Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-21 Thread jbero tds.net
I am sorry, but I am not familiar with feLIX and my only association with
AAFP is the american association of family practitioners.  I'm not sure why
felv would be addressed in any guidelines they put out.  Could you enlighten
me.

Jenny


On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 there's no mention of it in the 2008 AAFP guidelines, and i would expect it
 to be there.



 On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:51 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

  Granted it is older, but I see nothing in the literature later to refute
  this information.
 
  On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
  
   check the date: 1996. see my other note!
  
   i found a link to a 2000 article in the same journal. is there anything
   later than, say, 2005?
  
   MC
  
   On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:31 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:
  
Okay, this is kind of technical but it basically supports the idea
 that
mutations (in this case deletions in DNA) result in a more virulent
 and
pathogenic virus worsening the disease state as these mutations are
   gained
by the virus.  Here's the link.
   
http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/70/1/359.pdf
   
   
On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 i do know that there are different strains, but really haven't
encountered
 this before--so anything you send to the list will be gratefully
digested!



 On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net
  wrote:

  Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and
 B
being
  those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily
  causes
  disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.
 
  Jenny
 
 
  On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
  
   jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of
FeLV--FeCoV,
   yes,
   which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new,
 and
  i
 would
   like to see some backing for the statement.
  
   there is significant research that implies that many truly
  positive
 FeLVs
   NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the
   2008
 AAFP
   guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new
  research,
 just
   ignored.
  
   i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency
  theory:
with
   cats
   who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way
 that
   we
 will
   ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just
  not
 been
   enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES
   shed
 the
   virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV,
  because
it's
  so
   common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a
  definition
   of
   latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming
  symptomatic,
and
 if
   that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used
 for
   cats
 who
   only test negative once
  
   more input, as they say!
  
   MC
   --
   Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
   Maybe That'll Make The Difference
  
   MaryChristine
   Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
  www.purebredcats.org
   )
   Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
   ___
   Felvtalk mailing list
   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  
   
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 



 --
 Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
 Maybe That'll Make The Difference

 MaryChristine
 Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
www.purebredcats.org
 )
 Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

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   --
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   Maybe That'll Make The Difference
  
   MaryChristine
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  www.purebredcats.org
   )
   Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
   ___
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread jbero tds.net
Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B being
those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.

Jenny


On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of FeLV--FeCoV,
 yes,
 which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i would
 like to see some backing for the statement.

 there is significant research that implies that many truly positive FeLVs
 NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the 2008 AAFP
 guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research, just
 ignored.

 i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory: with
 cats
 who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that we will
 ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not been
 enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES shed the
 virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because it's so
 common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition of
 latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic, and if
 that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for cats who
 only test negative once

 more input, as they say!

 MC
 --
 Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
 Maybe That'll Make The Difference

 MaryChristine
 Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (www.purebredcats.org
 )
 Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread MaryChristine
i do know that there are different strains, but really haven't encountered
this before--so anything you send to the list will be gratefully digested!



On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

 Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B being
 those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
 disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.

 Jenny


 On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of FeLV--FeCoV,
  yes,
  which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i would
  like to see some backing for the statement.
 
  there is significant research that implies that many truly positive FeLVs
  NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the 2008 AAFP
  guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research, just
  ignored.
 
  i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory: with
  cats
  who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that we will
  ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not been
  enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES shed the
  virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because it's
 so
  common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition of
  latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic, and if
  that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for cats who
  only test negative once
 
  more input, as they say!
 
  MC
  --
  Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
  Maybe That'll Make The Difference
 
  MaryChristine
  Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
 www.purebredcats.org
  )
  Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




-- 
Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
Maybe That'll Make The Difference

MaryChristine
Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (www.purebredcats.org)
Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread jbero tds.net
Okay this is going to take awhile but here's a sort explanation from a pet
md website.  I should clarify - type C being the mutation I most fear -
causes the severe anemia and rapid decline to death.  It is what I have seen
multiple times.


