Re: Cornell website and misinformation

2006-06-21 Thread Kerry MacKenzie



I second that. It's shameful of Cornell to continue posting 
such outdated info. Should we ask Jamesif he would take it off this 
website? I remember being astonished at its inaccuracy years ago, and being 
bewildered as to why a body as supposedly authoritative as Cornell would post 
suchmisleading info.

  - Original Message - 
  From: 
  Nina 
  
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  
  Sent: Monday, June 19, 2006 1:14 PM
  Subject: Cornell website and 
  misinformation
  Belinda,Thank you for taking the time to dispel some of the 
  misinformation on the Cornell site. They aren't the only source of what 
  people would suspect to be reliable information that causes more harm than 
  good in the public's perception of felv. It think that many in the 
  veterinary community take the approach of "safety" first and they err on the 
  side of caution. Unfortunately that causes panic and hopelessness. 
  Every vet, (and guardian for that matter), that is enlightened is a victory 
  for all our special needs kids. Keep fighting the good fight 
  girl,NinaBelinda wrote:
  In my opinion and my opinion only, some of their info is outdated and incorrect, espeically when it comes to transmitting the virus and how long it survives in the enviornment.  Last time I was on their website looking up info the way they presented it in my opinion is by using scare tactics and for that reason many people going to their website for info along with a vet that doesn't know anything realistic about it will opt to take their vets advise and euthanize a positive cat.

I've had people call me and specifically quote stuff they read on Cornell's website and says they had seriously thought about euthanizing the positive they found and then thankfully looked around some more and atleast got enough conflicting info to reconsider.

From their website:
"FeLV doesn't survive long outside a cat's bodyprobably less than a few hours under normal household conditions."

Any vet I've EVER asked about this say's it doesn't live anywhere near this long, some think a minute or two, some think seconds, NOBODY thinks up to an hour under any circumstances.

"It is impossible to accurately predict the life expectancy of a cat infected with FeLV. With appropriate care and under ideal conditions, infected cats can remain in apparent good health for many months, although most succumb to a FeLV-related disease within two or three years after becoming infected. If your cat has already experienced one or more severe illnesses as a result of FeLV infection, or if persistent fever, weight loss, or cancer is present, a much shorter survival time can be expected."

Not necassarily true.  My Frankie was sick every single year with a URI, pretty bad ones, in December.  I finally let my vet test him at about 7 years of age.  He was positive, indoor only and I suspect born with it or got it shortly after birth (I got Frankie in a bar when he was about 3 weeks old, couldn't even eat real food yet).  He lived to be 9 years old still getting his usual URI in December and finally succumbed to anemia which my then vet had no idea how to treat other than with transfusions which she told me would only work for a while and he would suffer.  His HCT was at 6% when he finally displayed any sign to me that there was something wrong.  And really the only sign I got that told me something was wrong was that he wasn't staying in bed with me as he usually did every night all of his 9 years.  He still weighted 18 pounds, was eating fine, and not really sleeping more or lethargic.  He hid it so good by the time we did find it it was pretty much too 

late to do anything for him, I lost him the night we diagnosed him.

"Feline leukemia virus will not survive outside the cat for more than a few hours in most environments.
However, FeLV-infected cats are frequently infected with other hardier infectious agents, and these may pose some threat to a newcomer. Thoroughly clean and disinfect or replace food and water dishes, bedding, litter pans and toys. A dilute solution of household bleach (4 ounces of bleach in a gallon of water) makes an excellent disinfectant. Vacuum carpets and mop floors. Any new cats or kittens should be properly vaccinated before entering the household."

As I said before as far as I'm concerned "Feline leukemia virus will not survive outside the cat for more than a few hours in most environments."  is not true and almost all the FeLV positives that I'm aware if have died from anemia or some type of cancer and to my knowledge neither of these is contagious.  Very few FeLV positive cats in todays world die from URI's or something else similar that a healthy cat probably wouldn't even get.  It happens I'm sure though not to the extent that they try to make it sound like and therefore unnecessarily scare people.  Anyone who has an outbreak of Panleukemia or something else as contagious that is not lim

