Re: [Felvtalk] Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2010-04-08 Thread Joe Reil
Good evening,

I don't know if anyone currently active remembers me, I first signed up for 
this list in April of 2007, when one cat (Chewie) was diagnosed with FELV after 
getting sick.

I haven't been really active on here since, but I thought I'd post again with 
an update. My original introduction message is copied below.

It is with sadness that I report that Stitch, who I mentioned originally has 
having been tested shortly after Chewie died has now left us, almost exactly 3 
years after Chewie did.

Stitch has done great these last few years, we never had any problems and had 
some hopes that she might have fought the virus off.

Sadly, this was not the case. She started acting sick this weekend and we 
brought her to the vet on Tuesday. She'd lost a few pounds since her last 
visit, and a blood test revealed that she was very low on red blood cells, the 
Vet thinking that she had a bone marrow disease as she didn't seem to have any 
new red blood cells at all (could this be myeloproliferative leukemia, which 
I've seen mentioned in other places?). Given that she was FELV positive and was 
clearly suffering, we decided to have her put to sleep.

Anyway, though I haven't been really active here, folks were very helpful after 
my initial post and the info and support I did get here were instrumental in 
keeping Stich as healthy as she was for as long as she was. It's still really 
hard, but I know that we did everything that we could for her.

She was a very special kitty, and she'll be greatly missed.

These are direct links to photos I have stored on my Facebook stage, I'm not 
sure if they'll work like this, but we shall see. These are both very recent 
photos of Stitch:

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs417.snc3/25118_384112819913_539489913_3684055_4308847_n.jpg

http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs437.snc3/25118_384111604913_539489913_3684051_7341747_n.jpg

Thanks,

Joe Reil
redshar...@yahoo.com


_
Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe



  

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Re: [Felvtalk] Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2010-04-08 Thread Sally Davis
Hi Joe

She is beautiful and she will remain forever in your heart and memories.

Sally




-- 
Sally(me), Eric (not a cat),Junior(angel), Tiny(angel) Fluffy(soul mate
angel), Lionel(angel),Speedy, Grey and White, Ittle Bitty, Little
Black(MIA), Lily, Daisy, Pewter, Junior Junior, Hotdog (newest) Silver, and
 Spike
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Re: [Felvtalk] Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2010-04-08 Thread Hotmail Junk

Joe,
I am sorry to hear of your great loss! My Gray Kitty, who did test  
positive and currently test negative for FeLV, battles anemia. He has  
been on very high dosages of Pred for almost 2 years. This seems to  
keep his hematocrit in normal range. His story is a very long one   
someday, I will write a book on it. Our hopes is that he will set  
presidence for future FeLV cats  give pet owners hope!


Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 8, 2010, at 3:50 PM, Joe Reil redshar...@yahoo.com wrote:


Good evening,

I don't know if anyone currently active remembers me, I first signed  
up for this list in April of 2007, when one cat (Chewie) was  
diagnosed with FELV after getting sick.


I haven't been really active on here since, but I thought I'd post  
again with an update. My original introduction message is copied  
below.


It is with sadness that I report that Stitch, who I mentioned  
originally has having been tested shortly after Chewie died has now  
left us, almost exactly 3 years after Chewie did.


Stitch has done great these last few years, we never had any  
problems and had some hopes that she might have fought the virus off.


Sadly, this was not the case. She started acting sick this weekend  
and we brought her to the vet on Tuesday. She'd lost a few pounds  
since her last visit, and a blood test revealed that she was very  
low on red blood cells, the Vet thinking that she had a bone marrow  
disease as she didn't seem to have any new red blood cells at all  
(could this be myeloproliferative leukemia, which I've seen  
mentioned in other places?). Given that she was FELV positive and  
was clearly suffering, we decided to have her put to sleep.


Anyway, though I haven't been really active here, folks were very  
helpful after my initial post and the info and support I did get  
here were instrumental in keeping Stich as healthy as she was for as  
long as she was. It's still really hard, but I know that we did  
everything that we could for her.


She was a very special kitty, and she'll be greatly missed.