FelV is a retrovirus, an enveloped RNA virus which uses specific enzymes to
translate its own RNA into DNA and incorporate that DNA into the body's DNA.
Retroviruses were only discovered in late 1960s and did not gain their name
till 1974.

In retroviral infection, a virus infects a new host through receptor
proteins on cells at the infection site, much like a key fits into a lock.
Once a cat is infected, the virus gains a foothold by undergoing a series of
genetic mutations designed to invade new sets of receptors, allowing it to
continually evade detection, attack, and ultimately shut down the body's
defenses. This shutdown occurs when mutated versions of the virus infect and
destroy the body's T cells, which are critical to immune function. Recently,
studies on FeLV identified another factor in the infection process: a
secondary retroviral receptor (or cofactor) that is crucial for the mutated,
or T-cell adapted, virus to do its work. Without this receptor,
appropriately dubbed FELIX, the virus would be unable to set up shop.
Specific blocking of FELIX may bring a new way to treat FeLV in future.

The specifics are certainly more complicated than this, but I'll try to find
a good article or paper or something.

Jenny


On 4/20/10, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

 Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B being
 those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
 disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.

 Jenny


  On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of FeLV--FeCoV,
 yes,
 which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i would
 like to see some backing for the statement.

 there is significant research that implies that many truly positive FeLVs
 NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the 2008 AAFP
 guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research, just
 ignored.

 i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory: with
 cats
 who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that we will
 ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not been
 enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES shed the
 virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because it's so
 common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition of
 latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic, and if
 that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for cats who
 only test negative once

 more input, as they say!

 MC
 --
 Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
 Maybe That'll Make The Difference

 MaryChristine
 Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
 www.purebredcats.org)
 Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread MaryChristine
FeLIX, indeed! however, having that info, a really quick search shows stuff
back from the early 2000s; i can't follow-up right now, but there were a
number of things that showed up in early research back then that has been
completely invalidated by further stuff.

anyone remember if FeLIX was mentioned in the aafp's latest set of
guidelines? (i have to go do a transport or i'd check on it all now!)

the more we know

MC


On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:24 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

 Okay this is going to take awhile but here's a sort explanation from a pet
 md website.  I should clarify - type C being the mutation I most fear -
 causes the severe anemia and rapid decline to death.  It is what I have
 seen
 multiple times.


 FelV is a retrovirus, an enveloped RNA virus which uses specific enzymes to
 translate its own RNA into DNA and incorporate that DNA into the body's
 DNA.
 Retroviruses were only discovered in late 1960s and did not gain their name
 till 1974.

 In retroviral infection, a virus infects a new host through receptor
 proteins on cells at the infection site, much like a key fits into a lock.
 Once a cat is infected, the virus gains a foothold by undergoing a series
 of
 genetic mutations designed to invade new sets of receptors, allowing it to
 continually evade detection, attack, and ultimately shut down the body's
 defenses. This shutdown occurs when mutated versions of the virus infect
 and
 destroy the body's T cells, which are critical to immune function.
 Recently,
 studies on FeLV identified another factor in the infection process: a
 secondary retroviral receptor (or cofactor) that is crucial for the
 mutated,
 or T-cell adapted, virus to do its work. Without this receptor,
 appropriately dubbed FELIX, the virus would be unable to set up shop.
 Specific blocking of FELIX may bring a new way to treat FeLV in future.

 The specifics are certainly more complicated than this, but I'll try to
 find
 a good article or paper or something.

 Jenny


 On 4/20/10, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:
 
  Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B being
  those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
  disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.
 
  Jenny
 
 
   On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of FeLV--FeCoV,
  yes,
  which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i
 would
  like to see some backing for the statement.
 
  there is significant research that implies that many truly positive
 FeLVs
  NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the 2008
 AAFP
  guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research, just
  ignored.
 
  i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory: with
  cats
  who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that we
 will
  ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not been
  enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES shed the
  virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because it's
 so
  common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition of
  latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic, and
 if
  that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for cats
 who
  only test negative once
 
  more input, as they say!
 
