Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
The hanging out tongue must be something other than missing teeth.  We have
quite a few cats with no teeth, and their tongues don't hang out the side of
their mouths, if anything, the tips of the tongue might stick out in front -
and looks adorable.  We have some real oldtimers here - started out feral
and are mushes now.
Life with bad teeth must be absolutely horrible and painful  I am always
surprised how toothless cats just love dry food!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 6:31 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

Pretty Boy, a feral who hangs around and who is very loved, was live  
trapped for neutering.  The vet called me after they put him  
under...he had shuttered in pain when they put a tube in his mouth.   
She checked his teeth and they were totally awful.  Most of them were  
pulled.  The only side effect is that his tongue hangs out a lot of  
the time...no teeth to help him keep it in...or maybe he is expressing  
his opinion.  He eats both canned and dry food with the rest of the  
clan and is so handsome.  He is probably 13-14 years old (per vet) and  
is a total doll. Like the rest of the clan, he is not touchable most  
of the time.  He fusses and fumes and catches ground squirrels and  
others who are stupid enough to come into an area guarded by numerous  
cats.  Removing his teeth has definitely improved the quality if not  
quantity of his life.   As far as I know, none of the clan is FeLV+.
On Jul 6, 2011, at 6:00 PM, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:

 Yes, in cats (and in humans) the constant infections and abscesses  
 in a bad
 mouth of teeth have all sorts of dire consequences in the rest of  
 the body's
 systems. I have never heard anyone who regretted having some or all  
 of their
 babies' teeth pulled in the interests of clearing up stomatitis, etc.

 Diane R.

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Heather
 Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 10:00 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

 Yes, we have had 3 cases (2 rescues of mine, one a friend's so I  
 don't know
 his testing status, he could be FIV+ though, he was a big male  
 brought in
 from the streets) of full mouth extractions that resulted in a very  
 sick
 kitty soon becoming a 'brand new cat.  One is a year out from the
 extraction, the other is 2 years out, both are doing so well!   Both  
 of
 those guys were negative.  My friend's kitty is doing wonderfully,  
 too, and
 his full mouth extraction was done by our humane society low-cost  
 clinic for
 a fraction of what my guys were done for--most low cost clinics  
 probably
 can't do that, though.

 All 3 of these guys now also eat dry food, by their own liking, I  
 couldn't
 believe it.

 On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 10:53 AM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Your cats had stomatitis?  And it helped having all teeth removed?
 The problem with doing this to a cat with immunodeficiencies is (ours
 is
 FIV+, which is better than FeLV+) obviously slightly more risky!  It
 FIV+does
 sound rather drastic, doesn't it?
 We have several old cats without teeth, and they look like they're
 chomping a way at dry food...they just swallow it and love it more
 than canned food at times.
 Natalie

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Heather
 Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 10:18 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

 Hope the DMG proves to be helpful, but just thought I'd mention the 3
 we've had who had full mouth extractions were like new cats
 afterwards, and have done wonderfully ever since.  They were not FELV
 cats, though.

 On Tue, Jul 5, 2011 at 9:59 AM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Has any vet ever suggested using DMG (N, N-DIMETHYLGLYCINE)for FeLV+
 cats?

 I AM USING IT ON A FIV+ CAT THAT HAS PAINFUL STOMATITIS IN THE
 MOUTH, TO THE POINT WHERE HE COULDN'T EAT; FIV/FeLV+ cats often get
 that condition, and unfortunately, the only suggested and supposedly
 appropriate thing is to have their teeth pulled by a specialist,
 with special emphasis on
 cleaning
 out the areas extremely well.  My vet says that he doesn't like
 doing it because often it doesn't help at all, so we are trying DMG.

 I am using the liquid form, but it apparently also comes in
 different forms.



 It has many clinical uses and a variety of applications:

 http://www.goodsearch.com/search.aspx?keywords=N%2C+N-DIMETHYLGLYCIN
 E

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 rg

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Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
In-house tests results are limited, and I would do the more sophisticated
one that is sent to the lab.  However, before getting that urinalysis back
with results, I would not sign up for an X-ray before it is determined that
one is absolutely required!
Yes, this vet does seem to do it for the money!  My vet always does one step
at a time, and based on the last step, if needed, proceeds to the next.
Many vets like to do ALL of them at one time!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Cindy McHugh
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 11:24 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up and

I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the 
litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months 
ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 3 
years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his other 
issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated on my bed

about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was fostering 2 dogs 
at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs. They were adopted and

all was well until a couple days ago.

He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 days. 
There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use his 
litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but I 
thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a 
clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was told, 
so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a 
urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and 
gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't 
really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a culture. 
She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones. This is not 
my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We want to do what's

necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra funds for 
tests/procedures that are not necessary.

If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these procedures, I

wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in 
money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than $100 
on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I mentioned

today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea situation, the 
vet and tech both said they've had many, many complaints about Frontline 
this summer and agreed that it's ineffective (in this area, anyway). The vet

said the fleas laugh at Frontline. They suggested I purchase another flea 
product (V-something, I didn't catch the name). They said it's the same 
price, but much more effective. This is the same place that swore by, and 
sold me, Frontline about a week ago.

They're holding the urine sample overnight because I wanted to see what 
tests the cat had by his prior owner. (I didn't have the vet records with me

at the time.)

If he needs the culture and x-rays, I'll have it done. But I don't want to 
spend the rescue's very limited funds needlessly. Any input would be most 
welcome. The cat is NOT  FeLV+.

Thank you for your time.
Cindy



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Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for cats
that don't like any kind of litter!
BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When I 
had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the waterproof 
mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This is 
what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever since. 
Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet said 
the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an exception 
at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the 
litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and fill

them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's better 
than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.

I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted :)

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


 This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up 
 and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

 I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the 
 litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months 
 ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 3

 years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his 
 other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated 
 on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was 
 fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs. 
 They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.

 He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 days.

 There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use 
 his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but 
 I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a 
 clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was 
 told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

 In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a 
 urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and 
 gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

 The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't 
 really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a 
 culture. She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones. 
 This is not my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We 
 want to do what's necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra funds

 for tests/procedures that are not necessary.

 If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these procedures,

 I wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in 
 money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than $100

 on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I 
 mentioned today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea 
 situation, the vet and tech both said they've had many, many complaints 
 about Frontline this summer and agreed that it's ineffective (in this 
 area, anyway). The vet said the fleas laugh at Frontline. They suggested I

 purchase another flea product (V-something, I didn't catch the name). They

 said it's the same price, but much more effective. This is the same place 
 that swore by, and sold me, Frontline about a week ago.

 They're holding the urine sample overnight because I wanted to see what 
 tests the cat had by his prior owner. (I didn't have the vet records with 
 me at the time.)

 If he needs the culture and x-rays, I'll have it done. But I don't want to

 spend the rescue's very limited funds needlessly. Any input would be most 
 welcome. The cat is NOT  FeLV+.

 Thank you for your time.
 Cindy



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Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

2011-07-08 Thread MaiMaiPG
His tongue does not hang out the side of his mouth nor does he look  
like he is pantingand he does look adorable.  Sorry to give any  
other impression.

On Jul 8, 2011, at 1:53 AM, Natalie wrote:

The hanging out tongue must be something other than missing teeth.   
We have
quite a few cats with no teeth, and their tongues don't hang out the  
side of
their mouths, if anything, the tips of the tongue might stick out in  
front -
and looks adorable.  We have some real oldtimers here - started out  
feral

and are mushes now.
Life with bad teeth must be absolutely horrible and painful  I am  
always

surprised how toothless cats just love dry food!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 6:31 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

Pretty Boy, a feral who hangs around and who is very loved, was live
trapped for neutering.  The vet called me after they put him
under...he had shuttered in pain when they put a tube in his mouth.
She checked his teeth and they were totally awful.  Most of them were
pulled.  The only side effect is that his tongue hangs out a lot of
the time...no teeth to help him keep it in...or maybe he is expressing
his opinion.  He eats both canned and dry food with the rest of the
clan and is so handsome.  He is probably 13-14 years old (per vet) and
is a total doll. Like the rest of the clan, he is not touchable most
of the time.  He fusses and fumes and catches ground squirrels and
others who are stupid enough to come into an area guarded by numerous
cats.  Removing his teeth has definitely improved the quality if not
quantity of his life.   As far as I know, none of the clan is FeLV+.
On Jul 6, 2011, at 6:00 PM, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:


Yes, in cats (and in humans) the constant infections and abscesses
in a bad
mouth of teeth have all sorts of dire consequences in the rest of
the body's
systems. I have never heard anyone who regretted having some or all
of their
babies' teeth pulled in the interests of clearing up stomatitis, etc.

Diane R.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Heather
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 10:00 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

Yes, we have had 3 cases (2 rescues of mine, one a friend's so I
don't know
his testing status, he could be FIV+ though, he was a big male
brought in
from the streets) of full mouth extractions that resulted in a very
sick
kitty soon becoming a 'brand new cat.  One is a year out from the
extraction, the other is 2 years out, both are doing so well!   Both
of
those guys were negative.  My friend's kitty is doing wonderfully,
too, and
his full mouth extraction was done by our humane society low-cost
clinic for
a fraction of what my guys were done for--most low cost clinics
probably
can't do that, though.

All 3 of these guys now also eat dry food, by their own liking, I
couldn't
believe it.

On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 10:53 AM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:


Your cats had stomatitis?  And it helped having all teeth removed?
The problem with doing this to a cat with immunodeficiencies is  
(ours

is
FIV+, which is better than FeLV+) obviously slightly more risky!  It
FIV+does
sound rather drastic, doesn't it?
We have several old cats without teeth, and they look like they're
chomping a way at dry food...they just swallow it and love it more
than canned food at times.
Natalie

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Heather
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 10:18 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] DMG

Hope the DMG proves to be helpful, but just thought I'd mention  
the 3

we've had who had full mouth extractions were like new cats
afterwards, and have done wonderfully ever since.  They were not  
FELV

cats, though.

On Tue, Jul 5, 2011 at 9:59 AM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

Has any vet ever suggested using DMG (N, N-DIMETHYLGLYCINE)for  
FeLV+

cats?


I AM USING IT ON A FIV+ CAT THAT HAS PAINFUL STOMATITIS IN THE
MOUTH, TO THE POINT WHERE HE COULDN'T EAT; FIV/FeLV+ cats often get
that condition, and unfortunately, the only suggested and  
supposedly

appropriate thing is to have their teeth pulled by a specialist,
with special emphasis on

cleaning

out the areas extremely well.  My vet says that he doesn't like
doing it because often it doesn't help at all, so we are trying  
DMG.


I am using the liquid form, but it apparently also comes in
different forms.



It has many clinical uses and a variety of applications:

http://www.goodsearch.com/search.aspx?keywords=N%2C+N- 
DIMETHYLGLYCIN

E

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Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Caspercat
Not sure if this is possible but they probably got a bad batch of Frontline
- I've used it in the Northeast with zero proplems (and like it because it
addresses fleas  ticks).  My vet also started using a product called
v-somthing but it doesn't help with ticks.  If you know for sure you only
have a flea problem (no ticks) then advantage is a good product (and will
get rid of ear mites and worms as well).  Just spoke to a lady yesterday who
does rescue.  She orders advantage from Canada via the mail as it is much
cheaper that way.

About the stones - does the cat appear to be straining when peeing or appear
constipated?  That would be indicative of stones.   Also if the cat is prone
to stones he may have developed an aversion to using the litter box
and choose other objects to pee on instead or he may have developed an
aversion to using the litter box for another reason.  So changing the type
of litter you use may help.  Having said all that we had a cat that prone to
UTIs and they way she would let us know she had one is by peeing on our bed
(hooray for waterproof matress covers).

Is there anyway you can call and ask your vet at home what they use to
diagnose kidney stones?

In googling feline kidney stones it appears that x-trays or ultrasounds are
used for diagnosis.  Found x-rays mentioned on a couple of sites (but note
that the information below is from a site I just found by googling so not
sure how good it is  http://www.cat-health-guide.org/felinekidneystones.html).
My guess is that if the vet finds no stones via x-ray the next step they
will suggest an ultrasound (which of course is even more expensive).

If cat kidney stones are suspected, your vet will take x-rays. The stones
will usually show up white on the x-ray. Some kinds of stones don’t show up
on x-rays and can only be seen by ultrasound. Your vet will look for stones
elsewhere in the urinary tract as well.

Your vet will also test your cat’s urine to see if she has a bladder
infection. Bladder infections are very common in pets with kidney stones. 


On Thu, Jul 7, 2011 at 11:23 PM, Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org wrote:

 This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up
 and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

 I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
 litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months
 ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 3
 years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his other
 issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated on my bed
 about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was fostering 2 dogs
 at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs. They were adopted and
 all was well until a couple days ago.

 He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 days.
 There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use his
 litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but I
 thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a
 clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was told,
 so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

 In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a
 urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and
 gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

 The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't
 really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a culture.
 She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones. This is not
 my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We want to do what's
 necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra funds for
 tests/procedures that are not necessary.

 If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these procedures,
 I wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in
 money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than $100
 on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I mentioned
 today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea situation, the
 vet and tech both said they've had many, many complaints about Frontline
 this summer and agreed that it's ineffective (in this area, anyway). The vet
 said the fleas laugh at Frontline. They suggested I purchase another flea
 product (V-something, I didn't catch the name). They said it's the same
 price, but much more effective. This is the same place that swore by, and
 sold me, Frontline about a week ago.

 They're holding the urine sample overnight because I wanted to see what
 tests the cat had by his prior owner. (I didn't have the vet records with me
 at the time.)

 If he needs the culture and x-rays, I'll have it done. But I don't want to
 spend the rescue's very limited funds needlessly. Any input would be most
 welcome. The cat is NOT 

[Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+

2011-07-08 Thread Jenny Orvis
I just rescued a kitten two days ago, Cali. She was bullied by a dog so was
looking a little rough. She's 8 weeks old. Broke my heart when I found her
in the state she was in and I couldn't leave her. On the drive home she
stayed in my arms clinging close. We stopped and got her a can of food and
nearly snarfed the thing down in one setting! She's a very happy kitten,
little skiddish, but happy.
I took her to the vet yesterday. She has a sore on her tongue and a bit of a
runny nose and small fever, and otherwise heart and lungs sound good. But,
she tested positive for FeLV with the SNAP test. My heart just dropped. I
have an 8 month old kitten also, Joey, who tested negative when we got him,
and am worried about his health. He's up-to-date on all of his shots, and
the vet is not concerned about it spreading to him too much other than
biting.