These are direct links to photos I have stored on my Facebook stage,  
I'm not sure if they'll work like this, but we shall see. These are  
both very recent photos of Stitch:


http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs417.snc3/25118_384112819913_539489913_3684055_4308847_n.jpg

http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs437.snc3/25118_384111604913_539489913_3684051_7341747_n.jpg

Thanks,

Joe Reil
redshar...@yahoo.com


_
Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe






RE: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch/Cassidy

2007-04-14 Thread Joe Reil
 I don't know where you live, but Cassidy is the most
 beautiful, friendly,
 loving cat! He's probably less than one year old, or
 around there. Here's
 his picture:

He's gorgeous. I'm up in Vermont but am not really in
a position to take in other cats at the moment, mostly
because of Stitch's particular personality issues. :)
If I think of or find anyone who is, though, or if my
situation changes, I'll keep you in mind.

 Best of luck with your new quest on educating
 yourself on FeLV. There's so
 much to learn as I've found out this past week! But,
 the people here are so
 helpful and understanding-I'm so glad you've found
 this resource as well!

Thanks!

Joe
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

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RE: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch/Cassidy

2007-04-14 Thread Melissa Lind
Thanks Joe! Vermont is quite a distance from Nebraska! But, of course keep
us in mind if you know of any compassionate people would like and FeLV baby.
A vacation with a purpose would be nice. However, I'm sure there are plenty
of cats in need out East! And, luckily, Cassidy has been accepted to Best
Friends in Utah (a little closer), if I don't find him a home before then.
Best, Melissa

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Joe Reil
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2007 7:49 AM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: RE: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch/Cassidy

 I don't know where you live, but Cassidy is the most
 beautiful, friendly,
 loving cat! He's probably less than one year old, or
 around there. Here's
 his picture:

He's gorgeous. I'm up in Vermont but am not really in
a position to take in other cats at the moment, mostly
because of Stitch's particular personality issues. :)
If I think of or find anyone who is, though, or if my
situation changes, I'll keep you in mind.

 Best of luck with your new quest on educating
 yourself on FeLV. There's so
 much to learn as I've found out this past week! But,
 the people here are so
 helpful and understanding-I'm so glad you've found
 this resource as well!

Thanks!

Joe
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

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Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
http://mail.yahoo.com 






Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-11 Thread elizabeth trent

Hi Joe - welcome.  I'm glad you found us -- this is the place to be.  I'm a
little behind on posts and will have to catch up but just wanted to let you
know that you and Stitch have every reason to have hope.  Don't ever
hesitate to ask questions.

elizabeth



On 4/9/07, Joe Reil [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe






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Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-10 Thread Gina WN
Welcome Joe, you have come to the right place.  There are a lot of 
knowledgeable and caring people here.
   
  Gina

Joe Reil [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe





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Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-10 Thread Joe Reil
 Welcome to the group. You came to the right place
 for more info! Something I just
 have to mention though, right off-hand, is the
 option to adopt another FELV+ cat!

Perhaps at some point, but not yet. :)

Thanks for the welcome, I've already gotten some
useful info and I'll be asking questions as soon as I
collect my thoughts and figure out what to ask! 
 
 anyways, so be sure your vet ISN'T. Other vaccines
 should be carefully reconsidered,
 and only given if the risk indicates it's required
 to protect the cat. Any vaccine
 causes stress to the immune system, and since FELV
 is an immune system virus, you
 want to try to keep it as STRONG as possible, and
 vaccines are a extra weight on an
 already compromised system. For those you do choose
 to continue to give, you should
 request a non-adjuvanted version of the vaccine, as
 it has less harmful, toxic, and
 carcinogenic ingredients than regular vaccines (yes,
 vaccines are VERY nasty things -
 most people don't realize).

Our vet seems to be good as they did go over this with
me. She did say there were some vaccines we may
consider and some we definitely shouldn't bother with.

Stitch is a 99% of the time indoor cat. The only time
we let her outside is with supervision, and even then
not very often.