Cornell website and misinformation

2006-06-19 Thread Nina




Belinda,
Thank you for taking the time to dispel some of the misinformation on
the Cornell site. They aren't the only source of what people would
suspect to be reliable information that causes more harm than good in
the public's perception of felv. It think that many in the veterinary
community take the approach of "safety" first and they err on the side
of caution. Unfortunately that causes panic and hopelessness. Every
vet, (and guardian for that matter), that is enlightened is a victory
for all our special needs kids. Keep fighting the good fight girl,
Nina

Belinda wrote:

  
  In my opinion and my opinion only, some of their info is outdated and incorrect, espeically when it comes to transmitting the virus and how long it survives in the enviornment.  Last time I was on their website looking up info the way they presented it in my opinion is by using scare tactics and for that reason many people going to their website for info along with a vet that doesn't know anything realistic about it will opt to take their vets advise and euthanize a positive cat.

I've had people call me and specifically quote stuff they read on Cornell's website and says they had seriously thought about euthanizing the positive they found and then thankfully looked around some more and atleast got enough conflicting info to reconsider.

From their website:
"FeLV doesn't survive long outside a cat's bodyprobably less than a few hours under normal household conditions."

Any vet I've EVER asked about this say's it doesn't live anywhere near this long, some think a minute or two, some think seconds, NOBODY thinks up to an hour under any circumstances.

"It is impossible to accurately predict the life expectancy of a cat infected with FeLV. With appropriate care and under ideal conditions, infected cats can remain in apparent good health for many months, although most succumb to a FeLV-related disease within two or three years after becoming infected. If your cat has already experienced one or more severe illnesses as a result of FeLV infection, or if persistent fever, weight loss, or cancer is present, a much shorter survival time can be expected."

Not necassarily true.  My Frankie was sick every single year with a URI, pretty bad ones, in December.  I finally let my vet test him at about 7 years of age.  He was positive, indoor only and I suspect born with it or got it shortly after birth (I got Frankie in a bar when he was about 3 weeks old, couldn't even eat real food yet).  He lived to be 9 years old still getting his usual URI in December and finally succumbed to anemia which my then vet had no idea how to treat other than with transfusions which she told me would only work for a while and he would suffer.  His HCT was at 6% when he finally displayed any sign to me that there was something wrong.  And really the only sign I got that told me something was wrong was that he wasn't staying in bed with me as he usually did every night all of his 9 years.  He still weighted 18 pounds, was eating fine, and not really sleeping more or lethargic.  He hid it so good by the time we did find it it was pretty much too 

late to do anything for him, I lost him the night we diagnosed him.

"Feline leukemia virus will not survive outside the cat for more than a few hours in most environments.
However, FeLV-infected cats are frequently infected with other hardier infectious agents, and these may pose some threat to a newcomer. Thoroughly clean and disinfect or replace food and water dishes, bedding, litter pans and toys. A dilute solution of household bleach (4 ounces of bleach in a gallon of water) makes an excellent disinfectant. Vacuum carpets and mop floors. Any new cats or kittens should be properly vaccinated before entering the household."

As I said before as far as I'm concerned "Feline leukemia virus will not survive outside the cat for more than a few hours in most environments."  is not true and almost all the FeLV positives that I'm aware if have died from anemia or some type of cancer and to my knowledge neither of these is contagious.  Very few FeLV positive cats in todays world die from URI's or something else similar that a healthy cat probably wouldn't even get.  It happens I'm sure though not to the extent that they try to make it sound like and therefore unnecessarily scare people.  Anyone who has an outbreak of Panleukemia or something else as contagious that is not limited to FeLV+'s as they are trying to make it look like would go through the appropriate steps to clean their home before brining in any more cats.

I have no positives left in my household and when one of my guys gets a URI, it doesn't spread to all of them, in fact usually nobody else gets it.  Even when Bailey was alive and one of the others got a URI, Bailey never got it from them.

I haven't been to Cornell's website in quite a while before today and I see they have revised some of their info but they still as far as I'm concerned have some 

Re: Cornell website and misinformation

2006-06-19 Thread BONNIE J KALMBACH
Maybe we should remind Cornell to update their website. Isn't some of
that information older than ten years?

