Re: [Felvtalk] gassy cat

2009-12-13 Thread Cougar Clan
If he eats dry food, try slowing him down with a small (not too small)  
ball.  If he has wet food, try smearing it in the bowl so he has to  
slow down.  I would still add probiotics.

On Dec 13, 2009, at 1:29 AM, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:

It could even just be that Harley swallows a lot of air with his  
food. Not

sure how to deal with that...

Diane R.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Cougar Clan
Sent: Sunday, December 13, 2009 1:12 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] gassy cat

Try giving him probiotics.  They help with the gas.  I've had that  
problem
with young cats who have come in from the pine thicket.  No idea why  
though
unless there is a food allergy.  In my cats' cases it may be the  
change of

food and the (new) regularity of food.
On Dec 12, 2009, at 7:43 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:

Harley is sleeping in my arm as i write, passing gas big time.  he  
has

done this before and you can smell it all the way across the room.
any suggestions as to why?  is he eating too fast?  gets same food as
Dee, Hill's kitten healthy development.  Lord have mercy, i love him,
but!  dorlis

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Re: [Felvtalk] gassy cat

2009-12-13 Thread wendy
Stop feeding him Mexican food...LOLOLOL!
 Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change 
the world - indeed it is the only thing that ever has! ~~~ Margaret Meade 
~~~ 





From: dlg...@windstream.net dlg...@windstream.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Sat, December 12, 2009 7:43:21 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] gassy cat

Harley is sleeping in my arm as i write, passing gas big time.  he has done 
this before and you can smell it all the way across the room.  any suggestions 
as to why?  is he eating too fast?  gets same food as Dee, Hill's kitten 
healthy development.  Lord have mercy, i love him, but!  dorlis

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[Felvtalk] gassy cat

2009-12-13 Thread Alice Flowers
Hmmm-maybe you're hugging him too tight!! LOL! But seriously, after having the 
6 positives, I began researching the food. So many popular brands, Hills 
included, contain carcinogens. The big baddie is Ethoxyquin-with Lymphoma a 
common disease of FeLV kitties, I tried to eliminate that from their diet-they 
are at our mercy, having to eat what we put in front of them. Just do a google 
search for ethoxyquin in pet food-it is shocking! I am now feeding a 
combination of Evo, Felidae (certain formulas, the fish meal has Ethoxyquin-so 
avoid that) and mainly Blue Buffalo. I think all are made with human grade 
ingredients and contain probiotics-my cats are less farty these days and much 
shinier. I wish I had known about the ingredients years ago, I lost my last 3 
big dogs, 2 Aussies and a mixed breed to cancer. It was horrible to go through. 
I have subscribed to a site that reviews pet foods and lists all the red flag 
ingredients and also rates each food.
 Many animal fats and meat by products can mean stuff from the rendering 
plants-diseased animals and euthanized pets-containing the euthanasia 
drugs  also. There have been articles on pets having horrible reactions to 
foods with those chemicals in it. All we can do is try, thank goodness 
(somedays) for the internet.It does help with research. Alice
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[Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread lernermichelle
Hi. I'm fostering an FIV+ cat right now who has pretty bad stomatitis. We had 
his teeth cleaned and 6 of them removed, and after a few weeks of antibiotics 
post-dental surgery he was doing much much better-- eating a lot more, gained 3 
pounds in 3 weeks, not seeming to have any mouth pain and the redness was all 
gone. We stopped the antibiotics (which had been clindamycin then switched to 
clavamox) and he remained ok for  a few days. He then went to a potential 
adoptive home with another FIV+ cat. A week later she called for us to get him 
back, largely because his mouth got really bad again. He is back on Clavamox, 
and has been for a few days, but is growling when he eats and can only eat wet 
food that we break up into very small pieces. His gums are very inflamed again. 
I had 6 FeLV+ cats, but was lucky that none had stomatitis like this. For those 
of you whose cats have it or had it, what do you recommend?

thanks,
Michelle
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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread Gloria B. Lane

I'll have to think - for Stomatitis/gingivitis, I've used
1) pulling the teeth (seems to work well)
2) Oral dexamethasone (some folks have good luck with that - made my  
kitty cough a little but helped somewhat)
3) Monthly Demo (steroid) shot - nice but if it gets too frequent,  
kitty comes down with other things
4) Convenia antibiotic shot, followed by oral Axithromycin as needed  
(worked pretty well)


