Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-04-02 Thread czadna sacarawicz

Some of us are just denser than gold.

Five of 7 tested positive for FeLV in March 2010 on in-house test.  Issac, a 
positive, crashed in February.  Vet had said to retest in a year. Do we now do 
the IFA or ELISA on everyone?  Vet had vaccinated and given boosters to 
everyone at that time.  We have switched from that vet.
 
Today vet said should do in-office test on positives. 
 
Earlier this week some of you had kindly commented re:  poisoning possibilities 
for changes in pupils of unclaimed cats who dine at restaurants.  This vet said 
Henry's pupils were result of calcivirus or herpes virus post stress of 
neutering in September.  I have known him since July 2010.  He has never had 
runny eyes or pussy eyes or ocular discharge or respiratory symptoms.
 
 
There is a word for people unknown to each other who work on a project together 
for a Supreme Power.  You truly keep me on the planet.
 
Blessed Be
 
czadna


m


 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
 hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
 the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
 positive on the IFA test.  
  
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not going 
 to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
 would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
 virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats 
 would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and 
 fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on 
 the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  
 Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and 
 continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 
 30 days later, and he continued to test negative on all three tests.  His 
 body built an immune defense and fought off the virus
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
 
 
 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
 vet 
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
 not 
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
 to 
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
 nice 
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
 basement 
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
 don't 
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
 find 
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying 
 to 
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, so 
 any 
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
  Jannes 
 
 
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-04-02 Thread MaiMaiPG

May be the term should be hearts of gold instead of denser

No clue on the testing.  I have been blessed with one beautiful FeLV+  
(Dixie Louise Doodle Katt, JP) and have several ferals of unknown  
status (it just doesn't matter at this point).  Suggest you check the  
difference in cost and realize you may have to go to the next level  
whether you use the office test or not.Also consider some of the  
supplements others may offer.


One of the ferals has runny eyes but it seems to be the result of a  
fungus I am trying to treatreally fun with a non-compliant cat  
with four friends.:)))


Blessings to you for caring.  Continue to be concerned about  
poison...I am terrified about the cat that ate the mouse that ate  
the.



On Apr 2, 2011, at 3:55 PM, czadna sacarawicz wrote:



Some of us are just denser than gold.

Five of 7 tested positive for FeLV in March 2010 on in-house test.   
Issac, a positive, crashed in February.  Vet had said to retest in a  
year. Do we now do the IFA or ELISA on everyone?  Vet had vaccinated  
and given boosters to everyone at that time.  We have switched from  
that vet.


Today vet said should do in-office test on positives.

Earlier this week some of you had kindly commented re:  poisoning  
possibilities for changes in pupils of unclaimed cats who dine at  
restaurants.  This vet said Henry's pupils were result of calcivirus  
or herpes virus post stress of neutering in September.  I have known  
him since July 2010.  He has never had runny eyes or pussy eyes or  
ocular discharge or respiratory symptoms.



There is a word for people unknown to each other who work on a  
project together for a Supreme Power.  You truly keep me on the  
planet.


Blessed Be

czadna


m




Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.   
I felt the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV  
because I would hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may  
not even be infected with the virus.  You cannot consider a cat  
persistently viremic until they test positive on the IFA test.


If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is  
not going to transmit the virus to your other cats through some  
chance encounter.  It would take prolonged contact with your other  
cats to infect them with the virus.  Even if they had prolonged  
contact, it does not mean your other cats would get the virus.   
Some cats are able to build an immune response and fight off the  
virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on the  
combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.   
Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA  
test and continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a  
precaution, we tested again 30 days later, and he continued to test  
negative on all three tests.  His body built an immune defense and  
fought off the virus


--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:


From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM


Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and  
they said
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she  
has gained
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems  
healthy. The vet
said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last  
week. I did not
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.   
However, I have
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they  
will escape to
the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep  
her in a nice
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in  
the basement
about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4'  
wide x 6'
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged  
up, but don't
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I  
tried to find
a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We  
are trying to
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me  
fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this  
situation, so any

comments or ideas are much appreciated.
Jannes



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/ 
felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/ 
felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Maureen Olvey

Now I have a question and need advice.

My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing.  
Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was not 
to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  Maybe 
the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I know 
they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is there any 
chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we should 
separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked the virus 
up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them not to have 
it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 weeks old their 
chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for them and save 
them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if they need to be 
taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if there's no point to 
it.

What do you guys think?

Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins?  
Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
 uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
 this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
 be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
 figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
 
 Diane R. 
 
 
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Jacquelyn Gonzales
If your vet did the FELV/FIV combo snap test on the mother, beware as this test 
can produce false positive readings due to cross-reactivity.  Please test her 
via ELISA sent to the lab and if that comes back positive, test via IFA.  Or, 
you can go straight to the IFA test.  

--- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM



Now I have a question and need advice.

My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing.  
Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was not 
to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  Maybe 
the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I know 
they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is there any 
chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we should 
separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked the virus 
up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them not to have 
it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 weeks old their 
chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for them and save 
them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if they need to be 
taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if there's no point to 
it.

What do you guys think?

Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins?  
Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
 uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
 this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
 be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
 figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
 
 Diane R. 
 
 
              
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Maureen Olvey

A, good point.  Hadn't thought about that.  Would we get the results of 
those tests pretty quick?

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 14:40:00 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 If your vet did the FELV/FIV combo snap test on the mother, beware as this 
 test can produce false positive readings due to cross-reactivity.  Please 
 test her via ELISA sent to the lab and if that comes back positive, test via 
 IFA.  Or, you can go straight to the IFA test.  
 
 --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM
 
 
 
 Now I have a question and need advice.
 
 My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing. 
  Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was 
 not to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  
 Maybe the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I 
 know they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is 
 there any chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we 
 should separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked 
 the virus up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them 
 not to have it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 
 weeks old their chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for 
 them and save them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if 
 they need to be taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if 
 there's no point to it.
 
 What do you guys think?
 
 Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins? 
  Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
  uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
  this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
  be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
  figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
  
  Diane R. 
  
  
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Jacquelyn Gonzales
Yes. Both tests are usually back in 24 hours. 

--- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:46 PM



A, good point.  Hadn't thought about that.  Would we get the results of 
those tests pretty quick?

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 14:40:00 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 If your vet did the FELV/FIV combo snap test on the mother, beware as this 
 test can produce false positive readings due to cross-reactivity.  Please 
 test her via ELISA sent to the lab and if that comes back positive, test via 
 IFA.  Or, you can go straight to the IFA test.  
 
 --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM
 
 
 
 Now I have a question and need advice.
 
 My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still 
 nursing.  Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My 
 recommendation was not to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to 
 see what happens.  Maybe the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is 
 about the kittens.  I know they have probably already gotten the virus from 
 the mama cat, but is there any chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  
 One vet said maybe we should separate the kittens from the mama just in case 
 they haven't picked the virus up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be 
 possible - for them not to have it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens 
 are only about 4 weeks old their chances aren't too good but we want to do 
 the best we can for them and save them if possible.  We've got people that 
 can bottle feed if they need to be taken from the mom.  But I don't want to 
 separate them if there's no point to it.
 
 What do you guys think?
 
 Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B 
 vitamins?  Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
  uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
  this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
  be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
  figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
  
  Diane R. 
  
  
                           
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
              
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Sharyl
Maureen, the kittens are probably already FeLV+.  I would separate them from 
the Momma cat.  They are old enough to eat canned kitten food mixed with a 
little warm water and KMR.  When I rescued a momma a litter of 4 all were 
positive.  The kittens lived 12-14 months.  Momma lived for 4 yrs.  But they 
had a good life for as long as they were with me.
 
I tried B12, folic acid, brewers yeast, L-lysine and Mega C.  Didn't help my 
kittens but yours could be different.
 
Thank you for taking this family in.  Be sure to spay the Momma immediately.
Sharyl

--- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olive molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 5:27 PM



Now I have a question and need advice.

My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing.  
Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was not 
to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  Maybe 
the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I know 
they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is there any 
chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we should 
separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked the virus 
up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them not to have 
it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 weeks old their 
chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for them and save 
them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if they need to be 
taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if there's no point to 
it.

What do you guys think?

Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins?  
Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
 uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
 this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
 be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
 figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
 
 Diane R. 
 
 
              
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Maureen Olvey

Why are you thinking I should go ahead and separate them from mama cat?  Is 
that so her milk will hurry and dry up so we can get her spayed or is there 
another reason?

Oh, there's another foster that has the family right now.  I'm hoping to keep 
it that way!  I thought I would be able to get out of fostering since I found 
out one of my kitties had FeLV.  As much as I love fostering I was looking 
forward to a break.  I had already told the rest of the board that I wouldn't 
be able to foster anymore.  Figures we'd take in a FeLV + kitty right after my 
discovery.  Somehow I have a feeling that at some point I'll end up with the 
family.  So much for taking a break from fostering!  Actually, I'd rather take 
a break from work not fostering but that's not an option.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 14:58:37 -0700
 From: cline...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Maureen, the kittens are probably already FeLV+.  I would separate them from 
 the Momma cat.  They are old enough to eat canned kitten food mixed with a 
 little warm water and KMR.  When I rescued a momma a litter of 4 all were 
 positive.  The kittens lived 12-14 months.  Momma lived for 4 yrs.  But they 
 had a good life for as long as they were with me.
  