I've only had Cali for 48 hours and I'm already attached. I want to keep
her, but am a bit worried about FeLV and Joey. I know I won't introduce the
two until she's over her sniffles. She's in the spare bedroom all set up,
and Joey is quite interested thankfully! Was afraid it'd be World War 3.

I know I've read somewhere about a kitten being so young and testing
positive, but actually not having it so I'm hoping that's what it is. She
goes back in two weeks. I've just been worrying if I'm crazy for wanting to
keep a possible FeLV+ kitten while my other baby is not positive. Any
advice?
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Re: [Felvtalk] Pretty Boy

2011-07-08 Thread Lorrie
Thanks for taking care of Pretty Boy. I just love old cats,
maybe that's because I'm old :-)

Lorrie

On 07-07, MaiMaiPG wrote:
 Pretty Boy, a feral who hangs around and who is very loved, was live  
 trapped for neutering.  The vet called me after they put him  
 under...he had shuttered in pain when they put a tube in his mouth.   
 She checked his teeth and they were totally awful.  Most of them were  
 pulled.  The only side effect is that his tongue hangs out a lot of  
 the time...no teeth to help him keep it in...or maybe he is expressing  
 his opinion.  He eats both canned and dry food with the rest of the  
 clan and is so handsome.  He is probably 13-14 years old (per vet) and  
 is a total doll. Like the rest of the clan, he is not touchable most  
 of the time.  He fusses and fumes and catches ground squirrels and  
 others who are stupid enough to come into an area guarded by numerous  
 cats.  Removing his teeth has definitely improved the quality if not  
 quantity of his life.   As far as I know, none of the clan is FeLV+.
 On Jul 6, 2011, at 6:00 PM, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:
 

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Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Cindy McHugh

Hi Lynda,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts. We have 4 cats in his area and 4 
litterboxes, so I can certainly try adding one more. There are two in my 
room (where he spends most of his time); one in the other two rooms. It's a 
small house, so the only rooms that don't have boxes are the kitchen and 
living room. I clean them at least once a day, usually 2-3 times (whenever I 
notice one is used). The cats each have a box they prefer, so one box 
doesn't usually get particularly dirty.


I've used a couple different litters (always clumping), but I've been using 
this particular kind for at least a month and he only had issues for 2 days. 
Last night he was fine again, but as I write this, he's back to pacing in 
front of the door. His pace is like what you see zoo animals do in a 
cage - a repetitive path, back and forth, like he's oblivious to everything 
around him. I've tried interrupting him with play, but he ignores me. He 
enjoys catnip, so I sometimes give him that as a diversion, but I have to be 
careful because it makes him very aggressive toward the other cats. I'm 
really hoping the outdoor enclosure helps him. I hate to see him so 
frustrated.


Thanks again for your ideas.

Cindy

- Original Message - 
From: Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When I 
had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the 
waterproof mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted 
another. This is what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has 
been fine ever since. Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another 
litter box. My vet said the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus 
one! My cat was an exception at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every 
two weeks, I empty all the litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, 
dry them thoroughly and fill them again with litter. This has helped as 
well. It's work, but it's better than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, 
etc.


I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted 
:)


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up 
and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.


I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the 
litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months 
ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 
3 years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his 
other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated 
on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was 
fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs. 
They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.


He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 
days. There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also 
use his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, 
but I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I 
used a clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I 
was told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...


In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a 
urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and 
gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.


The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't 
really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a 
culture. She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones. 
This is not my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We 
want to do what's necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra 
funds for tests/procedures that are not necessary.


If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these 
procedures, I wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more 
interested in money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent 
more than $100 on flea products recommended by another vet in this 
office. When I mentioned today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be 
helping the flea situation, the vet and tech both said they've had many, 
many complaints about Frontline this summer and agreed that it's 
ineffective (in this area, anyway). The vet said the fleas laugh at 
Frontline. They suggested I purchase another flea product (V-something, I 
didn't catch the name). They said it's the same price, but much more 
effective. This is the same place that swore by, and sold me, Frontline 
about a week ago.


They're holding the urine sample overnight because I wanted to see what 

Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Cindy McHugh
Thanks for sharing. I think I will go ahead with the lab test, but hold off 
on the x-ray until we get the results. Would the lab results indicate if he 
has stones (and needs an x-ray)? Based on his past, I'm almost positive it's 
entirely behavioral, but I don't want to risk him suffering either.


Thanks,
Cindy


- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 2:58 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question



In-house tests results are limited, and I would do the more sophisticated
one that is sent to the lab.  However, before getting that urinalysis back
with results, I would not sign up for an X-ray before it is determined 
that

one is absolutely required!
Yes, this vet does seem to do it for the money!  My vet always does one 
step

at a time, and based on the last step, if needed, proceeds to the next.
Many vets like to do ALL of them at one time!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Cindy McHugh
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 11:24 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up 
and


I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months
ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 3
years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his 
other
issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated on my 
bed


about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was fostering 2 
dogs
at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs. They were adopted 
and


all was well until a couple days ago.

He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 days.
There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use 
his

litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but I
thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a
clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was 
told,

so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a
urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and
gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't
really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a 
culture.

She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones. This is not
my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We want to do 
what's


necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra funds for
tests/procedures that are not necessary.

If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these procedures, 
I


wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in
money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than $100
on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I 
mentioned


today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea situation, 
the

vet and tech both said they've had many, many complaints about Frontline
this summer and agreed that it's ineffective (in this area, anyway). The 
vet


said the fleas laugh at Frontline. They suggested I purchase another flea
product (V-something, I didn't catch the name). They said it's the same
price, but much more effective. This is the same place that swore by, and
sold me, Frontline about a week ago.

They're holding the urine sample overnight because I wanted to see what
tests the cat had by his prior owner. (I didn't have the vet records with 
me


at the time.)

If he needs the culture and x-rays, I'll have it done. But I don't want to
spend the rescue's very limited funds needlessly. Any input would be most
welcome. The cat is NOT  FeLV+.

Thank you for your time.
Cindy



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Re: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+

2011-07-08 Thread Ben Williams
Are you able to vaccinate your other kitty and keep the new girl separated for 
a month or so? If so, I can't think of any reason why you shouldn't keep her.  
Just because she's potentially FeLV positive doesn't mean she isn't a wonderful 
kitty who deserves a chance at happiness just as much as a cat who tests 
negative.  Your heart seems to have already led you in this direction and 
following your heart will serve you well.

Best,

Ben

-- My iPhone told me to send this message. --

On Jul 8, 2011, at 5:06 AM, Jenny Orvis mi...@cableone.net wrote:

 I just rescued a kitten two days ago, Cali. She was bullied by a dog so was
 looking a little rough. She's 8 weeks old. Broke my heart when I found her
 in the state she was in and I couldn't leave her. On the drive home she
 stayed in my arms clinging close. We stopped and got her a can of food and
 nearly snarfed the thing down in one setting! She's a very happy kitten,
 little skiddish, but happy.
 I took her to the vet yesterday. She has a sore on her tongue and a bit of a
 runny nose and small fever, and otherwise heart and lungs sound good. But,
 she tested positive for FeLV with the SNAP test. My heart just dropped. I
 have an 8 month old kitten also, Joey, who tested negative when we got him,
 and am worried about his health. He's up-to-date on all of his shots, and
 the vet is not concerned about it spreading to him too much other than
 biting.
 
 I've only had Cali for 48 hours and I'm already attached. I want to keep
 her, but am a bit worried about FeLV and Joey. I know I won't introduce the
 two until she's over her sniffles. She's in the spare bedroom all set up,
 and Joey is quite interested thankfully! Was afraid it'd be World War 3.
 
 I know I've read somewhere about a kitten being so young and testing
 positive, but actually not having it so I'm hoping that's what it is. She
 goes back in two weeks. I've just been worrying if I'm crazy for wanting to
 keep a possible FeLV+ kitten while my other baby is not positive. Any
 advice?
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Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
Lynda,
I hope that the clumping litter you are using does NOT contain sodium
bentonite!  Often they don't list it, but they tell you NOT to flush down
the toilet, you can be assured that it contains it!
I have lots of info on it, but this site does not allow more than a certain
amount to be sent.
Here's just one source:
http://www.ny-petrescue.org/clumping.php 
Natalie   

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Cindy McHugh
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:32 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

Hi Lynda,

I've used a couple different litters (always clumping), 



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[Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning 

Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline friends
including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
cancer.

Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs in
the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
Damage can occur in just a short period of time. 

Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung problems
like the ones mentioned above. 

Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not Let
Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat from
grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form a
hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal. 

The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your pet.
You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If you're
worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
has a filter for odor control. 

Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
saving the health or life of an animal.
 



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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Cindy McHugh
Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just 
checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an 
ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All 
Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus and 
haven't opened/tried it yet.


I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to use 
something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was getting 
so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping clay - 
not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular 
litter and baking soda.


Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others I 
know who are using the clumping litter.


Cindy


- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
friends

including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
cancer.

Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
in

the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
problems

like the ones mentioned above.

Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
Let

Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
from

grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form 
a

hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.

The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
pet.
You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
you're

worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
has a filter for odor control.

Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
saving the health or life of an animal.




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Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
Good advice, I will try it as well. By the way, I use Feline Pine (it's 
similar to saw dust, without the dust, lol!). But my cat, Sugar, only 
urinated once outside the box onto our bed. Glad that it was only once, and 
the problem was solved quick.


Have a great weekend everyone!
- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 2:03 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question



Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for cats
that don't like any kind of litter!
BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When I
had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the 
waterproof
mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This 
is
what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever 
since.

Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet said
the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an 
exception

at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the
litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and 
fill


them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's 
better

than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.

I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted 
:)


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question



This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up
and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months
ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 
3



years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his
other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated
on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was
fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs.
They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.

He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 
days.



There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use
his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but
I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a
clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was
told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a
urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and
gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't
really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a
culture. She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones.
This is not my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We
want to do what's necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra 
funds



for tests/procedures that are not necessary.

If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these 
procedures,



I wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in
money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than 
$100



on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I
mentioned today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea
situation, the vet and tech both said they've had many, many complaints
about Frontline this summer and agreed that it's ineffective (in this
area, anyway). The vet said the fleas laugh at Frontline. They suggested 
I


purchase another flea product (V-something, I didn't catch the name). 
They



said it's the same price, but much more effective. This is the same place
that swore by, and sold me, Frontline about a week ago.

They're holding the urine sample overnight because I wanted to see what
tests the cat had by his prior owner. (I didn't have the vet records with
me at the time.)

If he 

Re: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
What a lucky kitten she is to have you find her! 8 weeks old is so young, I 
wonder where the rest of the litter is?  I bet she is so spoiled already and 
it's a great sign that Joey is interested :)


Keep them separate until you know for sure if she is truly positive or can 
clear the virus later for a negative result. We all know that test are not 
100% accurate, therefore you may have to take it one step further and have 
an IFA done, but I would not do that until she is at least 3 mos old.  Give 
her time, she could clear the virus. Do a test again in 30 days, then go 
from there and let us know. I would definitely make sure Joey has had the 
vaccination for FeLV.  He will have a better chance of not getting it, but 
in order for the vaccine to be effective, he has to have the second shot 3 
weeks later after the first initial shot.


That's my advice for now. Since she is so young it's hard to tell you each 
step b/c I feel she will need more tests as she gets older (in other words, 
I would keep testing until you get a negative result) and I will repeat 
myself one more time, she could clear the virus.


Good luck, and keep in touch :0)

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Jenny Orvis mi...@cableone.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 5:06 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+



I just rescued a kitten two days ago, Cali. She was bullied by a dog so was
looking a little rough. She's 8 weeks old. Broke my heart when I found her
in the state she was in and I couldn't leave her. On the drive home she
stayed in my arms clinging close. We stopped and got her a can of food and
nearly snarfed the thing down in one setting! She's a very happy kitten,
little skiddish, but happy.
I took her to the vet yesterday. She has a sore on her tongue and a bit of 
a

runny nose and small fever, and otherwise heart and lungs sound good. But,
she tested positive for FeLV with the SNAP test. My heart just dropped. I
have an 8 month old kitten also, Joey, who tested negative when we got 
him,

and am worried about his health. He's up-to-date on all of his shots, and
the vet is not concerned about it spreading to him too much other than
biting.

I've only had Cali for 48 hours and I'm already attached. I want to keep
her, but am a bit worried about FeLV and Joey. I know I won't introduce 
the

two until she's over her sniffles. She's in the spare bedroom all set up,
and Joey is quite interested thankfully! Was afraid it'd be World War 3.

I know I've read somewhere about a kitten being so young and testing
positive, but actually not having it so I'm hoping that's what it is. She
goes back in two weeks. I've just been worrying if I'm crazy for wanting 
to

keep a possible FeLV+ kitten while my other baby is not positive. Any
advice?
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust. 
Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around. 
What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long 
time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps 
the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not Petco, 
they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as well, 
but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.


Thanks so much :)
Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
friends

including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
cancer.

Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
in

the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
problems

like the ones mentioned above.

Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
Let

Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
from

grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form 
a

hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.

The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
pet.
You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
you're

worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
has a filter for odor control.

Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
saving the health or life of an animal.




___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
Cindy,
ONLY clumping litter would contain sodium bentonite - the regular kitty
litter clays just have dust which can be irritating but not as deadly!  Many
people believe that because clumping litter is so much more expensive, it
must be good!  There used to be a holistic cat magazine, Tiger Tribe, when
they folded, I purchased all their back copies.  They researched clumping
litter, and were told by manufacturers that the old adage buyer beware
should always be applied!  DUH!  Don't you think that when one purchases
something for one's pets, one wouldn't have to check its safety?
Natalie

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Cindy McHugh
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:09 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just 
checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an 
ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All 
Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus and 
haven't opened/tried it yet.

I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to use 
something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was getting 
so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping clay - 
not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular 
litter and baking soda.

Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others I 
know who are using the clumping litter.

Cindy


- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
 friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
 cancer.

 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
 in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
 ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
 safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
 hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
 up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
 expands
 from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
 problems
 like the ones mentioned above.

 Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
 Let
 Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
 from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
 from
 grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
 nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
 the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
 cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form

 a
 hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.

 The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
 litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
 dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
 simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
 non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
 recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
 pet.
 You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
 you're
 worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
 litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
 instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
 has a filter for odor control.

 Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
 litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
 saving the health or life of an animal.




 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Katy Doyle
Wow... You know, the dusty clay litter gives me asthma attacks, I'm ashamed
that I never thought of how it would affect my cats.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 9:33 AM, Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.netwrote:

 Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust.
 Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around.
 What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long
 time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps
 the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not Petco,
 they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as well,
 but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.

 Thanks so much :)
 Lynda

 - Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


   Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
 friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
 cancer.

 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs
 in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
 ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
 safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
 hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
 up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
 expands
 from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
 problems
 like the ones mentioned above.

 Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not
 Let
 Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
 from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat
 from
 grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
 nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
 the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
 cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form
 a
 hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.

 The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
 litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
 dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
 simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
 non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
 recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your
 pet.
 You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If
 you're
 worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
 litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
 instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
 has a filter for odor control.

 Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
 litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
 saving the health or life of an animal.




 __**_
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/**mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_**
 felineleukemia.orghttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




 __**_
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/**mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_**felineleukemia.orghttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
We have to use a good basic litter because of cost - when you have to
provide litter for over 70 cats, we prefer spending the money on good food!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:13 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

Good advice, I will try it as well. By the way, I use Feline Pine (it's 
similar to saw dust, without the dust, lol!). But my cat, Sugar, only 
urinated once outside the box onto our bed. Glad that it was only once, and 
the problem was solved quick.

Have a great weekend everyone!
- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 2:03 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


 Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
 type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for cats
 that don't like any kind of litter!
 BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
 When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
 holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
 then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
 time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
 not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

 My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When I
 had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the 
 waterproof
 mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This 
 is
 what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever 
 since.
 Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet said
 the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an 
 exception
 at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the
 litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and 
 fill

 them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's 
 better
 than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.

 I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted 
 :)

 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


 This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up
 and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

 I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
 litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months
 ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 
 3

 years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his
 other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated
 on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was
 fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs.
 They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.

 He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 
 days.

 There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use
 his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but
 I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a
 clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was
 told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

 In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a
 urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and
 gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

 The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't
 really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a
 culture. She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones.
 This is not my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We
 want to do what's necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra 
 funds

 for tests/procedures that are not necessary.

 If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these 
 procedures,

 I wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in
 money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than 
 $100

 on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I
 mentioned today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea
 situation, the vet and tech both said they've had many, many complaints
 about Frontline this summer and agreed that it's ineffective (in this
 area, 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
We get our litter at Walmart - cheapest there, even though we get a discount
at PetSmart.
The problem is that they are still pushing and selling all kinds of clumping
litter as if it were something special for your beloved cats!
My husband bought a small fabric toy for the cats, and I decided to read the
label: It said to be careful, make sure that cats don't tear the fabric and
eat the contents because it could cause serious injury or death! Mad in
China, and who oversees the safety of things coming in?

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:33 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust. 
Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around. 
What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long 
time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps 
the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not Petco,

they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as well,

but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.

Thanks so much :)
Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
 friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
 cancer.

 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
 in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
 ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
 safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
 hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
 up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
 expands
 from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
 problems
 like the ones mentioned above.

 Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
 Let
 Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
 from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
 from
 grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
 nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
 the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
 cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form

 a
 hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.

 The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
 litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
 dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
 simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
 non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
 recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
 pet.
 You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
 you're
 worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
 litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
 instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
 has a filter for odor control.

 Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
 litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
 saving the health or life of an animal.




 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 



___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
That's because we assume that everything we buy must be safe for them!
It's a shame that we have to be so suspicious of everything and question
every bit of info!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Katy Doyle
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:40 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

Wow... You know, the dusty clay litter gives me asthma attacks, I'm ashamed
that I never thought of how it would affect my cats.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 9:33 AM, Lynda Wilson
longhornf...@verizon.netwrote:

 Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust.
 Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around.
 What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long
 time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps
 the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not
Petco,
 they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as
well,
 but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.

 Thanks so much :)
 Lynda

 - Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


   Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most

 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
 friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
 cancer.

 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs
 in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and
can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to
make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
 ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
 safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
 hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
stirring
 up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
 expands
 from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
 problems
 like the ones mentioned above.

 Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not
 Let
 Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
 from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat
 from
 grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
 nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested.
Once
 the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only
could
 cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also
form
 a
 hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.

 The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from
clumping
 litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
 dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
 simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
 non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
 recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your
 pet.
 You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If
 you're
 worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
 litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
 instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
 has a filter for odor control.

 Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
 litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
 saving the health or life of an animal.




 __**_
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/**mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_**

felineleukemia.orghttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felin
eleukemia.org




 __**_
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

http://felineleukemia.org/**mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_**felineleukemia.orgh
ttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Re: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+

2011-07-08 Thread SomeWhere Sam
The SNAP test is not as accurate as the maker has hyped, or most Vet's 
knowledge.

Go to this link for Testing Protocols.
http://www.felineleukemia.org/felvhlth.html
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/Pages/FeLV_Web.pdf

Basically both tests the SNAP(Elisa) and the IFA results need to be the same 
results, otherwise the kitten/cat is still not a true positive.

SomeWhere Sam





From: Jenny Orvis mi...@cableone.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Fri, July 8, 2011 5:06:28 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+

I just rescued a kitten two days ago, Cali. She was bullied by a dog so was
looking a little rough. She's 8 weeks old. Broke my heart when I found her
in the state she was in and I couldn't leave her. On the drive home she
stayed in my arms clinging close. We stopped and got her a can of food and
nearly snarfed the thing down in one setting! She's a very happy kitten,
little skiddish, but happy.
I took her to the vet yesterday. She has a sore on her tongue and a bit of a
runny nose and small fever, and otherwise heart and lungs sound good. But,
she tested positive for FeLV with the SNAP test. My heart just dropped. I
have an 8 month old kitten also, Joey, who tested negative when we got him,
and am worried about his health. He's up-to-date on all of his shots, and
the vet is not concerned about it spreading to him too much other than
biting.

I've only had Cali for 48 hours and I'm already attached. I want to keep
her, but am a bit worried about FeLV and Joey. I know I won't introduce the
two until she's over her sniffles. She's in the spare bedroom all set up,
and Joey is quite interested thankfully! Was afraid it'd be World War 3.

I know I've read somewhere about a kitten being so young and testing
positive, but actually not having it so I'm hoping that's what it is. She
goes back in two weeks. I've just been worrying if I'm crazy for wanting to
keep a possible FeLV+ kitten while my other baby is not positive. Any
advice?
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Re: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+

2011-07-08 Thread Maureen Olvey

Also - you mentioned that the vet isn't worried about her spreading it to your 
cat unless they bite.  That sounds more like FIV.  Are you sure he said Feline 
Leukemia or did he say Feline Aids?  Just wanted to check because you mentioned 
the bite thing.  Feline Leukemia can be spread much easier by like mutual 
grooming, food and water bowls, etc. (and bites of course).  But Feline Aides 
(FIV) is spread by bites almost exclusively.  It can't be spread by sharing 
food bowls or mutual grooming because the virus from the infected cat has to be 
injected straight into the bloodstream.  I hope for the kitten's sake he meant 
to say feline aids but mis-spoke and said FeLV but was thinking of FIV.  FIV is 
usually not nearly as devastating to the body and isn't as contagious so it's 
much better of the two dreadful diseases.
 
Either way, Somewhere Sam is right.  Need to re-test and two tests much match.  
If he meant FeLV definitely do an IFA but if he meant FIV then another snap 
test in a few weeks is probably enough because I don't think the snap test 
screws up the results of FIV quite as often as FeLV.  Not sure but it seems 
that way from the reading I've done.  It's true that you can't trust the 
results of the snap test on a young kitten either.  I've had 3 kittens from a 
litter of 4 test positive for FIV but then 3 weeks later test negative.   
That's because they had the antibodies from the mother in their system and it 
made them test positive but as soon as they had stopped nursing and the 
antibodies cleared their system they tested negative.
 
Did the vet mention calici virus?  It's pronounced like ka-lee-see.  That's 
another type of URI that can cause ulcers on the tongue.  You treat it the same 
though and since it's a virus it just has to make it through the system.  
L-Lysine is a good supplement for the sniffles.  If the ulcers are bad or if 
she gets too clogged up and she can't smell her food she may not want to eat so 
you just have to watch for that because young kittens dehydrate easily.
 
You're so kind for taking her in.  Check with the vet about FeLV versus FIV.  
Hopefully he just mis-spoke and hopefully the next snap test will be negative 
for both.  I know Joey would love to have a playmate.
 
 
 

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 

 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 08:04:34 -0700
 From: sin...@sbcglobal.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+
 
 The SNAP test is not as accurate as the maker has hyped, or most Vet's 
 knowledge.
 
 Go to this link for Testing Protocols.
 http://www.felineleukemia.org/felvhlth.html
 http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/Pages/FeLV_Web.pdf
 
 Basically both tests the SNAP(Elisa) and the IFA results need to be the same 
 results, otherwise the kitten/cat is still not a true positive.
 
 SomeWhere Sam
 
 
 
 
 
 From: Jenny Orvis mi...@cableone.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Fri, July 8, 2011 5:06:28 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Rescue Kitten FeLV+
 
 I just rescued a kitten two days ago, Cali. She was bullied by a dog so was
 looking a little rough. She's 8 weeks old. Broke my heart when I found her
 in the state she was in and I couldn't leave her. On the drive home she
 stayed in my arms clinging close. We stopped and got her a can of food and
 nearly snarfed the thing down in one setting! She's a very happy kitten,
 little skiddish, but happy.
 I took her to the vet yesterday. She has a sore on her tongue and a bit of a
 runny nose and small fever, and otherwise heart and lungs sound good. But,
 she tested positive for FeLV with the SNAP test. My heart just dropped. I
 have an 8 month old kitten also, Joey, who tested negative when we got him,
 and am worried about his health. He's up-to-date on all of his shots, and
 the vet is not concerned about it spreading to him too much other than
 biting.
 
 I've only had Cali for 48 hours and I'm already attached. I want to keep
 her, but am a bit worried about FeLV and Joey. I know I won't introduce the
 two until she's over her sniffles. She's in the spare bedroom all set up,
 and Joey is quite interested thankfully! Was afraid it'd be World War 3.
 
 I know I've read somewhere about a kitten being so young and testing
 positive, but actually not having it so I'm hoping that's what it is. She
 goes back in two weeks. I've just been worrying if I'm crazy for wanting to
 keep a possible FeLV+ kitten while my other baby is not positive. Any
 advice?
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Val Green
This truly is scary and I've got first hand experience with how bad clumping 
litter can be. One of my cats had a mass of clumped litter caught between his 
toes which I didn't notice until I clipped his claws. (a maine coon with very 
furry toes) He was't even limping because of the mass.  I had to end up having 
the vet remove it because it was so embedded. I'll have to try the ground corn 
cob litter again. They didn't like it at all so I'll have to mix the two for a 
while then gradually phase out the clumping stuff. 

Thanks so much for the heads up on this, Natalie. 

Valerie

On Jul 8, 2011, at 7:36 AM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
 
 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning 
 
 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
 cancer.
 
 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time. 
 
 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
 ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
 safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
 hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
 up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it expands
 from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung problems
 like the ones mentioned above. 
 
 Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not Let
 Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
 from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat from
 grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
 nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
 the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
 cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form a
 hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal. 
 
 The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
 litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
 dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
 simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
 non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
 recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your pet.
 You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If you're
 worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
 litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
 instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
 has a filter for odor control. 
 
 Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
 litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
 saving the health or life of an animal.
 
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Maureen Olvey

Oh - since you guys mentioned asthma I just wanted to throw out there that if 
any of your kitties ever develop asthma there is a wonderful feline asthma 
group.  The people on that list know more about it than a lot of vets because 
it's not that common and they've had years of experience with it.  I have a cat 
with asthma and with their help I got him on inhaled medications, same kind 
that humans use, and it's wonderful and keeps his asthma under control.  Not 
nearly as hard on the body as prednisone or other steroids which is how asthma 
in cats is usually controlled.  Lots of vets have not had experience with using 
inhaled medications (Flovent) on cats so they either tell owners to put their 
cats on prednisone or steriod shots for the rest of their life.  Or the vets 
that know about inhaled meds for cats will start them on the lowest dosage of 
Flovent and then when it doesn't help the asthma the vet thinks inhaled meds 
doesn't work for cats.  This asthma group is great and can help get a kitty on 
the right dosage and give you lots of tips to get them used to using the 
Aerokat to do the inhaled treatments.
 
I also use an online pharmacy called 4 Corners which is located in New Zealand, 
to get the meds.  It's one third of the cost as the drugs in the U.S.
 
Anyway, just wanted you guys to know so if you ever need help with an asthma 
kitty go straight to that group.  I don't know what I would have done without 
them.  My vet knew about asthma and even gave me an Aerokat but she didn't 
think it was easy to get a cat to take inhaled meds so she just recommended a 
steroid shot every 6 weeks.  Thank God I found the group.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 

 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 09:51:15 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 That's because we assume that everything we buy must be safe for them!
 It's a shame that we have to be so suspicious of everything and question
 every bit of info!
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Katy Doyle
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:40 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 Wow... You know, the dusty clay litter gives me asthma attacks, I'm ashamed
 that I never thought of how it would affect my cats.
 
 On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 9:33 AM, Lynda Wilson
 longhornf...@verizon.netwrote:
 
  Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust.
  Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around.
  What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long
  time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps
  the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not
 Petco,
  they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as
 well,
  but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.
 
  Thanks so much :)
  Lynda
 
  - Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and
 can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to
 make
  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
 stirring
  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Terri Brown
Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.  Exquisicat 
Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the switch 
well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any litter box odors.

Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

=^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori and 6 
furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi =^..^=
  - Original Message - 
  From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


  Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just 
  checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an 
  ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All 
  Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus and 
  haven't opened/tried it yet.

  I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to use 
  something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was getting 
  so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping clay - 
  not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular 
  litter and baking soda.

  Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others I 
  know who are using the clumping litter.

  Cindy


  - Original Message - 
  From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


   Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
  
   The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
  
   Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
  
   Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
   Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
   friends
   including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
   cancer.
  
   Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
   absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
   in
   the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
   wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
   With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
   Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
  
   Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
   the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
   their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
   ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
   safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
   hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
   up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
   expands
   from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
   problems
   like the ones mentioned above.
  
   Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
   Let
   Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
   from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
   from
   grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
   nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
   the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
   cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form 
   a
   hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.
  
   The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
   litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
   dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
   simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
   non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
   recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
   pet.
   You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
   you're
   worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
   litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
   instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
   has a filter for odor control.
  
   Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
   litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
   saving the health or life of an animal.
  
  
  
  
   

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But I won't 
switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!


good to know, thanks for sharing!
- Original Message - 
From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive. 
Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this


I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the 
switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any litter box 
odors.


Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

=^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori and 6 
furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi 
=^..^=
 - Original Message - 
 From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org

 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just
 checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
 ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All
 Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus 
and

 haven't opened/tried it yet.

 I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to 
use
 something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was 
getting
 so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping 
clay -

 not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular
 litter and baking soda.

 Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others 
I

 know who are using the clumping litter.

 Cindy


 - Original Message - 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net

 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust 
Most

 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to 
litter.

  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even 
lung

  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat 
digs

  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and 
can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in 
jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its 
lungs.

  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one 
of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to 
make

  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not 
always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms 
a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's 
stirring

  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not
  Let
  Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your 
cat

  from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat
  from
  grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting 
and
  nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. 
Once
  the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only 
could
  cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also 
form

  a
  hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be 
fatal.

 
  The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from 
clumping
  litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and 
even

  dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
  simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
  non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
  recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your
  pet.
  You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If
  you're
  worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
  litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up 
odors
  instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But I won't 
switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

good to know, thanks for sharing!
- Original Message - 
From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive. 
 Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

 I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the 
 switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any litter box 
 odors.

 Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

 =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori and 6 
 furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi 
 =^..^=
  - Original Message - 
  From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


  Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just
  checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
  ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All
  Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus 
 and
  haven't opened/tried it yet.

  I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to 
 use
  something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was 
 getting
  so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping 
 clay -
  not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular
  litter and baking soda.

  Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others 
 I
  know who are using the clumping litter.

  Cindy


  - Original Message - 
  From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


   Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
  
   The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust 
 Most
  
   Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
  
   Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to 
 litter.
   Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
   friends
   including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even 
 lung
   cancer.
  
   Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
   absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat 
 digs
   in
   the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and 
 can
   wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in 
 jeopardy.
   With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its 
 lungs.
   Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
  
   Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one 
 of
   the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to 
 make
   their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
   ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not 
 always
   safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms 
 a
   hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's 
 stirring
   up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
   expands
   from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
   problems
   like the ones mentioned above.
  
   Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not
   Let
   Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your 
 cat
   from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat
   from
   grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting 
 and
   nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. 
 Once
   the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only 
 could
   cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also 
 form
   a
   hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be 
 fatal.
  
   The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from 
 clumping
   litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and 
 even
   dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
   simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
   non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Katy Doyle
Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used it
before?

I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in my
town.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But I won't
 switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

 good to know, thanks for sharing!
 - Original Message -
 From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


  Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
  Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this
 
  I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the
  switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any litter box
  odors.
 
  Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.
 
  =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori and 6
  furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi
  =^..^=
   - Original Message -
   From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
   Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just
   checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
   ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All
   Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus
  and
   haven't opened/tried it yet.
 
   I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to
  use
   something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
  getting
   so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping
  clay -
   not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular
   litter and baking soda.
 
   Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others
  I
   know who are using the clumping litter.
 
   Cindy
 
 
   - Original Message -
   From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
   Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
   
The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust
  Most
   
Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
   
Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
  litter.
Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
friends
including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even
  lung
cancer.
   
Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat
  digs
in
the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and
  can
wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
  jeopardy.
With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its
  lungs.
Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
   
Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one
  of
the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to
  make
their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not
  always
safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms
  a
hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
  stirring
up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
problems
like the ones mentioned above.
   
Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do
 Not
Let
Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your
  cat
from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat
from
grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting
  and
nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested.
  Once
the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only
  could
cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also
  form
a
hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be
  fatal.
   
The problem of health difficulties and even 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Katy Doyle
Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It got
good online reviews.




On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:

 Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used it
 before?

 I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in my
 town.

   On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But I
 won't
 switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

 good to know, thanks for sharing!
 - Original Message -
 From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


  Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
  Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this
 
  I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the
  switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any litter box
  odors.
 
  Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.
 
  =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori and 6
  furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi
  =^..^=
   - Original Message -
   From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
   Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just
   checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
   ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All
   Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus
  and
   haven't opened/tried it yet.
 
   I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to
  use
   something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
  getting
   so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping
  clay -
   not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using
 regular
   litter and baking soda.
 
   Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to
 others
  I
   know who are using the clumping litter.
 
   Cindy
 
 
   - Original Message -
   From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
   Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
   
The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust
  Most
   
Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
   
Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
  litter.
Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
friends
including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even
  lung
cancer.
   
Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat
  digs
in
the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs
 and
  can
wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
  jeopardy.
With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its
  lungs.
Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
   
Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is
 one
  of
the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to
  make
their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural
 clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not
  always
safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and
 forms
  a
hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
  stirring
up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
problems
like the ones mentioned above.
   
Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do
 Not
Let
Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your
  cat
from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your
 cat
from
grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting
  and
nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested.
  Once
the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only
  could
cause dehydration by 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread MaiMaiPG
I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural  
thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it  
around trees or compost it.

On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:

Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone  
used it

before?

I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in  
my

town.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:


Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda  
Wilson

Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But  
I won't

switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

good to know, thanks for sharing!
- Original Message -
From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the
switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any  
litter box

odors.

Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

=^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori  
and 6

furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi
=^..^=
- Original Message -
From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I  
just

checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium  
Choice All
Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies  
Plus

and
haven't opened/tried it yet.

I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I  
used to

use
something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
getting
so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping
clay -
not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using  
regular

litter and baking soda.

Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to  
others

I
know who are using the clumping litter.

Cindy


- Original Message -
From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
To:  
felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners  
Trust

Most


Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to

litter.
Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our  
feline

friends
including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even

lung

cancer.

Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat

digs

in
the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's  
lungs and

can

wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in

jeopardy.

With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its

lungs.

Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet,  
is one

of
the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this  
clay to

make
their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural  
clay

ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not

always
safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and  
forms

a

hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's

stirring

up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
problems
like the ones mentioned above.

Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do

Not

Let
Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop  
your

cat
from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop  
your cat

from
grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from  
swatting

and
nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets  
ingested.

Once
the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not  
only

could
cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could  
also

form

a
hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be

fatal.


The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
You throw it outside?  Not the poop, though, do you?
I can't imagine doing that with all my cat's doodoosor all the pee!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:15 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural  
thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it  
around trees or compost it.
On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:

 Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone  
 used it
 before?

 I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in  
 my
 town.

 On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda  
 Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But  
 I won't
 switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

 good to know, thanks for sharing!
 - Original Message -
 From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
 Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

 I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the
 switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any  
 litter box
 odors.

 Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

 =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori  
 and 6
 furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi
 =^..^=
 - Original Message -
 From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I  
 just
 checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
 ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium  
 Choice All
 Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies  
 Plus
 and
 haven't opened/tried it yet.

 I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I  
 used to
 use
 something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
 getting
 so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping
 clay -
 not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using  
 regular
 litter and baking soda.

 Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to  
 others
 I
 know who are using the clumping litter.

 Cindy


 - Original Message -
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
 To:  
 felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners  
 Trust
 Most

 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
 litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our  
 feline
 friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even
 lung
 cancer.

 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat
 digs
 in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's  
 lungs and
 can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
 jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its
 lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet,  
 is one
 of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this  
 clay to
 make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural  
 clay
 ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not
 always
 safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and  
 forms
 a
 hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
 stirring
 up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
 expands
 from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
 problems
 like the ones mentioned above.

 Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do
 Not
 Let
 Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop  
 your
 cat
 from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop  
 your cat
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread MaiMaiPG
There is 124 acres to put it on.  Poop gets pitched into unused  
fields--far from the house.  I can't see a difference between theirs  
and that of the numerous cats who stray this way/deer/buzzards/turkey  
etc. The pee turns the pellets into sawdust.  It may sound gross but  
it really isn't


On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:28 PM, Natalie wrote:


You throw it outside?  Not the poop, though, do you?
I can't imagine doing that with all my cat's doodoosor all the  
pee!


-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:15 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural
thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it
around trees or compost it.
On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:


Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone
used it
before?

I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in
my
town.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:


Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda
Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But
I won't
switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

good to know, thanks for sharing!
- Original Message -
From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making  
the

switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any
litter box
odors.

Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

=^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori
and 6
furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and  
Sammi

=^..^=
- Original Message -
From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I
just
checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have  
an

ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium
Choice All
Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies
Plus
and
haven't opened/tried it yet.

I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I
used to
use
something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
getting
so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the  
clumping

clay -
not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using
regular
litter and baking soda.

Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to
others
I
know who are using the clumping litter.

Cindy


- Original Message -
From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
To:
felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners
Trust

Most


Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to

litter.

Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our
feline
friends
including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly  
even

lung

cancer.

Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help  
with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your  
cat

digs

in
the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's
lungs and

can

wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in

jeopardy.

With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its

lungs.

Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet,
is one

of

the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this
clay to

make

their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural
clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not

always

safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and
forms

a

hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's

stirring
up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs,  
it

expands
from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of  
lung

problems
like the ones mentioned 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Edna Taylor

I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I 
noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again (after 
deleting most of the original emails).  I have used Feline Pine at home before 
and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their Petsmart adoptions.  The 
smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used the box even once and even 
customers complained about the smell in the adoption center.  We had to go back 
to scoopable in both places but especially at the store because people would 
not go in to meet the cats due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular 
basis.
 
For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid Totes.  
Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out and it 
prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side.  We also use a low 
dust litter.  So far, our cats have done well and most of our cats are 12 and 
up.
 
Edna
 

 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
 From: athenapities...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It got
 good online reviews.
 
 
 
 
 On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
 
  Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used it
  before?
 
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
It's not really gross on a large area - we couldn't - we'd smell it!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 5:35 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

There is 124 acres to put it on.  Poop gets pitched into unused  
fields--far from the house.  I can't see a difference between theirs  
and that of the numerous cats who stray this way/deer/buzzards/turkey  
etc. The pee turns the pellets into sawdust.  It may sound gross but  
it really isn't

On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:28 PM, Natalie wrote:

 You throw it outside?  Not the poop, though, do you?
 I can't imagine doing that with all my cat's doodoosor all the  
 pee!

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:15 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural
 thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it
 around trees or compost it.
 On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:

 Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone
 used it
 before?

 I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in
 my
 town.

 On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

 Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda
 Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But
 I won't
 switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

 good to know, thanks for sharing!
 - Original Message -
 From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
 Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

 I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making  
 the
 switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any
 litter box
 odors.

 Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

 =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori
 and 6
 furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and  
 Sammi
 =^..^=
 - Original Message -
 From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I
 just
 checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have  
 an
 ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium
 Choice All
 Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies
 Plus
 and
 haven't opened/tried it yet.

 I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I
 used to
 use
 something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
 getting
 so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the  
 clumping
 clay -
 not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using
 regular
 litter and baking soda.

 Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to
 others
 I
 know who are using the clumping litter.

 Cindy


 - Original Message -
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
 To:
 felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

 The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners
 Trust
 Most

 Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

 Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
 litter.
 Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our
 feline
 friends
 including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly  
 even
 lung
 cancer.

 Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help  
 with
 absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your  
 cat
 digs
 in
 the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's
 lungs and
 can
 wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
 jeopardy.
 With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its
 lungs.
 Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

 Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet,
 is one
 of
 the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this
 clay to
 make
 their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural
 clay
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread MaiMaiPG
Totes are wonderful.  I leave the top off and the boys are young  
enough to jump in the 18 gallon totes and the lower larger ones are  
wonderful too.  I figured this out when I had a wonderful boy who,  
late in life, had issues getting positioned.  Besides the totes are a  
lot cheaper and more appropriately sized.  FYI:  They make great  
outdoor shelters too.

On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:57 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:



I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large  
however, I noticed that others have responded with no problems so I  
will try again (after deleting most of the original emails).  I have  
used Feline Pine at home before and the rescue group I am with used  
to use it at their Petsmart adoptions.  The smell (to me) was gawd  
awful after they had used the box even once and even customers  
complained about the smell in the adoption center.  We had to go  
back to scoopable in both places but especially at the store because  
people would not go in to meet the cats due to the smell and it was  
scooped on a regular basis.


For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large  
Rubbermaid Totes.  Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats  
can get in and out and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from  
peeing over the side.  We also use a low dust litter.  So far, our  
cats have done well and most of our cats are 12 and up.


Edna



Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
From: athenapities...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop.  
It got

good online reviews.




On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle  
athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:


Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone  
used it

before?



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Susan Hoffman
I had the same experience with the feline Pine.  It smells like moldy wood to 
me.  Bought one bag and never again.

I think we may need to make a distinction between rescue households with a lot 
of cats and a constant parade of fosters coming and going and a household with 
just a few pet cats.  Mine is a rescue household and I have adopters coming too 
the house so I have to make sure it doesn't stink.  I've been using clumping 
litter for more than 10 years and we've never had a problem.  (When I fostered 
kittens though I used the old fashioned non-clumping clay litter because 
kittens have been known to try to eat litter.)



--- On Fri, 7/8/11, Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com wrote:

 From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, July 8, 2011, 2:57 PM
 
 I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too
 large however, I noticed that others have responded with no
 problems so I will try again (after deleting most of the
 original emails).  I have used Feline Pine at home
 before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at
 their Petsmart adoptions.  The smell (to me) was gawd
 awful after they had used the box even once and even
 customers complained about the smell in the adoption
 center.  We had to go back to scoopable in both places
 but especially at the store because people would not go in
 to meet the cats due to the smell and it was scooped on a
 regular basis.
  
 For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large
 Rubbermaid Totes.  Frank cuts a large hole in one end
 so the cats can get in and out and it prevents our elevator
 b*tt peers from peeing over the side.  We also use a
 low dust litter.  So far, our cats have done well and
 most of our cats are 12 and up.
  
 Edna
  
 
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
  From: athenapities...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter,
 Sweat Scoop. It got
  good online reviews.
  
  
  
  
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
  
   Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline
 Pine - has anyone used it
   before?
  