  MC
  --
  Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
  Maybe That'll Make The Difference
 
  MaryChristine
  Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
  www.purebredcats.org)
  Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




-- 
Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
Maybe That'll Make The Difference

MaryChristine
Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (www.purebredcats.org)
Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread jbero tds.net
Okay, this is kind of technical but it basically supports the idea that
mutations (in this case deletions in DNA) result in a more virulent and
pathogenic virus worsening the disease state as these mutations are gained
by the virus.  Here's the link.

http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/70/1/359.pdf


On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 i do know that there are different strains, but really haven't encountered
 this before--so anything you send to the list will be gratefully digested!



 On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

  Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B being
  those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
  disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.
 
  Jenny
 
 
  On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
  
   jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of FeLV--FeCoV,
   yes,
   which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i
 would
   like to see some backing for the statement.
  
   there is significant research that implies that many truly positive
 FeLVs
   NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the 2008
 AAFP
   guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research,
 just
   ignored.
  
   i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory: with
   cats
   who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that we
 will
   ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not
 been
   enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES shed
 the
   virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because it's
  so
   common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition of
   latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic, and
 if
   that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for cats
 who
   only test negative once
  
   more input, as they say!
  
   MC
   --
   Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
   Maybe That'll Make The Difference
  
   MaryChristine
   Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
  www.purebredcats.org
   )
   Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
   ___
   Felvtalk mailing list
   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
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  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 



 --
 Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
 Maybe That'll Make The Difference

 MaryChristine
 Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (www.purebredcats.org
 )
 Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread MaryChristine
check the date: 1996. see my other note!

i found a link to a 2000 article in the same journal. is there anything
later than, say, 2005?

MC

On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:31 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

 Okay, this is kind of technical but it basically supports the idea that
 mutations (in this case deletions in DNA) result in a more virulent and
 pathogenic virus worsening the disease state as these mutations are gained
 by the virus.  Here's the link.

 http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/70/1/359.pdf


 On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  i do know that there are different strains, but really haven't
 encountered
  this before--so anything you send to the list will be gratefully
 digested!
 
 
 
  On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:
 
   Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B
 being
   those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
   disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.
  
   Jenny
  
  
   On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
   
jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of
 FeLV--FeCoV,
yes,
which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i
  would
like to see some backing for the statement.
   
there is significant research that implies that many truly positive
  FeLVs
NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the 2008
  AAFP
guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research,
  just
ignored.
   
i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory:
 with
cats
who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that we
  will
ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not
  been
enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES shed
  the
virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because
 it's
   so
common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition of
latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic,
 and
  if
that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for cats
  who
only test negative once
   
more input, as they say!
   
MC
--
Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
Maybe That'll Make The Difference
   
MaryChristine
Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
   www.purebredcats.org
)
Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
   
   ___
   Felvtalk mailing list
   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 
 
  --
  Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
  Maybe That'll Make The Difference
 
  MaryChristine
  Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
 www.purebredcats.org
  )
  Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
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-- 
Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
Maybe That'll Make The Difference

MaryChristine
Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (www.purebredcats.org)
Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
___
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread jbero tds.net
Granted it is older, but I see nothing in the literature later to refute
this information.

On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 check the date: 1996. see my other note!

 i found a link to a 2000 article in the same journal. is there anything
 later than, say, 2005?

 MC

 On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:31 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

  Okay, this is kind of technical but it basically supports the idea that
  mutations (in this case deletions in DNA) result in a more virulent and
  pathogenic virus worsening the disease state as these mutations are
 gained
  by the virus.  Here's the link.
 
  http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/70/1/359.pdf
 
 
  On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
  
   i do know that there are different strains, but really haven't
  encountered
   this before--so anything you send to the list will be gratefully
  digested!
  