 I tried B12, folic acid, brewers yeast, L-lysine and Mega C.  Didn't help my 
 kittens but yours could be different.
  
 Thank you for taking this family in.  Be sure to spay the Momma immediately.
 Sharyl
 
 --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olive molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 5:27 PM
 
 
 
 Now I have a question and need advice.
 
 My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing. 
  Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was 
 not to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  
 Maybe the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I 
 know they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is 
 there any chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we 
 should separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked 
 the virus up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them 
 not to have it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 
 weeks old their chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for 
 them and save them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if 
 they need to be taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if 
 there's no point to it.
 
 What do you guys think?
 
 Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins? 
  Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
  uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
  this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
  be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
  figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
  
  Diane R. 
  
  
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Jacquelyn Gonzales
Since it takes 2 to 4 weeks after exposure for the virus to circulate in the 
bloodstream, chances are that the kittens are infected if the mother cat is 
truly infected with the virus.  You will not know if the mother is truly 
infected with the virus until you do more testing. You can test for FELV at any 
age so if you want to know if the kittens have the virus, have them tested for 
FELV. If it were me, I would test the mother cat via the ELISA test sent to the 
lab, then do the IFA test.  Many of us in rescue have and continue to get false 
positive readings for the FELV/FIV snap combo test.  I see absolutely no reason 
to separate the kittens from their mother. If mom is infected, then it is 
likely that kittens have been exposed to the virus since birth or in-vitro.

--- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM



Now I have a question and need advice.

My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing.  
Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was not 
to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  Maybe 
the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I know 
they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is there any 
chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we should 
separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked the virus 
up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them not to have 
it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 weeks old their 
chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for them and save 
them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if they need to be 
taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if there's no point to 
it.

What do you guys think?

Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins?  
Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
 uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
 this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
 be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
 figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
 
 Diane R. 
 
 
              
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Maureen Olvey

Yeah, I figured there's a 99% chance the kittens have already gotten enough 
exposure to the virus to catch it.

I did recommend the other tests though like you said.  Are the tests very 
expensive?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:16:38 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Since it takes 2 to 4 weeks after exposure for the virus to circulate in the 
 bloodstream, chances are that the kittens are infected if the mother cat is 
 truly infected with the virus.  You will not know if the mother is truly 
 infected with the virus until you do more testing. You can test for FELV at 
 any age so if you want to know if the kittens have the virus, have them 
 tested for FELV. If it were me, I would test the mother cat via the ELISA 
 test sent to the lab, then do the IFA test.  Many of us in rescue have and 
 continue to get false positive readings for the FELV/FIV snap combo test.  I 
 see absolutely no reason to separate the kittens from their mother. If mom is 
 infected, then it is likely that kittens have been exposed to the virus since 
 birth or in-vitro.
 
 --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM
 
 
 
 Now I have a question and need advice.
 
 My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still nursing. 
  Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My recommendation was 
 not to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to see what happens.  
 Maybe the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is about the kittens.  I 
 know they have probably already gotten the virus from the mama cat, but is 
 there any chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  One vet said maybe we 
 should separate the kittens from the mama just in case they haven't picked 
 the virus up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be possible - for them 
 not to have it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens are only about 4 
 weeks old their chances aren't too good but we want to do the best we can for 
 them and save them if possible.  We've got people that can bottle feed if 
 they need to be taken from the mom.  But I don't want to separate them if 
 there's no point to it.
 
 What do you guys think?
 
 Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B vitamins? 
  Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
  uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
  this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
  be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
  figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
  
  Diane R. 
  
  
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Natalie
Chances are, if she was positive when they were born, they've got it.
Taking them away wouldn't make any difference. I don't see any point, and
they're too young to test; at a very young age, there are too many false
positives.  Poor family! 
I would definitely give mama Vitamin C and CoQ10 - vegetarian type at GNC is
in powder form, open capsule and add to her food.  With Vitamin C, start
small amounts and build up not to cause diarrhea. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Friday, March 18, 2011 5:27 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


Now I have a question and need advice.

My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still
nursing.  Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My
recommendation was not to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to
see what happens.  Maybe the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is
about the kittens.  I know they have probably already gotten the virus from
the mama cat, but is there any chance at all that they haven't gotten it?
One vet said maybe we should separate the kittens from the mama just in case
they haven't picked the virus up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that
be possible - for them not to have it already, I mean?  I know since the
kittens are only about 4 weeks old their chances aren't too good but we want
to do the best we can for them and save them if possible.  We've got people
that can bottle feed if they need to be taken from the mom.  But I don't
want to separate them if there's no point to it.

What do you guys think?

Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B
vitamins?  Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?


I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain



 From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
 uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them.
But
 this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they
should
 be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
 figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
 
 Diane R. 
 
 
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Jacquelyn Gonzales
It depends on the vet and what they charge. I am in Los Angeles and most of the 
vets I know of charge about $100 for the IFA and about $50 or $60 for the ELISA 
test sent to the lab.  I would assume your rescue group has a vet where they 
can get a discount.  Our rescue group pays $80 for the IFA and $27 for the 
ELISA sent to the lab.  I hope your rescue group is not considering euthanasia 
if the mom and kits test positive. What city are you in?

--- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 3:24 PM



Yeah, I figured there's a 99% chance the kittens have already gotten enough 
exposure to the virus to catch it.

I did recommend the other tests though like you said.  Are the tests very 
expensive?


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:16:38 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Since it takes 2 to 4 weeks after exposure for the virus to circulate in the 
 bloodstream, chances are that the kittens are infected if the mother cat is 
 truly infected with the virus.  You will not know if the mother is truly 
 infected with the virus until you do more testing. You can test for FELV at 
 any age so if you want to know if the kittens have the virus, have them 
 tested for FELV. If it were me, I would test the mother cat via the ELISA 
 test sent to the lab, then do the IFA test.  Many of us in rescue have and 
 continue to get false positive readings for the FELV/FIV snap combo test.  I 
 see absolutely no reason to separate the kittens from their mother. If mom is 
 infected, then it is likely that kittens have been exposed to the virus since 
 birth or in-vitro.
 
 --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM
 
 
 
 Now I have a question and need advice.
 
 My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still 
 nursing.  Just our luck the mama cat tested positive for FeLV.  My 
 recommendation was not to put any of them down, but to wait a few months to 
 see what happens.  Maybe the mama cat can kick the virus.  My question is 
 about the kittens.  I know they have probably already gotten the virus from 
 the mama cat, but is there any chance at all that they haven't gotten it?  
 One vet said maybe we should separate the kittens from the mama just in case 
 they haven't picked the virus up yet.  What do you guys think?  Would that be 
 possible - for them not to have it already, I mean?  I know since the kittens 
 are only about 4 weeks old their chances aren't too good but we want to do 
 the best we can for them and save them if possible.  We've got people that 
 can bottle feed if they need to be taken from the mom.  But I don't want to 
 separate them if there's no point to it.
 
 What do you guys think?
 
 Also, seems like I've heard you guys mentioning vitamins.  Was it B 
 vitamins?  Would that be a good idea for the mama cat?
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  From: drosenfe...@wi.rr.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 18:39:13 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
  uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
  this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
  be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
  figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).
  
  Diane R. 
  
  
                           
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
              
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread Maureen Olvey

That's what I was thinking the IFA costs.  That's not bad at all.  Definitely 
worth it.  I live on the outskirts of Atlanta.

In the old days I think our group would have considered euthanasia but 
since me and some other folks have been around they are more open-minded
 and don't listen to the vets.  I'm kind of a b and always speak my 
mind about doing research and not trusting everything the vet says.  
I've gotten burned that way when I had my Basset Hound.  When I first 
started with the humane society I was only working with ferals and 
strays.  I got tired of people telling me that any cat that tested 
positive for FIV or FeLV one time should be put down without question.  
They were saying that even the tame ones that I found in my feral 
colonies should be put down and not taken in and fostered.  And oh God, 
if one cat had an injury, even just a small injury that got a little 
infected, and the cat had FIV some vets said that it would never heal so
 I should just go ahead and put the cat down.  Even if the cat belonged 
to someone else they'd say that.  Another lady and I started doing 
research and webinars and going to shelter medicine seminars to be more 
informed.  Funny how a little knowledge can make some big changes.

Still though, if they are all definitely positive there will be some 
challenges.  We don't have a lot of foster homes and I can't think of any that 
would take these guys in to give them a forever home.  I told one lady her and 
I would be taking a road trip to find a sanctuary for them.  I don't think 
there's a place in GA that takes in FeLV cats.  I really don't know what we'll 
do.  I'm probably the only one willing to take them in but I've got so many 
cats already that won't be able to be adopted because they've been exposed to 
FeLV that I'd rather not take anymore.  But, I'm such a sucker that if it came 
to it I'd end up taking them versus putting them down.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:35:20 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 It depends on the vet and what they charge. I am in Los Angeles and most of 
 the vets I know of charge about $100 for the IFA and about $50 or $60 for the 
 ELISA test sent to the lab.  I would assume your rescue group has a vet where 
 they can get a discount.  Our rescue group pays $80 for the IFA and $27 for 
 the ELISA sent to the lab.  I hope your rescue group is not considering 
 euthanasia if the mom and kits test positive. What city are you in?
 