There's another oral med that I've tried but can't remember the name  
right now, have to look it up.  It was pretty good.  I'm sure there  
are some other options.  As I understand, Stomatitis can be called by  
several different things...


Best of luck,

Gloria



On Dec 13, 2009, at 3:54 PM, lernermiche...@aol.com wrote:

Hi. I'm fostering an FIV+ cat right now who has pretty bad  
stomatitis. We had his teeth cleaned and 6 of them removed, and  
after a few weeks of antibiotics post-dental surgery he was doing  
much much better-- eating a lot more, gained 3 pounds in 3 weeks,  
not seeming to have any mouth pain and the redness was all gone. We  
stopped the antibiotics (which had been clindamycin then switched to  
clavamox) and he remained ok for  a few days. He then went to a  
potential adoptive home with another FIV+ cat. A week later she  
called for us to get him back, largely because his mouth got really  
bad again. He is back on Clavamox, and has been for a few days, but  
is growling when he eats and can only eat wet food that we break up  
into very small pieces. His gums are very inflamed again. I had 6  
FeLV+ cats, but was lucky that none had stomatitis like this. For  
those of you whose cats have it or had it, what do you recommend?


thanks,
Michelle
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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread janine paton
Took in an FIV cat with very bad stomatitis.  I'd never seen a huge, emaciated 
cat try to eat but run backwards growling and screaming and pawing at his face, 
and boy, was I afraid of him!  Vet pulled teeth, was reluctant at first to use 
steroid because of FIV status but after a month, very bad flare-up so vet 
wanted to try steroid.  I found an excellent homeopath instead and Kohl did 
very well for 2 years with this (rather intensive treatment) and a raw diet.  
He was actually physically and mentally excellent until we noticed a swelling 
that was dx as an oral cancer, but even his ending was helped with the 
homeopathy and he did well until the few days before we opted to have him 
eithanized.  

Janine





From: Gloria B. Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Sun, December 13, 2009 5:22:23 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

I'll have to think - for Stomatitis/gingivitis, I've used
1) pulling the teeth (seems to work well)
2) Oral dexamethasone (some folks have good luck with that - made my kitty 
cough a little but helped somewhat)
3) Monthly Demo (steroid) shot - nice but if it gets too frequent, kitty comes 
down with other things
4) Convenia antibiotic shot, followed by oral Axithromycin as needed (worked 
pretty well)

There's another oral med that I've tried but can't remember the name right now, 
have to look it up.  It was pretty good.  I'm sure there are some other 
options.  As I understand, Stomatitis can be called by several different 
things...

Best of luck,

Gloria



On Dec 13, 2009, at 3:54 PM, lernermiche...@aol.com wrote:

 Hi. I'm fostering an FIV+ cat right now who has pretty bad stomatitis. We had 
 his teeth cleaned and 6 of them removed, and after a few weeks of antibiotics 
 post-dental surgery he was doing much much better-- eating a lot more, gained 
 3 pounds in 3 weeks, not seeming to have any mouth pain and the redness was 
 all gone. We stopped the antibiotics (which had been clindamycin then 
 switched to clavamox) and he remained ok for  a few days. He then went to a 
 potential adoptive home with another FIV+ cat. A week later she called for us 
 to get him back, largely because his mouth got really bad again. He is back 
 on Clavamox, and has been for a few days, but is growling when he eats and 
 can only eat wet food that we break up into very small pieces. His gums are 
 very inflamed again. I had 6 FeLV+ cats, but was lucky that none had 
 stomatitis like this. For those of you whose cats have it or had it, what do 
 you recommend?
 
 thanks,
 Michelle
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Re: [Felvtalk] gassy cat

2009-12-13 Thread dlgegg
what is the list for foods?  where do you get Evo, Felidae and Blue Buffalo?  i 
haven't seen them in any store0s around here.  Harley is helping me again. 
dorlis

 Alice Flowers aliceflow...@sbcglobal.net wrote: 
 Hmmm-maybe you're hugging him too tight!! LOL! But seriously, after having 
 the 6 positives, I began researching the food. So many popular brands, Hills 
 included, contain carcinogens. The big baddie is Ethoxyquin-with Lymphoma a 
 common disease of FeLV kitties, I tried to eliminate that from their 
 diet-they are at our mercy, having to eat what we put in front of them. Just 
 do a google search for ethoxyquin in pet food-it is shocking! I am now 
 feeding a combination of Evo, Felidae (certain formulas, the fish meal has 
 Ethoxyquin-so avoid that) and mainly Blue Buffalo. I think all are made with 
 human grade ingredients and contain probiotics-my cats are less farty these 
 days and much shinier. I wish I had known about the ingredients years ago, I 