     
 
       
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
I've used Feline Pine for years! It really controls the odor and have never 
experienced a cat that does not like it, but I'm sure there may be some out 
there that don't. But mine have no problem with it :)



- Original Message - 
From: Katy Doyle athenapities...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 2:56 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used it
before?

I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in my
town.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:


Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But I 
won't

switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

good to know, thanks for sharing!
- Original Message -
From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
 Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

 I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the
 switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any litter box
 odors.

 Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

 =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori and 6
 furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi
 =^..^=
  - Original Message -
  From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


  Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just
  checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
  ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice 
 All
  Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies 
 Plus

 and
  haven't opened/tried it yet.

  I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to
 use
  something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
 getting
  so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping
 clay -
  not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using 
 regular

  litter and baking soda.

  Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to 
 others

 I
  know who are using the clumping litter.

  Cindy


  - Original Message -
  From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


   Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
  
   The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust
 Most
  
   Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
  
   Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
 litter.
   Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
   friends
   including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even
 lung
   cancer.
  
   Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
   absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat
 digs
   in
   the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs 
 and

 can
   wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
 jeopardy.
   With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its
 lungs.
   Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
  
   Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is 
 one

 of
   the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay 
 to

 make
   their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural 
 clay

   ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not
 always
   safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and 
 forms

 a
   hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
 stirring
   up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
   expands
   from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
   problems
   like the ones mentioned above.
  
   Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do
Not
   Let
   Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your
 cat
   from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your 
 cat

   from
   grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from 
 swatting

 and
   nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
I don't buy the pellets. It was too hard on my cats feet. I buy the kind 
that is already turned into saw dustit works wonders.



- Original Message - 
From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


There is 124 acres to put it on.  Poop gets pitched into unused 
fields--far from the house.  I can't see a difference between theirs  and 
that of the numerous cats who stray this way/deer/buzzards/turkey  etc. 
The pee turns the pellets into sawdust.  It may sound gross but  it really 
isn't


On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:28 PM, Natalie wrote:


You throw it outside?  Not the poop, though, do you?
I can't imagine doing that with all my cat's doodoosor all the  pee!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:15 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural
thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it
around trees or compost it.
On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:


Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone
used it
before?

I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in
my
town.

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:


Same here - I might try it on a very small group.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda
Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But
I won't
switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!

good to know, thanks for sharing!
- Original Message -
From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this

I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making  the
switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any
litter box
odors.

Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.

=^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori
and 6
furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and  Sammi
=^..^=
- Original Message -
From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I
just
checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have  an
ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium
Choice All
Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies
Plus
and
haven't opened/tried it yet.

I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I
used to
use
something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
getting
so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the  clumping
clay -
not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using
regular
litter and baking soda.

Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to
others
I
know who are using the clumping litter.

Cindy


- Original Message -
From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
To:
felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!

The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners
Trust

Most


Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning

Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to

litter.

Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our
feline
friends
including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly  even

lung

cancer.

Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help  with
absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your  cat

digs

in
the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's
lungs and

can

wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in

jeopardy.

With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its

lungs.

Damage can occur in just a short period of time.

Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet,
is one

of

the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this
clay to

make

their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural
clay
ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not

always

safe. Here's the problem: When this 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes in 
a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home in 
an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in 
our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as 
the cats.



- Original Message - 
From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =




I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I 
noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again 
(after deleting most of the original emails).  I have used Feline Pine at 
home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their 
Petsmart adoptions.  The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used 
the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the 
adoption center.  We had to go back to scoopable in both places but 
especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats 
due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.


For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid 
Totes.  Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out 
and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side.  We 
also use a low dust litter.  So far, our cats have done well and most of 
our cats are 12 and up.


Edna



Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
From: athenapities...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It 
got

good online reviews.




On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:


 Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used 
 it

 before?



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org





___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Edna Taylor

I agree Susan.  I think with a couple of cats, the wheat or pine would be great 
but when the numbers are constantly changing and you sometimes have a Mom with 
kittens in a bathroom, an older litter in another room and some adults in yet 
another room, you have to use what keeps the smell down :)  Due to fostering I 
have repainted the study 3 times and the guest bedroom twice.  HOW can kittens 
get poop 4 feet up a wall??? :)
 
Oh, best invention EVER for a foster household is a Lampe Berger (Winterwood is 
my fav oil).  If you don't have one, I HIGHLY recommend getting a couple.  They 
are pricey but S worth it.
 
http://www.lampeberger.us/lampe-berger-official-website-luxury-fragrances-for-the-home
 

 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 15:09:47 -0700
 From: susan_hoff...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 I had the same experience with the feline Pine. It smells like moldy wood to 
 me. Bought one bag and never again.
 
 I think we may need to make a distinction between rescue households with a 
 lot of cats and a constant parade of fosters coming and going and a household 
 with just a few pet cats. Mine is a rescue household and I have adopters 
 coming too the house so I have to make sure it doesn't stink. I've been using 
 clumping litter for more than 10 years and we've never had a problem. (When I 
 fostered kittens though I used the old fashioned non-clumping clay litter 
 because kittens have been known to try to eat litter.)
 
 
 
 --- On Fri, 7/8/11, Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com wrote:
 
  From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Friday, July 8, 2011, 2:57 PM
  
  I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too
  large however, I noticed that others have responded with no
  problems so I will try again (after deleting most of the
  original emails).  I have used Feline Pine at home
  before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at
  their Petsmart adoptions.  The smell (to me) was gawd
  awful after they had used the box even once and even
  customers complained about the smell in the adoption
  center.  We had to go back to scoopable in both places
  but especially at the store because people would not go in
  to meet the cats due to the smell and it was scooped on a
  regular basis.
  
  For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large
  Rubbermaid Totes.  Frank cuts a large hole in one end
  so the cats can get in and out and it prevents our elevator
  b*tt peers from peeing over the side.  We also use a
  low dust litter.  So far, our cats have done well and
  most of our cats are 12 and up.
  
  Edna
  
  
   Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
   From: athenapities...@gmail.com
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
   
   Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter,
  Sweat Scoop. It got
   good online reviews.
   
   
   
   
   On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
   athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
   
Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline
  Pine - has anyone used it
before?
   
 
  


  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Maureen Olvey

Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink!  Maybe he's too good to have smelly poop!  
His name is Sugar after all.
 
Just kidding.  I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop.  Geez, couldn't 
believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my first cat about 
6 or 7 years ago.
 
It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different kinds 
of litter.  I guess that's why there are so many choices.  It gets so confusing 
though.
 
 
“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 

 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes in 
 a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home in 
 an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in 
 our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as 
 the cats.
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
 
  I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I 
  noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again 
  (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at 
  home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their 
  Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used 
  the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the 
  adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but 
  especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats 
  due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
 
  For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid 
  Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out 
  and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We 
  also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of 
  our cats are 12 and up.
 
  Edna
 
 
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
  From: athenapities...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It 
  got
  good online reviews.
 
 
 
 
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
  athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
 
   Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used 
   it
   before?
  
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
You are right Maureen, I can almost compare it to walking down the cereal 
isle in the grocery store, lol! There are too many choices of cat litters 
but they are finicky, right?!  You may think that we are just used to the 
smell, but many of my friends are honest and outspoken. They say they can't 
tell I have cats, so I'm assuming they are being honest. Hopefully they 
really are! I don't want my house to smell like a ginormous litter box.


Sugar does not think his poop stinks, so why should I, right?! Lol!! He's a 
keeper!!



- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 5:30 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink!  Maybe he's too good to have smelly 
poop!  His name is Sugar after all.


Just kidding.  I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop.  Geez, 
couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my 
first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.


It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different 
kinds of litter.  I guess that's why there are so many choices.  It gets so 
confusing though.



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain




From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes 
in
a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home 
in

an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in
our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as
the cats.


- Original Message - 
From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



 I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I
 noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again
 (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at
 home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their
 Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used
 the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the
 adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but
 especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats
 due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.

 For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid
 Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out
 and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We
 also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of
 our cats are 12 and up.

 Edna


 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
 From: athenapities...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It
 got
 good online reviews.




 On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle
 athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:

  Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used
  it
  before?
 

 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Maureen Olvey

If your friends come to your house and leave rather quickly then it might 
smell.  But if they stay and visit for a while then you're probably good  ;-)   
Especially if you have friends that don't have pets, they can't tolerate the 
smell for long.  
 
I bet Sugar is something else.  I've got one that doesn't think her poop smells 
either.  Her name is Spaz and she lives up to it every day.
 
 
 


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 

 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:39:04 -0500
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 You are right Maureen, I can almost compare it to walking down the cereal 
 isle in the grocery store, lol! There are too many choices of cat litters 
 but they are finicky, right?! You may think that we are just used to the 
 smell, but many of my friends are honest and outspoken. They say they can't 
 tell I have cats, so I'm assuming they are being honest. Hopefully they 
 really are! I don't want my house to smell like a ginormous litter box.
 
 Sugar does not think his poop stinks, so why should I, right?! Lol!! He's a 
 keeper!!
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 5:30 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
 
 Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink! Maybe he's too good to have smelly 
 poop! His name is Sugar after all.
 
 Just kidding. I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop. Geez, 
 couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my 
 first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.
 
 It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different 
 kinds of litter. I guess that's why there are so many choices. It gets so 
 confusing though.
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
 Twain
 
 
  From: longhornf...@verizon.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes 
  in
  a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home 
  in
  an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in
  our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as
  the cats.
 
 
  - Original Message - 
  From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  
   I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I
   noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again
   (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at
   home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their
   Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used
   the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the
   adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but
   especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats
   due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
  
   For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid
   Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out
   and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We
   also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of
   our cats are 12 and up.
  
   Edna
  
  
   Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
   From: athenapities...@gmail.com
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
   Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It
   got
   good online reviews.
  
  
  
  
   On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle
   athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
  
Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used
it
before?
   
  
   ___
   Felvtalk mailing list
   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
Are they called totes?
I use large Styrofoam containers to ship chemo to hospitals - a friend is an
oncology nurse practitioner and saves them for us. They're larger than
Styrofoam coolers, sturdier, and already insulated.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:08 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

Totes are wonderful.  I leave the top off and the boys are young  
enough to jump in the 18 gallon totes and the lower larger ones are  
wonderful too.  I figured this out when I had a wonderful boy who,  
late in life, had issues getting positioned.  Besides the totes are a  
lot cheaper and more appropriately sized.  FYI:  They make great  
outdoor shelters too.
On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:57 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:


 I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large  
 however, I noticed that others have responded with no problems so I  
 will try again (after deleting most of the original emails).  I have  
 used Feline Pine at home before and the rescue group I am with used  
 to use it at their Petsmart adoptions.  The smell (to me) was gawd  
 awful after they had used the box even once and even customers  
 complained about the smell in the adoption center.  We had to go  
 back to scoopable in both places but especially at the store because  
 people would not go in to meet the cats due to the smell and it was  
 scooped on a regular basis.

 For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large  
 Rubbermaid Totes.  Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats  
 can get in and out and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from  
 peeing over the side.  We also use a low dust litter.  So far, our  
 cats have done well and most of our cats are 12 and up.

 Edna


 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
 From: athenapities...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop.  
 It got
 good online reviews.




 On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle  
 athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:

 Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone  
 used it
 before?

   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Natalie
We have an almost 19 yr old cat - I swear, I should market the smell of her
poop: It could raise the dead!  It is so potent, that I wait at night until
she makes one or two before I go to bed.I bet she could win the
International smelliest poop contest!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:30 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink!  Maybe he's too good to have smelly
poop!  His name is Sugar after all.
 
Just kidding.  I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop.  Geez,
couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my
first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.
 
It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different
kinds of litter.  I guess that's why there are so many choices.  It gets so
confusing though.
 
 
I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain
 

 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes
in 
 a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home
in 
 an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in 
 our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as 
 the cats.
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
 
  I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I

  noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again 
  (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at

  home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their 
  Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used

  the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the 
  adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but 
  especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats 
  due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
 
  For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid 
  Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out

  and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We 
  also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of 
  our cats are 12 and up.
 
  Edna
 
 
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
  From: athenapities...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It 
  got
  good online reviews.
 
 
 
 
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
  athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
 
   Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used

   it
   before?
  
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Maureen Olvey

I doubt she could compete with my FIV + cat.  It has actually woken me up in 
the middle of the night.  It's really bad because he doesn't cover so as soon 
as I get the first whiff of it I drop everything and go running to find which 
litterbox he used and cover it immediately.  Even if I'm eating I put 
everything down and go take care of it.  It's not like I could eat anymore 
anyway!  Yuck.  Lots of times in the middle of winter I have my patio door wide 
open to get the smell out.
 
He's always had runny poop too.  Think it's cause of the FIV?  I heard that it 
can have that effect on them.  But then I wondered if it's something else.  Do 
any of you guys have FIV + cats that almost always have runny poops?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 

 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 19:36:48 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 We have an almost 19 yr old cat - I swear, I should market the smell of her
 poop: It could raise the dead! It is so potent, that I wait at night until
 she makes one or two before I go to bed.I bet she could win the
 International smelliest poop contest!
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:30 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
 Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink! Maybe he's too good to have smelly
 poop! His name is Sugar after all.
 
 Just kidding. I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop. Geez,
 couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my
 first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.
 
 It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different
 kinds of litter. I guess that's why there are so many choices. It gets so
 confusing though.
 
 
 I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
 profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
 Twain
 
 
  From: longhornf...@verizon.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes
 in 
  a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home
 in 
  an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in 
  our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as 
  the cats.
  
  
  - Original Message - 
  From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  
  
   I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I
 
   noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again 
   (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at
 
   home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their 
   Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used
 
   the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the 
   adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but 
   especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats 
   due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
  
   For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid 
   Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out
 
   and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We 
   also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of 
   our cats are 12 and up.
  
   Edna
  
  
   Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
   From: athenapities...@gmail.com
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
   Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It 
   got
   good online reviews.
  
  
  
  
   On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
   athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
  
Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used
 
it
before?
   
  
   ___
   Felvtalk mailing list
   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
   
  
  
  
  ___
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  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
Maureen, For the short time I had Crash, he had very loose stools and the 
fumes when he had a BM, could take the paint off the walls!  He had coccidia 
as you know when he was very young. Then he tested positive for FeLV. But 
before we knew this, my vet had put him on Royal Canin Feline High Energy 
Gastro-Intestinal (HE30) dry food and it worked well for him. His stools 
became formed but not near as stinky but still somewhat soft.  It was not 
perfect, but it certainly was an improvement.  See if this will work for 
yours as well.