 Outside of the vaccination issue, there's general
 health and immune system
 considerations. The VERY FIRST thing you need to
 evaluate is the food you are
 feeding. FELV+ cats require a very optimal diet, and
 this is highly varied depending
 on owner preferences, BUT, you should either be
 feeding a super-premium commercial
 cat food, such as Innova, Wellness, Chicken Soup for
 the Cat, or Felidae (just some
 good examples - I feed felidae or Innova dry and
 merrick or innova canned), or you
 can make your own homemade diet using a recipe found
 from a reputable source, OR, you
 can feed raw (also requires good recipes to obtain
 optimal nutritional balance).

I'll check these out. Any suggestions as to where I'd
find these? I have a small, but well stocked pet store
nearby, we also have a Petsmart about 45 minutes away.
If neither of these are workable, are there any good
web dealers selling these products? (I'll start with
the link from the bottom of your e-mail - anywhere
else I should be checking out?).

Joe


 

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with the Yahoo! Search movie showtime shortcut.
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Re: To Joe: Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-10 Thread Joe Reil
 Welcome to the group.  I'm really sorry to hear
 about
 Chewie and that Stitch has also tested positive for
 FeLV.

Thanks. :)

The best thing you can do for Stitch is to
 educate yourself on this virus. 

That's why I'm here. :)

 If Stitch is asymptomatic, there's not much else you
 can do, other than considering supplements for her
 immune system, like L-lysine (without propynol
 glycol)
 or Mega C.  And keep us bookmarked because this is
 the
 place to be for FeLV info.  Bless you for not pts
 this
 kitty and for taking such good care of her.

Thanks. I couldn't see putting her to sleep now -
she's still young, healthy and active. I've never
understood people who can do that so easily...  
Chewie was very obviously sick and was getting worse
rapidly so I think I made the right decision, but I'd
like to put that off for Stitch as long as possible.

 Take care and keep us posted on Stitch!

Will do!

Thanks,

Joe


   

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See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.
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Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-10 Thread Kelley Saveika

I'll check these out. Any suggestions as to where I'd
find these? I have a small, but well stocked pet store
nearby, we also have a Petsmart about 45 minutes away.
If neither of these are workable, are there any good
web dealers selling these products? (I'll start with
the link from the bottom of your e-mail - anywhere
else I should be checking out?).




Hi Joe,

It is actually hard to find good food at PetSmart.  I buy my Felidae
at the feed store here in town.  We also have a local pet store that
sells most premium brands.  PetSmart sells a lot of foods that are
expensive, like Royal Canin, but not really very good.  Expensive food
doesn't necessarily equal good food.

I'm not sure what link was linked to you, but you can buy almost any
food at http://www.petfooddirect.com  Since you are only dealing with
one cat, you could buy a case of canned and it would last you a good
amount of time.

--
Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

http://www.rescuties.org

Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

Please help Joey!
http://rescuties.chipin.com/joey-autoimmune-hemolytic-anemia



RE: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-10 Thread Melissa Lind
Hi Joe!

 

I'm also very new to this list, but I'm in love with it and everyone here is
so very supportive. I'm learning a lot about FeLV too. I rescued three cats
last week (well, three found me). But, one, our beautiful Cassidy is FeLV+.
The rest are negative, as are the three permanent cats we have in our house.
Cassidy is currently camped out in our office room to protect the others.
Many people on here have had successful mixing of FeLV positives and
negatives, but I'm not prepared to do that since our youngest (less than one
year) is most susceptible at this age.

 

I don't know where you live, but Cassidy is the most beautiful, friendly,
loving cat! He's probably less than one year old, or around there. Here's
his picture:

 

http://picasaweb.google.com/mzurovsk/Cassidy/photo?authkey=Iq5dHa-Vucs#50501
79613677810130

 

I'm trying to find an FeLV positive home for him. Some day I'd like to have
a shelter with plenty of room for positives, but right now we don't have the
resources. If you'd like him, or if you know of a good home for him, please
let me know! I want to keep him so badly, he's stole my heart, but it's just
not fair to keep him in one room forever. He's super healthy-better than one
of the negatives I rescued last week. He talks constantly-but not
annoyingly-and I understand his pungent urine will be subsiding as soon as
his hormones are out of his system. He's only newly neutered. And he loves
to bite at the letters as I type on the computer-so cute! A very good office
buddy and helper.

