[Felvtalk] OT: blind deaf cat

2010-06-13 Thread Gloria B. Lane
I just took in a blind-deaf cat, was one of 25 or so in a lady's  
house.  The lady became disabled, developed dementia, and our rescue  
took some of her cats.  This one first was taken to the city animal  
services, developed a URI, got about over it, was altered, tested and  
shots, and we pulled him.


He (?) was transferred to a different cage, then to my carrier, then  
to my home and a large cage.   He's not too friendly, although I can  
at times pet him on the head and scratch his ears.  We think it's just  
because of the changes in his life, that he just doesn't know what's  
going on and if he needs to defend himself.  I haven't had a blind or  
deaf cat before.


Does anyone know of a rescue that will take a blind-deaf cat?  I found  
one in North Carolina, but I'm in Arkansas.


Thanks very much,

Gloria

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Re: [Felvtalk] OT: blind deaf cat

2010-06-13 Thread Laurieskatz
Gloria,
I hope you will consider keeping him as he will do much better in a private
home than a sanctuary.
I have a blind cat and am going to take in a deaf cat so have been doing
lots of research.
He would be fine in one room of your house. He will learn his way around
that room and feel safe.

At first Frankie (who lost his vision at age 9) got upset when he would run
into the other cats unexpectedly. He is much better about it now (3 1/2
years later and he is doing great). Once the other cats know a cat is
disabled they may pick on him and attack him. I don't think a group of cats
is the right thing for this boy. The vet told me Frankie would be at the
bottom of the totem pole once the other cats knew he was blind. He isn't but
he does stay to himself more than he used to. He does have run of the house
- he did before he lost his vision.

Frankie was a feral 5 month old kitten when I took him in. I could not hold
or touch him. With work I was able to touch him but not hold him or pick him
up. Then I had to start treating him for asthma and we both learned a lot
about going slow and trust. After he lost he sight he LOVES touch. I suspect
this kitty will love touch once he is familiar with his surroundings. Smell
is important and probably heightened. He may smell the other cats and be
overwhelmed and afraid right now. All he has is smell and touch. Wonderful
food will be a pleasure. Also you might rub your own scent on a towel and
give it to him to comfort him. Even better if you could get something from
his previous owner to give him.

Info I found on deaf cats:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2108978_happily-communicate-deaf-cat.html

If you are willing and able to keep this boy, you have a wonderful
opportunity to learn so much and to help others in the future. Not to
mention, enhance his life and let him live with grace and peace.

Thanks for helping him!
Laurie




-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Gloria B. Lane
Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2010 8:11 AM
To: Feline Leukemia
Subject: [Felvtalk] OT: blind deaf cat

I just took in a blind-deaf cat, was one of 25 or so in a lady's  
house.  The lady became disabled, developed dementia, and our rescue  
took some of her cats.  This one first was taken to the city animal  
services, developed a URI, got about over it, was altered, tested and  
shots, and we pulled him.

He (?) was transferred to a different cage, then to my carrier, then  
to my home and a large cage.   He's not too friendly, although I can  
at times pet him on the head and scratch his ears.  We think it's just  
because of the changes in his life, that he just doesn't know what's  
going on and if he needs to defend himself.  I haven't had a blind or  
deaf cat before.

Does anyone know of a rescue that will take a blind-deaf cat?  I found  
one in North Carolina, but I'm in Arkansas.

Thanks very much,

Gloria

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Re: [Felvtalk] OT: blind deaf cat INFO

2010-06-13 Thread Laurieskatz
http://www.messybeast.com/disabled.htm#deaf
GREAT info here on: blind cats, deaf cats and deaf-blind cats
BLIND CATS
Cats that keep bumping into things either can't co-ordinate their limbs or
can't see. A blind eye is often cloudy or the pupil remains dilated even in
bright light. Some cats are born without eyes (anopthalmia) or with very
small eyes (micropthalmia) which may not function. Others lose their sight
either permanently or temporarily as a result of illness, physical injury,
brain damage or poisoning (including extreme reaction to anaesthesia) and
conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts or scarring caused by untreated
entropion (inturned eyelashes). 

The degree of blindness varies from total blindness to partial blindness
(cloudy sight, ability to differentiate between light and shade, tunnel
vision) in much the same way that human blindness varies. Usually the loss
of sight is gradual and the cat compensates gradually so that you don't even
realise how bad its sight is. Sometimes illness or injury necessitates the
removal of one or both eyes. Sudden blindness is more noticeable because the
cat is disoriented, hesitant when walking, bumps into things and may
vocalize more often (some cats appear to listen for sound echoes).

Where a cat becomes suddenly blind it may develop unusual behaviours until
it learns to adapt. It may be unwilling to leave its sleeping area and may
develop inappropriate toilet habits because it is unable to find the litter
tray. It will be reluctant to go outdoors to toilet. It may appear withdrawn
and call out (when disoriented or in need of reassurance).

To test your cat's vision, cover each eye in turn and see if its other eye
can follow a moving finger or responds to a finger moving towards the
uncovered eye. You can also test its response to a torch (flashlight) being
flashed on and off in the direction of the eye, but this is not 100%
accurate since blindness is not always seated in the eyeball itself - the
pupil may respond to light, but the normal 'vision signals' are not
correctly processed by the brain. 

A cat blind in one eye may lash out in self-defence at sudden movements on
its blind side. A cat with unilateral blindness may turn its head more often
in order to compensate for the reduced field of vision. It may also have
problems with depth perception since it has lost the stereoscopic area of
vision - one-eyed cats often take several 'sightings' of a chair (etc)
before jumping onto it, but quickly memorize the heights of such objects for
future reference. Fully blind cats may clamber onto things rather than jump,
but many also memorize heights and distances which is why furniture should
not be rearranged and obstructions should not be left on the floor when
there is a blind cat in the house.

A blind cat is easily disoriented and should not be allowed to roam; indoors
only or indoors with access to a fenced pen or garden is best. It may enjoy
supervised forays in the garden using a harness and lead. Make sure it is
wearing a collar stating its address and disability in case it escapes. If
it is allowed to roam freely and is chased by another animal it may become
lost or run into the path of traffic. Because it relies so much on
scent/sound, a lost blind cat will probably be unable to find its way home
once it is beyond its normal territory.

Blind cats rely on scent and memory to find their way around so keep
furniture in the same place and don't leave obstacles in unexpected places
where he could walk into them. If he is prone to bumping into furniture, try
padding table legs and chair legs with old pillows or some foam to reduce
impact damage. While most blind cats soon memorize routes and distances, not
all manage this feat and rely on 'bumping into' their signposts.

Whiskers become more important to blind cats to judge the cat's proximity to
an object. This means they are subjected to more wear and tear than normal
and can be broken or even worn down!

Sound is also important to a blind cat. Noisy toys such as balls with bells
in, a noisy paper sack or a scrunched up paper ball will provide
stimulation. Many blind cats learn how dribble scrunched paper balls or
jingly toys. According to Dean, his 2 year old born-blind domestic longhair
can actually locate crumpled paper by listening for it to un-crumple a
little and retrieves toys to play with. She also catches flies, runs around
the house at speed based on her memory of obstacles, pounces on other cats
by listening to their footsteps and uses her very long whiskers and ear hair
as sensors, possibly also sensing changes in air pressure with them. She
also walks with her tail tip touching the ground as an additional sense
organ. 

Carrying a blind cat around can disorient it so if you must move it, place
it somewhere it knows well such as its feeding or sleeping area so that it
can easily get its bearings. Don't move its litter tray or feeding areas
around, it needs to find them easily by memory or