 lost my last 3 big dogs, 2 Aussies and a mixed breed to cancer. It was 
 horrible to go through. I have subscribed to a site that reviews pet foods 
 and lists all the red flag ingredients and also rates each food.
  Many animal fats and meat by products can mean stuff from the rendering 
 plants-diseased animals and euthanized pets-containing the euthanasia 
 drugs  also. There have been articles on pets having horrible reactions to 
 foods with those chemicals in it. All we can do is try, thank goodness 
 (somedays) for the internet.It does help with research. Alice
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Re: [Felvtalk] gassy cat

2009-12-13 Thread Alice Flowers
Ahh-the true test of a mother's love! Root a toot! Just do a search on-line. 
Type in Evo Cat Food and it will bring up their website to click on. They all 
have store locators-just usually put in your zip code. I can get the Blue 
Buffalo brand at Petsmart or Petco along with my local feed dealer-they have a 
really great pet food dept with a good selection of holistic style foods. 
Felidae is made by the Canadae people. The others-Evo and Felidae I get at the 
feed store. The site that lists pet food and the ingredients is Petsumers? 
Reports- I think-the truth about pet food...It costs something like $17 for a 
year-but it has both dog and cat foods and treats listed and alerts you on food 
recalls and important pet news. I now have my dogs on the Blue Buffalo dry food 
after seeing the brands I had used had bad ingredients and by products and 
way too much grain and garbage.  Alice
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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread Cougar Clan
I can't say enough for the alternative vet who has helped me with  
numerous four-legged friends including Dixie who was FeLV+.  She was  
fine until a few days before she left this world and I, too, believe  
the alternative treatment helped her leave this world more  
peacefully. If you have an alternative vet in the area, please try  
her.

On Dec 13, 2009, at 5:03 PM, janine paton wrote:

Took in an FIV cat with very bad stomatitis.  I'd never seen a huge,  
emaciated cat try to eat but run backwards growling and screaming  
and pawing at his face, and boy, was I afraid of him!  Vet pulled  
teeth, was reluctant at first to use steroid because of FIV status  
but after a month, very bad flare-up so vet wanted to try steroid.   
I found an excellent homeopath instead and Kohl did very well for 2  
years with this (rather intensive treatment) and a raw diet.  He was  
actually physically and mentally excellent until we noticed a  
swelling that was dx as an oral cancer, but even his ending was  
helped with the homeopathy and he did well until the few days before  
we opted to have him eithanized.


Janine





From: Gloria B. Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Sun, December 13, 2009 5:22:23 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

I'll have to think - for Stomatitis/gingivitis, I've used
1) pulling the teeth (seems to work well)
2) Oral dexamethasone (some folks have good luck with that - made my  
kitty cough a little but helped somewhat)
3) Monthly Demo (steroid) shot - nice but if it gets too frequent,  
kitty comes down with other things
4) Convenia antibiotic shot, followed by oral Axithromycin as needed  
(worked pretty well)


There's another oral med that I've tried but can't remember the name  
right now, have to look it up.  It was pretty good.  I'm sure there  
are some other options.  As I understand, Stomatitis can be called  
by several different things...


Best of luck,

Gloria



On Dec 13, 2009, at 3:54 PM, lernermiche...@aol.com wrote:

Hi. I'm fostering an FIV+ cat right now who has pretty bad  
stomatitis. We had his teeth cleaned and 6 of them removed, and  
after a few weeks of antibiotics post-dental surgery he was doing  
much much better-- eating a lot more, gained 3 pounds in 3 weeks,  
not seeming to have any mouth pain and the redness was all gone. We  
stopped the antibiotics (which had been clindamycin then switched  
to clavamox) and he remained ok for  a few days. He then went to a  
potential adoptive home with another FIV+ cat. A week later she  
called for us to get him back, largely because his mouth got really  
bad again. He is back on Clavamox, and has been for a few days, but  
is growling when he eats and can only eat wet food that we break up  
into very small pieces. His gums are very inflamed again. I had 6  
FeLV+ cats, but was lucky that none had stomatitis like this. For  
those of you whose cats have it or had it, what do you recommend?


thanks,
Michelle
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Re: [Felvtalk] Felvtalk Digest, Vol 15, Issue 8

2009-12-13 Thread dlgegg
just a question, did you find homes for your babies?  how are you doing?  have 
things gotten better for you?  i have asked my vet to help me remember i can't 
take them all in.  right now i have 6 older cats (2 felv, but well) and 2 new 5 
month old babies.  they were going to be turned over to animal control which 