 

Best of luck with your new quest on educating yourself on FeLV. There's so
much to learn as I've found out this past week! But, the people here are so
helpful and understanding-I'm so glad you've found this resource as well!

 

Best Wishes,

Melissa



Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-10 Thread [EMAIL PROTECTED]
If you want to find a local retailer for a particular brand of cat food, just 
search
for the company website, and MOST have a locate a store near you option. Or, 
just
go to your local store and ASK if they can carry one of those brands I 
mentioned (or
which-ever brand you decide to use). Outside that, if you must buy online (the
shipping $ is astronomical) I suggest http://petfooddirect.com as they have a 
good
selection of brands.

Phaewryn

http://ucat.us/domesticcatlinks.html
Special Needs Cat Resources




Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Joe Reil
Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe



 

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RE: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Rosenfeldt, Diane
Hi, Joe -- you've come to the right place for info and support with all
things FeLV!   

Diane R.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Joe Reil
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 10:55 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe



 


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Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Marylyn
First, I think you are right to wait for a little while before adding 
another cat.  You need time to mourn, learn, and adjust and so does Stitch.


Second, when the time is right, consider adopting a cat whose person is 
surrendering it and has had it vaccinated already.  Local vets sometimes 
know of these people (a cat might be surrendered because his person dies, 
goes into a nursing home and the family abandons the cat etc).


Third, consider an adult cat from a kill shelterthese lovely little 
darlings are destined to die and would love to take the risk of contracting 
FeLV in exchange for the chance to live in a loving home (my opinion only).


Good luck.





If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
from the shelter of 
compassion and pity, you will have men who
will deal likewise with 
their fellow man.
 St. 
Francis
- Original Message - 
From: Rosenfeldt, Diane [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 11:11 AM
Subject: RE: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch


Hi, Joe -- you've come to the right place for info and support with all
things FeLV!

Diane R.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Joe Reil
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 10:55 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe






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may be privileged.
They should be read or retained only by the intended recipient.  If you have 
received this
transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately and delete the 
transmission from
your system.  In addition, in order to comply with Treasury Circular 230, we 
are required to
inform you that unless we have specifically stated to the contrary in 
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provide in this email or any attachment concerning federal tax issues or 
submissions is not
intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, to avoid federal tax 
penalties.






Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Nina
Hi Joe and welcome to the list.  Bless you for being the type of person 
to take in animals in need.  My condolences on losing Zoro and Stitch.  
Everyone in this group understands the bonds of interspecies love and we 
know how much it hurts.  You must be reeling from Chewie's pos test 
result.  Did you bring Chewie home while Zoro was still with you?  
There's no way to know who transmitted the disease to whom, I was just 
wondering.  The good news is that Chewie is 3.5 yrs.  Kittens who 
present symptoms of the disease usually do so before their 3rd birthday, 
so it's fabulous that Chewie is so healthy.  There are so many false pos 
using the in-house ELISA test that there is always the hope that they 
aren't really pos at all.  Given your history, it seems less likely in 
your case though.  It could be that Chewie is a carrier and will never 
develop symptoms, it could be that she is in the process of fighting off 
the disease and will later test neg.


You will learn all sorts of things to do to help Chewie stay healthy, a 
quality diet, supplements and a stress free environment make a huge 
difference in their longevity.  You are wise to consider the stress of 
adopting another cat, but it is possible to acclimate a new arrival in 
ways that lessen that stress. 

I'm sure you will be hearing from our list members with lots of good 
suggestions very soon.  In the meantime, you might want to visit our 
archives and do searches on our past discussions.  You'll be surprised 
at how our experiences differ from much of the veterinary community's 
stance and the common misconceptions of the general public.  Please let 
us hear from you often, ask as many questions as you like.  This is a 
very informative and supportive group, we're all in this together.

Nina


Joe Reil wrote:

Howdy all,

This is my first post to this list, thought I'd do a
bit of intro.

We had three cats in our family. The older two were
both castaways that were adopted as adults. Zoro was
the oldest and I adopted him from a co-worker when I
lived by myself. He died several years ago.