 --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 3:24 PM
 
 
 
 Yeah, I figured there's a 99% chance the kittens have already gotten enough 
 exposure to the virus to catch it.
 
 I did recommend the other tests though like you said.  Are the tests very 
 expensive?
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:16:38 -0700
  From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Since it takes 2 to 4 weeks after exposure for the virus to circulate in 
  the bloodstream, chances are that the kittens are infected if the mother 
  cat is truly infected with the virus.  You will not know if the mother is 
  truly infected with the virus until you do more testing. You can test for 
  FELV at any age so if you want to know if the kittens have the virus, have 
  them tested for FELV. If it were me, I would test the mother cat via the 
  ELISA test sent to the lab, then do the IFA test.  Many of us in rescue 
  have and continue to get false positive readings for the FELV/FIV snap 
  combo test.  I see absolutely no reason to separate the kittens from their 
  mother. If mom is infected, then it is likely that kittens have been 
  exposed to the virus since birth or in-vitro.
  
  --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
  
  
  From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 2:27 PM
  
  
  
  Now I have a question and need advice.
  
  My rescue just took in a mama cat and 4 young kittens that are still 
  nursing.  Just our luck the mama cat tested

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-18 Thread dlgegg
I know the costs for felv and fiv cats CAN be high, but why not take a chance 
for their sake.  My 2 felv positive girls are amoung the healthiest of my 7 and 
none of my other girls and 1 boy have contracted it from them.  Plus my vet 
said that it is possible they were exposesd just before I got them and 
developed an immunity to it, but that now they will always test positive 
because of the exposure.  Annie was 4 when I got her and Nitnoy was around 1 or 
2.  They were both highly stressed:  Nitnoy had her tail bitten off by a 
raccoon and Annie lost her person to liver cancer and was islolated in a 
trailer for 21 days.  That would be enough to lower anyone's immunity.  Now, 
all we have to do is keep the negatives up to date on their shots just in case 
Annie or Nitnoy would bite them.
 Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote: 
 
 That's what I was thinking the IFA costs.  That's not bad at all.  Definitely 
 worth it.  I live on the outskirts of Atlanta.
 
 In the old days I think our group would have considered euthanasia but 
 since me and some other folks have been around they are more open-minded
  and don't listen to the vets.  I'm kind of a b and always speak my 
 mind about doing research and not trusting everything the vet says.  
 I've gotten burned that way when I had my Basset Hound.  When I first 
 started with the humane society I was only working with ferals and 
 strays.  I got tired of people telling me that any cat that tested 
 positive for FIV or FeLV one time should be put down without question.  
 They were saying that even the tame ones that I found in my feral 
 colonies should be put down and not taken in and fostered.  And oh God, 
 if one cat had an injury, even just a small injury that got a little 
 infected, and the cat had FIV some vets said that it would never heal so
  I should just go ahead and put the cat down.  Even if the cat belonged 
 to someone else they'd say that.  Another lady and I started doing 
 research and webinars and going to shelter medicine seminars to be more 
 informed.  Funny how a little knowledge can make some big changes.
 
 Still though, if they are all definitely positive there will be some 
 challenges.  We don't have a lot of foster homes and I can't think of any 
 that would take these guys in to give them a forever home.  I told one lady 
 her and I would be taking a road trip to find a sanctuary for them.  I don't 
 think there's a place in GA that takes in FeLV cats.  I really don't know 
 what we'll do.  I'm probably the only one willing to take them in but I've 
 got so many cats already that won't be able to be adopted because they've 
 been exposed to FeLV that I'd rather not take anymore.  But, I'm such a 
 sucker that if it came to it I'd end up taking them versus putting them down.
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:35:20 -0700
  From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  It depends on the vet and what they charge. I am in Los Angeles and most of 
  the vets I know of charge about $100 for the IFA and about $50 or $60 for 
  the ELISA test sent to the lab.  I would assume your rescue group has a vet 
  where they can get a discount.  Our rescue group pays $80 for the IFA and 
  $27 for the ELISA sent to the lab.  I hope your rescue group is not 
  considering euthanasia if the mom and kits test positive. What city are you 
  in?
  
  --- On Fri, 3/18/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
  
  
  From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 3:24 PM
  
  
  
  Yeah, I figured there's a 99% chance the kittens have already gotten enough 
  exposure to the virus to catch it.
  
  I did recommend the other tests though like you said.  Are the tests very 
  expensive?
  
  
  “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
  profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
  unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
  sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
  Twain
  
  
  
   Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:16:38 -0700
   From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
   
   Since it takes 2 to 4 weeks after exposure for the virus to circulate in 
   the bloodstream, chances are that the kittens are infected if the mother 
   cat is truly infected with the virus.  You will not know if the mother is 
   truly infected with the virus until you do more

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-17 Thread Natalie
Our cats prefer the organic dried catnip - they eat it!  They pay no
attention to the spray at all.  In fact, even our dog loves the dried catnip
(has anyone heard that before?).  I place the small toys into a jar of
catnip, that way there's always a scent on them, and recycle the toys - in
and out of the jar.  There are some cats that don't respond to catnip at
all, and some cats don't playand the ones that don't, usually end up
finding their own toys like bottle caps, toilet paper rolls, etc. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 5:31 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Find a feather...maybe at a hobby storetease her gently.  Also try  
a catnip spray (forget the powdered stuff) and Feliway.  Oh yeah, my  
boys just reminded me that paper sacks are wonderful.

It is always painful when they leave but, if it wasn't, they would  
mean nothing.
On Mar 16, 2011, at 3:55 PM, Jannes Taylor wrote:

 Thanks, Bonnie,
 Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted  
 and know it
 will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great  
 Dane put down
 five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio  
 myothapy and
 an parasitic infection.
 It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to  
 her new
 surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
 Jannes




 
 From: Bonnie Hogue ho...@sonic.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 3:12:40 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

 Jannes
 You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and  
 helpful advice
 from this group.
 Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber  
 (which it
 certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy  
 whatever life she
 had on earth, Go For It!
 You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely  
 will be!
 Peace,
 Bonnie
 - Original Message - From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com

 
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and  
 they said
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she  
 has gained
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems  
 healthy. The
 vet
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last  
 week. I did
 not
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However,  
 I have
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they  
 will escape
 to
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep  
 her in a nice
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in  
 the
 basement
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4'  
 wide x 6'
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged  
 up, but don't
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I  
 tried to
 find
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We  
 are trying
 to
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me  
 fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this  
 situation, so
 any
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes



 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/ 
 felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-17 Thread Natalie
Sorry, I forgot to mention our three dogs that died - we are on our fourth
one now since we got married in 1968, although we vowed to stick to cats.
We found her when she was a teeny 2-month old, 4-lb puppy on the street in
MexicoShe thinks that she's a cat. No, one never forgets - it's like a
video going off in your mind, reliving all the details.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 6:00 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I can relate to that! I've had quite a few cats in my 52 years. You never
really 
forget no matter how long it has been. 

 Jannes 





From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 4:30:13 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

You're among like-minded people in this group - just this afternoon, I was
sitting with a few cats in my lap, a dog next to me, watching the horrors
happening in Japan.  I looked over at one of our cats who looks just like
our old Houdini who die in Novembersuddenly, I started tearfully
remembering details of almost ALL the cats that have died in my
lifetimenow, I have a headache.  

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:56 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Thanks, Bonnie,
Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted and know
it 
will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great Dane put
down 
five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio myothapy
and 
an parasitic infection.
It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to her new 
surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
Jannes 





From: Bonnie Hogue ho...@sonic.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 3:12:40 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Jannes
You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and helpful
advice 
from this group.
Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber (which it

certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy whatever life
she 
had on earth, Go For It!
You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely will be!
Peace,
Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they
said
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has
gained
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy.
The 
vet
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I
did 
not
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However, I have
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will
escape 
to
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a
nice
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x
6'
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but
don't
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried
to 
find
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are
trying 
to
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation,
so 
any
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Lorrie
I recently had a FelV female spayed and she came thru the proceedure
just fine.   I too was afraid to do it, but I'm glad I did as she is
a happier cat.

Lorrie

On 03-15, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:

 Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
 uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for
 them. But this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with
 FeLV -- they should be able to judge whether Amber would be too
 stressed by the procedure, or figure out ways that she won't be
 (kitty Prozac?).
 
 Diane R. 
 