means killed, so now they are with me.  i meant to find homes for them, but 
that didn't work.  i could not paart with them.  i am afraid the in the current 
financial situation, many more dogs and cats, and around here, horses will be 
turned out to fend for themselves.  people can't keep them anymore so they 
just turn them loose.  people around here are seeing moe strays than ever 
before.  dorlis
 jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote: 
 Jackie,
 
 It sounds as though you a woman who's heart is bigger than her pocket.  I
 can relate.  24 cats alone is tough, but add Felv and you're in for a rough
 ride.
 
 This is difficult situation.  I know there are a number of felv+ sanctuaries
 out there but some of them are questionable places.  There are quite a few
 people in this group that have worked with different places - some with good
 success.
 
 How much time do you have?  There is a shelter I know of north of Chicago
 that has two felv+ cats and may take another one or two.  I will check.
 
 I have two Felv+ right now and am also financially burdened so I don't think
 I can help but I will see what shelters around here have available.
 
 Don't give up, miracles happen every day.  I will pray for you.
 
 Jenny
 
 
 On 9/9/09, Jacalyn Moffat jaklyn1...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  I'm new to this list and I need some advice. Here is my brief story: we
  were
  a farm family and people always dumped their cats on our farm, and I would
  always take them in and feed and care for them, and add them to our barn
  kitties. We vaccinated and wormed our cats and spayed and neutered them.
  Then it all fell apart and we lost our farm and pretty much everything and
  moved to a much smaller place on just 2 acres. I couldn't abandon all of
  the
  kitties so I brought them with us and six of them we turned into house
  cats.
  I would get them homes as I could. But life being what it is, our finances
  continued to worsen and we spayed and neutered as we could get some money
  together but of course, despite our best efforts, cats became pregnant, and
  other feral cats showed up. Long story short, but default, I became sort of
  a cat sanctuary for FELV positive cats. I have 24 right now and I love them
  all. They are beautiful, loved, well-fed; and they are all so affectionate.
 
  Financially things have worsened and my husband has been out of a job since
  last November. Our income is now less than $150/week. I can't keep up
  anymore with buying medications for them and spaying and neutering. There
  is
  a clinic here that will spay and neuter for $20 and I'm embarassed to say
  that we can't even afford that. I have a degree in Medical Technology and a
  wonderful, old vet (when we were on the farm) taught me some basic
  doctoring
  with otc antibiotics. They are still well-fed but it is getting hard.
 
  We are going to lose our home and I'm in a panic. It's hard to find homes
  for some many felv cats. We are going to keep our 6 indoor cats but how do
  I
  find homes for the others? How do I find out if there is a felv+ sanctuary
  in Oklahoma? I tried Google but had no luck.
 
  These beautiful cats deserve so much more than I can give them all right
  now. I'm really tired. I'm 54 and their care had gotten to be almost more
  than I can handle. I have lovingly nursed and held many very sick kitties
  in
  their final days, and I cry terribly with each one that doesn't make it.
  I'm the one with a college degree so I have to go out and try to find a
  full
  time job, and taking care of these kitties has been a full-time job for me-
  doctoring, administering medications,worming, treating fleas, syringe
  feeding some of them etc.. My husband built a nice cattery outside so I
  could put the outdoor kitties up at night and try to keep the queens
  separated from the toms (which despite our best effort fails sometimes).
  And
  of course they all deserve love, affection and attention, and I give them
  all some of that. I'm laying awake at night crying trying to figure out
  what
  to do and worried about what is going to happen to them if we lose our
  home.
 
 
  Does anyone have any advice on how to find homes for them or find a
  sanctuary?  We think if we can get it down to just 6 (from the 24) we can
  realistically give those the care they deserve if we sacrifice. I love them
  all but I dearly love these 6 and would really grieve if I couldn't keep
  them.
 
  Thank you for listening. Jackie
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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread Gloria Lane

What treatment did your alternative vet use?

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 13, 2009, at 7:03 PM, Cougar Clan maima...@duo-county.com  
wrote:


I can't say enough for the alternative vet who has helped me with  
numerous four-legged friends including Dixie who was FeLV+.  She was  
fine until a few days before she left this world and I, too, believe  
the alternative treatment helped her leave this world more  