The remaining two were Stitch and Chewie. Chewie was
the next oldest. She had a really hard start to life,
she was originally found, as a stray by some friends
of ours. She was probably two or three at the time and
she had evidence of being abused - she had some
suspicious scars on her underside.

She lived with them for a while, very shy/nervous and
eventually came out of her shell. A couple years
later, they had to move, and couldn't take her with
them so we took her in. We had her for several years
as well and while we don't know her exact age, best
estimate put her at 8-10 years old when she died last
month.

She had a loss of appetite and started losing weight.
She had two trips to the Vet - after the first visit
she took a serious turn for the worse so we had her
back at the vet only a few days later. A blood test on
the second visit revealed that she had FelV. So,
considering she was very sick and was suffering from a
pretty serious disease we opted to put her to sleep
then. :(

I didn't know much about FelV then (and I'm still
learning about it), but information from both our Vet
and online resources I found indicated that it was
contagious so we decided to have our third (and
youngest) cat tested for it. Stitch is the only one we
got as a Kitten and she's about 3.5 years old.

I brought her to the vet this weekend and she tested
positive for FelV. :(

I do intend to learn as much as I can about the
disease so we can keep her with us as long as
possible. I know that it will eventually catch up to
her and our main thing will be to put that off as long
as possible. She's still young and healthy so
hopefully that'll be a long time still. :)

We had been planning to get a second cat, but we've
put that plan on hold now. I know it is possible to
inoculate against FelV, but given that the vaccine
takes a while to take effect, we'd either have to
quarantine the new cat until the vaccine took effect
or find it someplace else to live for a month or so,
and on top of all that I don't think we want to put
Stitch through the stress of another housemate at the
moment (she doesn't react well to strangers).

Thanks,

Joe





Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Joe Reil
 Hi Joe and welcome to the list.  Bless you for being
 the type of person 
 to take in animals in need.  My condolences on
 losing Zoro and Stitch. 

Thanks. :) It is entirely possible that Zoro had it
first. I'd consider that less likely because Zoro was
always well kept with regular veterinary care.

At this point it doesn't really matter. Zoro's death
was completely unrelated to FelV, btw.

 Everyone in this group understands the bonds of
 interspecies love and we 
 know how much it hurts.  You must be reeling from
 Chewie's pos test 
 result.  Did you bring Chewie home while Zoro was
 still with you?

Minor confusion here. :) Chewie is the one who died
recently, about a month ago. She was VERY sick and
tested positive for FelV which led to our decision to
put her to sleep.

Stitch is now our only cat, and was the youngest of
the three that we have had.

I got Zoro first, when I was living by myself. Later
on, when I was first living with my wife, before we
were married, we got Chewie. Stitch came after that.

 There's no way to know who transmitted the disease
 to whom, I was just 
 wondering.  The good news is that Chewie is 3.5 yrs.
  Kittens who 
 present symptoms of the disease usually do so before
 their 3rd birthday, 
 so it's fabulous that Chewie is so healthy.

Now I'm second-guessing. I remember we got Stitch
around Thanksgiving - and that she was born in October
but I'm having a hard time remembering if it was 2003
or 2004 that she was born and it makes a difference.
:)

 are so many false pos 
 using the in-house ELISA test that there is always
 the hope that they 
 aren't really pos at all.  Given your history, it
 seems less likely in 
 your case though.  It could be that Chewie is a
 carrier and will never 
 develop symptoms, it could be that she is in the
 process of fighting off 
 the disease and will later test neg.

That's interesting. I had heard that healthy-appearing
cats can show a false-negative, but that
false-positives were not as common.

In the meantime, you might
 want to visit our 
 archives and do searches on our past discussions. 

I'll definitely do that. Is there a FAQ available?

 like.  This is a 
 very informative and supportive group, we're all in
 this together.

Again, Thank you,

Joe


 

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Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Nina
Sorry for getting their names confused.  (No offense Stitch!).  My brain 
doesn't seem to be working that great at the moment.  Just for 
clarification, Zoro never tested pos for felv?