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread TANYA NOE
Cats do develop a type of natural immunity to FeLV after the age of one, so 
cats that are over 3 are less likely to develop FelV even if they are not 
vaccinated. Add the vaccine and they are even less likely to get it. This is 
most likely why so many of us have had such good lick with mixing our kids.
Tanya

--- On Tue, 3/15/11, Beth create_me_...@yahoo.com wrote:

 From: Beth create_me_...@yahoo.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tuesday, March 15, 2011, 10:37 AM
 I worked a hoarding case with 26
 unvaccinated cats. 3 of them turned out to be FeLV positive.
 We quarantined the remaining cats for 6 months  none
 showed up FeLV positive after the 6 months. I was amazed.
 
 Beth
 Don't Litter, Fix Your Critter! www.Furkids.org   
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 wrote:
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 10:48 PM
 
 
 My FIV cat has never been vaccinated against FeLV which is
 why I assumed he would get it from the other kitty. 
 Doesn't make sense.  Oh well, I'm glad he didn't get it.
 
 Maureen
 
 
 
 
 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  From: create_me_...@yahoo.com
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 02:26:16 +
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  My FIV cat lived on and off for 10 years with FeLV
 cats  never got it. Of coarse he was vaccinated.
  Beth
  Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
  
  -Original Message-
  From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
  Sender: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 20:18:40 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Reply-To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  
  Matter of fact, I have an FIV + cat living with me
 that hasn't contracted the FeLV.  I'm not quite sure how
 that has happened because he should have gotten it right
 away.  I'm going to have him tested a couple more times
 over the next few months to be sure.  Maybe FeLV isn't as
 contagious as they say.  I'm still shaking my head on that
 one.
  
  “I am not interested to know whether vivisection
 produces results that are profitable to the human race or
 doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon unconsenting
 animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking
 further.” – Mark Twain
  
  
  
   Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
   From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
   
   I realize now that I did not address the concern
 you posted about.  I felt the need to educate you about the
 testing protocol for FELV because I would hate to see you
 cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with
 the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic
 until they test positive on the IFA test.  
    
   If it turns out the cat you rescued is really
 FELV positive, she is not going to transmit the virus to
 your other cats through some chance encounter.  It would
 take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them
 with the virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it
 does not mean your other cats would get the virus.  Some
 cats are able to build an immune response and fight off the
 virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested
 positive on the combo snap test and the ELISA test but
 tested negative on the IFA.  Thirty days later, he tested
 negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and continued to
 test negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested
 again 30 days later, and he continued to test negative on
 all three tests.  His body built an immune defense and
 fought off the virus
   
   --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 wrote:
   
   
   From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
   Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
   
   
   Hello,
   I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the
 vet a week ago and they said 
   she was FELV positive. She was starving when I
 found her, but she has gained 
   weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten
 and she seems healthy. The vet 
   said she was about a year old. She only weighed
 six pounds last week. I did not 
   have the heart to euthanize her when she is not
 suffering.  However, I have 
   three healthy cats upstairs and I live in
 constant fear that they will escape to 
   the basement where this cat we now call Amber is
 staying. I keep her in a nice 
   cage during most of the time and let her out to
 get her exercise in the basement 
   about four hours per day. My husband is building
 her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
   tall cage so she will have more room I do hate
 keeping her caged up, but don't 
   have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a
 sad

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Bonnie Hogue

Jannes
You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and helpful 
advice from this group.
Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber (which it 
certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy whatever life 
she had on earth, Go For It!

You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely will be!
Peace,
Bonnie
- Original Message - 
From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.



Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they 
said
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has 
gained
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. 
The vet
said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I 
did not

have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However, I have
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will 
escape to
the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
nice
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement
about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 
6'
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
don't
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried 
to find
a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are 
trying to

be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
so any

comments or ideas are much appreciated.
Jannes



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Jannes Taylor
Thanks, Bonnie,
Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted and know it 
will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great Dane put down 
five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio myothapy 
and 
an parasitic infection.
It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to her new 
surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
Jannes 





From: Bonnie Hogue ho...@sonic.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 3:12:40 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Jannes
You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and helpful advice 
from this group.
Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber (which it 
certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy whatever life she 
had on earth, Go For It!
You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely will be!
Peace,
Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
vet
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
not
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However, I have
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
to
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a nice
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6'
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but don't
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
find
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying 
to
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, so 
any
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Natalie
You're among like-minded people in this group - just this afternoon, I was
sitting with a few cats in my lap, a dog next to me, watching the horrors
happening in Japan.  I looked over at one of our cats who looks just like
our old Houdini who die in Novembersuddenly, I started tearfully
remembering details of almost ALL the cats that have died in my
lifetimenow, I have a headache.  

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:56 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Thanks, Bonnie,
Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted and know
it 
will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great Dane put
down 
five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio myothapy
and 
an parasitic infection.
It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to her new 
surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
Jannes 





From: Bonnie Hogue ho...@sonic.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 3:12:40 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Jannes
You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and helpful
advice 
from this group.
Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber (which it

certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy whatever life
she 
had on earth, Go For It!
You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely will be!
Peace,
Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they
said
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has
gained
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy.
The 
vet
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I
did 
not
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However, I have
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will
escape 
to
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a
nice
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x
6'
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but
don't
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried
to 
find
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are
trying 
to
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation,
so 
any
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread MaiMaiPG
Find a feather...maybe at a hobby storetease her gently.  Also try  
a catnip spray (forget the powdered stuff) and Feliway.  Oh yeah, my  
boys just reminded me that paper sacks are wonderful.


It is always painful when they leave but, if it wasn't, they would  
mean nothing.

On Mar 16, 2011, at 3:55 PM, Jannes Taylor wrote:


Thanks, Bonnie,
Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted  
and know it
will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great  
Dane put down
five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio  
myothapy and

an parasitic infection.
It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to  
her new

surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
Jannes





From: Bonnie Hogue ho...@sonic.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 3:12:40 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Jannes
You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and  
helpful advice

from this group.
Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber  
(which it
certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy  
whatever life she

had on earth, Go For It!
You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely  
will be!

Peace,
Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com 


To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.



Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and  
they said
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she  
has gained
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems  
healthy. The

vet
said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last  
week. I did

not
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However,  
I have
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they  
will escape

to
the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep  
her in a nice
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in  
the

basement
about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4'  
wide x 6'
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged  
up, but don't
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I  
tried to

find
a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We  
are trying

to
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me  
fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this  
situation, so

any
comments or ideas are much appreciated.
Jannes



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/ 
felvtalk_felineleukemia.org





___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Jannes Taylor
I can relate to that! I've had quite a few cats in my 52 years. You never 
really 
forget no matter how long it has been. 

 Jannes 





From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 4:30:13 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

You're among like-minded people in this group - just this afternoon, I was
sitting with a few cats in my lap, a dog next to me, watching the horrors
happening in Japan.  I looked over at one of our cats who looks just like
our old Houdini who die in Novembersuddenly, I started tearfully
remembering details of almost ALL the cats that have died in my
lifetimenow, I have a headache.  

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:56 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Thanks, Bonnie,
Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted and know
it 
will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great Dane put
down 
five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio myothapy
and 
an parasitic infection.
It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to her new 
surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
Jannes 





From: Bonnie Hogue ho...@sonic.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 3:12:40 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Jannes
You will get (if you haven't already) loads of really great and helpful
advice 
from this group.
Personally, I would say, if you have a heart-connection with Amber (which it

certainly seems you do) and you are willing to help her enjoy whatever life
she 
had on earth, Go For It!
You may be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.  And Amber surely will be!
Peace,
Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2011 1:50 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they
said
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has
gained
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy.
The 
vet
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I
did 
not
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering. However, I have
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will
escape 
to
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a
nice
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x
6'
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but
don't
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried
to 
find
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are
trying 
to
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation,
so 
any
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Maureen Olvey

Alright you two - cut it out!  It's only been a week and two days since my two 
year old cat died so it doesn't take much right now to get me bawling like a 
baby.

No, really you guys aren't upsetting me.  I think about her a lot anyway.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 15:00:01 -0700
 From: jannestay...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I can relate to that! I've had quite a few cats in my 52 years. You never 
 really 
 forget no matter how long it has been. 
 
  Jannes 
 
 
 
 
 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 4:30:13 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 You're among like-minded people in this group - just this afternoon, I was
 sitting with a few cats in my lap, a dog next to me, watching the horrors
 happening in Japan.  I looked over at one of our cats who looks just like
 our old Houdini who die in Novembersuddenly, I started tearfully
 remembering details of almost ALL the cats that have died in my
 lifetimenow, I have a headache.  
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
 Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:56 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Thanks, Bonnie,
 Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted and know
 it 
 will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great Dane put
 down 
 five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio myothapy
 and 
 an parasitic infection.
 It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to her new 
 surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
 Jannes 
 
 
 
 
 
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-16 Thread Jannes Taylor
So sorry to hear of your loss. I believe I am more sentimental than I have ever 
been! But, I can't help it Is this what happens after you pass the 50 
mark??? Must be menopaws contributing to it, I guess. LOL
 Jannes 





From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 5:24:52 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


Alright you two - cut it out!  It's only been a week and two days since my two 
year old cat died so it doesn't take much right now to get me bawling like a 
baby.