peacefully. If you have an alternative vet in the area, please  
try her.

On Dec 13, 2009, at 5:03 PM, janine paton wrote:

Took in an FIV cat with very bad stomatitis.  I'd never seen a  
huge, emaciated cat try to eat but run backwards growling and  
screaming and pawing at his face, and boy, was I afraid of him!   
Vet pulled teeth, was reluctant at first to use steroid because of  
FIV status but after a month, very bad flare-up so vet wanted to  
try steroid.  I found an excellent homeopath instead and Kohl did  
very well for 2 years with this (rather intensive treatment) and a  
raw diet.  He was actually physically and mentally excellent until  
we noticed a swelling that was dx as an oral cancer, but even his  
ending was helped with the homeopathy and he did well until the few  
days before we opted to have him eithanized.


Janine





From: Gloria B. Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Sun, December 13, 2009 5:22:23 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

I'll have to think - for Stomatitis/gingivitis, I've used
1) pulling the teeth (seems to work well)
2) Oral dexamethasone (some folks have good luck with that - made  
my kitty cough a little but helped somewhat)
3) Monthly Demo (steroid) shot - nice but if it gets too frequent,  
kitty comes down with other things
4) Convenia antibiotic shot, followed by oral Axithromycin as  
needed (worked pretty well)


There's another oral med that I've tried but can't remember the  
name right now, have to look it up.  It was pretty good.  I'm sure  
there are some other options.  As I understand, Stomatitis can be  
called by several different things...


Best of luck,

Gloria



On Dec 13, 2009, at 3:54 PM, lernermiche...@aol.com wrote:

Hi. I'm fostering an FIV+ cat right now who has pretty bad  
stomatitis. We had his teeth cleaned and 6 of them removed, and  
after a few weeks of antibiotics post-dental surgery he was doing  
much much better-- eating a lot more, gained 3 pounds in 3 weeks,  
not seeming to have any mouth pain and the redness was all gone.  
We stopped the antibiotics (which had been clindamycin then  
switched to clavamox) and he remained ok for  a few days. He then  
went to a potential adoptive home with another FIV+ cat. A week  
later she called for us to get him back, largely because his mouth  
got really bad again. He is back on Clavamox, and has been for a  
few days, but is growling when he eats and can only eat wet food  
that we break up into very small pieces. His gums are very  
inflamed again. I had 6 FeLV+ cats, but was lucky that none had  
stomatitis like this. For those of you whose cats have it or had  
it, what do you recommend?


thanks,
Michelle
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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread S. Jewell
Michelle, 

No amount of antibiotics will do for your cat's stomatitis
what ascorbic acid will do.  See
http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorbate/197x/belfield-w-j_int
_assn_prev_med-1978-v2-n3-p10.htmstomatit for an idea of how
much to use for different similar conditions in animals.  I
would put the cat on oral vitamin C or subcutaneous or
intramuscular injections of sodium ascorbate.  Better yet
would be asking your vet to put the cat on intravenous
vitamin C (in a sodium chloride drip) from McGuff -
http://www.mcguffpharmaceuticals.com/ascor_l_NC.htm.  I can
give you the protocol for your vet if you would like to have
it.  The key is dosage - using enough vitamin C for long
enough to clear the infection and inflammation (again, see
the general guidelines in the Belfield paper).  Vitamin C
used in any of these forms is safe, nontoxic and highly
therapeutic for a myriad of conditions in animals when given
in sufficient doses.  



Sally Snyder Jewell
Tower Laboratories Corporation



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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread S. Jewell
Michelle, 

No amount of antibiotics will do for your cat's stomatitis
what ascorbic acid will do.  See
http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorbate/197x/belfield-w-j_int
_assn_prev_med-1978-v2-n3-p10.htmstomatit for an idea of how
much to use for different similar conditions in animals.  I
would put the cat on oral vitamin C or subcutaneous or
intramuscular injections of sodium ascorbate.  Better yet
would be asking your vet to put the cat on intravenous
vitamin C (in a sodium chloride drip) from McGuff -
http://www.mcguffpharmaceuticals.com/ascor_l_NC.htm.  I can
give you the protocol for your vet if you would like to have
it.  The key is dosage - using enough vitamin C for long
enough to clear the infection and inflammation (again, see
the general guidelines in the Belfield paper).  Vitamin C
used in any of these forms is safe, nontoxic and highly
therapeutic for a myriad of conditions in animals when given
in sufficient doses.  



Sally Snyder Jewell
Tower Laboratories Corporation



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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread Gloria B. Lane