  
  
   On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:
  
Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B
  being
those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily causes
disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.
   
Jenny
   
   
On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:

 jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of
  FeLV--FeCoV,
 yes,
 which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and i
   would
 like to see some backing for the statement.

 there is significant research that implies that many truly positive
   FeLVs
 NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the
 2008
   AAFP
 guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new research,
   just
 ignored.

 i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency theory:
  with
 cats
 who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that
 we
   will
 ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just not
   been
 enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES
 shed
   the
 virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV, because
  it's
so
 common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a definition
 of
 latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming symptomatic,
  and
   if
 that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for
 cats
   who
 only test negative once

 more input, as they say!

 MC
 --
 Spay  Neuter Your Neighbors!
 Maybe That'll Make The Difference

 MaryChristine
 Special-Needs Coordinator, Purebred Cat Breed Rescue (
www.purebredcats.org
 )
 Member, SCAT (Special-Cat Action Team)
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-20 Thread MaryChristine
there's no mention of it in the 2008 AAFP guidelines, and i would expect it
to be there.



On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:51 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:

 Granted it is older, but I see nothing in the literature later to refute
 this information.

 On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  check the date: 1996. see my other note!
 
  i found a link to a 2000 article in the same journal. is there anything
  later than, say, 2005?
 
  MC
 
  On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:31 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote:
 
   Okay, this is kind of technical but it basically supports the idea that
   mutations (in this case deletions in DNA) result in a more virulent and
   pathogenic virus worsening the disease state as these mutations are
  gained
   by the virus.  Here's the link.
  
   http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/70/1/359.pdf
  
  
   On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
   
i do know that there are different strains, but really haven't
   encountered
this before--so anything you send to the list will be gratefully
   digested!
   
   
   
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 4:17 PM, jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net
 wrote:
   
 Yeah, it's felv type c.  You know how there are three types A and B
   being
 those transmitted and C being the mutated form that primarily
 causes
 disease.  Let me see if I can find a good paper.

 Jenny


 On 4/20/10, MaryChristine twelvehousec...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  jeni, i have NEVER seen or heard about mutated versions of
   FeLV--FeCoV,
  yes,
  which mutates into FIP. but this is something completely new, and
 i
would
  like to see some backing for the statement.
 
  there is significant research that implies that many truly
 positive
FeLVs
  NEVER become symptomatic, and that they are NOT contagious--the
  2008
AAFP
  guidelines show the citations for this, and it is NOT new
 research,
just
  ignored.
 
  i have also never seen any ACTUAL data proving the latency
 theory:
   with
  cats
  who are never retested after a negative test, there's no way that
  we
will
  ever know that the cat wasn't positive all over. there has just
 not
been
  enough research done to know how long a truly positive cat DOES
  shed
the
  virus. they DO have a pretty good idea of that with FeCoV,
 because
   it's
 so
  common (over 100 strains, i believe).  i guess i want a
 definition
  of
  latent: yes, a positive can go years without becoming
 symptomatic,
   and
if
  that's all it means, fine. however, i've been seeing if used for
  cats
who
  only test negative once
 
  more input, as they say!
 
  MC
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-19 Thread trmckelvey
Hi Jenny,

Good information, thank you for the investigation.  If you have further 
contact, could you ask about the risks of using steroids?  Since you already 
have contact, it's probably better if you could ask rather than the man being 
bombarded with emails from the rest of us :-) 

My vets try to avoid steroid use on my FeLV/FIV positive cats (unless 
absolutely necessary) because of further suppression of the immunosystem and 
the subsequent risk of being unable to fight off a secondary disease.  It seems 
this protocol would create a constant risk of the patient being even more 
vulnerable to secondary diseases.  I'm concerned this might work really well in 
a sterile environment, for a couple months, but prove impractical in the real 
world.  Any insights Dr. Van Dyke could provide would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Terry
 jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net wrote: 

=
I just wanted to update you all where I'm at now.  I got an email from Dr.
Van Dyke, the biochemist involved in this treatment plan.