No, really you guys aren't upsetting me.  I think about her a lot anyway.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 15:00:01 -0700
 From: jannestay...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I can relate to that! I've had quite a few cats in my 52 years. You never 
really 

 forget no matter how long it has been. 
 
  Jannes 
 
 
 
 
 
 From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Wed, March 16, 2011 4:30:13 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 You're among like-minded people in this group - just this afternoon, I was
 sitting with a few cats in my lap, a dog next to me, watching the horrors
 happening in Japan.  I looked over at one of our cats who looks just like
 our old Houdini who die in Novembersuddenly, I started tearfully
 remembering details of almost ALL the cats that have died in my
 lifetimenow, I have a headache.  
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
 Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:56 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Thanks, Bonnie,
 Yes, Amber and I have a connection now but I am very tender hearted and know
 it 
 will be painful if her health gets bad.  We had to have our Great Dane put
 down 
 five years ago and I STILL get teary eyed about that. He had cardio myothapy
 and 
 an parasitic infection.
 It does warm my heart to see Amber safe, well fed, and adjusting to her new 
 surroundings. She won't play yet, but maybe that will come..
 Jannes 
 
 
 
 
 
                        
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Beth
I worked a hoarding case with 26 unvaccinated cats. 3 of them turned out to be 
FeLV positive. We quarantined the remaining cats for 6 months  none showed up 
FeLV positive after the 6 months. I was amazed.

Beth
Don't Litter, Fix Your Critter! www.Furkids.org   

--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 10:48 PM


My FIV cat has never been vaccinated against FeLV which is why I assumed he 
would get it from the other kitty.  Doesn't make sense.  Oh well, I'm glad he 
didn't get it.

Maureen





 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 From: create_me_...@yahoo.com
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 02:26:16 +
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 My FIV cat lived on and off for 10 years with FeLV cats  never got it. Of 
 coarse he was vaccinated.
 Beth
 Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
 
 -Original Message-
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Sender: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 20:18:40 
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Reply-To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 
 Matter of fact, I have an FIV + cat living with me that hasn't contracted the 
 FeLV.  I'm not quite sure how that has happened because he should have gotten 
 it right away.  I'm going to have him tested a couple more times over the 
 next few months to be sure.  Maybe FeLV isn't as contagious as they say.  I'm 
 still shaking my head on that one.
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
  From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
  the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
  hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
  the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
  positive on the IFA test.  
   
  If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not 
  going to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance 
  encounter.  It would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect 
  them with the virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean 
  your other cats would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune 
  response and fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that 
  tested positive on the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested 
  negative on the IFA.  Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap 
  test, the ELISA test and continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a 
  precaution, we tested again 30 days later, and he continued to test 
  negative on all three tests.  His body built an immune defense and fought 
  off the virus
  
  --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
  
  
  From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
  
  
  Hello,
  I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they 
  said 
  she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has 
  gained 
  weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. 
  The vet 
  said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
  not 
  have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
  three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will 
  escape to 
  the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
  nice 
  cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
  basement 
  about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 
  6' 
  tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
  don't 
  have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
  find 
  a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are 
  trying to 
  be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
  I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
  so any 
  comments or ideas are much appreciated.
   Jannes 
  
  
        
 ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Jannes Taylor
Thank You so much for your informative information. I really appreciate it!
 Jannes 





From: Jacquelyn Gonzales jgonza...@pacbell.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 4:08:44 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.






Hi Jannes:
 
The FELV/FIV Combo SNAP tests can have a lot of cross-reactivity resulting in 
false positives.  IF you tested via the in-house FELV/FIV Combo test (the test 
they run in the vet's office) you should retest via the ELISA test that is sent 
to the lab. Alternatively, you could test via the IFA test now and if the test 
is positive, the cat is considered persistently viremic and no further testing 
is required.  

 
The ELISA test shows the presence of an antigen created by the cat's immune 
response to FeLV infection in the red blood cells, while the IFA shows this 
same 
antigen in the white blood cells. The difference is that the antigen only goes 
into the white cells at a later stage of infection, which is why IFA+ cats are 
considered persistently viremic while an ELISA+ / IFA- cat may have a transient 
viremia that can be completely thrown off. 

 
There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to the testing.  You can test 
via the IFA now and if it is positive, the cat is considered persistently 
viremic and no further testing is needed.  If you test via the IFA test and it 
is negative, you have to test via the ELISA lab test. I have FELV+ cats of my 
own and have rescued others. If you have discordant test results, you cannot 
consider the cat FELV negative until you get results that match.  

 
There is no need to wait 3 months.  If I were you, I would test via the ELISA 
test that is sent to the lab now.  If it is positive, the next step is to test 
via the IFA test.  


--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:


From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM


Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
vet 

said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did not 
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
to 

the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a nice 
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement 

about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but don't 
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
find 

a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying to 
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
so any 

comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes 


      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Jannes Taylor
Thank you so much for sharing. This makes me feel less paranoid, at the 
least. I 
will definately have her retested. If she still tests negative, I will still 
give her the best life I can. :)
 Jannes 





From: Jacquelyn Gonzales jgonza...@pacbell.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 4:26:53 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt the 
need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would hate to 
see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with the virus.  
You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test positive on the 
IFA test.  

 
If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not going 
to 
transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It would 
take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the virus.  
Even 
if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats would get the 
virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and fight off the 
virus.  
I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on the combo snap test and 
the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  Thirty days later, he tested 
negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and continued to test negative on the 
IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 30 days later, and he continued to 
test negative on all three tests.  His body built an immune defense and fought 
off the virus

--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:


From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM


Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
vet 

said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did not 
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
to 

the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a nice 
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement 

about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but don't 
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
find 

a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying to 
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
so any 

comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes 


      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Jannes Taylor
I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we stand after 
the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as nervous about the 
situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning experience for me. I 
have 
loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much as I can. It makes me feel 
good to see Amber get all the food she wants and I hear her purr. It is sad she 
has lost her freedom but I hope to be able to give her a good life.
BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the restesting? 
My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she can't get out. 
 Jannes 





From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix 
mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 year 
 old 
kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a kitten and at that 
time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few cats that have been living 
with me as long as she has been with me.  They all share the same food bowls 
and 
litterboxes.  None are vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten that 
comes into my house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out 
she 
had been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has been 
living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an older kitten 
that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.  The older kitten has 
been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.  They both came out negative.  A 
couple weeks ago I had an adult that had been with me almost as long as the 
FeLV 
cat was with me and she tested negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes 
to 
confirm what the others have said because it shows that not all cats contract 
FeLV and there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since those 
kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so long 
that 
if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it.  Especially 
the 
cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living alongside her 
healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats vaccinated against FeLV and 
they have never contracted the disease from the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate 
your healthy cats now and let the FeLV + cat run around the basement and if 
she 
tests negative in a few months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test I 
would let her in the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's what 
I 
would do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the 
vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a series 
of 
two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang together.  But it's your 
cats and you have to make that decision.
 
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the 
need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would hate 
to 
see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with the 
virus.  
You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test positive on 
the 
IFA test.  

 
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not 
 going 
to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats 
would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and 
fight 
off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on the 
combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  Thirty 
days 
later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and continued to 
test 
negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 30 days later, 
and 
he continued to test negative on all three tests.  His body built an immune 
defense and fought off the virus
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Gloria Lane
I've always spay/neutered mine- No problems. Except one Felv girl I have, who 
has seizures, and I have not had her spayed. Year or two old. She just seems so 
fragile I couldn't put her thru it. Doesn't seem to have heat cycles, if so 
very mild and unnoticeable. 

Gloria

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 15, 2011, at 2:19 PM, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:

 I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we stand 
 after 
 the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as nervous about 
 the 
 situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning experience for me. I 
 have 
 loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much as I can. It makes me 
 feel 
 good to see Amber get all the food she wants and I hear her purr. It is sad 
 she 
 has lost her freedom but I hope to be able to give her a good life.
 BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the 
 restesting? 
 My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she can't get 
 out. 
  Jannes 
 
 
 
 
 
 From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix 
 mine.
 
 Sent from my iPhone
 
 On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 year 
 old 
 kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a kitten and at 
 that 
 time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few cats that have been living 
 with me as long as she has been with me.  They all share the same food bowls 
 and 
 litterboxes.  None are vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten 
 that 
 comes into my house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out 
 she 
 had been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has 
 been 
 living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an older 
 kitten 
 that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.  The older kitten has 
 been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.  They both came out negative.  
 A 
 couple weeks ago I had an adult that had been with me almost as long as the 
 FeLV 
 cat was with me and she tested negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes 
 to 
 confirm what the others have said because it shows that not all cats 
 contract 
 FeLV and there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since those 
 kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so long 
 that 
 if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it.  Especially 
 the 
 cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living alongside her 
 healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats vaccinated against FeLV 
 and 
 they have never contracted the disease from the FeLV cats.  I would 
 vaccinate 
 your healthy cats now and let the FeLV + cat run around the basement and if 
 she 
 tests negative in a few months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test 
 I 
 would let her in the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's 
 what I 
 would do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the 
 vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a series 
 of 
 two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang together.  But it's 
 your 
 cats and you have to make that decision.
 