That's interesting  I'll start that (orally) with a cat I have.

Gloria



On Dec 13, 2009, at 9:55 PM, S. Jewell wrote:


Michelle,

No amount of antibiotics will do for your cat's stomatitis
what ascorbic acid will do.  See
http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorbate/197x/belfield-w-j_int
_assn_prev_med-1978-v2-n3-p10.htmstomatit for an idea of how
much to use for different similar conditions in animals.  I
would put the cat on oral vitamin C or subcutaneous or
intramuscular injections of sodium ascorbate.  Better yet
would be asking your vet to put the cat on intravenous
vitamin C (in a sodium chloride drip) from McGuff -
http://www.mcguffpharmaceuticals.com/ascor_l_NC.htm.  I can
give you the protocol for your vet if you would like to have
it.  The key is dosage - using enough vitamin C for long
enough to clear the infection and inflammation (again, see
the general guidelines in the Belfield paper).  Vitamin C
used in any of these forms is safe, nontoxic and highly
therapeutic for a myriad of conditions in animals when given
in sufficient doses.



Sally Snyder Jewell
Tower Laboratories Corporation



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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread S. Jewell
Don't be afraid to push the cat to bowel tolerance if giving
vitamin C orally.  The best type of vitamin C for pushing to
bowel tolerance would be a pure sodium ascorbate powder (no
other vitamins) mixed into the cat's wet food with liver
powder to help flavor it.  Increase the amount daily until
the cat has loose stool, then back down and try again until
the cat consistently has diarrhea at a certain level.  Just
below that level would be bowel tolerance.  

For those of you who may be concerned about all the negative
propaganda surrounding the use of high levels of vitamin C,
don't be.  It is completely and totally benign and nontoxic
at any level and will not harm your cat.  Cats (and dogs)
make only 40 mg per kilogram of body weight per day, whereas
a mouse makes 275.  Based on this it is easy to see why cats
and dogs succumb to so much viral disease, infection and
cancer and other animals do not.  The difference in the
amount they make is likely due to the high level of
domestication of cats and dogs compared to their wild
ancestors and also the poor quality of food that they are
reduced to eating.  

Remember to try to spread the dosing out to a couple of
times a day, as animals usually make vitamin C 24/7 in the
liver.  Again, do not be afraid to give your cat vitamin C
to bowel tolerance, for you will see the most benefit and
healing at the highest possible dosing.  Intravenous is
best, followed by subcutaneous or intramuscular injections,
followed by oral.  The Injections sting a little and the
cats are not crazy about them but faster healing will be
seen with this administration over the oral dosing.
However, however you can get it into the cat, the key is
using enough, starting immediately, and being consistent.  


Sally Snyder Jewell
Tower Laboratories Corporation



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Re: [Felvtalk] stomatitis

2009-12-13 Thread S. Jewell
Don't be afraid to push the cat to bowel tolerance if giving
vitamin C orally.  The best type of vitamin C for pushing to
bowel tolerance would be a pure sodium ascorbate powder (no
other vitamins) mixed into the cat's wet food with liver
powder to help flavor it.  Increase the amount daily until
the cat has loose stool, then back down and try again until
the cat consistently has diarrhea at a certain level.  Just
below that level would be bowel tolerance.  

For those of you who may be concerned about all the negative
propaganda surrounding the use of high levels of vitamin C,
don't be.  It is completely and totally benign and nontoxic
at any level and will not harm your cat.  Cats (and dogs)
make only 40 mg per kilogram of body weight per day, whereas
a mouse makes 275.  Based on this it is easy to see why cats
and dogs succumb to so much viral disease, infection and
cancer and other animals do not.  The difference in the
amount they make is likely due to the high level of
domestication of cats and dogs compared to their wild
ancestors and also the poor quality of food that they are
reduced to eating.  

Remember to try to spread the dosing out to a couple of
times a day, as animals usually make vitamin C 24/7 in the
liver.  Again, do not be afraid to give your cat vitamin C
to bowel tolerance, for you will see the most benefit and
healing at the highest possible dosing.  Intravenous is
best, followed by subcutaneous or intramuscular injections,
followed by oral.  The Injections sting a little and the
cats are not crazy about them but faster healing will be
seen with this administration over the oral dosing.
However, however you can get it into the cat, the key is
using enough, starting immediately, and being consistent.  


Sally Snyder Jewell
Tower Laboratories Corporation



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