Poop smells anyway, but when it practically takes the wallpaper/paint off, 
then you have to try something.  Good luck!


L
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:45 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =



I doubt she could compete with my FIV + cat.  It has actually woken me up in 
the middle of the night.  It's really bad because he doesn't cover so as 
soon as I get the first whiff of it I drop everything and go running to find 
which litterbox he used and cover it immediately.  Even if I'm eating I put 
everything down and go take care of it.  It's not like I could eat anymore 
anyway!  Yuck.  Lots of times in the middle of winter I have my patio door 
wide open to get the smell out.


He's always had runny poop too.  Think it's cause of the FIV?  I heard that 
it can have that effect on them.  But then I wondered if it's something 
else.  Do any of you guys have FIV + cats that almost always have runny 
poops?



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain




Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 19:36:48 -0400
From: at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

We have an almost 19 yr old cat - I swear, I should market the smell of 
her

poop: It could raise the dead! It is so potent, that I wait at night until
she makes one or two before I go to bed.I bet she could win the
International smelliest poop contest!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:30 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink! Maybe he's too good to have smelly
poop! His name is Sugar after all.

Just kidding. I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop. Geez,
couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my
first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.

It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different
kinds of litter. I guess that's why there are so many choices. It gets so
confusing though.


I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain


 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

 I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes
in
 a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at 
 home

in
 an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) 
 in
 our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well 
 as

 the cats.


 - Original Message - 
 From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com

 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


 
  I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, 
  I


  noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try 
  again
  (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine 
  at


  home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their
  Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had 
  used


  the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the
  adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but
  especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the 
  cats

  due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
 
  For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid
  Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and 
  out


  and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We
  also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most 
  of

  our cats are 12 and up.
 
  Edna
 
 
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
  

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
I had tried Feline Pine, but it does not scoop very well, especially with Dee, 
she covers and covers again and ten again until she destroys the clumps.
I have been using World's Best Cat Litter.  You can find it at Petsmart or 
Tractor supply.  It is made fromcorn, clumps great (even with Dee doing her 
best to destroy the clumps) and holds down the odor.  With 7 cats, I use the 
Multi Ca formula.  If you want, you can add some baking soda or cedar to the 
litter.  Of course, I scoop the boxes 2 times a day and sometimes 3 times.  
Then you have Harley, who sometimes passes gas when he gets excited.  Get out 
the clothspins time then.  The best thing about World's Best, is that it is 
okay to put in the compost  or just pick a spot with lots of leaves, add a bit 
of sand and each day put the litter there and cover it.  Dung beetles, etc. 
will take care of the rest of it.  I do not have any smell around the house.
 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 We have an almost 19 yr old cat - I swear, I should market the smell of her
 poop: It could raise the dead!  It is so potent, that I wait at night until
 she makes one or two before I go to bed.I bet she could win the
 International smelliest poop contest!
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:30 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
 Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink!  Maybe he's too good to have smelly
 poop!  His name is Sugar after all.
  
 Just kidding.  I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop.  Geez,
 couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my
 first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.
  
 It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different
 kinds of litter.  I guess that's why there are so many choices.  It gets so
 confusing though.
  
  
 I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
 profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
 Twain
  
 
  From: longhornf...@verizon.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes
 in 
  a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home
 in 
  an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in 
  our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as 
  the cats.
  
  
  - Original Message - 
  From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  
  
   I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I
 
   noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again 
   (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at
 
   home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their 
   Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used
 
   the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the 
   adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but 
   especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats 
   due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
  
   For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid 
   Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out
 
   and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We 
   also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of 
   our cats are 12 and up.
  
   Edna
  
  
   Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
   From: athenapities...@gmail.com
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
   Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It 
   got
   good online reviews.
  
  
  
  
   On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
   athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
  
Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used
 
it
before?
   
  
   ___
   Felvtalk mailing list
   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
   
  
  
  
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
Styrofoam?  Harley and Dee would make hash out of them in no time.  If it 
resist the claws, it gets clawed to death.
 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 Are they called totes?
 I use large Styrofoam containers to ship chemo to hospitals - a friend is an
 oncology nurse practitioner and saves them for us. They're larger than
 Styrofoam coolers, sturdier, and already insulated.
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:08 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 Totes are wonderful.  I leave the top off and the boys are young  
 enough to jump in the 18 gallon totes and the lower larger ones are  
 wonderful too.  I figured this out when I had a wonderful boy who,  
 late in life, had issues getting positioned.  Besides the totes are a  
 lot cheaper and more appropriately sized.  FYI:  They make great  
 outdoor shelters too.
 On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:57 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
 
 
  I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large  
  however, I noticed that others have responded with no problems so I  
  will try again (after deleting most of the original emails).  I have  
  used Feline Pine at home before and the rescue group I am with used  
  to use it at their Petsmart adoptions.  The smell (to me) was gawd  
  awful after they had used the box even once and even customers  
  complained about the smell in the adoption center.  We had to go  
  back to scoopable in both places but especially at the store because  
  people would not go in to meet the cats due to the smell and it was  
  scooped on a regular basis.
 
  For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large  
  Rubbermaid Totes.  Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats  
  can get in and out and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from  
  peeing over the side.  We also use a low dust litter.  So far, our  
  cats have done well and most of our cats are 12 and up.
 
  Edna
 
 
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
  From: athenapities...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop.  
  It got
  good online reviews.
 
 
 
 
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle  
  athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
 
  Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone  
  used it
  before?
 
  
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
My Boby was urinating out of the box, all over the house.  He had a problem 
with salcite and sturivite stones.  Then Casey had stones.  She got over them, 
but Bobby did not.  Being a male, the urether was more narrow and he did not 
make it tru the treatment time.  Homey is doing gret now.  I would check hm out 
with the vet and take a fresh urine sample for testing.  I found a special 
litter box that uses safflower seed instead of litter.  It allows the urine to 
go thru to a collection box that has a pour spout so you can pur it into a pill 
bottle and take it to the vet.  It was pricey ($60.00) but really comes in 
handy when you suspect a urinary tract infection or stones.  Also great for 
diabetic cats - invented by a lady with a diabetic cat.  Only thing is they 
have to be seperated from the others so there is no chance of others using the 
box.
 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
 type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for cats
 that don't like any kind of litter!
 BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
 When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
 holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
 then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
 time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
 not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When I 
 had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the waterproof 
 mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This is 
 what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever since. 
 Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet said 
 the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an exception 
 at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the 
 litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and fill
 
 them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's better 
 than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.
 
 I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted :)
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
  This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up 
  and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.
 
  I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the 
  litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months 
  ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 3
 
  years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his 
  other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated 
  on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was 
  fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs. 
  They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.
 
  He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 days.
 
  There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use 
  his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but 
  I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a 
  clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was 
  told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...
 
  In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a 
  urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and 
  gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.
 
  The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't 
  really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a 
  culture. She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones. 
  This is not my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We 
  want to do what's necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra funds
 
  for tests/procedures that are not necessary.
 
  If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these procedures,
 
  I wouldn't hesitate, but I get the feeling this vet is more interested in 
  money. The other reason I say this is because we just spent more than $100
 
  on flea products recommended by another vet in this office. When I 
  mentioned today that the Frontline doesn't seem to be helping the flea 
  situation, the vet and tech both said 

Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson
What a great invention of a litter box! I might have purchased it when I had 
my diabetic cat. She passed away 2 yrs ago.  She made it easy for me to 
catch her urine mid-stream. She would squat close to the litter but not sit 
on it, with her rear end towards me and I could catch it in a small, 
sterilized bottle cap. Then I could get her keytone level by dipping the 
strip into her urine. I had to prick her ear to get her blood to get her 
glucose. I did this for 9 yrs (she lived to be 17 1/2 yrs).  I still miss 
her even though she was a lot of work.


RIP, Pebbles!

Sorry, I got carried away...

L


- Original Message - 
From: dlg...@windstream.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:47 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


My Boby was urinating out of the box, all over the house.  He had a 
problem with salcite and sturivite stones.  Then Casey had stones.  She 
got over them, but Bobby did not.  Being a male, the urether was more 
narrow and he did not make it tru the treatment time.  Homey is doing gret 
now.  I would check hm out with the vet and take a fresh urine sample for 
testing.  I found a special litter box that uses safflower seed instead of 
litter.  It allows the urine to go thru to a collection box that has a 
pour spout so you can pur it into a pill bottle and take it to the vet. 
It was pricey ($60.00) but really comes in handy when you suspect a 
urinary tract infection or stones.  Also great for diabetic cats - 
invented by a lady with a diabetic cat.  Only thing is they have to be 
seperated from the others so there is no chance of others using the box.

 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for 
cats

that don't like any kind of litter!
BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When 
I
had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the 
waterproof
mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This 
is
what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever 
since.
Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet 
said
the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an 
exception

at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the
litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and 
fill


them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's 
better

than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.

I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted 
:)


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


 This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting 
 up

 and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.

 I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
 litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several 
 months
 ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement 
 for 3


 years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his
 other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he 
 urinated

 on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was
 fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs.
 They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.

 He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 
 days.


 There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use
 his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, 
 but
 I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used 
 a

 clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was
 told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...

 In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a
 urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, 
 and

 gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.

 The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it 
 wouldn't

 really give us much information and I 

Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
iT ISN' THE WORK INVOLVED IN CARING FOR THEM, IT IS WHAT YOU GET BACK FROM THEM 
IN RETURN THAT COUNTS!  
A friend of mine had to follow her little dog around the yard with a shallow 
dish to catch the urine for the vet.  She said she hoped that the neighbors 
never saw her, or they would have thought she was crazy.  Folks around here 
just do not think you need to go to all that trouble for cats and dogs, 
ESPECIALLY CATS.  They think I am crazy because I take my pride to the vet for 
shots, etc.  The only thing they are good for is out in the barn to catch mice. 
 I have earned the name Crazy Cat Lady
 Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net wrote: 
 What a great invention of a litter box! I might have purchased it when I had 
 my diabetic cat. She passed away 2 yrs ago.  She made it easy for me to 
 catch her urine mid-stream. She would squat close to the litter but not sit 
 on it, with her rear end towards me and I could catch it in a small, 
 sterilized bottle cap. Then I could get her keytone level by dipping the 
 strip into her urine. I had to prick her ear to get her blood to get her 
 glucose. I did this for 9 yrs (she lived to be 17 1/2 yrs).  I still miss 
 her even though she was a lot of work.
 
 RIP, Pebbles!
 
 Sorry, I got carried away...
 
 L
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: dlg...@windstream.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:47 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
  My Boby was urinating out of the box, all over the house.  He had a 
  problem with salcite and sturivite stones.  Then Casey had stones.  She 
  got over them, but Bobby did not.  Being a male, the urether was more 
  narrow and he did not make it tru the treatment time.  Homey is doing gret 
  now.  I would check hm out with the vet and take a fresh urine sample for 
  testing.  I found a special litter box that uses safflower seed instead of 
  litter.  It allows the urine to go thru to a collection box that has a 
  pour spout so you can pur it into a pill bottle and take it to the vet. 
  It was pricey ($60.00) but really comes in handy when you suspect a 
  urinary tract infection or stones.  Also great for diabetic cats - 
  invented by a lady with a diabetic cat.  Only thing is they have to be 
  seperated from the others so there is no chance of others using the box.
   Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:
  Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
  type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for 
  cats
  that don't like any kind of litter!
  BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
  When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
  holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
  then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
  time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
  not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
  My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When 
  I
  had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the 
  waterproof
  mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This 
  is
  what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever 
  since.
  Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet 
  said
  the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an 
  exception
  at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the
  litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and 
  fill
 
  them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's 
  better
  than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.
 
  I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted 
  :)
 
  Lynda
  - Original Message - 
  From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
   This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting 
   up
   and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.
  
   I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
   litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several 
   months
   ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement 
   for 3
 
   years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his
   other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he 
   urinated
   on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was
   fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to 

Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread Christiane Biagi
As someone who followed my little dog around with a dish to catch urine on a
very busy street in front of my apt house, I can relate!  I just put my head
down  wouldn't look at any passer by. LOL

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of
dlg...@windstream.net
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 10:33 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

iT ISN' THE WORK INVOLVED IN CARING FOR THEM, IT IS WHAT YOU GET BACK FROM
THEM IN RETURN THAT COUNTS!  
A friend of mine had to follow her little dog around the yard with a shallow
dish to catch the urine for the vet.  She said she hoped that the neighbors
never saw her, or they would have thought she was crazy.  Folks around here
just do not think you need to go to all that trouble for cats and dogs,
ESPECIALLY CATS.  They think I am crazy because I take my pride to the vet
for shots, etc.  The only thing they are good for is out in the barn to
catch mice.  I have earned the name Crazy Cat Lady
 Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net wrote: 
 What a great invention of a litter box! I might have purchased it when 
 I had my diabetic cat. She passed away 2 yrs ago.  She made it easy 
 for me to catch her urine mid-stream. She would squat close to the 
 litter but not sit on it, with her rear end towards me and I could 
 catch it in a small, sterilized bottle cap. Then I could get her 
 keytone level by dipping the strip into her urine. I had to prick her 
 ear to get her blood to get her glucose. I did this for 9 yrs (she 
 lived to be 17 1/2 yrs).  I still miss her even though she was a lot of
work.
 
 RIP, Pebbles!
 
 Sorry, I got carried away...
 
 L
 
 
 - Original Message -
 From: dlg...@windstream.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:47 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
  My Boby was urinating out of the box, all over the house.  He had a 
  problem with salcite and sturivite stones.  Then Casey had stones.  
  She got over them, but Bobby did not.  Being a male, the urether was 
  more narrow and he did not make it tru the treatment time.  Homey is 
  doing gret now.  I would check hm out with the vet and take a fresh 
  urine sample for testing.  I found a special litter box that uses 
  safflower seed instead of litter.  It allows the urine to go thru to 
  a collection box that has a pour spout so you can pur it into a pill
bottle and take it to the vet.
  It was pricey ($60.00) but really comes in handy when you suspect a 
  urinary tract infection or stones.  Also great for diabetic cats - 
  invented by a lady with a diabetic cat.  Only thing is they have to 
  be seperated from the others so there is no chance of others using the
box.
   Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:
  Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't 
  like the type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded 
  newspaper for cats that don't like any kind of litter!
  BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
  When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by 
  gently holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the 
  wet area, and then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the 
  litter clean for a long time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use 
  clumping litter; regular litter may not clump into a hard ball, but it
can easily be removed!
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda 
  Wilson
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
  My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? 
  When I had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy 
  the waterproof mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he 
  wanted another. This is what my vet advised me. He got another box 
  and he has been fine ever since.
  Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My 
  vet said the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat 
  was an exception at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two 
  weeks, I empty all the litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid 
  lysol, dry them thoroughly and fill
 
  them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but 
  it's better than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.
 