Bonnie

http://grants.library.wisc.edu/organizations/animals.html
http://savingspaldingpets.blogspot.com/
http://www.bestfriends.org/nomorehomelesspets/pdf/walkforanimals.pdf


- Original Message -
From: Nina [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Date: Monday, June 19, 2006 1:17 pm
Subject: Cornell website and misinformation
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

 Belinda,
 Thank you for taking the time to dispel some of the misinformation 
 on 
 the Cornell site.  They aren't the only source of what people would 
 suspect to be reliable information that causes more harm than good 
 in 
 the public's perception of felv.  It think that many in the 
 veterinary 
 community take the approach of safety first and they err on the 
 side 
 of caution.  Unfortunately that causes panic and hopelessness.  
 Every 
 vet, (and guardian for that matter), that is enlightened is a 
 victory 
 for all our special needs kids.  Keep fighting the good fight girl,
 Nina
 
 Belinda wrote:
 
 In my opinion and my opinion only, some of their info is 
 outdated and incorrect, espeically when it comes to transmitting 
 the virus and how long it survives in the enviornment.  Last time I 
 was on their website looking up info the way they presented it in 
 my opinion is by using scare tactics and for that reason many 
 people going to their website for info along with a vet that 
 doesn't know anything realistic about it will opt to take their 
 vets advise and euthanize a positive cat.
 
 I've had people call me and specifically quote stuff they read on 
 Cornell's website and says they had seriously thought about 
 euthanizing the positive they found and then thankfully looked 
 around some more and atleast got enough conflicting info to 
 reconsider.
 From their website:
 FeLV doesn't survive long outside a cat's body--probably less 
 than a few hours under normal household conditions.
 
 *Any* vet I've *EVER* asked about this say's it doesn't live 
 anywhere near this long, some think a minute or two, some think 
 seconds, NOBODY thinks up to an hour under any circumstances.
 
 It is impossible to accurately predict the life expectancy of a 
 cat infected with FeLV. With appropriate care and under ideal 
 conditions, infected cats can remain in apparent good health for 
 many months, although most succumb to a FeLV-related disease within 
 two or three years after becoming infected. *If your cat has 
 already experienced one or more severe illnesses as a result of 
 FeLV infection, or if persistent fever, weight loss, or cancer is 
 present, a much shorter survival time can be expected.*
 
 Not necassarily true.  My Frankie was sick *every single year* 
 with a URI, pretty bad ones, in December.  I finally let my vet 
 test him at about 7 years of age.  He was positive, indoor only and 
 I suspect born with it or got it shortly after birth (I got Frankie 
 in a bar when he was about 3 weeks old, couldn't even eat real food 
 yet).  He lived to be 9 years old still getting his usual URI in 
 December and finally succumbed to anemia which my then vet had no 
 idea how to treat other than with transfusions which she told me 
 would only work for a while and he would suffer.  His HCT was at 6% 
 when he finally displayed any sign to me that there was something 
 wrong.  And really the only sign I got that told me something was 
 wrong was that he wasn't staying in bed with me as he usually did 
 every night all of his 9 years.  He still weighted 18 pounds, was 
 eating fine, and not really sleeping more or lethargic.  He hid it 
 so good by the time we did find it it was pretty much too 
 late to do anything for him, I lost him the night we diagnosed him.
 
 Feline leukemia virus will not survive outside the cat for more 
 than a few hours in most environments.
 However, FeLV-infected cats are frequently infected with other 
 hardier infectious agents, and these may pose some threat to a 
 newcomer. Thoroughly clean and disinfect or replace food and water 
 dishes, bedding, litter pans and toys. A dilute solution of 
 household bleach (4 ounces of bleach in a gallon of water) makes an 
 excellent disinfectant. Vacuum carpets and mop floors. Any new cats 
 or kittens should be properly vaccinated before entering the 
 household.
 As I said before as far as I'm concerned Feline leukemia virus 
 will not survive outside the cat for more than a few hours in most 
 environments.  is not true and almost all the FeLV positives that 
 I'm aware if have died from anemia or some type of cancer and to my 
 knowledge neither of these is contagious.  Very few FeLV positive 
 cats in todays world die from URI's or something else similar that 
 a healthy cat probably wouldn't even get.  It happens I'm sure 
 though not to the extent that they try to make it sound like and 
 therefore unnecessarily scare people.  Anyone who has an outbreak