You may be thinking of the false negs that are the result of the felv 
being sequestered in their bone marrow.  When the virus isn't 
circulating in their blood stream, it can't be detected by the ELISA.  
Other than that, at least to my knowledge, the rate of false negs is 
very low.  False pos on the other hand are more common. 

We don't have a FAQ section, but if you put in a key word in the search 
box you should come up with lots of results.  Is there something 
specific that you are wondering about?

Nina




Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread Joe Reil
 Sorry for getting their names confused.  (No offense
 Stitch!).  My brain 
 doesn't seem to be working that great at the moment.
  Just for 
 clarification, Zoro never tested pos for felv?

Correct. It is possible that he had it, but he was
never tested for it (while he was in my care), nor was
I given any indication from his original owners that
it was a possibility - they had another cat from the
same litter who was still alive and healthy when Zoro
died (at around 13). They also had another unrelated
cat.

 We don't have a FAQ section, but if you put in a key
 word in the search 
 box you should come up with lots of results.  Is
 there something 
 specific that you are wondering about?

Not yet, but I thought I'd start there. :)

Thanks,

Joe


 

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Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Welcome to the group. You came to the right place for more info! Something I 
just
have to mention though, right off-hand, is the option to adopt another FELV+ 
cat! SO
many are euthanised only because they test positive, and most would have lived
normal, healthy lives, if not for that ill-fated test result. I do understand 
not
wanting to stress her with a new member to the family right now though, just 
wanted
to put the idea into your head, for future reference. :-)

I'm sure since I'm replying so late (I'm perpetually behind on email these 
days),
someone has by now told you to re-test in 3-6 months, and confirm any ELISA (in 
vet
office) tests with a IFA (which is sent out to a laboratory, and is more 
accurate).
Also worth mentioning is that FELV+ cats should not be vaccinated for FELV, I 
know
that sounds obvious, but many vets just rake in the $ by still giving the shots
anyways, so be sure your vet ISN'T. Other vaccines should be carefully 
reconsidered,
and only given if the risk indicates it's required to protect the cat. Any 
vaccine
causes stress to the immune system, and since FELV is an immune system virus, 
you
want to try to keep it as STRONG as possible, and vaccines are a extra weight 
on an
already compromised system. For those you do choose to continue to give, you 
should
request a non-adjuvanted version of the vaccine, as it has less harmful, toxic, 
and
carcinogenic ingredients than regular vaccines (yes, vaccines are VERY nasty 
things -
most people don't realize).

Outside of the vaccination issue, there's general health and immune system
considerations. The VERY FIRST thing you need to evaluate is the food you are
feeding. FELV+ cats require a very optimal diet, and this is highly varied 
depending
on owner preferences, BUT, you should either be feeding a super-premium 
commercial
cat food, such as Innova, Wellness, Chicken Soup for the Cat, or Felidae (just 
some
good examples - I feed felidae or Innova dry and merrick or innova canned), or 
you
can make your own homemade diet using a recipe found from a reputable source, 
OR, you
can feed raw (also requires good recipes to obtain optimal nutritional 
balance).
Feeding the very best quality you can afford will go a long way in keeping your 
cat
healthy. it can't be stressed enough, and it's one of the easiest changes to 
make.
One thing to always keep in mind is that cats are obligate carnivores, so 
anything
you feed them should be MOSTLY meat. If feeding a commercial cat food, the 
FIRST TWO
ingredients should be some form of meat, ALWAYS. Also limit the amount of grains
(rice, wheat, oats, bran) and NEVER feed corn (cat's can't digest it, and it 
has no
nutritional value - plus it's the #1 cause of food allergies).

The second thing to consider are immune system boosting treatments. This ranges 
from
nutritional supplements like Lysine and Vitamin C, to prescription drugs like
Immuno-Regulin and Interferon. Personally, I would immediately start 
supplementing
with Lysine, as it's easy to pick up at any health food store (or even the drug
store). Others here can post the optimal dosage (I don't recall it off-hand, 
and I'm
not using it currently as I have no sick cats). Vitamin C is controversial in 
cat
circles, do a web search for more info, but the general debate is that cat's 
create
their own vitamin C, so they don't need extra, while others say extra helps 
boost the
immune system. It's a personal choice, as so far I've seen no studies to 
indicate
extra is harmful OR beneficial (it's a toss-up). As for drugs and more extensive
measures, those are all summed up in brief on the main felineleukemia.org 
webpage,
under treatments. If you want more info about anything listed there, just ask.

