asanas don't take 
very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer activity to sitting so my whole TMSP 
is about the minimum. But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 
hours per day. And have been doing so for 7 years!
Spiritual warriors IMHO!





 From: s3raph...@yahoo.com s3raph...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 


  
Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see 
research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain enlivening 
and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
Yes indeed. 
How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power naps? 
(And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing ever day?) 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Seraphita, I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want 
to see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain 
enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed, though that is a good 
thing too. And I mean whole brain enlivening and coherence as indicated by an 
fMRI or EEG not just subjective report. 





 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 


  
A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the occurrence of deep 
sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly revitalize the subject. 
Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short compared 
to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed to prevent 
nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep cycle without 
being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I and II but failing to 
complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, 
where one feels groggy, disoriented, and even more sleepy than before beginning 
the nap. Brief naps (10–15 minutes) can improve alertness directly after 
awakening.
Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average power nap 
duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more time, and the body 
enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who regularly take power naps may 
develop a good idea of what duration works best for them, as well as what 
tools, environment, position, and associated factors help induce the best 
results. Mitsuo Hayashi and Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves 
mental performance even after a full night's sleep.
Power naps of less than 30 minutes—even those as brief as 6 and 10 
minutes—restore wakefulness and promote performance and learning. 
(Copied from Wiki)




RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread s3raphita
Re But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. And 
have been doing so for 7 years!:
 7 1/2 hours per day! They've moved on from being householders and are well on 
their way to being recluses by the sound of it!
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Uh oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a small rural 
town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10 minutes and only 
if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every day. My asanas don't take 
very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer activity to sitting so my whole TMSP 
is about the minimum. But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 
hours per day. And have been doing so for 7 years!
Spiritual warriors IMHO!
 

 

 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 
 
   Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to 
see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain 
enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
 Yes indeed. 
 How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power naps? 
(And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing ever day?) 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote: Seraphita, I 
like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see 
research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain enlivening 
and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed, though that is a good thing too. 
And I mean whole brain enlivening and coherence as indicated by an fMRI or EEG 
not just subjective report. 
 
 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@... To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com Sent: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an 
alternative to TM? 
   A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the occurrence of deep 
sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly revitalize the subject. 
 Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short 
compared to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed to 
prevent nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep cycle 
without being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I and II but 
failing to complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a phenomenon known as 
sleep inertia, where one feels groggy, disoriented, and even more sleepy than 
before beginning the nap. Brief naps (10–15 minutes) can improve alertness 
directly after awakening.
 Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average power 
nap duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more time, and the 
body enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who regularly take power naps 
may develop a good idea of what duration works best for them, as well as what 
tools, environment, position, and associated factors help induce the best 
results. Mitsuo Hayashi and Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves 
mental performance even after a full night's sleep.
 Power naps of less than 30 minutes—even those as brief as 6 and 10 
minutes—restore wakefulness and promote performance and learning. 
 (Copied from Wiki)
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 






 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 





Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread Share Long
3 people in this situation that I know best are all married.





 From: s3raph...@yahoo.com s3raph...@yahoo.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 11:09 AM
Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 


  
Re But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. And 
have been doing so for 7 years!:
7 1/2 hours per day! They've moved on from being householders and are well on 
their way to being recluses by the sound of it!


---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:


Uh oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a small rural 
town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10 minutes and only 
if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every day. My asanas don't take 
very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer activity to sitting so my whole TMSP 
is about the minimum. But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 
hours per day. And have been doing so for 7 years!
Spiritual warriors IMHO!





 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 


  
Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see 
research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain enlivening 
and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
Yes indeed. 
How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power naps? 
(And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing ever day?) 


---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote:


Seraphita, I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want 
to see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain 
enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed, though that is a good 
thing too. And I mean whole brain enlivening and coherence as indicated by an 
fMRI or EEG not just subjective report. 





 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 


  
A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the occurrence of deep 
sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly revitalize the subject. 
Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short compared 
to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed to prevent 
nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep cycle without 
being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I and II but failing to 
complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, 
where one feels groggy, disoriented, and even more sleepy than before beginning 
the nap. Brief naps (10–15 minutes) can improve alertness directly after 
awakening.
Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average power nap 
duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more time, and the body 
enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who regularly take power naps may 
develop a good idea of what duration works best for them, as well as what 
tools, environment, position, and associated factors help induce the best 
results. Mitsuo Hayashi and Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves 
mental performance even after a full night's sleep.
Power naps of less than 30 minutes—even those as brief as 6 and 10 
minutes—restore wakefulness and promote performance and learning. 
(Copied from Wiki)






RE: Re: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 3 people in this situation that I know best are all married.
 