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the 
 need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
 hate to 
 see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with the 
 virus.  
 You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test positive on 
 the 
 IFA test.  
 
 
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not 
 going 
 to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
 would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
 virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other 
 cats 
 would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and 
 fight 
 off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on the 
 combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Diane Rosenfeldt
Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).

Diane R. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 2:20 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we stand
after the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as nervous
about the situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning experience
for me. I have loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much as I
can. It makes me feel good to see Amber get all the food she wants and I
hear her purr. It is sad she has lost her freedom but I hope to be able to
give her a good life.
BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the
restesting? 
My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she can't get
out.
 Jannes 





From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix
mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 
year old kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a 
kitten and at that time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few 
cats that have been living with me as long as she has been with me.  
They all share the same food bowls and litterboxes.  None are 
vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten that comes into my 
house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out she had 
been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has 
been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an 
older kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.  
The older kitten has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.  
They both came out negative.  A couple weeks ago I had an adult that 
had been with me almost as long as the FeLV cat was with me and she 
tested negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes to confirm what 
the others have said because it shows that not all cats contract FeLV 
and there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since those 
kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so long
that if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it. 
Especially the cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year
and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living 
alongside her healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats 
vaccinated against FeLV and they have never contracted the disease from 
the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate your healthy cats now and let the 
FeLV + cat run around the basement and if she tests negative in a few 
months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test I would let her in 
the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's what I would 
do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the 
vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a 
series of two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang together. 
But it's your cats and you have to make that decision.
 
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that 
are profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts 
upon unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it 
is to me sufficient justification of the enmity without looking 
further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I 
felt the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV 
because I would hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even
be infected with the virus.
You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
positive on the IFA test.

 
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not
going 
to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter. 
It 
would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other
cats 
would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and
fight 
off the virus.  I rescued a cat over

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Natalie
My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections for
about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
system a bit before surgery.  We call it The Cocktail. You can't imagine
how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
coming back from the dead!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:39 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).

Diane R. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 2:20 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we stand
after the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as nervous
about the situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning experience
for me. I have loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much as I
can. It makes me feel good to see Amber get all the food she wants and I
hear her purr. It is sad she has lost her freedom but I hope to be able to
give her a good life.
BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the
restesting? 
My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she can't get
out.
 Jannes 





From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix
mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 
year old kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a 
kitten and at that time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few 
cats that have been living with me as long as she has been with me.  
They all share the same food bowls and litterboxes.  None are 
vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten that comes into my 
house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out she had 
been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has 
been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an 
older kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.  
The older kitten has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.  
They both came out negative.  A couple weeks ago I had an adult that 
had been with me almost as long as the FeLV cat was with me and she 
tested negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes to confirm what 
the others have said because it shows that not all cats contract FeLV 
and there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since those 
kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so long
that if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it. 
Especially the cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year
and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living 
alongside her healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats 
vaccinated against FeLV and they have never contracted the disease from 
the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate your healthy cats now and let the 
FeLV + cat run around the basement and if she tests negative in a few 
months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test I would let her in 
the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's what I would 
do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the 
vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a 
series of two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang together. 
But it's your cats and you have to make that decision.
 
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that 
are profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts 
upon unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it 
is to me sufficient justification of the enmity without looking 
further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I 
felt the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV 
because I would hate to see you cage a cat

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Diane Rosenfeldt
Sounds like you've got a great vet there. Congrats!

Diane R. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Natalie
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:27 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections for
about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
system a bit before surgery.  We call it The Cocktail. You can't imagine
how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
coming back from the dead!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:39 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).

Diane R. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 2:20 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we stand
after the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as nervous
about the situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning experience
for me. I have loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much as I
can. It makes me feel good to see Amber get all the food she wants and I
hear her purr. It is sad she has lost her freedom but I hope to be able to
give her a good life.
BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the
restesting? 
My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she can't get
out.
 Jannes 





From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix
mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 
year old kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a 
kitten and at that time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few 
cats that have been living with me as long as she has been with me.
They all share the same food bowls and litterboxes.  None are 
vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten that comes into my 
house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out she had 
been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has 
been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an 
older kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.
The older kitten has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old. They 
both came out negative.  A couple weeks ago I had an adult that had 
been with me almost as long as the FeLV cat was with me and she tested 
negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes to confirm what the 
others have said because it shows that not all cats contract FeLV and 
there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since those 
kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so 
long
that if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it.
Especially the cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year
and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living 
alongside her healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats 
vaccinated against FeLV and they have never contracted the disease from 
the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate your healthy cats now and let the 
FeLV + cat run around the basement and if she tests negative in a few 
months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test I would let her in 
the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's what I would 
do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the 
vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a 
series of two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang together.
But it's your cats and you have to make that decision.
 
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that 
are profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts 
upon unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it 
is to me sufficient justification of the enmity without looking 
further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Natalie
My veterinarian is co-founder of AVAR (Association of Veterinarians for
Animal Rights), now under the umbrella of HSUS.  He refuses to declaw cats,
crop ears and dock tails on dogs, uses alternative medicine and acupuncture.
Yes, I am lucky to have him just a few minutes from where we live - he
always make time for me, even when office hours are filled.  But then,
again, I've been quite a good customer with our own dogs and cats since 1984
and with the cat rescue group since 1992.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 8:43 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Sounds like you've got a great vet there. Congrats!

Diane R. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Natalie
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:27 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections for
about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
system a bit before surgery.  We call it The Cocktail. You can't imagine
how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
coming back from the dead!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:39 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for them. But
this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV -- they should
be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the procedure, or
figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).

Diane R. 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 2:20 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we stand
after the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as nervous
about the situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning experience
for me. I have loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much as I
can. It makes me feel good to see Amber get all the food she wants and I
hear her purr. It is sad she has lost her freedom but I hope to be able to
give her a good life.
BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the
restesting? 
My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she can't get
out.
 Jannes 





From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix
mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 
year old kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a 
kitten and at that time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few 
cats that have been living with me as long as she has been with me.
They all share the same food bowls and litterboxes.  None are 
vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten that comes into my 
house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out she had 
been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has 
been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an 
older kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.
The older kitten has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old. They 
both came out negative.  A couple weeks ago I had an adult that had 
been with me almost as long as the FeLV cat was with me and she tested 
negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes to confirm what the 
others have said because it shows that not all cats contract FeLV and 
there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since those 
kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so 
long
that if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it.
Especially the cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year
and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living 
alongside her healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats 
vaccinated against FeLV and they have never contracted the disease from 
the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate your healthy cats now and let the 
FeLV + cat run around the basement and if she tests negative in a few

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread MaiMaiPG

laser helps reduce the stress
On Mar 15, 2011, at 6:39 PM, Diane Rosenfeldt wrote:


Generally spay/neuter is a good idea in most cases -- much less
uncomfortable for the cat, since heat is usually excruciating for  
them. But
this is a reason you should seek out a vet familiar with FeLV --  
they should
be able to judge whether Amber would be too stressed by the  
procedure, or

figure out ways that she won't be (kitty Prozac?).

Diane R.

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes  
Taylor

Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 2:20 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I feel like I must be very cautious until I know for sure where we  
stand
after the restesting. I do appreciate your story and do not feel as  
nervous
about the situation as I did. This has certainly been a learning  
experience
for me. I have loved cats all my life and try to spoil them as much  
as I
can. It makes me feel good to see Amber get all the food she wants  
and I
hear her purr. It is sad she has lost her freedom but I hope to be  
able to

give her a good life.
BTW, Do you think I should have her spayed or wait until after the
restesting?
My husband questions whether we should ever her spayed since she  
can't get

out.
Jannes





From: Gloria Lane gbl...@aristotle.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Mon, March 14, 2011 7:04:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that  
contagious. I mix

mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com  
wrote:




I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2
year old kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a
kitten and at that time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few
cats that have been living with me as long as she has been with me.
They all share the same food bowls and litterboxes.  None are
vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten that comes into my
house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found out she  
had

been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that has
been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an
older kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.
The older kitten has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.
They both came out negative.  A couple weeks ago I had an adult that
had been with me almost as long as the FeLV cat was with me and she
tested negative as well.  So, I tell you this Jannes to confirm what
the others have said because it shows that not all cats contract FeLV
and there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since  
those
kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for  
so long

that if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it.
Especially the cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat  
for a year

and a half.


A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living
alongside her healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats
vaccinated against FeLV and they have never contracted the disease  
from

the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate your healthy cats now and let the
FeLV + cat run around the basement and if she tests negative in a few
months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test I would let her  
in

the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's what I would
do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the
vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a
series of two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang  
together.

But it's your cats and you have to make that decision.




“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results  
that
are profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it  
inflicts

upon unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it
is to me sufficient justification of the enmity without looking
further.” – Mark Twain




Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted  
about.  I

felt the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV
because I would hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may  
not even

be infected with the virus.

You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test
positive on the IFA test.


If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she  
is not

going
to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance  
encounter.