Again, nice to have you here!

Phaewryn

http://ucat.us/domesticcatlinks.html
Special Needs Cat Resources




To Joe: Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread wendy
Hi Joe,

Welcome to the group.  I'm really sorry to hear about
Chewie and that Stitch has also tested positive for
FeLV.  The best thing you can do for Stitch is to
educate yourself on this virus.  It is a serious, and
often times, deadly disease, but not necessarily a
death sentence.  Keeping Stitch stress-free and
feeding him the best diet possible will go a long way
in combatting the virus.  FeLV is not AIDS for
kitties, but it is similar in how it behaves.  Keeping
the immune system in top-notch shape is how we combat
the virus in our beloved furbabies.

Stitch may still throw off this virus, depending on
when he was exposed, which could certainly have just
been recently when Chewie got sick, even though they
have been living together for a while.  Also, there
are a lot of false-positive tests.  Retesting Stitch
in 3-6 months with the IFA test would be a good idea. 
You are right to wait on adopting another cat right
now, and if other cats stress Stitch out, I wouldn't
get one at all, unless she does test negative in 3-6
months; then it won't matter too much if she gets a
little stressed out.

If Stitch is asymptomatic, there's not much else you
can do, other than considering supplements for her
immune system, like L-lysine (without propynol glycol)
or Mega C.  And keep us bookmarked because this is the
place to be for FeLV info.  Bless you for not pts this
kitty and for taking such good care of her.

Take care and keep us posted on Stitch!
:)
Wendy
Dallas, TX

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the 
world: Indeed it is the only thing that ever has! 

  ~~~ Margaret Meade ~~~



 

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P.S. Re: To Joe: Re: Felvtalk - introduction - Chewie and Stitch

2007-04-09 Thread wendy
P.S. There is a FAQ link on the Felineleukemia.org
site that links to Cornell University's FAQ page, but
beware, we here do not always agree with Cornell, and
often find that some of their info. is outdated. 
Also, there is a Feline Leukemia Information link on
the felineleukemia.org website towards the bottom of
the page.

:)
Wendy

--- wendy [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Hi Joe,
 
 Welcome to the group.  I'm really sorry to hear
 about
 Chewie and that Stitch has also tested positive for
 FeLV.  The best thing you can do for Stitch is to
 educate yourself on this virus.  It is a serious,
 and
 often times, deadly disease, but not necessarily a
 death sentence.  Keeping Stitch stress-free and
 feeding him the best diet possible will go a long
 way
 in combatting the virus.  FeLV is not AIDS for
 kitties, but it is similar in how it behaves. 
 Keeping
 the immune system in top-notch shape is how we
 combat
 the virus in our beloved furbabies.
 
 Stitch may still throw off this virus, depending on
 when he was exposed, which could certainly have just
 been recently when Chewie got sick, even though they
 have been living together for a while.  Also, there
 are a lot of false-positive tests.  Retesting Stitch
 in 3-6 months with the IFA test would be a good
 idea. 
 You are right to wait on adopting another cat right
 now, and if other cats stress Stitch out, I wouldn't
 get one at all, unless she does test negative in 3-6
 months; then it won't matter too much if she gets a
 little stressed out.
 
 If Stitch is asymptomatic, there's not much else you
 can do, other than considering supplements for her
 immune system, like L-lysine (without propynol
 glycol)
 or Mega C.  And keep us bookmarked because this is
 the
 place to be for FeLV info.  Bless you for not pts
 this
 kitty and for taking such good care of her.
 
 Take care and keep us posted on Stitch!
 :)
 Wendy
 Dallas, TX
 
 Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful
 committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it
 is the only thing that ever has! 
 
  ~~~ Margaret Meade
 ~~~
 
 
 
  


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 Marketing.

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world: Indeed it is the only thing that ever has! 

  ~~~ Margaret Meade ~~~



   

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