 Well, that's one good way to be able to ignore your spouse. Honey, I'll be in 
the Absolute for the next 7.5 hours if you need me, where I can neither see or 
hear you and I sure as hell don't have to talk to you or do any household 
chores so have fun with that and see in when it's time to go to sleep.
 
 

 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 11:09 AM
 Subject: RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 
 
   Re But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. 
And have been doing so for 7 years!:
 7 1/2 hours per day! They've moved on from being householders and are well on 
their way to being recluses by the sound of it!
 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote: Uh 
oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a small rural 
town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10 minutes and only 
if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every day. My asanas don't take 
very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer activity to sitting so my whole TMSP 
is about the minimum. But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 
hours per day. And have been doing so for 7 years! Spiritual warriors IMHO! 
 
 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@... To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com Sent: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: 
an alternative to TM? 
   Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to 
see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain 
enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
 Yes indeed. 
 How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power naps? 
(And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing ever day?) 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote: Seraphita, I 
like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see 
research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain enlivening 
and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed, though that is a good thing too. 
And I mean whole brain enlivening and coherence as indicated by an fMRI or EEG 
not just subjective report. 
 
 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@... To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com Sent: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an 
alternative to TM? 
   A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the occurrence of deep 
sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly revitalize the subject. 
 Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short 
compared to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed to 
prevent nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep cycle 
without being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I and II but 
failing to complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a phenomenon known as 
sleep inertia, where one feels groggy, disoriented, and even more sleepy than 
before beginning the nap. Brief naps (10–15 minutes) can improve alertness 
directly after awakening.
 Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average power 
nap duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more time, and the 
body enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who regularly take power naps 
may develop a good idea of what duration works best for them, as well as what 
tools, environment, position, and associated factors help induce the best 
results. Mitsuo Hayashi and Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves 
mental performance even after a full night's sleep.
 Power naps of less than 30 minutes—even those as brief as 6 and 10 
minutes—restore wakefulness and promote performance and learning. 
 (Copied from Wiki)
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 






 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 



 
 

 
 



 
 
 





RE: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread awoelflebater
 
 

---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com wrote:

 Uh oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a small rural 
town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10 minutes and only 
if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every day. My asanas don't take 
very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer activity to sitting so my whole TMSP 
is about the minimum. But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 
hours per day. And have been doing so for 7 years!
Spiritual warriors IMHO!
 

 No, no Share. These are not spiritual warriors. These are people, like the 
rest of us, who do what is most desirable and fulfilling for themselves. If 
these meditators actually felt like they wanted to do something else for 7 
hours a day they would do it. Now, these long-term, incessant meditators 
obviously have absolutely nothing else pressing in their lives to compel them 
to want to stand up and open their eyes. I feel sorry for them. You spend a 
long time dead (presumably in the dark with your eyes, or lack of eyes, closed 
seeing nothing). I have a theory and I'm stickin' to it: if these meditating 
individuals had a passion or real interests in their lives (or even a family) 
they would be up and at 'em and imbibing what this magnificent world has to 
offer. Do you not think someone in activity can be a spiritual warrior? And 
what is that anyway?
 

 

 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 
 
   Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to 
see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain 
enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
 Yes indeed. 
 How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power naps? 
(And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing ever day?) 
 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@... wrote: Seraphita, I 
like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want to see 
research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole brain enlivening 
and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed, though that is a good thing too. 
And I mean whole brain enlivening and coherence as indicated by an fMRI or EEG 
not just subjective report. 
 
 From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@... To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com Sent: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an 
alternative to TM? 
   A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the occurrence of deep 
sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly revitalize the subject. 
 Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short 
compared to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed to 
prevent nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep cycle 
without being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I and II but 
failing to complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a phenomenon known as 
sleep inertia, where one feels groggy, disoriented, and even more sleepy than 
before beginning the nap. Brief naps (10–15 minutes) can improve alertness 
directly after awakening.
 Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average power 
nap duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more time, and the 
body enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who regularly take power naps 
may develop a good idea of what duration works best for them, as well as what 
tools, environment, position, and associated factors help induce the best 
results. Mitsuo Hayashi and Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves 
mental performance even after a full night's sleep.
 Power naps of less than 30 minutes—even those as brief as 6 and 10 
minutes—restore wakefulness and promote performance and learning. 
 (Copied from Wiki)
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 






 
 
 

 
 



 
 
 





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread turquoiseb
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long  wrote:

 3 people in this situation that I know best are all married.

And people on this forum have called me names
for living in a polyamorous household.

:-)

 
  From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...

 Â
 Re But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per
day. And have been doing so for 7 years!:
 7 1/2 hours per day! They've moved on from being householders and are
well on their way to being recluses by the sound of it!