To set a few things straight - he was doing research to find a cure for
HIV/AIDS and using cats as an animal model.  The intermixed use of
FIV/HIV/Felv was in part because of the knowledge at the time concerning the
believed similarities of HIV and FIV and in part simply to say that
hopefully HIV would behave similarily to FIV and that his work on cats could
be carried over to people.  Probably not entirely accurate.

With respect to the patent being abandoned, it was but he sent me the number
of different patent - #6514955.

Finally - and I will ask him about this - the paper describes latently
infected cats (this by definition means integrated into the host DNA) - but
I will clarify this with him.

Apparently, what this does is use antioxidants and steroids in combination
to suppress the production of virus.  It does not 'cure' anyone in that the
viral DNA is still within the cat cells, but they are not able to multiple
and thereby infect other cells.  This, by the way, is the essence of HAART
therapy currently used to treat HIV (the difference is that the drugs used
now directly inhibit viral activity, in Van Dyke's approach,it is an attempt
to get the body to do it for you).

The value of this is that if the virus cannot replicate, it cannot mutate
(the mutated form of felv is the one that is thought to cause the
hematologic diseases and it not contagious; i.e. the virus must mutate
within the cat in order to cause these problems).  The downside is that the
treatment is lifelong.

I will ask him for more information and keep you updated.

Hope this helps.

Jenny
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Re: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv

2010-04-19 Thread gary
I'm glad to hear that he is willing to communicate with you.  That the 
treatment only results in the suppression of the virus, is a little 
disappointing.  This would make it about equivalent to the claims of Dr. 
Belfield for his vitamin C therapy.  He claims he cured every FeLV 
positive cat that came through his practice, using his Mega C formula (takes 
much longer than the time cited in the VanDyke study) but later says that if 
you stop giving the Mega C, the virus will return.  That would indicate to 
me that the virus isn't cured, just suppressed.  Not that there is anything 
wrong with suppressing the virus and stopping it's progression.  Dr. 
Belfield says there are not side effects from long term use of his Mega C 
formula, but I do have to wonder about side effects from the long term use 
of Depo.


Thanks for getting the info.

Gary

--
From: jbero tds.net jb...@tds.net
Sent: Monday, April 19, 2010 10:18 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Knox and treatment of felv


I just wanted to update you all where I'm at now.  I got an email from Dr.
Van Dyke, the biochemist involved in this treatment plan.

To set a few things straight - he was doing research to find a cure for
HIV/AIDS and using cats as an animal model.  The intermixed use of
FIV/HIV/Felv was in part because of the knowledge at the time concerning 
the

believed similarities of HIV and FIV and in part simply to say that
hopefully HIV would behave similarily to FIV and that his work on cats 
could

be carried over to people.  Probably not entirely accurate.

With respect to the patent being abandoned, it was but he sent me the 
number

of different patent - #6514955.

Finally - and I will ask him about this - the paper describes latently
infected cats (this by definition means integrated into the host DNA) - 
but

I will clarify this with him.

Apparently, what this does is use antioxidants and steroids in combination
to suppress the production of virus.  It does not 'cure' anyone in that 
the

viral DNA is still within the cat cells, but they are not able to multiple
and thereby infect other cells.  This, by the way, is the essence of HAART
therapy currently used to treat HIV (the difference is that the drugs used
now directly inhibit viral activity, in Van Dyke's approach,it is an 
attempt

to get the body to do it for you).

The value of this is that if the virus cannot replicate, it cannot mutate
(the mutated form of felv is the one that is thought to cause the
hematologic diseases and it not contagious; i.e. the virus must mutate
within the cat in order to cause these problems).  The downside is that 
the

treatment is lifelong.

I will ask him for more information and keep you updated.

Hope this helps.

Jenny




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