It
would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them  
with the
virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your  
other

cats
would get the virus

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

I love him already.  Please tell me you live near Atlanta.  If so, he's my new 
vet!!!

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:05:37 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 My veterinarian is co-founder of AVAR (Association of Veterinarians for
 Animal Rights), now under the umbrella of HSUS. He refuses to declaw cats,
 crop ears and dock tails on dogs, uses alternative medicine and acupuncture.
 Yes, I am lucky to have him just a few minutes from where we live - he
 always make time for me, even when office hours are filled. But then,
 again, I've been quite a good customer with our own dogs and cats since 1984
 and with the cat rescue group since 1992.
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 8:43 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Sounds like you've got a great vet there. Congrats!
 
 Diane R. 
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Natalie
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:27 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections for
 about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
 system a bit before surgery. We call it The Cocktail. You can't imagine
 how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
 coming back from the dead!
 
 
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Natalie
No, sorry - we are in Greenwich, CT!  Blue Cross Animal Hospital! But how
about moving here?

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 9:16 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


I love him already.  Please tell me you live near Atlanta.  If so, he's my
new vet!!!

I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:05:37 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 My veterinarian is co-founder of AVAR (Association of Veterinarians for
 Animal Rights), now under the umbrella of HSUS. He refuses to declaw cats,
 crop ears and dock tails on dogs, uses alternative medicine and
acupuncture.
 Yes, I am lucky to have him just a few minutes from where we live - he
 always make time for me, even when office hours are filled. But then,
 again, I've been quite a good customer with our own dogs and cats since
1984
 and with the cat rescue group since 1992.
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 8:43 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 Sounds like you've got a great vet there. Congrats!
 
 Diane R. 
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Natalie
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:27 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections
for
 about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
 system a bit before surgery. We call it The Cocktail. You can't imagine
 how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
 coming back from the dead!
 
 
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

Ha, ha - for a vet like him it might be worth the move!  I don't think my 
husband would like it though!

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:36:33 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 No, sorry - we are in Greenwich, CT! Blue Cross Animal Hospital! But how
 about moving here?
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 9:16 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 
 I love him already. Please tell me you live near Atlanta. If so, he's my
 new vet!!!
 
 I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
 profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
 Twain
 
 
 
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:05:37 -0400
  From: at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  My veterinarian is co-founder of AVAR (Association of Veterinarians for
  Animal Rights), now under the umbrella of HSUS. He refuses to declaw cats,
  crop ears and dock tails on dogs, uses alternative medicine and
 acupuncture.
  Yes, I am lucky to have him just a few minutes from where we live - he
  always make time for me, even when office hours are filled. But then,
  again, I've been quite a good customer with our own dogs and cats since
 1984
  and with the cat rescue group since 1992.
  
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane Rosenfeldt
  Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 8:43 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Sounds like you've got a great vet there. Congrats!
  
  Diane R. 
  
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Natalie
  Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:27 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections
 for
  about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
  system a bit before surgery. We call it The Cocktail. You can't imagine
  how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
  coming back from the dead!
  
  
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Natalie
I love that mark Twain quote! What would your husband have against
Greenwich?  It's beautiful here, great ferries to island beaches,
beachesclose to NY City

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 9:43 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


Ha, ha - for a vet like him it might be worth the move!  I don't think my
husband would like it though!

I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:36:33 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 No, sorry - we are in Greenwich, CT! Blue Cross Animal Hospital! But how
 about moving here?
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 9:16 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 
 I love him already. Please tell me you live near Atlanta. If so, he's my
 new vet!!!
 
 I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
 profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
 Twain
 
 
 
  Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:05:37 -0400
  From: at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  My veterinarian is co-founder of AVAR (Association of Veterinarians for
  Animal Rights), now under the umbrella of HSUS. He refuses to declaw
cats,
  crop ears and dock tails on dogs, uses alternative medicine and
 acupuncture.
  Yes, I am lucky to have him just a few minutes from where we live - he
  always make time for me, even when office hours are filled. But then,
  again, I've been quite a good customer with our own dogs and cats since
 1984
  and with the cat rescue group since 1992.
  
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Diane
Rosenfeldt
  Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 8:43 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  Sounds like you've got a great vet there. Congrats!
  
  Diane R. 
  
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Natalie
  Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:27 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  My vet always treats a cat with health problems with vitamin injections
 for
  about a week or two - vitamin B12, C, etc. - it builds up their immune
  system a bit before surgery. We call it The Cocktail. You can't
imagine
  how many cats' lives have been saved with these cocktails, practically
  coming back from the dead!
  
  
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

I bet it is beautiful.  I lived in NH for 5 years and loved it.  New England is 
gorgeous.  He's not much of a traveler though.  He likes to visit other places 
but I can't imagine him ever moving outside of GA.  He's close to his family 
and friends so that's probably a lot of the reason.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 22:12:34 -0400
 From: at...@optonline.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I love that mark Twain quote! What would your husband have against
 Greenwich? It's beautiful here, great ferries to island beaches,
 beachesclose to NY City
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
 Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 9:43 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 
 Ha, ha - for a vet like him it might be worth the move! I don't think my
 husband would like it though!
 
 I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
 profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
 Twain
 
 
 

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Katy Doyle
When I lived with my parents, my FeLV+ cat lived in my bedroom away from my
parents healthy cats. (My cat tested positive at 5 weeks old and I was not
going to put him down. P.S. He's almost 2 years old and still healthy!)

They played under the door, my cat escaped a few times, but the Leukemia
never spread between cats. Contact was limited. Don't get too worried.

--Katy

On Mon, Mar 14, 2011 at 4:50 PM, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.comwrote:

 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they
 said
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has
 gained
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy.
 The vet
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did
 not
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will
 escape to
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a
 nice
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the
 basement
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x
 6'
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but
 don't
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to
 find
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are
 trying to
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation,
 so any
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
  Jannes



 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Jacquelyn Gonzales





Hi Jannes:
 
The FELV/FIV Combo SNAP tests can have a lot of cross-reactivity resulting in 
false positives.  IF you tested via the in-house FELV/FIV Combo test (the test 
they run in the vet's office) you should retest via the ELISA test that is sent 
to the lab. Alternatively, you could test via the IFA test now and if the test 
is positive, the cat is considered persistently viremic and no further testing 
is required.  
 
The ELISA test shows the presence of an antigen created by the cat's immune 
response to FeLV infection in the red blood cells, while the IFA shows this 
same antigen in the white blood cells. The difference is that the antigen only 
goes into the white cells at a later stage of infection, which is why IFA+ cats 
are considered persistently viremic while an ELISA+ / IFA- cat may have a 
transient viremia that can be completely thrown off. 
 
There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to the testing.  You can test 
via the IFA now and if it is positive, the cat is considered persistently 
viremic and no further testing is needed.  If you test via the IFA test and it 
is negative, you have to test via the ELISA lab test. I have FELV+ cats of my 
own and have rescued others. If you have discordant test results, you cannot 
consider the cat FELV negative until you get results that match.  
 
There is no need to wait 3 months.  If I were you, I would test via the ELISA 
test that is sent to the lab now.  If it is positive, the next step is to test 
via the IFA test.  

--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:


From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM


Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
vet 
said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did not 
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
to 
the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a nice 
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement 
about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but don't 
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
find 
a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying to 
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
so any 
comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes 


      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Beth
Jannes -
I mix my FeLV fosters with my healthy, negative, vaccinated  cats. I have done 
this for years  have my healthy cats re-tested many time - including about a 
month ago. They remain negative. They all share food, water, groom each other, 
etc. 
You might want to search the archives on mixing.
Beth
Dont Litter, Fix Your Critter! www.Furkids.org   

--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:

From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 4:50 PM

Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
vet 
said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did not 
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
to 
the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a nice 
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement 
about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but don't 
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
find 
a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying to 
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
so any 
comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes 


      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Jacquelyn Gonzales
I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt the 
need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would hate to 
see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with the virus.  
You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test positive on the 
IFA test.  
 
If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not going 
to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats 
would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and fight 
off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on the 
combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  Thirty days 
later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and continued to 
test negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 30 days later, 
and he continued to test negative on all three tests.  His body built an immune 
defense and fought off the virus

--- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:


From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM


Hello,
I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
vet 
said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did not 
have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
to 
the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a nice 
cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
basement 
about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but don't 
have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
find 
a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying to 
be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
so any 
comments or ideas are much appreciated.
 Jannes 


      
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Maureen Olvey

I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 year old 
kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a kitten and at that 
time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few cats that have been living 
with me as long as she has been with me.  They all share the same food bowls 
and litterboxes.  None are vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or kitten 
that comes into my house has been tested first.  It terrified me when I found 
out she had been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old kitten that 
has been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had him and an older 
kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's office.  The older kitten 
has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.  They both came out negative. 
 A couple weeks ago I had an adult that had been with me almost as long as the 
FeLV cat was with me and she tested negative as well.  So, I tell you this 
Jannes to confirm what the others have said because it shows that not all cats 
contract FeLV and there is no need to panic right now.  The vet felt that since 
those kittens and the cat that I had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so 
long that if they were going to get it they would have already gotten it.  
Especially the cat that had lived at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year 
and a half.