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
wrote:

 Uh oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a
small rural town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10
minutes and only if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every
day. My asanas don't take very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer
activity to sitting so my whole TMSP is about the minimum. But I am in
awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. And have been
doing so for 7 years!
 Spiritual warriors IMHO!

 
  From: s3raphita@ s3raphita@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

 Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want
to see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole
brain enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
 Yes indeed.Â
 How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power
naps? (And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing
ever day?)Â

 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@ wrote:

 Seraphita, I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap,
I'd want to see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to
whole brain enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed,
though that is a good thing too. And I mean whole brain enlivening and
coherence as indicated by an fMRI or EEG not just subjective report.

 
  From: s3raphita@ s3raphita@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an alternative to TM?

 A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the
occurrence of deep sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly
revitalize the subject.Â
 Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short
compared to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed
to prevent nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep
cycle without being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I
and IIÂ but failing to complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a
phenomenon known as sleep inertia, where one feels groggy, disoriented,
and even more sleepy than before beginning the nap. Brief naps
(10â€15 minutes) can improve alertness directly after awakening.
 Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average
power nap duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more
time, and the body enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who
regularly take power naps may develop a good idea of what duration works
best for them, as well as what tools, environment, position, and
associated factors help induce the best results. Mitsuo Hayashi and
Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves mental performance
even after a full night's sleep.
 Power naps of less than 30 minutesâ€even those as brief as 6 and
10 minutesâ€restore wakefulness and promote performance and
learning.Â
 (Copied from Wiki)





Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

2013-10-08 Thread Share Long
Two of the peeps are married to each other though I suspect they are 
polycelibate (-:
And the third is married to another person who I don't know so well but who is 
also on the rounding course.
All four of these people seem pretty happy to me. Go figure! 





 From: turquoiseb no_re...@yahoogroups.com
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 11:59 AM
Subject: Re: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?
 


  
--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long  wrote:

 3 people in this situation that I know best are all married.

And people on this forum have called me names
for living in a polyamorous household.

:-)

 
  From: s3raphita@... s3raphita@...

 Â
 Re But I am in awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per
day. And have been doing so for 7 years!:
 7 1/2 hours per day! They've moved on from being householders and are
well on their way to being recluses by the sound of it!

 ---In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com
wrote:

 Uh oh, now I'm in trouble! Seraphita, I'm retired and I live in a
small rural town. So I have time for all this. My power naps are like 10
minutes and only if I've had insomnia the night before, so not every
day. My asanas don't take very long, nor does my pranayama. I prefer
activity to sitting so my whole TMSP is about the minimum. But I am in
awe of people who are doing TMSP for 7 1/2 hours per day. And have been
doing so for 7 years!
 Spiritual warriors IMHO!

 
  From: s3raphita@ s3raphita@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 10:37 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] RE: The power nap: an alternative to TM?

 Re I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap, I'd want
to see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to whole
brain enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed.:
 Yes indeed.Â
 How do you find time to fit in two meditation sessions a day AND power
naps? (And are you also yoga-stretching, pranayama-ing and butt-bouncing
ever day?)Â

 ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, sharelong60@ wrote:

 Seraphita, I like power naps. But before I substitute TM with a nap,
I'd want to see research that indicates that the nap was contributing to
whole brain enlivening and coherence, not just to feeling refreshed,
though that is a good thing too. And I mean whole brain enlivening and
coherence as indicated by an fMRI or EEG not just subjective report.

 
  From: s3raphita@ s3raphita@
 To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 9:42 AM
 Subject: [FairfieldLife] The power nap: an alternative to TM?

 A power nap is a short sleep which terminates before the
occurrence of deep sleep or slow-wave sleep, intended to quickly
revitalize the subject.Â
 Various durations are recommended for power naps, which are very short
compared to regular sleep. The short duration of a power nap is designed
to prevent nappers from sleeping so long that they enter a normal sleep
cycle without being able to complete it. Going beyond sleep stages I
and IIÂ but failing to complete a full sleep cycle, can result in a
phenomenon known as sleep inertia, where one feels groggy, disoriented,
and even more sleepy than before beginning the nap. Brief naps
(10â€15 minutes) can improve alertness directly after awakening.
 Scientific experiments and anecdotal evidence suggest that an average
power nap duration of around 30 minutes is most effective. Any more
time, and the body enters into its usual sleep cycle. People who
regularly take power naps may develop a good idea of what duration works
best for them, as well as what tools, environment, position, and
associated factors help induce the best results. Mitsuo Hayashi and
Tadao Hori have demonstrated that a nap improves mental performance
even after a full night's sleep.
 Power naps of less than 30 minutesâ€even those as brief as 6 and
10 minutesâ€restore wakefulness and promote performance and
learning.Â
 (Copied from Wiki)