  I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us 
  posted
  :)
 
  Lynda
  - Original Message -
  From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
   This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is 
   acting up and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat 
   discussion list.
  
   I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of 
   the 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
I just have 25 acres nd I just walk down the grvel roa and into the woods a it. 
 I have never noticed any smell coming from the area I dump it in. It is made 
from ground up corn (World's Best Cat Litter) so the clumps break down in the  
rain and the dung beetles, etc take care of the rest of it.  My guys love it so 
I am sticking with it.  I tried the Feline Pine (pellets) and we wanted nothing 
to do with it.  Same with the Sweat.  Wehad more out of the box problems than 
ever.   
 MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com wrote: 
 There is 124 acres to put it on.  Poop gets pitched into unused  
 fields--far from the house.  I can't see a difference between theirs  
 and that of the numerous cats who stray this way/deer/buzzards/turkey  
 etc. The pee turns the pellets into sawdust.  It may sound gross but  
 it really isn't
 
 On Jul 8, 2011, at 4:28 PM, Natalie wrote:
 
  You throw it outside?  Not the poop, though, do you?
  I can't imagine doing that with all my cat's doodoosor all the  
  pee!
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:15 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural
  thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it
  around trees or compost it.
  On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:
 
  Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone
  used it
  before?
 
  I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in
  my
  town.
 
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:
 
  Same here - I might try it on a very small group.
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda
  Wilson
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But
  I won't
  switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!
 
  good to know, thanks for sharing!
  - Original Message -
  From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
  Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this
 
  I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making  
  the
  switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any
  litter box
  odors.
 
  Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.
 
  =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori
  and 6
  furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and  
  Sammi
  =^..^=
  - Original Message -
  From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I
  just
  checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have  
  an
  ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium
  Choice All
  Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies
  Plus
  and
  haven't opened/tried it yet.
 
  I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I
  used to
  use
  something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
  getting
  so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the  
  clumping
  clay -
  not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using
  regular
  litter and baking soda.
 
  Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to
  others
  I
  know who are using the clumping litter.
 
  Cindy
 
 
  - Original Message -
  From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
  To:
  felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners
  Trust
  Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
  litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our
  feline
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly  
  even
  lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help  
  with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your  
  cat
  digs
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's
  lungs and
  can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
  

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
Go on their website, they should be able to tell you a store near you that 
carries it.


 MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com wrote: 
 I like it a lot.  My boys came from a pine thicket so it was a natural  
 thing for them.  I can pitch the sawdust into the fields, use it  
 around trees or compost it.
 On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:56 PM, Katy Doyle wrote:
 
  Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone  
  used it
  before?
 
  I'd be interested in trying the ExquisiCat, but no stores sell it in  
  my
  town.
 
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:21 PM, Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:
 
  Same here - I might try it on a very small group.
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda  
  Wilson
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 1:19 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
  I've seen that brand and have always wondered how cats like it. But  
  I won't
  switch unless they tell me they want a change, lol!
 
  good to know, thanks for sharing!
  - Original Message -
  From: Terri Brown siggies...@hotmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Petsmart carries a wheat litter that is relatively inexpensive.
  Exquisicat Natural Wheat.  I'm transitioning to this
 
  I bought a bag for my FLUTD boy, and the gang seems to be making the
  switch well.  It's also scoopable, and I haven't noticed any  
  litter box
  odors.
 
  Maybe give this a try.  It's a little cheaper than Swheat Scoop.
 
  =^..^= Terri, Siggie the Tomato Vampire, Guinevere, Travis, Dori  
  and 6
  furangels: Ruthie, Samantha, Arielle, Gareth, Alec, Salome and Sammi
  =^..^=
  - Original Message -
  From: Cindy McHughmailto:ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:08 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I  
  just
  checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an
  ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium  
  Choice All
  Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies  
  Plus
  and
  haven't opened/tried it yet.
 
  I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I  
  used to
  use
  something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was
  getting
  so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping
  clay -
  not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using  
  regular
  litter and baking soda.
 
  Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to  
  others
  I
  know who are using the clumping litter.
 
  Cindy
 
 
  - Original Message -
  From: Natalie at...@optonline.netmailto:at...@optonline.net
  To:  
  felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgmailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners  
  Trust
  Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to
  litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our  
  feline
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even
  lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat
  digs
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's  
  lungs and
  can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in
  jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its
  lungs.
  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet,  
  is one
  of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this  
  clay to
  make
  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural  
  clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not
  always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and  
  forms
  a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's
  stirring
  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do
  Not
  Let
  Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop  
  your
  cat
  from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop  
  your cat
  from
  grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from  
  swatting
  and
  

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
What about natural alternatives?  Try the Only Natural Pet store on line.  They 
have a great Chinese herbal that I used for Homey when she had her crystal 
problem.
 Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote: 
 
 Oh - since you guys mentioned asthma I just wanted to throw out there that if 
 any of your kitties ever develop asthma there is a wonderful feline asthma 
 group.  The people on that list know more about it than a lot of vets because 
 it's not that common and they've had years of experience with it.  I have a 
 cat with asthma and with their help I got him on inhaled medications, same 
 kind that humans use, and it's wonderful and keeps his asthma under control.  
 Not nearly as hard on the body as prednisone or other steroids which is how 
 asthma in cats is usually controlled.  Lots of vets have not had experience 
 with using inhaled medications (Flovent) on cats so they either tell owners 
 to put their cats on prednisone or steriod shots for the rest of their life.  
 Or the vets that know about inhaled meds for cats will start them on the 
 lowest dosage of Flovent and then when it doesn't help the asthma the vet 
 thinks inhaled meds doesn't work for cats.  This asthma group is great and 
 can help get a kitty on the right dosage and give you lots of tips to get 
 them used to using the Aerokat to do the inhaled treatments.
  
 I also use an online pharmacy called 4 Corners which is located in New 
 Zealand, to get the meds.  It's one third of the cost as the drugs in the U.S.
  
 Anyway, just wanted you guys to know so if you ever need help with an asthma 
 kitty go straight to that group.  I don't know what I would have done without 
 them.  My vet knew about asthma and even gave me an Aerokat but she didn't 
 think it was easy to get a cat to take inhaled meds so she just recommended a 
 steroid shot every 6 weeks.  Thank God I found the group.
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
  
 
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 09:51:15 -0400
  From: at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  That's because we assume that everything we buy must be safe for them!
  It's a shame that we have to be so suspicious of everything and question
  every bit of info!
  
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Katy Doyle
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:40 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  Wow... You know, the dusty clay litter gives me asthma attacks, I'm ashamed
  that I never thought of how it would affect my cats.
  
  On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 9:33 AM, Lynda Wilson
  longhornf...@verizon.netwrote:
  
   Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust.
   Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around.
   What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long
   time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps
   the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not
  Petco,
   they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as
  well,
   but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.
  
   Thanks so much :)
   Lynda
  
   - Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
   Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  
   Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
  
   The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
  
   Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
  
   Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
   Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline
   friends
   including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
   cancer.
  
   Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
   absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs
   in
   the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and
  can
   wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
   With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
   Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
  
   Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
   the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to
  make
   their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
   ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
   safe. Here's the problem: When this clay 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
I have gotten very parinoid about everything made for pets.  Especially since I 
found that my guys were upchucking all the time because of the corn, wheat or 
soy in their food (Science Diet).  I switched to Blue Buffalo Duck and no more 
upchucks except for Casey when I forget to give her additional hairball meds.  
She has long Persian like fur, very silky, fine and she is a meticulous groomer.


 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 We get our litter at Walmart - cheapest there, even though we get a discount
 at PetSmart.
 The problem is that they are still pushing and selling all kinds of clumping
 litter as if it were something special for your beloved cats!
 My husband bought a small fabric toy for the cats, and I decided to read the
 label: It said to be careful, make sure that cats don't tear the fabric and
 eat the contents because it could cause serious injury or death! Mad in
 China, and who oversees the safety of things coming in?
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:33 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust. 
 Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around. 
 What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long 
 time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps 
 the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not Petco,
 
 they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as well,
 
 but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.
 
 Thanks so much :)
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
  Let
  Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
  from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
  from
  grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
  nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
  the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
  cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form
 
  a
  hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.
 
  The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
  litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
  dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
  simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
  non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
  recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
  pet.
  You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
  you're
  worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
  litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
  instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
  has a filter for odor control.
 
  Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
  litter, hope you will pass this information on 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg

 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 We get our litter at Walmart - cheapest there, even though we get a discount
 at PetSmart.
 The problem is that they are still pushing and selling all kinds of clumping
 litter as if it were something special for your beloved cats!
 My husband bought a small fabric toy for the cats, and I decided to read the
 label: It said to be careful, make sure that cats don't tear the fabric and
 eat the contents because it could cause serious injury or death! 
Mad in
 China, and who oversees the safety of things coming in?  AT TIMES, I 
 THINK NO ONE IS CHECKING.  I JUST DO NOT TRUST ANYONE SO I READ LABELS ON 
 EVERYTHING.
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:33 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 Thanks, Natalie. I've never used clay litter or anything that makes dust. 
 Can you imagine being enclosed in a box with all that dust flying around. 
 What were they thinking back in the day?! I've used Feline Pine for a long 
 time and all my cats through the years have all accepted it. It sure keeps 
 the smell down as well. The cheapest place to get it it Petsmart (not Petco,
 
 they are extremely higher for some reason). It last for a long time as well,
 
 but like I said, I dump it just to keep Sugar happy.
 
 Thanks so much :)
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 7:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
  Let
  Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
  from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
  from
  grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
  nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
  the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
  cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form
 
  a
  hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.
 
  The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
  litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
  dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
  simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
  non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
  recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
  pet.
  You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
  you're
  worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
  litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
  instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
  has a filter for odor control.
 
  Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
  litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
  saving the health or life of an animal.
 
 
 
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 
 
 

Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg

 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 We have to use a good basic litter because of cost - when you have to
 provide litter for over 70 cats, we prefer spending the money on good food!
aCTUALLY, THE wROLD'S bEST mULTI CAT IS NOT ALL THAT EXPENSIVE CONSIDERING THAT 
YOU DO NOT HVE TO CHANGE IT THAT OFTEN.  i SCOOP 2, SOMETIMES 3 TIMES A DAY SO 
THE LITTER STAYS CLEAN LONGER AND MY GUYS DON'T SEEM TO HAVE A PROBLEM WITH IT. 
 AS LONG AS EACH ONE HAS HIS OR HER OWN BOX.
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:13 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 Good advice, I will try it as well. By the way, I use Feline Pine (it's 
 similar to saw dust, without the dust, lol!). But my cat, Sugar, only 
 urinated once outside the box onto our bed. Glad that it was only once, and 
 the problem was solved quick.
 
 Have a great weekend everyone!
 - Original Message - 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 2:03 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
  Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like the
  type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for cats
  that don't like any kind of litter!
  BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
  When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by gently
  holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, and
  then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a long
  time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter may
  not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Wilson
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
  My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? When I
  had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the 
  waterproof
  mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. This 
  is
  what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever 
  since.
  Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet said
  the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an 
  exception
  at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all the
  litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly and 
  fill
 
  them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's 
  better
  than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.
 
  I hope nothing is medically wrong with him. Good luck, and keep us posted 
  :)
 
  Lynda
  - Original Message - 
  From: Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:23 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] UTI Question
 
 
  This is a little off topic, but please forgive me. My email is acting up
  and I've been unsubbed from my more general cat discussion list.
 
  I'm fostering a neutered male cat that is urinating outside of the
  litterbox. This was one of the reasons he was relinquished several months
  ago - and one of the reasons his former owner kept him in a basement for 
  3
 
  years. He seemed to be doing well here and was overcoming some of his
  other issues (aggression and obsessive licking/chewing), but he urinated
  on my bed about 2 months ago and then on an upholstered chair. I was
  fostering 2 dogs at the time and attributed it to stress over the dogs.
  They were adopted and all was well until a couple days ago.
 
  He's urinated on a chair and on the bare floor 3 times in the past 2 
  days.
 
  There's large amounts of urnie, no trace of blood, and he does also use
  his litterbox. I don't think he has a UTI based on his past behavior, but
  I thought I'd run him to the vet to be sure. I'm not at home, so I used a
  clinic that is relatively new to me and I was surprised by what I was
  told, so I thought I'd run it by you folks...
 
  In the past, when I've suspected a UTI in a dog or cat, I simply took a
  urine sample (dog) or took the cat and they obtained one, checked it, and
  gave me an answer and antibiotic if needed.
 
  The vet today told me they could do an in house check, but it wouldn't
  really give us much information and I advised I send it away for a
  culture. She also suggested they x-ray his abdomen to check for stones.
  This is not my cat, but it is in the care of a rescue I co-founded. We
  want to do what's necessary to help the cat, but we don't have extra 
  funds
 
  for tests/procedures that are not necessary.
 
  If I had seen my regular vet (at home) and she suggested these 
  procedures,
 
  I wouldn't 

Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
I fond the Arm  Hammer to be extremely dusty, also a litter that said it was 
made from desert sand.  Krger carried it.  I got one box and tried it in one of 
the boxes.  Threw it out the next day.  The cats and I were sneezing and I 
found a fine coat of dust all over my room.

 Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org wrote: 
 Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just 
 checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an 
 ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All 
 Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus and 
 haven't opened/tried it yet.
 
 I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to use 
 something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was getting 
 so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping clay - 
 not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular 
 litter and baking soda.
 
 Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others I 
 know who are using the clumping litter.
 
 Cindy
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
  Let
  Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
  from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
  from
  grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
  nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
  the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
  cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form 
  a
  hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.
 
  The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
  litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
  dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
  simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
  non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
  recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
  pet.
  You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
  you're
  worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
  litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
  instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
  has a filter for odor control.
 
  Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
  litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
  saving the health or life of an animal.
 
 
 
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
  Forgot to mention tat I have 2 litter boxes in my bedroom and no ODOR PRBLEM. 
 eITHER THAT OR MY SINUSES ARE CLOGGED UP.

 Cindy McHugh ci...@furangels.org wrote: 
 Oh my goodness! Thank you so much for sharing this information. I just 
 checked both types of litter I have in the house and neither have an 
 ingredient label. One is Fresh Step and the other is Premium Choice All 
 Natural Unscented. I just found the Premium Choice at Pet Supplies Plus and 
 haven't opened/tried it yet.
 
 I tried Feline Pine previously, but the cats didn't like it. I used to use 
 something by Arm  Hammer that was almost like saw dust, but it was getting 
 so expensive as I took in more cats that I went back to the clumping clay - 
 not realizing the risks. I'll try the method you described using regular 
 litter and baking soda.
 
 Thanks again for sharing this info. I'll be sure to pass it on to others I 
 know who are using the clumping litter.
 
 Cindy
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:36 AM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
  Here's more, and this is just the tip of the iceberg!
 
  The #1 Authority On Pet Products, Care and Services Pet Owners Trust Most
 
  Kitty Litter with a Serious Warning
 
  Vets have been reporting more and more kitty illnesses related to litter.
  Certain litters are actually causing serious problems for our feline 
  friends
  including asthma, bronchitis, intestinal blockage and possibly even lung
  cancer.
 
  Most litters are loaded with chemicals to reduce odor and help with
  absorption. These chemicals are released into the air when your cat digs 
  in
  the litter box. The dust from the litter gets into the cat's lungs and can
  wreak havoc on its immune system, putting his or her health in jeopardy.
  With every visit to the litter box, your cat may be polluting its lungs.
  Damage can occur in just a short period of time.
 
  Clumping clay litter, which forms a hard ball when it gets wet, is one of
  the most harmful types on the market. Several brands use this clay to make
  their litter easier to scoop. What makes it clump? It's a natural clay
  ingredient called sodium bentonite. In this case, natural is not always
  safe. Here's the problem: When this clay gets wet it expands and forms a
  hard mass. So when your cat or kitten digs in the litter box it's stirring
  up clay dust and breathing it in. Once it gets into their lungs, it 
  expands
  from the moisture, and in time builds up, causing all sorts of lung 
  problems
  like the ones mentioned above.
 
  Some clumping litters actually post a warning right on the bag; Do Not 
  Let
  Cat Ingest Litter. It is ridiculous to think that you can stop your cat
  from breathing while visiting the litter box .You cannot stop your cat 
  from
  grooming itself with its tongue or stop your new kitten from swatting and
  nibbling on the litter. Anything their tongue contacts gets ingested. Once
  the clay litter is inside the cat or kitten and expands, it not only could
  cause dehydration by absorbing all the body's moisture, it could also form 
  a
  hard mass in the intestines over a period of time, which could be fatal.
 
  The problem of health difficulties and even deaths resulting from clumping
  litters extend far beyond cats and kittens to ferrets, rabbits, and even
  dogs that raid litter boxes. So what can you do? The solution is easy,
  simple and inexpensive. Switch to a biodegradable, dust and clay free,
  non-clumping litter. Many of these biodegradable litters are made from
  recycled paper, which will help to save the environment as well as your 
  pet.
  You can find these products almost anywhere, just read the label. If 
  you're
  worried about odor, sprinkle a small amount of baking soda in with the
  litter. It works better than litter deodorizers that just cover up odors
  instead of absorbing them. You can also find a litter box with a top that
  has a filter for odor control.
 
  Now that you know some of the dangers and their solutions regarding kitty
  litter, hope you will pass this information on to a friend. You could be
  saving the health or life of an animal.
 
 
 
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Pretty Boy

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
Thanks for taking care of the OLD boy.  They need love too.  I took in 2 10 
year olds that no one wanted to adopt from a local no kill shelter.  They had 
been there in cages for over a year.  Lil Bit woudl not come out of my room for 
over a year, but now comes into the living room and sits on the back of the 
sofa with me.  Casey had no problems, just moved in and took over as queen of 
the house.
It is a shame that more people don't consider older cats, they still have at 
least 8 or 9 years left to live and they have lots of love to give you in 
return for your love
.  
 Lorrie felineres...@frontier.com wrote: 
 Thanks for taking care of Pretty Boy. I just love old cats,
 maybe that's because I'm old :-)
 
 Lorrie
 
 On 07-07, MaiMaiPG wrote:
  Pretty Boy, a feral who hangs around and who is very loved, was live  
  trapped for neutering.  The vet called me after they put him  
  under...he had shuttered in pain when they put a tube in his mouth.   
  She checked his teeth and they were totally awful.  Most of them were  
  pulled.  The only side effect is that his tongue hangs out a lot of  
  the time...no teeth to help him keep it in...or maybe he is expressing  
  his opinion.  He eats both canned and dry food with the rest of the  
  clan and is so handsome.  He is probably 13-14 years old (per vet) and  
  is a total doll. Like the rest of the clan, he is not touchable most  
  of the time.  He fusses and fumes and catches ground squirrels and  
  others who are stupid enough to come into an area guarded by numerous  
  cats.  Removing his teeth has definitely improved the quality if not  
  quantity of his life.   As far as I know, none of the clan is FeLV+.
  On Jul 6, 2011, at 6:00 PM, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:
  
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =

2011-07-08 Thread lexingtongrn
I have a FIV kitty without runny poop.


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 8, 2011 7:45 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =


I doubt she could compete with my FIV + cat.  It has actually woken me up in 
the middle of the night.  It's really bad because he doesn't cover so as soon 
as I get the first whiff of it I drop everything and go running to find which 
litterbox he used and cover it immediately.  Even if I'm eating I put 
everything down and go take care of it.  It's not like I could eat anymore 
anyway!  Yuck.  Lots of times in the middle of winter I have my patio door wide 
open to get the smell out.

He's always had runny poop too.  Think it's cause of the FIV?  I heard that it 
can have that effect on them.  But then I wondered if it's something else.  Do 
any of you guys have FIV + cats that almost always have runny poops?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 19:36:48 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 We have an almost 19 yr old cat - I swear, I should market the smell of her
 poop: It could raise the dead! It is so potent, that I wait at night until
 she makes one or two before I go to bed.I bet she could win the
 International smelliest poop contest!
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:30 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
 
 
 Maybe your cat's poop doesn't stink! Maybe he's too good to have smelly
 poop! His name is Sugar after all.
 
 Just kidding. I can't imagine any cat not having smelly poop. Geez,
 couldn't believe the difference between my cat and my dog when I got my
 first cat about 6 or 7 years ago.
 
 It's funny how there are so many different experiences with the different
 kinds of litter. I guess that's why there are so many choices. It gets so
 confusing though.
 
 
 I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
 profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
 Twain
 
 
  From: longhornf...@verizon.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 17:15:07 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  I've never heard of that problem, but then I don't keep the litter boxes
 in 
  a closed area like you would an adoption center. It's fine to use at home
 in 
  an open area. I have 3 litter boxes with Feline Pine (non-pellet form) in 
  our master bathroom. It actually controls the odors. I like it as well as 
  the cats.
  
  
  - Original Message - 
  From: Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 4:57 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
  
  
   I tried to respond earlier but it bounced back as too large however, I
 
   noticed that others have responded with no problems so I will try again 
   (after deleting most of the original emails). I have used Feline Pine at
 
   home before and the rescue group I am with used to use it at their 
   Petsmart adoptions. The smell (to me) was gawd awful after they had used
 
   the box even once and even customers complained about the smell in the 
   adoption center. We had to go back to scoopable in both places but 
   especially at the store because people would not go in to meet the cats 
   due to the smell and it was scooped on a regular basis.
  
   For our house, we have switched from hooded boxes to large Rubbermaid 
   Totes. Frank cuts a large hole in one end so the cats can get in and out
 
   and it prevents our elevator b*tt peers from peeing over the side. We 
   also use a low dust litter. So far, our cats have done well and most of 
   our cats are 12 and up.
  
   Edna
  
  
   Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 16:07:15 -0400
   From: athenapities...@gmail.com
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Clumping litter =
  
   Oh - I just found a Petco version of the wheat litter, Sweat Scoop. It 
   got
   good online reviews.
  
  
  
  
   On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Katy Doyle 
   athenapities...@gmail.comwrote:
  
Well, this has inspired me to check out Feline Pine - has anyone used
 
it
before?
   
  
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Re: [Felvtalk] Pet meds for humans

2011-07-08 Thread dlgegg
My mother was a nurse and a sales rep once told her that it is te same, they 
just put different labels on the bottles.
The only tme I went to the dr for a cat bite was ehn Moses, a neighbor's cat 
came courting my girls who have been spayed.  He thought my Harley was moving 
in on his territory and leaped at him.  Of course, I grabbed Harley to save him 
and I got bit on the back of my hand.  Don't think I had to worry about 
infection, blood was spurtijng all over the place.  I let it bleed out a bit, 
rinsed with peroxide, put a pressue bandage on it and went to the ER.  Of 
course, I had to find Moses and be sure he was okay, but everything turned out 
well.  All they did at the ER was tell me I did a good job of bandaging it, 
gave me a couple of antibiotic pills and sent me home.  Next time, I will go 
back to peroxide, vitamin E oil and lavendar and save myself the cost of and ER 
visit and an all night stand in their waiting room.
 Lorrie felineres...@frontier.com wrote: 
 On 07-07, Cindy McHugh wrote:
  Hi Kat,
  
  I don't know about buying it in Mexico, but when I had an infected tooth 
  recently, I did some research and ordered Fish Mox online. From everything 
  I read, it's the same stuff that's prescribed by doctors and vets.  Oddly 
  enough, if my pets are sick, I won't take a chance and I take them to the 
  vet, but for myself, I'm willing to compromise a bit.
  
  Cindy
  
 I can identify with that Cindy.  I recently got a bad cat bite and
 used large dog size Clavamox. It is the exact same thing as human
 Augmentin, which is the antibiotic recommended for cat bites. My arm
 was all swollen up after the bite but the Clavamox worked great and I
 saved money on a doctor bill and the Augmentin.  The last time I was
 bitten it cost me $95. for the doctor and $45. for the Augmentin. 
 Animal and vet meds are usually the same, but have different names,
 so the trick is knowing which is which, what works, and how much to
 take for how long.
 
 Lorrie
 
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[Felvtalk] Fw: Pebbles - dlgegg

2011-07-08 Thread Lynda Wilson



I do realize that, otherwise why would I go to all the trouble? It's sad to 
have ppl put down animals b/c they don't want to go to the trouble. I had 
the vet ask me if I wanted to put Pebbles down when they discovered she was 
a diabetic. I shivered at the thought. But I will still say she was a lot 
of work. I had to leave Thanksgiving dinners, Christmas gatherings, etc 
when it was time for her insulin. I had to give it to her 2 x's a 
dayand I spent thousands on her. She also had 5 other diseases by the 
time she passed. But I would do it all over again. I remember the day I 
brought her home at 5 weeks, yes 5 weeks. There were kids in Austin, TX 
giving away these kittens. She was the most pitiful looking one, but I knew 
she needed me.
- Original Message - 
From: dlg...@windstream.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Cc: Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 9:32 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


iT ISN' THE WORK INVOLVED IN CARING FOR THEM, IT IS WHAT YOU GET BACK 
FROM THEM IN RETURN THAT COUNTS!
A friend of mine had to follow her little dog around the yard with a 
shallow dish to catch the urine for the vet.  She said she hoped that the 
neighbors never saw her, or they would have thought she was crazy.  Folks 
around here just do not think you need to go to all that trouble for cats 
and dogs, ESPECIALLY CATS.  They think I am crazy because I take my pride 
to the vet for shots, etc.  The only thing they are good for is out in 
the barn to catch mice.  I have earned the name Crazy Cat Lady

 Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net wrote:
What a great invention of a litter box! I might have purchased it when I 
had

my diabetic cat. She passed away 2 yrs ago.  She made it easy for me to
catch her urine mid-stream. She would squat close to the litter but not 
sit

on it, with her rear end towards me and I could catch it in a small,
sterilized bottle cap. Then I could get her keytone level by dipping the
strip into her urine. I had to prick her ear to get her blood to get her
glucose. I did this for 9 yrs (she lived to be 17 1/2 yrs).  I still 
miss

her even though she was a lot of work.

RIP, Pebbles!

Sorry, I got carried away...

L


- Original Message - 
From: dlg...@windstream.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:47 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question


 My Boby was urinating out of the box, all over the house.  He had a
 problem with salcite and sturivite stones.  Then Casey had stones. 
 She

 got over them, but Bobby did not.  Being a male, the urether was more
 narrow and he did not make it tru the treatment time.  Homey is doing 
 gret
 now.  I would check hm out with the vet and take a fresh urine sample 
 for
 testing.  I found a special litter box that uses safflower seed 
 instead of

 litter.  It allows the urine to go thru to a collection box that has a
 pour spout so you can pur it into a pill bottle and take it to the 
 vet.

 It was pricey ($60.00) but really comes in handy when you suspect a
 urinary tract infection or stones.  Also great for diabetic cats -
 invented by a lady with a diabetic cat.  Only thing is they have to be
 seperated from the others so there is no chance of others using the 
 box.

  Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:
 Forgot this part of the question before:  Sometimes, cats don't like 
 the

 type of litter, too!  I have a friend who uses shredded newspaper for
 cats
 that don't like any kind of litter!
 BTW - OxiClean and X-O are GREAT to clean urine stain and odor!!
 When  I scoop the litter, I remove solids, and also wet litter, by 
 gently
 holding litter box up...then I sprinkle baking soda on the wet area, 
 and
 then some more mixed into the litter - keeps the litter clean for a 
 long
 time and doesn't stink.  I do NOT use clumping litter; regular litter 
 may

 not clump into a hard ball, but it can easily be removed!
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Lynda 
 Wilson

 Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 12:08 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] UTI Question

 My first thought was, how many litter boxes does he have access to? 
 When

 I
 had one cat, he urinated on my bed too (thank goodness I buy the
 waterproof
 mattress pad) and that was his way of telling me he wanted another. 
 This

 is
 what my vet advised me. He got another box and he has been fine ever
 since.
 Now I have another kitty, therefore, I got another litter box. My vet
 said
 the rule is one litter box for every cat, plus one! My cat was an
 exception
 at the time he was an only cat.  Also, every two weeks, I empty all 
 the
 litter boxes, disinfect them with liquid lysol, dry them thoroughly 
 and

 fill

 them again with litter. This has helped as well. It's work, but it's
 better
 than cat urine on carpets, beds, sofas, etc.

 I hope nothing is medically