A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living alongside her 
healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats vaccinated against FeLV and 
they have never contracted the disease from the FeLV cats.  I would vaccinate 
your healthy cats now and let the FeLV + cat run around the basement and if she 
tests negative in a few months or test negative with the ELISA and IFA test I 
would let her in the rest of the house with the other cats.  But, that's what I 
would do, not necessarily what you should do.  Actually, I would trust the 
vaccine and after your healthy cats get their vaccination (it takes a series of 
two shots the first time) then I'd let all three hang together.  But it's your 
cats and you have to make that decision.



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
 hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
 the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
 positive on the IFA test.  
  
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not going 
 to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
 would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
 virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats 
 would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and 
 fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on 
 the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  
 Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and 
 continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 
 30 days later, and he continued to test negative on all three tests.  His 
 body built an immune defense and fought off the virus
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
 
 
 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
 vet 
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
 not 
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
 to 
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
 nice 
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
 basement 
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
 don't 
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
 find 
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying 
 to 
 be very cautious

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Gloria Lane
I'd say don't worry about it. I just don't think it's that contagious. I mix 
mine.

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2011, at 6:59 PM, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 
 I foster cats and kittens for my local humane society.  Last week a 2 year 
 old kitty died.  She tested positive for FeLV.  I got her as a kitten and at 
 that time she tested negative.  I have got quite a few cats that have been 
 living with me as long as she has been with me.  They all share the same food 
 bowls and litterboxes.  None are vaccinated against FeLV since every cat or 
 kitten that comes into my house has been tested first.  It terrified me when 
 I found out she had been positive, especially since I have a 5 month old 
 kitten that has been living with me since he was 8 weeks old.  Today I had 
 him and an older kitten that is about 8 months old tested at the vet's 
 office.  The older kitten has been with me since he was about 12 weeks old.  
 They both came out negative.  A couple weeks ago I had an adult that had been 
 with me almost as long as the FeLV cat was with me and she tested negative as 
 well.  So, I tell you this Jannes to confirm what the others have said 
 because it shows that not all cats contract FeLV and there is no need to 
 panic right now.  The vet felt that since those kittens and the cat that I 
 had tested had been exposed to FeLV for so long that if they were going to 
 get it they would have already gotten it.  Especially the cat that had lived 
 at my house with the FeLV + cat for a year and a half.
 
 A friend of mine has also had 3 or 4 FeLV positive cats living alongside her 
 healthy cats for years.  She gets her healthy cats vaccinated against FeLV 
 and they have never contracted the disease from the FeLV cats.  I would 
 vaccinate your healthy cats now and let the FeLV + cat run around the 
 basement and if she tests negative in a few months or test negative with the 
 ELISA and IFA test I would let her in the rest of the house with the other 
 cats.  But, that's what I would do, not necessarily what you should do.  
 Actually, I would trust the vaccine and after your healthy cats get their 
 vaccination (it takes a series of two shots the first time) then I'd let all 
 three hang together.  But it's your cats and you have to make that decision.
 
 
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
 hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
 the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
 positive on the IFA test.  
 
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not 
 going to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance 
 encounter.  It would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect 
 them with the virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean 
 your other cats would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune 
 response and fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that 
 tested positive on the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested 
 negative on the IFA.  Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap 
 test, the ELISA test and continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a 
 precaution, we tested again 30 days later, and he continued to test negative 
 on all three tests.  His body built an immune defense and fought off the 
 virus
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
 
 
 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they 
 said 
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
 vet 
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
 not 
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will 
 escape to 
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
 nice 
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
 basement 
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 
 6' 
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate

Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Maureen Olvey

Matter of fact, I have an FIV + cat living with me that hasn't contracted the 
FeLV.  I'm not quite sure how that has happened because he should have gotten 
it right away.  I'm going to have him tested a couple more times over the next 
few months to be sure.  Maybe FeLV isn't as contagious as they say.  I'm still 
shaking my head on that one.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
 hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
 the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
 positive on the IFA test.  
  
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not going 
 to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
 would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
 virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats 
 would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and 
 fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on 
 the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  
 Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and 
 continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 
 30 days later, and he continued to test negative on all three tests.  His 
 body built an immune defense and fought off the virus
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
 
 
 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
 vet 
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
 not 
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
 to 
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
 nice 
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
 basement 
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
 don't 
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
 find 
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying 
 to 
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, so 
 any 
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
  Jannes 
 
 
   
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread create_me_new
My FIV cat lived on and off for 10 years with FeLV cats  never got it. Of 
coarse he was vaccinated.
Beth
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-Original Message-
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Sender: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 20:18:40 
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Reply-To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.


Matter of fact, I have an FIV + cat living with me that hasn't contracted the 
FeLV.  I'm not quite sure how that has happened because he should have gotten 
it right away.  I'm going to have him tested a couple more times over the next 
few months to be sure.  Maybe FeLV isn't as contagious as they say.  I'm still 
shaking my head on that one.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
 From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
 the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
 hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
 the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
 positive on the IFA test.  
  
 If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not going 
 to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance encounter.  It 
 would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect them with the 
 virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean your other cats 
 would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune response and 
 fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that tested positive on 
 the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested negative on the IFA.  
 Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap test, the ELISA test and 
 continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a precaution, we tested again 
 30 days later, and he continued to test negative on all three tests.  His 
 body built an immune defense and fought off the virus
 
 --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
 
 
 Hello,
 I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they said 
 she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has gained 
 weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. The 
 vet 
 said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
 not 
 have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
 three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will escape 
 to 
 the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
 nice 
 cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
 basement 
 about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 6' 
 tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
 don't 
 have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
 find 
 a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are trying 
 to 
 be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
 I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, so 
 any 
 comments or ideas are much appreciated.
  Jannes 
 
 
   
___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.

2011-03-14 Thread Maureen Olvey

My FIV cat has never been vaccinated against FeLV which is why I assumed he 
would get it from the other kitty.  Doesn't make sense.  Oh well, I'm glad he 
didn't get it.

Maureen





 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 From: create_me_...@yahoo.com
 Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 02:26:16 +
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 My FIV cat lived on and off for 10 years with FeLV cats  never got it. Of 
 coarse he was vaccinated.
 Beth
 Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
 
 -Original Message-
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Sender: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 20:18:40 
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Reply-To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
 
 
 Matter of fact, I have an FIV + cat living with me that hasn't contracted the 
 FeLV.  I'm not quite sure how that has happened because he should have gotten 
 it right away.  I'm going to have him tested a couple more times over the 
 next few months to be sure.  Maybe FeLV isn't as contagious as they say.  I'm 
 still shaking my head on that one.
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
 
  Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:26:53 -0700
  From: jgonza...@pacbell.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  
  I realize now that I did not address the concern you posted about.  I felt 
  the need to educate you about the testing protocol for FELV because I would 
  hate to see you cage a cat for 3 months that may not even be infected with 
  the virus.  You cannot consider a cat persistently viremic until they test 
  positive on the IFA test.  
   
  If it turns out the cat you rescued is really FELV positive, she is not 
  going to transmit the virus to your other cats through some chance 
  encounter.  It would take prolonged contact with your other cats to infect 
  them with the virus.  Even if they had prolonged contact, it does not mean 
  your other cats would get the virus.  Some cats are able to build an immune 
  response and fight off the virus.  I rescued a cat over the summer that 
  tested positive on the combo snap test and the ELISA test but tested 
  negative on the IFA.  Thirty days later, he tested negative on the snap 
  test, the ELISA test and continued to test negative on the IFA test.  As a 
  precaution, we tested again 30 days later, and he continued to test 
  negative on all three tests.  His body built an immune defense and fought 
  off the virus
  
  --- On Mon, 3/14/11, Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com wrote:
  
  
  From: Jannes Taylor jannestay...@yahoo.com
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Any advice appreciated.
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Monday, March 14, 2011, 1:50 PM
  
  
  Hello,
  I rescued a stray two weeks ago. Took her to the vet a week ago and they 
  said 
  she was FELV positive. She was starving when I found her, but she has 
  gained 
  weight and is looking good. Her eyes just glisten and she seems healthy. 
  The vet 
  said she was about a year old. She only weighed six pounds last week. I did 
  not 
  have the heart to euthanize her when she is not suffering.  However, I have 
  three healthy cats upstairs and I live in constant fear that they will 
  escape to 
  the basement where this cat we now call Amber is staying. I keep her in a 
  nice 
  cage during most of the time and let her out to get her exercise in the 
  basement 
  about four hours per day. My husband is building her a 8' long x 4' wide x 
  6' 
  tall cage so she will have more room I do hate keeping her caged up, but 
  don't 
  have a choice. She is very sweet and it is just a sad situation. I tried to 
  find 
  a home for her but no one seems to want a cat with her issues. We are 
  trying to 
  be very cautious regarding the other cats, but it is does make me fearful.
  I plan to have her rested in three months. I am so new to this situation, 
  so any 
  comments or ideas are much appreciated.
   Jannes 
  
  

 ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman