Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-12-03 Thread dlgegg
Are vet schools doing much to find a cure?

 Amani Oakley <aoak...@oakleylegal.com> wrote: 
> Yes Ardy. FIV is also a death sentence, more often than not, for afflicted 
> cats. And again, there is very little in the veterinary arsenal to combat it.
> 
> Amani
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Ardy 
> Robertson
> Sent: December-03-17 12:00 PM
> To: 'Margo'; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> Margo - I don't know much about FIV - is that fatal as often as FeLV?
> 
> Thank you,
> Ardy 
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Margo
> Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:36 AM
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> 
> Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, 
> water and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other 
> than by physical contact. 
> 
> Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;
> 
> "FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"
> 
> FelV spreads thru close friendly contact
> 
> FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
> altered...right?)
> 
> Margo
> 
> 
> 
> -Original Message-
> >From: dlg...@windstream.net
> >Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
> >To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> >Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
> >
> >Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
> >took Annie in.
> >
> > Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
> >> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in 
> >> his carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
> >> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
> >
> >Ardy
> >
> >-----Original Message-
> >From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf 
> >Of Theresa O'Rourke
> >Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
> >To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> >Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
> >
> >Thank you Lorrie,
> >
> >So happy I joined this group.
> >I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
> >clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
> >However, I won’t do this again,
> >Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through 
> >this again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure 
> >that is NOT NECESSARY.
> >IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so 
> >neurotic. 
> >
> >
> >Sent from my iPad
> >
> >> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
> >> 
> >> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
> >> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
> >> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand 
> >> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully 
> >> developed.
> >> 
> >> Lorrie
> >> 
> >>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
> >>> 
> >>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was 
> >>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the 
> >>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) 
> >>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little boy 
> >>> (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in the 
> >>> house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and 
> >>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read 
> >>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with 
> >>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
> >>> 
> >>> Amani
> >>> 
> >> 
> >> ___
> >> Felvtalk mailing list
> >> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> >> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.or
> >> g
> >
> >
> >___
> >Felvtalk mailing list
> >Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> >http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
> >
&

Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-12-03 Thread Amani Oakley
Yes Ardy. FIV is also a death sentence, more often than not, for afflicted 
cats. And again, there is very little in the veterinary arsenal to combat it.

Amani

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Ardy 
Robertson
Sent: December-03-17 12:00 PM
To: 'Margo'; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

Margo - I don't know much about FIV - is that fatal as often as FeLV?

Thank you,
Ardy 

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Margo
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:36 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question


Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, water 
and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other than by 
physical contact. 

Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;

"FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"

FelV spreads thru close friendly contact

FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
altered...right?)

Margo



-Original Message-
>From: dlg...@windstream.net
>Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
>To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
>took Annie in.
>
> Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
>
>Ardy
>
>-Original Message-
>From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf 
>Of Theresa O'Rourke
>Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
>To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Thank you Lorrie,
>
>So happy I joined this group.
>I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
>clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
>However, I won’t do this again,
>Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
>again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
>NOT NECESSARY.
>IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so 
>neurotic. 
>
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>> 
>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand 
>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully 
>> developed.
>> 
>> Lorrie
>> 
>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>> 
>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was 
>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the 
>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) 
>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little boy 
>>> (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in the 
>>> house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and 
>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read 
>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with 
>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>> 
>>> Amani
>>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.or
>> g
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-12-03 Thread Ardy Robertson
I try to do that too -- although I am surrounded by Amish farms who do not 
neuter their animals, and I have so many strays coming here - mostly for food. 
I do neuter as many as I can after they have been here for a while.

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
dlg...@windstream.net
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 6:29 AM
To: Margo <toomanykitti...@earthlink.net>; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

Re:  spay/neuter, First I give them 2 weeks for an owner to show up and then it 
is off to the vet for an exam and spay/neuter.  I do not want to be a 
contributor to unwanted kittens/puppies plus they will live longer healthier 
lives.

 Margo <toomanykitti...@earthlink.net> wrote: 
> 
Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, water 
and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other than by 
physical contact. 

Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;

"FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"

FelV spreads thru close friendly contact

FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
altered...right?)

Margo



-Original Message-
>From: dlg...@windstream.net
>Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
>To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
>took Annie in.
>
> Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
>
>Ardy
>
>-Original Message-
>From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf 
>Of Theresa O'Rourke
>Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
>To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Thank you Lorrie,
>
>So happy I joined this group.
>I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
>clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
>However, I won’t do this again,
>Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
>again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
>NOT NECESSARY.
>IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so 
>neurotic. 
>
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>> 
>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand 
>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully 
>> developed.
>> 
>> Lorrie
>> 
>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>> 
>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was 
>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the 
>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) 
>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little boy 
>>> (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in the 
>>> house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and 
>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read 
>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with 
>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>> 
>>> Amani
>>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.or
>> g
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-12-03 Thread Ardy Robertson
Margo - I don't know much about FIV - is that fatal as often as FeLV?

Thank you,
Ardy 

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Margo
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:36 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question


Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, water 
and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other than by 
physical contact. 

Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;

"FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"

FelV spreads thru close friendly contact

FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
altered...right?)

Margo



-Original Message-
>From: dlg...@windstream.net
>Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
>To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
>took Annie in.
>
> Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
>
>Ardy
>
>-Original Message-
>From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf 
>Of Theresa O'Rourke
>Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
>To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Thank you Lorrie,
>
>So happy I joined this group.
>I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
>clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
>However, I won’t do this again,
>Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
>again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
>NOT NECESSARY.
>IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so 
>neurotic. 
>
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>> 
>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand 
>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully 
>> developed.
>> 
>> Lorrie
>> 
>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>> 
>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was 
>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the 
>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) 
>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little boy 
>>> (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in the 
>>> house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and 
>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read 
>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with 
>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>> 
>>> Amani
>>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.or
>> g
>
>
>___
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>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>
>
>___
>Felvtalk mailing list
>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>
>
>
>___
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>Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-30 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 30, 2017, at 7:29 AM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
> 
> Re:  spay/neuter, First I give them 2 weeks for an owner to show up and then 
> it is off to the vet for an exam and spay/neuter.  I do not want to be a 
> contributor to unwanted kittens/puppies plus they will live longer healthier 
> lives.
> 
>  Margo <toomanykitti...@earthlink.net> wrote: 
>> 
> Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, 
> water and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other 
> than by physical contact. 
> 
> Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;
> 
> "FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"
> 
> FelV spreads thru close friendly contact
> 
> FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
> altered...right?)
> 
> Margo
> 
> 
> 
> -Original Message-
>> From: dlg...@windstream.net
>> Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
>> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>> 
>> Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
>> took Annie in.
>> 
>>  Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
>> 
>> Ardy
>> 
>> -Original Message-
>> From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
>> Theresa O'Rourke
>> Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
>> To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>> 
>> Thank you Lorrie,
>> 
>> So happy I joined this group.
>> I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
>> clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
>> However, I won’t do this again,
>> Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through 
>> this again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure 
>> that is NOT NECESSARY.
>> IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 
>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
>>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
>>> developed.
>>> 
>>> Lorrie 
>>> 
>>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>>>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>>>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>>> 
>>>> Amani
>>>> 
>>> 
>>> ___
>>> Felvtalk mailing list
>>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
> 
> ___
> Felvtalk mailing list
> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
> 
> 
> 
> ___
> Felvtalk mailing list
> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-30 Thread dlgegg
Re:  spay/neuter, First I give them 2 weeks for an owner to show up and then it 
is off to the vet for an exam and spay/neuter.  I do not want to be a 
contributor to unwanted kittens/puppies plus they will live longer healthier 
lives.

 Margo <toomanykitti...@earthlink.net> wrote: 
> 
Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, water 
and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other than by 
physical contact. 

Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;

"FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"

FelV spreads thru close friendly contact

FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
altered...right?)

Margo



-Original Message-
>From: dlg...@windstream.net
>Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
>To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
>took Annie in.
>
> Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
>
>Ardy
>
>-Original Message-
>From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
>Theresa O'Rourke
>Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
>To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Thank you Lorrie,
>
>So happy I joined this group.
>I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
>clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
>However, I won’t do this again,
>Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
>again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
>NOT NECESSARY.
>IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 
>
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>> 
>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
>> developed.
>> 
>> Lorrie 
>> 
>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>> 
>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>> 
>>> Amani
>>> 
>> 
>> ___
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>
>
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>
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-30 Thread Margo

Transmission of FeLV takes prolonged contact between cats; sharing food, water 
and litterboxes, and often mutual grooming. It is NOT transmitted other than by 
physical contact. 

Easiest way for me to differentiate between that and FIV transmission;

"FeLV is a disease of friends, FIV is a disease of enemies"

FelV spreads thru close friendly contact

FIV spreads by deep bite wounds (or sexual contact, but all our animals are 
altered...right?)

Margo



-Original Message-
>From: dlg...@windstream.net
>Sent: Nov 29, 2017 12:16 PM
>To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
>took Annie in.
>
> Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
>
>Ardy
>
>-Original Message-
>From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
>Theresa O'Rourke
>Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
>To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Thank you Lorrie,
>
>So happy I joined this group.
>I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
>clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
>However, I won’t do this again,
>Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
>again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
>NOT NECESSARY.
>IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 
>
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>> 
>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
>> developed.
>> 
>> Lorrie 
>> 
>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>> 
>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>> 
>>> Amani
>>> 
>> 
>> ___
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>
>
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>
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>
>
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-29 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you,
For all your wonderful responses.

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 29, 2017, at 12:16 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
> 
> Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I 
> took Annie in.
> 
>  Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
>> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
>> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed 
>> concerned about spreading it to the other patients.
> 
> Ardy
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
> Theresa O'Rourke
> Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
> To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> Thank you Lorrie,
> 
> So happy I joined this group.
> I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
> clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
> However, I won’t do this again,
> Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
> again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that 
> is NOT NECESSARY.
> IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
>> 
>> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
>> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
>> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
>> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
>> developed.
>> 
>> Lorrie 
>> 
>>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>>> 
>>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>>> 
>>> Amani
>>> 
>> 
>> ___
>> Felvtalk mailing list
>> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
> 
> 
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> 
> 
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> 
> 
> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-29 Thread dlgegg
Since the vet is not worried, why should you?  I thought about that when I took 
Annie in.

 Ardy Robertson <ar...@centurytel.net> wrote: 
> I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
> carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed concerned 
> about spreading it to the other patients.

Ardy

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
Theresa O'Rourke
Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

Thank you Lorrie,

So happy I joined this group.
I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
However, I won’t do this again,
Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
NOT NECESSARY.
IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
> 
> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
> developed.
> 
> Lorrie 
> 
>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>> 
>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>> 
>> Amani
>> 
> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-29 Thread Ardy Robertson
I always wondered about it when I took Tigger to the vet. I kept him in his 
carrier until we went into the exam room, but the vets never seemed concerned 
about spreading it to the other patients.

Ardy

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
Theresa O'Rourke
Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:34 PM
To: felineres...@frontier.com; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

Thank you Lorrie,

So happy I joined this group.
I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with Other cat’s, And 
clean well after, The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
However, I won’t do this again,
Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and Won’t go through this 
again! ☺️☺️ I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out, But sure that is 
NOT NECESSARY.
IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own, I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie <felineres...@frontier.com> wrote:
> 
> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
> developed.
> 
> Lorrie 
> 
>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>> 
>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>> 
>> Amani
>> 
> 
> ___
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-23 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you Lorrie,

So happy I joined this group.
I’ll keep the cat for a week, spoil him, not mix him with
Other cat’s,
And clean well after,
The room will be left empty for 7 days after.
However, I won’t do this again, 
Because I have other people’s cats in separate room and
Won’t go through this again! ☺️☺️
I’ll even change my clothes when I go in and out,
But sure that is NOT NECESSARY.
IF it was just my cat’s, I have three of my own,
I wouldn’t be so neurotic. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 23, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Lorrie  wrote:
> 
> This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
> and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
> with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
> FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
> developed.
> 
> Lorrie 
> 
>> On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:
>> 
>> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
>> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
>> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
>> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
>> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
>> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
>> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
>> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
>> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
>> 
>> Amani
>> 
> 
> ___
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-23 Thread Lorrie
This is my experience too.  I've had FelV cats who lived to be 8 or 9
and one of my FelV cats is about 11 and still OK.   These cats lived
with many other negative cats.  These were adult cats... I understand
FelV is most dangerous to kittens whose immune systems are not fully
developed.

Lorrie 

On 11-22, Amani Oakley wrote:

> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was
> infected, despite the fact that our vet initially said that the
> infection would decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.)
> That was the case event though we never isolated our FeLV little
> boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he had already been in
> the house almost a year by then) and even though he played with and
> groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read
> repeatedly that it really isn???t that infectious, especially with
> adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
> 
> Amani
> 

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread dlgegg
I have had feral and dump cats for over 40 years, including 4 FELV cats.  I 
have never had to wash anything when one of them passed.  None of my FELV 
negative cats ever contracted the disease and all have died of old age 
including Annie who was FELV and over 10 years.  They eat from the same bowls, 
sleep on the same beds.  It has to do with the age of the cts.  If your cts are 
under 1 year, they are more likely to contract the disease because their imune 
system is not as strong.

 Theresa O'Rourke  wrote: 
> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate room 
for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after the cat 
goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats also and want 
to know if they can catch
The disease. 

Sent from my iPad

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you, that is one of the best answers I’ve received. I won’t do this 
again, because
I take care of other’s cats. However, for this time, the cat will be in his own 
room, he’ll have special toys I’ll throw out after, I’ll play with him, and 
brush him, poor thing. 
I’ll wash my hands and change clothes, it may be fanatic, but whatever..
However, after he leaves, I’ll wash everything, and give the room and floor a 
big cleaning. So all should be well,
I promised my daughter,
But I won’t do it again.
Thank you for the great answer!!! 
Poor cat, it is so sad.

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 22, 2017, at 2:28 PM, Shelley Theye  wrote:
> 
> Actually, Feline Leukemia can also be transmitted through ‘friendly’ contact. 
>  Sharing food/water and grooming each other over a period of time.
> The virus only lives for a few hours in the environment, so really just 
> cleaning out the food/water bowls and litter box after the cat leaves 
> should suffice, and check to see if any wet spots on floor,  etc. from water 
> or urine and disinfect just to be on the safe side.
> 
> You might want to have different shoes on too?  and clothes, if you will be 
> playing with and handling the cat a lot, in case drools on you…but that might 
> be 
> going overboard.  Definitely wash hands after handling...
> 
> Shelley 
> 
> 
>> On Nov 22, 2017, at 11:03 AM, kresch...@mchsi.com wrote:
>> 
>> My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with 
>> blood or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily 
>> through a bite.
>> - Original Message -
>> From: Theresa O'Rourke 
>> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
>> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
>> 
>> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
>> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
>> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
>> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
>> also and want to know if they can catch
>> The disease. 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>> ___
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>> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>> 
>> 
>> ___
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> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Gloria
Immune system plays a huge part-usually mature cats have a vibrant immune 
system, it’s the very young or older cats that would be more at risk, IMO.
Also, the FeLV cat’s immune system is compromised, I believe, so contact with 
other cats would be something to consider for the health of the FeLV diagnosed 
cat.
I have a cat diagnosed in 2010, that I strongly feel beat the virus-(answer to 
Prayer) he was older when I found him, the vet guessing him to be around 1 year 
old.
We keep him in our guest room with a modified door so he “participates” in the 
hall/house activities and the room is ventilated.
I will not take him to the vet unless he becomes ill-keeping the STRESS down so 
no testing! 
My practice is to wash my hands with alcohol and or soap for 20 seconds
before & after I’m in his room. I keep his dishes sterile, no shared food or 
water or containers- but that’s about it.
Now- this is my practice and everyone needs to follow his/her own inner voice 
on this matter- just sharing - not pushing an agenda. lol
Gloria, furmommy to Buddy Luv
-g 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 22, 2017, at 11:04 AM, Amani Oakley  wrote:
> 
> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was infected, 
> despite the fact that our vet initially said that the infection would 
> decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) That was the case event 
> though we never isolated our FeLV little boy (it would have been fairly 
> pointless as he had already been in the house almost a year by then) and even 
> though he played with and groomed several of the other cats in the house. I 
> have since read repeatedly that it really isn’t that infectious, especially 
> with adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
> 
> Amani
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
> Theresa O'Rourke
> Sent: November-22-17 10:14 AM
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
> also and want to know if they can catch The disease. 
> 
> 


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Amani Oakley
As I said – I had a cat in with at least 8 other cats for 7 years with no 
transmission. They shared food and water bowls, beds, grooming, playing, 
biting, scratching - the whole nine yards. I don’t think it is particularly 
contagious with older cats.

Amani

From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
Shelley Theye
Sent: November-22-17 2:29 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

Actually, Feline Leukemia can also be transmitted through ‘friendly’ contact.  
Sharing food/water and grooming each other over a period of time.
The virus only lives for a few hours in the environment, so really just 
cleaning out the food/water bowls and litter box after the cat leaves
should suffice, and check to see if any wet spots on floor,  etc. from water or 
urine and disinfect just to be on the safe side.

You might want to have different shoes on too?  and clothes, if you will be 
playing with and handling the cat a lot, in case drools on you…but that might be
going overboard.  Definitely wash hands after handling...

Shelley



On Nov 22, 2017, at 11:03 AM, kresch...@mchsi.com<mailto:kresch...@mchsi.com> 
wrote:

My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with blood 
or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily through a 
bite.
- Original Message -
From: Theresa O'Rourke 
<theresa.orou...@videotron.ca<mailto:theresa.orou...@videotron.ca>>
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org<mailto:felvtalk@felineleukemia.org>
Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate room 
for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after the cat 
goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats also and want 
to know if they can catch
The disease.

Sent from my iPad

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Shelley Theye
Actually, Feline Leukemia can also be transmitted through ‘friendly’ contact.  
Sharing food/water and grooming each other over a period of time.
The virus only lives for a few hours in the environment, so really just 
cleaning out the food/water bowls and litter box after the cat leaves 
should suffice, and check to see if any wet spots on floor,  etc. from water or 
urine and disinfect just to be on the safe side.

You might want to have different shoes on too?  and clothes, if you will be 
playing with and handling the cat a lot, in case drools on you…but that might 
be 
going overboard.  Definitely wash hands after handling...

Shelley 


> On Nov 22, 2017, at 11:03 AM, kresch...@mchsi.com wrote:
> 
> My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with 
> blood or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily 
> through a bite.
> - Original Message -
> From: Theresa O'Rourke 
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
> also and want to know if they can catch
> The disease. 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
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> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you!

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 22, 2017, at 11:30 AM, marlene melpignano  wrote:
> 
> From what I read (scientific articles) the virus might stay in the room from 
> 2 to 7 days. No conclusive data on this, but be careful. Even if a bite is 
> surely the most common way to catch Felv 
> 
> Inviato da iPhone
> 
>> Il giorno 22 nov 2017, alle ore 17:03, kresch...@mchsi.com ha scritto:
>> 
>> My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with 
>> blood or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily 
>> through a bite.
>> - Original Message -
>> From: Theresa O'Rourke 
>> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
>> Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
>> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
>> 
>> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
>> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
>> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
>> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
>> also and want to know if they can catch
>> The disease. 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
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>> 
>> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you!

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 22, 2017, at 2:04 PM, Amani Oakley  wrote:
> 
> We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was infected, 
> despite the fact that our vet initially said that the infection would 
> decimate the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) That was the case event 
> though we never isolated our FeLV little boy (it would have been fairly 
> pointless as he had already been in the house almost a year by then) and even 
> though he played with and groomed several of the other cats in the house. I 
> have since read repeatedly that it really isn’t that infectious, especially 
> with adult cats. It is more of a risk with young kittens.
> 
> Amani
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
> Theresa O'Rourke
> Sent: November-22-17 10:14 AM
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
> also and want to know if they can catch The disease. 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Theresa O'Rourke
Thank you!

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 22, 2017, at 11:03 AM, kresch...@mchsi.com wrote:
> 
> My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with 
> blood or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily 
> through a bite.
> - Original Message -
> From: Theresa O'Rourke 
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
> also and want to know if they can catch
> The disease. 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
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> 
> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread Amani Oakley
We had a FeLV cat who lived to age 7. No other cat in our house was infected, 
despite the fact that our vet initially said that the infection would decimate 
the house. (We had at least 8 other cats.) That was the case event though we 
never isolated our FeLV little boy (it would have been fairly pointless as he 
had already been in the house almost a year by then) and even though he played 
with and groomed several of the other cats in the house. I have since read 
repeatedly that it really isn’t that infectious, especially with adult cats. It 
is more of a risk with young kittens.

Amani

-Original Message-
From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
Theresa O'Rourke
Sent: November-22-17 10:14 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate room 
for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after the cat 
goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats also and want 
to know if they can catch The disease. 

Sent from my iPad

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread marlene melpignano
From what I read (scientific articles) the virus might stay in the room from 2 
to 7 days. No conclusive data on this, but be careful. Even if a bite is surely 
the most common way to catch Felv 

Inviato da iPhone

> Il giorno 22 nov 2017, alle ore 17:03, kresch...@mchsi.com ha scritto:
> 
> My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with 
> blood or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily 
> through a bite.
> - Original Message -
> From: Theresa O'Rourke 
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
> Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
> 
> I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
> My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate 
> room for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after 
> the cat goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats 
> also and want to know if they can catch
> The disease. 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
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> 
> 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2017-11-22 Thread kresch831
My take on this disease is that FeL is transmitted by direct contact with blood 
or saliva from the infected cat. The FeLV is transmitted primarily through a 
bite.
- Original Message -
From: Theresa O'Rourke 
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:14:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

I have three cats, and take care of other people’s cats.
My daughter’s friend has a FeLV positive cat, can I keep her in a separate room 
for a week, do I have to wash all the linens and clean the room, after the cat 
goes back home?  It’s because I take care of other  friend’s cats also and want 
to know if they can catch
The disease. 

Sent from my iPad

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2016-08-29 Thread Margo


Hi Marlene,

Without more info, I can suggest starting DMG, if it isn't 
contraindicated with any of the other supplements you are using.

My Mako fought so hard at a recent Vet visit (and this was new) that 
they decided not to stress him. My Vet said she had been reading about using 
Gabapentin as sedation for aggressive/fractious cats, and when I googled, this 
came up;

http://vetanesthesiaspecialists.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/SerenityNowSedationOptions_Feline_ABVP2015_HeidiLShafford.pdf

We had to get blood, he was spiraling downhill. So, we tried. He got 50 
mgs (1/2 a capsule) in a small amount of baby food, an hour before his 
appointment, so about 1.5 hrs before the attempted blood draw. They got blood, 
and that sent us to the Vet Specialists. He got it for that appointment, as 
well, but 3 hours ahead. All went well there, too.

There didn't seem to be any real side effects, he was quiet, but not 
overly so. He did have anesthesia for aspirates, and the gabapentin was not an 
issue. Even better, it's easily available at human pharmacies in 100mg caps, 
and was on the $4 list. 

HTH,

Margo and Mako 

-Original Message-
>From: Marlene Snowman 
>Sent: Aug 28, 2016 8:15 PM
>To: Felv 
>Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
>
>Hi - I've been reading posts for a bit and decided I needed some advice too. I 
>have a FelV kitten who is 1 year old. I've had her since she was just a little 
>more than a month old. She tested positive twice and the vet has yet been able 
>to physically examine her or get a blood test since. She isn't feral but her 
>dislike of the vet and people is probably her strength and fight to stay 
>alive. I feed her really good kitten food and mixed with astragalus and 
>ligustrum twice daily and l-lysine. She's also been on antibiotics for a nose 
>and eye infection, not to mention the fleas, ear mites, tongue ulcers and 
>lacerations on her legs when I first rescued her but she hasn't been on 
>antibiotics for 4 months at least. (So antibiotics for most of her life). 
>She's gone from a pound to 7.2 lbs. So I've seen a great improvement. The nose 
>infection has never cleared, so boogers are a constant, although more a yellow 
>to clear than the original greenish mucous. 
>
>I recognize that I need to get her in for a complete blood work. She eats 
>well, drinks a lot and other than the boogers, seems healthy. 
>
>Would you suggest anything now other than the blood work for my girl Bear ? 
>
>Thanks 
>Marlene 
>
>Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2016-08-29 Thread Kelley S
I personally do not do lysine AT ALL.  It was only ever really recommended
for herpes, there's recent evidence it doesn't even work for that, and it
reduces something else they need (can't remember right now).
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2014/august/feline-herpes-virus-bad-news-popular-treatment-31971

What I totally recommend, and so does my holistic vet:  Raw or partially
cooked diet.  Standard Process Immune System Support.  I've seen standard
process clear up some nasty stuff.

Kelley and Coco.

On Sun, Aug 28, 2016 at 7:15 PM, Marlene Snowman 
wrote:

> Hi - I've been reading posts for a bit and decided I needed some advice
> too. I have a FelV kitten who is 1 year old. I've had her since she was
> just a little more than a month old. She tested positive twice and the vet
> has yet been able to physically examine her or get a blood test since. She
> isn't feral but her dislike of the vet and people is probably her strength
> and fight to stay alive. I feed her really good kitten food and mixed with
> astragalus and ligustrum twice daily and l-lysine. She's also been on
> antibiotics for a nose and eye infection, not to mention the fleas, ear
> mites, tongue ulcers and lacerations on her legs when I first rescued her
> but she hasn't been on antibiotics for 4 months at least. (So antibiotics
> for most of her life). She's gone from a pound to 7.2 lbs. So I've seen a
> great improvement. The nose infection has never cleared, so boogers are a
> constant, although more a yellow to clear than the original greenish mucous.
>
> I recognize that I need to get her in for a complete blood work. She eats
> well, drinks a lot and other than the boogers, seems healthy.
>
> Would you suggest anything now other than the blood work for my girl Bear ?
>
> Thanks
> Marlene
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question for those with multiple FeLV+ cats (2 or more)

2014-12-29 Thread dlgegg
My Annie (+) occassionaly sneezes, but I have put it down to dust, especially 
because he sneezes when the furnace kicks on.  Usually 2 or 3 times and then no 
more.  
You say heated area is 9' x 9', is he not allowed the run of the house?  Annie 
usually starts from the east end and slides into the west end.  In fact, they 
all love that or they leap to the back of a chair, rocking it back and forth.  
my Harley has been frustated because I won't let him out in ran, snow.  When I 
do let him out, he turns around or doesn't go out at all because he realizes it 
is WET out there.  When this happens, he starts pouncing on the others and 
slinks away to bed because they do not want to play.

 Marsha mar...@lynxe.com wrote: 
 Have you had one FeLV+ cat get a URI, but others did not get it? Brock 
 has not come down with the URI that Harley had.  He sneezed a few times 
 early on, but no discharge or any other symptoms, so the very mild 
 sneezing may or may not have been a URI.  Maybe just dust in the air.  
 Harley has an occasional sneeze now, but that's all, except he seems to 
 be less tolerant of cold, and is on a mission to make up for lost 
 playtime.  This is a little frustrating for him, because the heated area 
 is only 9' x 9', and Harley likes to zoom across a bigger area, and go 
 skidding on a piece of cardboard.  Plus Brock won't wrestle with him.  
 He was eyeing Brock night before last like he was going to get him, 
 and Brock cringed, but Harley decided Brock was no fun, and let him be.
 
 Marsha
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question for those with multiple FeLV+ cats (2 or more)

2014-12-29 Thread Marsha
Harley  Brock have the run of an 850 sq. ft. garage/workshop that is 
attached to the house, but it is not insulated, therefore not heated, 
plus due to its size, heating would be difficult.   I don't use it as a 
garage or workshop due to getting FeLV+ Milkdud 5 years ago.  Some 
construction materials are stored there, otherwise I just keep adding 
things for the cats.  There is a picnic table, a ladder and shelves to 
climb on, a Dogloo and a wooden dog house with heated pads and fluffy 
blankets, a couple of donut beds, rugs, toys, a deluxe cot with a 
comforter and a children's sleeping bag (Harley's favorite), and a 
lounge chair with a big sleeping bag. But I worried about Harley dealing 
with the cold when he came home to recover, so I set up  an ice fishing 
shelter in the middle of the garage and put an infrared heater in it 
(cube kind that can't tip).  I moved the cot  lounge chair in it, got a 
battery operated light/fan to hang from the ceiling, and put one 
litterbox in it so they can potty in comfort, and their water and kibble 
is in there too.  Plus lots of toys.  They love it, and I have been 
having fun camping out in there with them.  I am looking for a 
portable TV to put in there too!   I bought a bunch of new toys for 
them, and tonight I found that one of them (probably Harley) had brought 
an old toy inside the tent that had been left in a donut bed.  I zipper 
the door shut, but leave just enough unzipped so they can go in and out 
as they please.


In the main house, there are 12 cats that are FeLV negative. There is 
mostly an open floor plan, leaving no place in the house to keep the 
FeLV+ boys.  The bedroom is reserved for 2 girls that don't always get 
along with others (one is very timid, the other will bully smaller girls 
except for her roommate).  The bedroom door stays unlatched so the girls 
can come and go.  I only latch it if Peaches goes into bully mode while 
out and about.  Then I put her back in the room for a while and latch 
the door.  One other cat has her own fort in the great room with a 
door in it that is too small for her nemesis to get through.  The fort 
has 2 levels, 2 beds  a crate with a towel, food  water, 1 litterbox.  
Anaya has figured out when her nemesis Tressa sleeps, and comes out of 
her fort to explore then.


None of the cats are allowed outside due to coyotes and other wildlife, 
plus it would be so expensive to put Frontline Plus on all of them.  I 
used to allow Binky to go outside under supervision, but since Gabby 
died last year, Binky hasn't had much interest in going outside.


Marsha

On 12/30/2014 1:02 AM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:

My Annie (+) occassionaly sneezes, but I have put it down to dust, especially 
because he sneezes when the furnace kicks on.  Usually 2 or 3 times and then no 
more.
You say heated area is 9' x 9', is he not allowed the run of the house?  Annie 
usually starts from the east end and slides into the west end.  In fact, they 
all love that or they leap to the back of a chair, rocking it back and forth.  
my Harley has been frustated because I won't let him out in ran, snow.  When I 
do let him out, he turns around or doesn't go out at all because he realizes it 
is WET out there.  When this happens, he starts pouncing on the others and 
slinks away to bed because they do not want to play.




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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-26 Thread Lee Evans
What I meant is that I don't mix leukemia positive cats into my general group 
as I would an FIV positive cat with a marshmallow personality who does not 
fight, not an alpha cat type. I did have two feline leukemia positive cats for 
over two years. They lived together in a separate room with each other. They 
were perfectly healthy for those two years, then suddenly turned symptomatic. 
One passed away quickly from what the vet diagnosed as bone marrow cancer. The 
other simply lost weight uncontrollably and followed his buddy over the edge. 
He probably also had bone marrow cancer or lymphoma. Those are the most likely 
two illness that kill the leukemia positive cats when the disease goes active. 
I also found a wonderful  person who had had losses from feline leukemia but 
was willing to go through the heartbreak again just to give a cat a chance at 
life. One of the cats I gave to her passed away in two years. The second one I 
begged her to take ( I think
 she was ready to shoot me when phoned to ask if she would foster another FeLv+ 
cat) is still living the life of luxury with her. It has been 6 years and 
counting so far. Keeping all fingers and paws crossed.






 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 6:39 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 

Hi,
Thanks for describing your cats' histories.
Can you explain what you mean in the last few sentences of your posting?  
 However, I do not mix positive-for- leukemia cats with my regular group. 
 Right now all the cats who are with me are either negative or turned. 

Shelley


On Sep 24, 2013, at 8:37 PM, Lee Evans wrote:

 
 
 From: Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 7:33 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 You are a good, caring and compassionate person. I don't feel that FeLv is 
 as contagious as vets try to panic us into thinking. I had two cats mixed in 
 with 8 others. They all lived together in cat harmony for many years, 
 grooming each other, eating, drinking together and using the same litter 
 boxes. They lived in love and happiness. Then Tiger and Twerp became ill. 
 They were very old, around 15 years. I had had them tested twice throughout 
 their lifetime when each had come down with a very stubborn URI. But they 
 had tested negative both times. At the end of their days, I had them tested 
 again to see if they were not suffering from old age but from something I 
 could possibly treat. Along with the fact that they both had renal failure, 
 they both tested positive for FeLv. Probably, the virus was dormant in the 
 bone marrow all those years but when their immune system began to break down 
 and their kidneys were failing, the virus took hold also. They
 passed away quietly within hours of each other. The other 8 cats who had been 
living with them tested negative for everything and all died of old age and 
renal failure. I don't know when Tiger and Twerp became actively FeLv+ but it 
doesn't matter. It shows that even with such close interaction, the cats that 
did not test positive still did not test positive. However, I do not mix 
positive-for- leukemia cats with my regular group. Right now all the cats who 
are with me are either negative or turned. However, I do have a few little 
marshmallows who are FIV+ mixed into the group because they don't fight. I also 
have a small FIV shelter, a detached building of one large room and a 
wire-enclosed porch for four FIV+ cats who have a bit of an attitude and are 
not to be trusted to keep a friendly discussion friendly.
 

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-26 Thread trustinhim13
Lee makes a point, You probably do not want to mix a FL+ cat with others 
if that cat is a fighter. My Pookie is a total marshmellow. And he 
doesn't even like to mingle with the other cats. He'll be in the same 
room with them, but never grooms or lies next to them. Also this summer 
when he was symptomatic, he was separated into his own room. I have 
heard that what most often kills FL+ cats is an infection that they 
cannot fight because the virus attacks their immune system. My holistic 
vet, besides the accupuncture, has proscribed Wei Qi (Way chee) for his 
immune system. He is also on Standard Process Feline Immune System 
Support. The regular vets will not know about these (sadly). The Baytril 
(regular vet) knock out what secondary infection he came up with, and 
the accupuncture and these other herbs brought him to full health. 
Because the holistic vet was so helpful, I would recommend them to 
anyone. No kiddingone day he was not eating and running a 
tempthe day after the accupuncture, he jumped on my lap, had a cold 
nose, and started eating. I don't care how it works.but it did for 
him. Grateful mom..



On Thu, Sep 26, 2013 at 8:27 AM, Lee Evans wrote:

What I meant is that I don't mix leukemia positive cats into my 
general group as I would an FIV positive cat with a marshmallow 
personality who does not fight, not an alpha cat type. I did have two 
feline leukemia positive cats for over two years. They lived together 
in a separate room with each other. They were perfectly healthy for 
those two years, then suddenly turned symptomatic. One passed away 
quickly from what the vet diagnosed as bone marrow cancer. The other 
simply lost weight uncontrollably and followed his buddy over the 
edge. He probably also had bone marrow cancer or lymphoma. Those are 
the most likely two illness that kill the leukemia positive cats when 
the disease goes active. I also found a wonderful  person who had had 
losses from feline leukemia but was willing to go through the 
heartbreak again just to give a cat a chance at life. One of the cats 
I gave to her passed away in two years. The second one I begged her to 
take ( I think
 she was ready to shoot me when phoned to ask if she would foster 
another FeLv+ cat) is still living the life of luxury with her. It has 
been 6 years and counting so far. Keeping all fingers and paws 
crossed.








From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 
6:39 PM

Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing


Hi,
Thanks for describing your cats' histories.
Can you explain what you mean in the last few sentences of your 
posting? 
However, I do not mix positive-for- leukemia cats with my regular 
group. Right now all the cats who are with me are either negative or 
turned.


Shelley


On Sep 24, 2013, at 8:37 PM, Lee Evans wrote:




From: Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 7:33 PM

Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

You are a good, caring and compassionate person. I don't feel that 
FeLv is as contagious as vets try to panic us into thinking. I had 
two cats mixed in with 8 others. They all lived together in cat 
harmony for many years, grooming each other, eating, drinking 
together and using the same litter boxes. They lived in love and 
happiness. Then Tiger and Twerp became ill. They were very old, 
around 15 years. I had had them tested twice throughout their 
lifetime when each had come down with a very stubborn URI. But they 
had tested negative both times. At the end of their days, I had them 
tested again to see if they were not suffering from old age but from 
something I could possibly treat. Along with the fact that they both 
had renal failure, they both tested positive for FeLv. Probably, the 
virus was dormant in the bone marrow all those years but when their 
immune system began to break down and their kidneys were failing, 
the virus took hold also. They
 passed away quietly within hours of each other. The other 8 cats who 
had been living with them tested negative for everything and all died 
of old age and renal failure. I don't know when Tiger and Twerp became 
actively FeLv+ but it doesn't matter. It shows that even with such 
close interaction, the cats that did not test positive still did not 
test positive. However, I do not mix positive-for- leukemia cats with 
my regular group. Right now all the cats who are with me are either 
negative or turned. However, I do have a few little marshmallows who 
are FIV+ mixed into the group because they don't fight. I also have a 
small FIV shelter, a detached building of one large room and a 
wire-enclosed porch for four FIV+ cats who have a bit of an attitude 
and are not to be trusted to keep a friendly discussion friendly

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-25 Thread Shelley Theye
Thanks for sharing!  I have 2 cats and a foster cat who is pretty much mine 
too, and Leo, a neighborhood feral who 
I trapped last summer to neuter, and he tested FeLV positive, so he is mine too 
now, and he ended up becoming tame after many months...

I have never had my cats vaccinated for FeLV because they are strictly indoors, 
and I had always heard that the leukiemia vaccine was the worst of the bunch, 
but I might get everyone vaccinated before I attempt to mix.  I do have a cat 
with very bad fear aggression, and
that is another worry, because I don't want any fighting!

Shelley 


On Sep 24, 2013, at 2:22 PM, trustinhi...@charter.net wrote:

 Shelley..
 
 I lost a cat to FL in the 90's. After that I panicked and faithfully 
 vaccinated my next five cats every year. Then I rescued another FL cat. 
 Separated him from the others while he was symptomatic. He threw off the 
 virus. As fate would have it, other rescues came to my door. I couldn't 
 afford to have them all tested and vaccinated. (13).  All my cats mingle 
 together and non gets sick. I don't even bother to have my rescues tested 
 because I know that I would never put them down anyway. I was encouraged by a 
 women I met years ago who mixed negatives and positves with good results. 
 When my one FL cat has had symptoms (only twice in 4 years) I isolate and 
 treat him until he gets better. I am fastidious about clean bowls and water. 
 God is taking care of them and me. If you have the money and you have only a 
 few, get what ever treatment/tests are available. But I wouldn't stress over 
 the testing. My Pookie will always test positive because he carries the 
 disease in his system. But he is h
 ealthy as can be otherwise. I finally decided when my Lucy was 13 (she's 17 
now). to stop vaccinating her. If they don't have enough antibodies built up by 
then, they never will!  Maybe I am lucky, or just stupid, but I couldn't let an 
animal die form a lack of a home.
 
 On Tue, Sep 24, 2013 at 1:03 PM, Shelley Theye wrote:
 
 Hi Lee,
 
 Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still turn 
 negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and neutered, and then 
 again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am thinking of doing the IFA too. 
  Does the woman who has Taffy have all of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?
 
 Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their 
 negatives vaccinated for FeLV?
 
 Shelley
 
 
 
 On Sep 24, 2013, at 1:00 PM, Lee Evans wrote:
 
 Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were cats 
 rescued from different places at different times. One, a male who I have 
 had not for about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was not neutered, 
 around age 2, street cat, but tame. Since I was going to get him adopted 
 after neutering, I had him tested before I took him into my own house. He 
 tested negative for FIV but positive for FeLv. I tested again at another 
 vet. Still positive, but that vet suggested that I keep him for two months 
 and then re-test. This guy was on top of the latest literature in vet 
 medicine. So I did so, took Moses (cats name) back and he had turned 
 negative. Not to say that I did not believe the test but too, Moses for yet 
 another test and he was again negative. He's still with me.
 
 Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
 (notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a year 
 old when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, Bunny. I 
 put her in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. She tested 
 positive for FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, re-tested in about 3 
 months, she tested negative. Tested again to be sure. Negative again so got 
 her spayed.
 However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued kitten 
 brought to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in Bulverde Texas. 
 They tested her prior to putting her up for adoption. When they tested her, 
 she tested positive for FeLv. I took her back, found her a foster home with 
 a wonderful foster mom, who kept her isolated for 3 months but Taffy still 
 tested positive at the end of the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom 
 loves her and although Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that 
 Foster Mom has, Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and 
 gets to socialize with the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is 
 perfectly happy with the arrangement. So is the dog.
 
 The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect that 
 Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off the virus 
 as a kitten because she did not have very good care and ended up as a 
 little street stray.
 
 
 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:49 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 Lee,
 
 Can you explain more

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-25 Thread Shelley Theye
Thanks Sharly.  I am nervous to intentionally mix, but I don't want Leo to be 
alone forever.  
My other cats have never received the FeLV vaccine so far.

Shelley 



On Sep 24, 2013, at 2:29 PM, Sharyl wrote:

 Shelly all I can d I tell you what I did.  When I was rescuing FeLV kittens I 
 did have all my negatives vaccinated.  It has been over 3 years since my last 
 FeLV cat died.  All of my negatives are still with me and are fine
  
 Sharyl
 
 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 2:03 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 Hi Lee,
 
 Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still turn 
 negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and neutered, and then 
 again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am thinking of doing the IFA too.  
 Does the woman who has Taffy have all of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?
 
 Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their 
 negatives vaccinated for FeLV?
 
 Shelley
 
 
 
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 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-25 Thread Shelley Theye
Thanks Lee, that's interesting.  Hadn't thought about a limited contact 
scenario before.
So sorry to hear about your own negative vaccine experience.

Shelley

On Sep 24, 2013, at 5:14 PM, Lee Evans wrote:

 To answer if the foster mom has her cats vaccinated, NO. However, Taffy has 
 her own litter box and own feeding bowl and only mingles with the other cats 
 for a short time during the day, then back to her room with her pooch friend. 
 I'm not too keen on vaccines. I have heard nasty things about the FeLv 
 vaccine, like cats have come down with the disease a few weeks after being 
 vaccinated and had no other source of being infected. I have also had a 
 personal experience with a faulty polio vaccination when I was a teen. It 
 left me with nerve damage which has not improved with age but at least I 
 wasn't paralyzed, just in pain for a couple of years while my muscles gained 
 strength with physical therapy. Vaccines are not the perfect answer to 
 everything.
 
 
 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 1:03 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 Hi Lee,
 
 Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still turn 
 negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and neutered, and then 
 again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am thinking of doing the IFA too.  
 Does the woman who has Taffy have all of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?
 
 Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their 
 negatives vaccinated for FeLV?
 
 Shelley
 
 
 
 On Sep 24, 2013, at 1:00 PM, Lee Evans wrote:
 
  Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were cats 
  rescued from different places at different times. One, a male who I have 
  had not for about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was not neutered, 
  around age 2, street cat, but tame. Since I was going to get him adopted 
  after neutering, I had him tested before I took him into my own house. He 
  tested negative for FIV but positive for FeLv. I tested again at another 
  vet. Still positive, but that vet suggested that I keep him for two months 
  and then re-test. This guy was on top of the latest literature in vet 
  medicine. So I did so, took Moses (cats name) back and he had turned 
  negative. Not to say that I did not believe the test but too, Moses for yet 
  another test and he was again negative. He's still with me.
  
  Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
  (notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a year 
  old when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, Bunny. I 
  put her in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. She tested 
  positive for FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, re-tested in about 3 
  months, she tested negative. Tested again to be sure. Negative again so got 
  her spayed. 
  
  However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued kitten 
  brought to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in Bulverde Texas. 
  They tested her prior to putting her up for adoption. When they tested her, 
  she tested positive for FeLv. I took her back, found her a foster home with 
  a wonderful foster mom, who kept her isolated for 3 months but Taffy still 
  tested positive at the end of the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom 
  loves her and although Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that 
  Foster Mom has, Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and 
  gets to socialize with the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is 
  perfectly happy with the arrangement. So is the dog.
  
  The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect that 
  Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off the virus 
  as a kitten because she did not have very good care and ended up as a 
  little street stray.
  
  
  From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:49 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
  
  Lee,
  
  Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you have 
  that threw off the virus?
  Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they have 
  had the FeLV virus for more than 2 months
  before they ever were tested?
  
  Shelley
  
  
  
  On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:
  
   I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in 
   about 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may or 
   may not have been actually positive. Since their immune system is not 
   fully developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as adults. 
   Too bad about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such ridiculously 
   incorrect advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, then re-test. You 
   really should find them a home with a person who

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-25 Thread Shelley Theye
Hi,
Thanks for describing your cats' histories.
Can you explain what you mean in the last few sentences of your posting?  
 However, I do not mix positive-for- leukemia cats with my regular group. 
 Right now all the cats who are with me are either negative or turned. 

Shelley


On Sep 24, 2013, at 8:37 PM, Lee Evans wrote:

 
 
 From: Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 7:33 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 You are a good, caring and compassionate person. I don't feel that FeLv is as 
 contagious as vets try to panic us into thinking. I had two cats mixed in 
 with 8 others. They all lived together in cat harmony for many years, 
 grooming each other, eating, drinking together and using the same litter 
 boxes. They lived in love and happiness. Then Tiger and Twerp became ill. 
 They were very old, around 15 years. I had had them tested twice throughout 
 their lifetime when each had come down with a very stubborn URI. But they had 
 tested negative both times. At the end of their days, I had them tested again 
 to see if they were not suffering from old age but from something I could 
 possibly treat. Along with the fact that they both had renal failure, they 
 both tested positive for FeLv. Probably, the virus was dormant in the bone 
 marrow all those years but when their immune system began to break down and 
 their kidneys were failing, the virus took hold also. They passed away 
 quietly within hours of 
 each other. The other 8 cats who had been living with them tested negative for 
everything and all died of old age and renal failure. I don't know when Tiger 
and Twerp became actively FeLv+ but it doesn't matter. It shows that even with 
such close interaction, the cats that did not test positive still did not test 
positive. However, I do not mix positive-for- leukemia cats with my regular 
group. Right now all the cats who are with me are either negative or turned. 
However, I do have a few little marshmallows who are FIV+ mixed into the group 
because they don't fight. I also have a small FIV shelter, a detached 
building of one large room and a wire-enclosed porch for four FIV+ cats who 
have a bit of an attitude and are not to be trusted to keep a friendly 
discussion friendly.
 
 From: trustinhi...@charter.net trustinhi...@charter.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 1:22 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 Shelley..
 
 I lost a cat to FL in the 90's. After that I panicked and faithfully 
 vaccinated my next five cats every year. Then I rescued another FL cat. 
 Separated him from the others while he was symptomatic. He threw off the 
 virus. As fate would have it, other rescues came to my door. I couldn't 
 afford to have them all tested and vaccinated. (13).  All my cats mingle 
 together and non gets sick. I don't even bother to have my rescues 
 tested because I know that I would never put them down anyway. I was 
 encouraged by a women I met years ago who mixed negatives and positves 
 with good results. When my one FL cat has had symptoms (only twice in 4 
 years) I isolate and treat him until he gets better. I am fastidious 
 about clean bowls and water. God is taking care of them and me. If you 
 have the money and you have only a few, get what ever treatment/tests 
 are available. But I wouldn't stress over the testing. My Pookie will 
 always test positive because he carries the disease in his system. But 
 he is healthy as can be otherwise. I finally decided when my Lucy was 13 
 (she's 17 now). to stop vaccinating her. If they don't have enough 
 antibodies built up by then, they never will!  Maybe I am lucky, or just 
 stupid, but I couldn't let an animal die form a lack of a home.
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Lee Evans
I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in about 2 
months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may or may not have 
been actually positive. Since their immune system is not fully developed, they 
might not throw off the virus as soon as adults. Too bad about the idiot vet 
who gave the adopters such ridiculously incorrect advice. Keep the kittens for 
another 4 weeks, then re-test. You really should find them a home with a person 
who understands that a positive test does not mean the kitten should be killed. 
If they are still looking and feeling well, let them live. A home with no other 
cats or with cat-friendly dog is the best for this type of kitten.






 From: Betheny Laubenthal bailleyspetc...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 7:04 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 


What's the earliest that testing using a SNAP test for FeLV/FIV can be done so 
that it is accurate?  I know that if it is done early on, it can be inaccurate.
The reason I asked is that we adopted out a 10 week old kitten July 16.  We 
did not test.  I don't like testing before 16 weeks.  We pulled the kitten and 
her sister from another state.  Mom was in a high kill shelter.  She was PTS 
before we could rescue her.  The rest of the litter was PTS.  Miles and 
Journey were the only ones left.
Today, the kitten (Miles) tested positive for leukemia and was PTS (the ill 
informed vet used scare tactics on the owner and made the owner think that her 
dogs could get it).  I was called after the fact.
What is proper testing protocol?  Vaccination protcol?  I use a 4 way with 
feline leukemia, killed virus.
--Beth
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Shelley Theye
Lee,

Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you have that 
threw off the virus?
Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they have had 
the FeLV virus for more than 2 months
before they ever were tested?

Shelley



On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:

 I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in about 
 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may or may not 
 have been actually positive. Since their immune system is not fully 
 developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as adults. Too bad 
 about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such ridiculously incorrect advice. 
 Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, then re-test. You really should find 
 them a home with a person who understands that a positive test does not mean 
 the kitten should be killed. If they are still looking and feeling well, let 
 them live. A home with no other cats or with cat-friendly dog is the best for 
 this type of kitten.
 
 
 From: Betheny Laubenthal bailleyspetc...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 7:04 PM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 What's the earliest that testing using a SNAP test for FeLV/FIV can be done 
 so that it is accurate?  I know that if it is done early on, it can be 
 inaccurate.
 The reason I asked is that we adopted out a 10 week old kitten July 16.  We 
 did not test.  I don't like testing before 16 weeks.  We pulled the kitten 
 and her sister from another state.  Mom was in a high kill shelter.  She was 
 PTS before we could rescue her.  The rest of the litter was PTS.  Miles and 
 Journey were the only ones left.
 Today, the kitten (Miles) tested positive for leukemia and was PTS (the ill 
 informed vet used scare tactics on the owner and made the owner think that 
 her dogs could get it).  I was called after the fact.
 What is proper testing protocol?  Vaccination protcol?  I use a 4 way with 
 feline leukemia, killed virus.
 --Beth
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Lee Evans
Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were cats rescued 
from different places at different times. One, a male who I have had not for 
about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was not neutered, around age 2, street 
cat, but tame. Since I was going to get him adopted after neutering, I had him 
tested before I took him into my own house. He tested negative for FIV but 
positive for FeLv. I tested again at another vet. Still positive, but that vet 
suggested that I keep him for two months and then re-test. This guy was on top 
of the latest literature in vet medicine. So I did so, took Moses (cats name) 
back and he had turned negative. Not to say that I did not believe the test but 
too, Moses for yet another test and he was again negative. He's still with me.

Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
(notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a year old 
when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, Bunny. I put her 
in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. She tested positive for 
FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, re-tested in about 3 months, she tested 
negative. Tested again to be sure. Negative again so got her spayed. 

However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued kitten brought 
to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in Bulverde Texas. They tested 
her prior to putting her up for adoption. When they tested her, she tested 
positive for FeLv. I took her back, found her a foster home with a wonderful 
foster mom, who kept her isolated for 3 months but Taffy still tested positive 
at the end of the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom loves her and 
although Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that Foster Mom has, 
Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and gets to socialize with 
the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is perfectly happy with the 
arrangement. So is the dog.

The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect that 
Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off the virus as a 
kitten because she did not have very good care and ended up as a little street 
stray.






 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 

Lee,

Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you have 
that threw off the virus?
Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they have had 
the FeLV virus for more than 2 months
before they ever were tested?

Shelley



On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:

 I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in about 
 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may or may not 
 have been actually positive. Since their immune system is not fully 
 developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as adults. Too bad 
 about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such ridiculously incorrect 
 advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, then re-test. You really 
 should find them a home with a person who understands that a positive test 
 does not mean the kitten should be killed. If they are still looking and 
 feeling well, let them live. A home with no other cats or with cat-friendly 
 dog is the best for this type of kitten.
 
 
 From: Betheny Laubenthal bailleyspetc...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 7:04 PM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 What's the earliest that testing using a SNAP test for FeLV/FIV can be done 
 so that it is accurate?  I know that if it is done early on, it can be 
 inaccurate.
 The reason I asked is that we adopted out a 10 week old kitten July 16.  We 
 did not test.  I don't like testing before 16 weeks.  We pulled the kitten 
 and her sister from another state.  Mom was in a high kill shelter.  She was 
 PTS before we could rescue her.  The rest of the litter was PTS.  Miles and 
 Journey were the only ones left.
 Today, the kitten (Miles) tested positive for leukemia and was PTS (the ill 
 informed vet used scare tactics on the owner and made the owner think that 
 her dogs could get it).  I was called after the fact.
 What is proper testing protocol?  Vaccination protcol?  I use a 4 way with 
 feline leukemia, killed virus.
 --Beth
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread trustinhim13
I agree with Lee completely. It angers me that someone can get through 
Vet school and still not be knowledgable about this disease. I rescued a 
male cat, two years old, and only then learned he was FelV+ after he was 
neutered. He has thrown off the virus twice. He is over 6 now. mingels 
with my other rescues and no one has gotten sick. Killing kittens 
becasue they carry the virus (or some test says they ahve it) is 
irresponsible.



On Tue, Sep 24, 2013 at 10:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:

I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in 
about 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may 
or may not have been actually positive. Since their immune system is 
not fully developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as 
adults. Too bad about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such 
ridiculously incorrect advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, 
then re-test. You really should find them a home with a person who 
understands that a positive test does not mean the kitten should be 
killed. If they are still looking and feeling well, let them live. A 
home with no other cats or with cat-friendly dog is the best for this 
type of kitten.








From: Betheny Laubenthal bailleyspetc...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 7:04 
PM

Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing



What's the earliest that testing using a SNAP test for FeLV/FIV can 
be done so that it is accurate?  I know that if it is done early on, 
it can be inaccurate.
The reason I asked is that we adopted out a 10 week old kitten July 
16.  We did not test.  I don't like testing before 16 weeks.  We 
pulled the kitten and her sister from another state.  Mom was in a 
high kill shelter.  She was PTS before we could rescue her.  The rest 
of the litter was PTS.  Miles and Journey were the only ones left.
Today, the kitten (Miles) tested positive for leukemia and was PTS 
(the ill informed vet used scare tactics on the owner and made the 
owner think that her dogs could get it).  I was called after the 
fact.
What is proper testing protocol?  Vaccination protcol?  I use a 4 way 
with feline leukemia, killed virus.

--Beth
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org





 --

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Margo


I can't be so hard on Vets anymore. Getting thru Vet school can't educate where 
the whole disease process is so little understood. I have researched FeLV up 
down and sideways, and NOTHING is certain. Two years ago I had a house full of 
negative cats. All my FL cats (we moved to SC) had been tested at LEAST twice. 
No new cat (2) was added without a doubly negative (60 days apart) FeLV test. 
One of the new ones was my first symptomatic +. I now have 2 positives, and 
probably two others, as well. I'm now (to my great distress) vaccinating 
against it. 

Can't figure out what else to do.

Margo

-Original Message-
From: trustinhi...@charter.net
Sent: Sep 24, 2013 1:09 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Cc: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

I agree with Lee completely. It angers me that someone can get through 
Vet school and still not be knowledgable about this disease. I rescued a 
male cat, two years old, and only then learned he was FelV+ after he was 
neutered. He has thrown off the virus twice. He is over 6 now. mingels 
with my other rescues and no one has gotten sick. Killing kittens 
becasue they carry the virus (or some test says they ahve it) is 
irresponsible.


On Tue, Sep 24, 2013 at 10:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:

 I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in 
 about 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may 
 or may not have been actually positive. Since their immune system is 
 not fully developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as 
 adults. Too bad about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such 
 ridiculously incorrect advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, 
 then re-test. You really should find them a home with a person who 
 understands that a positive test does not mean the kitten should be 
 killed. If they are still looking and feeling well, let them live. A 
 home with no other cats or with cat-friendly dog is the best for this 
 type of kitten.





 
 From: Betheny Laubenthal bailleyspetc...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 7:04 
 PM
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing



 What's the earliest that testing using a SNAP test for FeLV/FIV can 
 be done so that it is accurate?  I know that if it is done early on, 
 it can be inaccurate.
 The reason I asked is that we adopted out a 10 week old kitten July 
 16.  We did not test.  I don't like testing before 16 weeks.  We 
 pulled the kitten and her sister from another state.  Mom was in a 
 high kill shelter.  She was PTS before we could rescue her.  The rest 
 of the litter was PTS.  Miles and Journey were the only ones left.
 Today, the kitten (Miles) tested positive for leukemia and was PTS 
 (the ill informed vet used scare tactics on the owner and made the 
 owner think that her dogs could get it).  I was called after the 
 fact.
 What is proper testing protocol?  Vaccination protcol?  I use a 4 way 
 with feline leukemia, killed virus.
 --Beth
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




  --

 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Shelley Theye
Hi Lee,

Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still turn 
negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and neutered, and then 
again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am thinking of doing the IFA too.  
Does the woman who has Taffy have all of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?

Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their negatives 
vaccinated for FeLV?

Shelley



On Sep 24, 2013, at 1:00 PM, Lee Evans wrote:

 Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were cats 
 rescued from different places at different times. One, a male who I have had 
 not for about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was not neutered, around age 
 2, street cat, but tame. Since I was going to get him adopted after 
 neutering, I had him tested before I took him into my own house. He tested 
 negative for FIV but positive for FeLv. I tested again at another vet. Still 
 positive, but that vet suggested that I keep him for two months and then 
 re-test. This guy was on top of the latest literature in vet medicine. So I 
 did so, took Moses (cats name) back and he had turned negative. Not to say 
 that I did not believe the test but too, Moses for yet another test and he 
 was again negative. He's still with me.
 
 Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
 (notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a year old 
 when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, Bunny. I put her 
 in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. She tested positive for 
 FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, re-tested in about 3 months, she 
 tested negative. Tested again to be sure. Negative again so got her spayed. 
 
 However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued kitten 
 brought to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in Bulverde Texas. They 
 tested her prior to putting her up for adoption. When they tested her, she 
 tested positive for FeLv. I took her back, found her a foster home with a 
 wonderful foster mom, who kept her isolated for 3 months but Taffy still 
 tested positive at the end of the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom 
 loves her and although Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that 
 Foster Mom has, Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and gets 
 to socialize with the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is perfectly 
 happy with the arrangement. So is the dog.
 
 The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect that 
 Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off the virus as 
 a kitten because she did not have very good care and ended up as a little 
 street stray.
 
 
 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:49 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 Lee,
 
 Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you have 
 that threw off the virus?
 Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they have had 
 the FeLV virus for more than 2 months
 before they ever were tested?
 
 Shelley
 
 
 
 On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:
 
  I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in 
  about 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may or 
  may not have been actually positive. Since their immune system is not fully 
  developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as adults. Too bad 
  about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such ridiculously incorrect 
  advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, then re-test. You really 
  should find them a home with a person who understands that a positive test 
  does not mean the kitten should be killed. If they are still looking and 
  feeling well, let them live. A home with no other cats or with cat-friendly 
  dog is the best for this type of kitten.
  
  
  From: Betheny Laubenthal bailleyspetc...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 7:04 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
  
  What's the earliest that testing using a SNAP test for FeLV/FIV can be done 
  so that it is accurate?  I know that if it is done early on, it can be 
  inaccurate.
  The reason I asked is that we adopted out a 10 week old kitten July 16.  We 
  did not test.  I don't like testing before 16 weeks.  We pulled the kitten 
  and her sister from another state.  Mom was in a high kill shelter.  She 
  was PTS before we could rescue her.  The rest of the litter was PTS.  Miles 
  and Journey were the only ones left.
  Today, the kitten (Miles) tested positive for leukemia and was PTS (the ill 
  informed vet used scare tactics on the owner and made the owner think that 
  her dogs could get it).  I was called after the fact.
  What is proper testing protocol?  Vaccination protcol?  I use a 4 way with 
  feline leukemia

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread trustinhim13

Shelley..

I lost a cat to FL in the 90's. After that I panicked and faithfully 
vaccinated my next five cats every year. Then I rescued another FL cat. 
Separated him from the others while he was symptomatic. He threw off the 
virus. As fate would have it, other rescues came to my door. I couldn't 
afford to have them all tested and vaccinated. (13).  All my cats mingle 
together and non gets sick. I don't even bother to have my rescues 
tested because I know that I would never put them down anyway. I was 
encouraged by a women I met years ago who mixed negatives and positves 
with good results. When my one FL cat has had symptoms (only twice in 4 
years) I isolate and treat him until he gets better. I am fastidious 
about clean bowls and water. God is taking care of them and me. If you 
have the money and you have only a few, get what ever treatment/tests 
are available. But I wouldn't stress over the testing. My Pookie will 
always test positive because he carries the disease in his system. But 
he is healthy as can be otherwise. I finally decided when my Lucy was 13 
(she's 17 now). to stop vaccinating her. If they don't have enough 
antibodies built up by then, they never will!  Maybe I am lucky, or just 
stupid, but I couldn't let an animal die form a lack of a home.


On Tue, Sep 24, 2013 at 1:03 PM, Shelley Theye wrote:


Hi Lee,

Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still 
turn negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and 
neutered, and then again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am 
thinking of doing the IFA too.  Does the woman who has Taffy have all 
of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?


Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their 
negatives vaccinated for FeLV?


Shelley



On Sep 24, 2013, at 1:00 PM, Lee Evans wrote:

Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were 
cats rescued from different places at different times. One, a male 
who I have had not for about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was 
not neutered, around age 2, street cat, but tame. Since I was going 
to get him adopted after neutering, I had him tested before I took 
him into my own house. He tested negative for FIV but positive for 
FeLv. I tested again at another vet. Still positive, but that vet 
suggested that I keep him for two months and then re-test. This guy 
was on top of the latest literature in vet medicine. So I did so, 
took Moses (cats name) back and he had turned negative. Not to say 
that I did not believe the test but too, Moses for yet another test 
and he was again negative. He's still with me.


Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
(notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a 
year old when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, 
Bunny. I put her in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. 
She tested positive for FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, 
re-tested in about 3 months, she tested negative. Tested again to be 
sure. Negative again so got her spayed.
However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued 
kitten brought to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in 
Bulverde Texas. They tested her prior to putting her up for adoption. 
When they tested her, she tested positive for FeLv. I took her back, 
found her a foster home with a wonderful foster mom, who kept her 
isolated for 3 months but Taffy still tested positive at the end of 
the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom loves her and although 
Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that Foster Mom has, 
Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and gets to 
socialize with the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is 
perfectly happy with the arrangement. So is the dog.


The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect 
that Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off 
the virus as a kitten because she did not have very good care and 
ended up as a little street stray.



From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 
10:49 AM

Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

Lee,

Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you 
have that threw off the virus?
Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they 
have had the FeLV virus for more than 2 months

before they ever were tested?

Shelley



On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:

I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus 
in about 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, 
they may or may not have been actually positive. Since their immune 
system is not fully developed, they might not throw off the virus as 
soon as adults. Too bad about the idiot vet who gave the adopters 
such ridiculously incorrect advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 
weeks, then re-test. You really

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Sharyl
Shelly all I can d I tell you what I did.  When I was rescuing FeLV kittens I 
did have all my negatives vaccinated.  It has been over 3 years since my last 
FeLV cat died.  All of my negatives are still with me and are fine
 
Sharyl
 


 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 2:03 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
  

Hi Lee,

Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still turn 
negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and neutered, and then 
again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am thinking of doing the IFA too.  
Does the woman who has Taffy have all of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?

Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their negatives 
vaccinated for FeLV?

Shelley___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread Lee Evans
To answer if the foster mom has her cats vaccinated, NO. However, Taffy has her 
own litter box and own feeding bowl and only mingles with the other cats for a 
short time during the day, then back to her room with her pooch friend. I'm not 
too keen on vaccines. I have heard nasty things about the FeLv vaccine, like 
cats have come down with the disease a few weeks after being vaccinated and had 
no other source of being infected. I have also had a personal experience with a 
faulty polio vaccination when I was a teen. It left me with nerve damage which 
has not improved with age but at least I wasn't paralyzed, just in pain for a 
couple of years while my muscles gained strength with physical therapy. 
Vaccines are not the perfect answer to everything.






 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 1:03 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 

Hi Lee,

Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still turn 
negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and neutered, and then 
again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am thinking of doing the IFA too.  
Does the woman who has Taffy have all of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?

Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their 
negatives vaccinated for FeLV?

Shelley



On Sep 24, 2013, at 1:00 PM, Lee Evans wrote:

 Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were cats 
 rescued from different places at different times. One, a male who I have had 
 not for about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was not neutered, around age 
 2, street cat, but tame. Since I was going to get him adopted after 
 neutering, I had him tested before I took him into my own house. He tested 
 negative for FIV but positive for FeLv. I tested again at another vet. Still 
 positive, but that vet suggested that I keep him for two months and then 
 re-test. This guy was on top of the latest literature in vet medicine. So I 
 did so, took Moses (cats name) back and he had turned negative. Not to say 
 that I did not believe the test but too, Moses for yet another test and he 
 was again negative. He's still with me.
 
 Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
 (notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a year 
 old when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, Bunny. I 
 put her in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. She tested 
 positive for FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, re-tested in about 3 
 months, she tested negative. Tested again to be sure. Negative again so got 
 her spayed. 
 
 However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued kitten 
 brought to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in Bulverde Texas. 
 They tested her prior to putting her up for adoption. When they tested her, 
 she tested positive for FeLv. I took her back, found her a foster home with 
 a wonderful foster mom, who kept her isolated for 3 months but Taffy still 
 tested positive at the end of the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom 
 loves her and although Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that 
 Foster Mom has, Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and 
 gets to socialize with the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is 
 perfectly happy with the arrangement. So is the dog.
 
 The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect that 
 Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off the virus 
 as a kitten because she did not have very good care and ended up as a little 
 street stray.
 
 
 From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 10:49 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
 Lee,
 
 Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you have 
 that threw off the virus?
 Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they have had 
 the FeLV virus for more than 2 months
 before they ever were tested?
 
 Shelley
 
 
 
 On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:
 
  I have had a lot of success with adult cats who threw off the virus in 
  about 2 months and tested negative from then on. For kittens, they may or 
  may not have been actually positive. Since their immune system is not 
  fully developed, they might not throw off the virus as soon as adults. Too 
  bad about the idiot vet who gave the adopters such ridiculously incorrect 
  advice. Keep the kittens for another 4 weeks, then re-test. You really 
  should find them a home with a person who understands that a positive test 
  does not mean the kitten should be killed. If they are still looking and 
  feeling well, let them live. A home with no other cats or with 
  cat-friendly dog is the best for this type of kitten.
  
  
  From: Betheny Laubenthal

Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing

2013-09-24 Thread dlgegg
MY ANNIE STIL TESTS POSITIVE, BUT SHE IS SO HEALTHY IT IS RIDUCULUS.  THE 
NEGATIVE CATS GET FELV VACCINE.  THEY EAT, DRINK AND PLAY TOGETHER, SQUABBLE 
SOMETIMES, BUT JUST SLAPPING AND HISSING, NO BITTING.  

 trustinhi...@charter.net wrote: 
 Shelley..
 
 I lost a cat to FL in the 90's. After that I panicked and faithfully 
 vaccinated my next five cats every year. Then I rescued another FL cat. 
 Separated him from the others while he was symptomatic. He threw off the 
 virus. As fate would have it, other rescues came to my door. I couldn't 
 afford to have them all tested and vaccinated. (13).  All my cats mingle 
 together and non gets sick. I don't even bother to have my rescues 
 tested because I know that I would never put them down anyway. I was 
 encouraged by a women I met years ago who mixed negatives and positves 
 with good results. When my one FL cat has had symptoms (only twice in 4 
 years) I isolate and treat him until he gets better. I am fastidious 
 about clean bowls and water. God is taking care of them and me. If you 
 have the money and you have only a few, get what ever treatment/tests 
 are available. But I wouldn't stress over the testing. My Pookie will 
 always test positive because he carries the disease in his system. But 
 he is healthy as can be otherwise. I finally decided when my Lucy was 13 
 (she's 17 now). to stop vaccinating her. If they don't have enough 
 antibodies built up by then, they never will!  Maybe I am lucky, or just 
 stupid, but I couldn't let an animal die form a lack of a home.
 
 On Tue, Sep 24, 2013 at 1:03 PM, Shelley Theye wrote:
 
  Hi Lee,
 
  Thanks for explaining.  Not sure if there is hope for Leo to still 
  turn negative.  He tested positive last July, when trapped and 
  neutered, and then again in Nov.  I haven't retested yet, and am 
  thinking of doing the IFA too.  Does the woman who has Taffy have all 
  of her other cats vaccinated for FeLV?
 
  Do most people on this list who mix positive and negatives have their 
  negatives vaccinated for FeLV?
 
  Shelley
 
 
 
  On Sep 24, 2013, at 1:00 PM, Lee Evans wrote:
 
  Hi Shelley - I'm not sure as to when they were exposed. These were 
  cats rescued from different places at different times. One, a male 
  who I have had not for about 6 to 7 years, was rescued when he was 
  not neutered, around age 2, street cat, but tame. Since I was going 
  to get him adopted after neutering, I had him tested before I took 
  him into my own house. He tested negative for FIV but positive for 
  FeLv. I tested again at another vet. Still positive, but that vet 
  suggested that I keep him for two months and then re-test. This guy 
  was on top of the latest literature in vet medicine. So I did so, 
  took Moses (cats name) back and he had turned negative. Not to say 
  that I did not believe the test but too, Moses for yet another test 
  and he was again negative. He's still with me.
 
  Bunny (Buns for short) is a female, abandoned at an apartment complex 
  (notorious for abandoned, feral and stray cats). She was less than a 
  year old when she was brought to me on Easter Morning. Thus her name, 
  Bunny. I put her in a separate room, then took to vet to be tested. 
  She tested positive for FeLv. Kept her isolated, did not spay, 
  re-tested in about 3 months, she tested negative. Tested again to be 
  sure. Negative again so got her spayed.
  However, my luck did not hold very well. Recently had a rescued 
  kitten brought to me. I took Taffy to a local Humane Society in 
  Bulverde Texas. They tested her prior to putting her up for adoption. 
  When they tested her, she tested positive for FeLv. I took her back, 
  found her a foster home with a wonderful foster mom, who kept her 
  isolated for 3 months but Taffy still tested positive at the end of 
  the isolation period. Fortunately, Foster mom loves her and although 
  Taffy doesn't mix in to the community of 7 cats that Foster Mom has, 
  Taffy lives with Foster Mom's dog in a spare bedroom and gets to 
  socialize with the cats except during feeding time. Taffy is 
  perfectly happy with the arrangement. So is the dog.
 
  The adults probably contracted FeLv during mating behavior. I suspect 
  that Taffy got it from her birth mother but was not able to fight off 
  the virus as a kitten because she did not have very good care and 
  ended up as a little street stray.
 
 
  From: Shelley Theye ve...@bellsouth.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 
  10:49 AM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about FeLV/FIV testing
 
  Lee,
 
  Can you explain more about the 2 month period for the adults that you 
  have that threw off the virus?
  Do you know when they were first exposed, in other words could they 
  have had the FeLV virus for more than 2 months
  before they ever were tested?
 
  Shelley
 
 
 
  On Sep 24, 2013, at 11:15 AM, Lee Evans wrote:
 
  I have had a lot of success with adult cats who

Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-30 Thread dlgegg
My vet gave Homey a antbiotic shot that lasts 2 weeks - easier than pills or 
liquids daily.  I also got a Chinese herbal pill from All Natural Pets.  It is 
a small, round gel cap.  Goes down real easy, before she has a chance to spit 
it out. It has dendrobium in it and other herbs.  She is in good shape now and 
I monitor her intake and output.  The thing that tipped me off to a problem was 
small urine balls in the boxes about the size of a quarter.  I started watching 
everyone to see what they were putting out.  Easy since I have a box next to 
the stool in my bathroom.  When mother goes, everyone else has to go so mom can 
see what is going on.
 MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com wrote: 
 It has been 15 + years since she left this world (not related to the  
 stones).  There were antibiotics and steriods I think.  Somehow I  
 think there was meds to deal with the urine PH.  Sorry I can't give  
 more information.  Now I would check with a holistic vet as well as my  
 regular vets.
 On Jul 29, 2011, at 5:31 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
 
 
  What did your vet do for the stones.  Bug has kidney stones and the  
  vet said that there really is not a lot they can do for those.  I  
  tried feeding her the special food but she wouldn't eat it and the  
  vet said if she is eating anything else (very hard to feed  
  individually when you have more than 10 cats) then it was not doing  
  her any good to eat the prescription diet :(
 
 
  From: maima...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 16:42:56 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  My very sweet little girl, Mi Tu, turned into a problem cat because  
  of
  bladder stones. I took her to the vets several times. They checked
  her, did routine lab tests and everything they could think of. I was
  finally at the end of my rope and they had been doing their research.
  The vets drew urine from the bladder. The stones were there and we
  got her the treatment she needed. She was in a lot of pain but the
  symptoms presented were for a behavioral disorder.
  On Jul 29, 2011, at 12:25 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
 
 
  SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very
  painful and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.
 
  Edna
 
 
  From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's
  related to
  FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing
  painful
  elimination.
 
  Good luck to you,
  Sara
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin
  Potter
  Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  Greetings Everyone,
 
  We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our
  vet, and
  last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling
  noise, i
  thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was
  growling in the
  corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor
  instead of her
  litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and
  Mr. Hyde,
  she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've
  never
  seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was
  more so
  sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst
  days
  ever!
 
  Has anyone else had this happen?
  ___
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  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/
  felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-30 Thread Natalie
I agree, stop any fish!
Here's a list of good info on feline kidney stones and a variety of
treatments:
http://www.goodsearch.com/search.aspx?keywords=Feline+kidney+stones 

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of
dlg...@windstream.net
Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2011 3:47 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

Almost forgot, they say that foods containing fish may be a contributor for
sturivite stones.  Maybe stay away from fishy things for a bit and see if
that helps.

Especially watch the treats, they are usually heavy on fish content.
 Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com wrote: 
 
 What did your vet do for the stones.  Bug has kidney stones and the vet
said that there really is not a lot they can do for those.  I tried feeding
her the special food but she wouldn't eat it and the vet said if she is
eating anything else (very hard to feed individually when you have more than
10 cats) then it was not doing her any good to eat the prescription diet :(
  
 
  From: maima...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 16:42:56 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
  
  My very sweet little girl, Mi Tu, turned into a problem cat because of 
  bladder stones. I took her to the vets several times. They checked 
  her, did routine lab tests and everything they could think of. I was 
  finally at the end of my rope and they had been doing their research. 
  The vets drew urine from the bladder. The stones were there and we 
  got her the treatment she needed. She was in a lot of pain but the 
  symptoms presented were for a behavioral disorder.
  On Jul 29, 2011, at 12:25 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
  
  
   SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very 
   painful and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.
  
   Edna
  
  
   From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
   Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
  
   I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's 
   related to
   FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing 
   painful
   elimination.
  
   Good luck to you,
   Sara
  
   -Original Message-
   From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
   [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin 
   Potter
   Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
  
   Greetings Everyone,
  
   We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our 
   vet, and
   last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling 
   noise, i
   thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was 
   growling in the
   corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor 
   instead of her
   litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and 
   Mr. Hyde,
   she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've 
   never
   seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was 
   more so
   sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst 
   days
   ever!
  
   Has anyone else had this happen?
   ___
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   Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/ 
   felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-30 Thread dlgegg
Ho covenient!  Just got an email from Only Natura Pet Store.  The pills I 
mentioned are made by Nature's Herbs for Pets b a Dr. Victor Tse.  

 MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com wrote: 
 It has been 15 + years since she left this world (not related to the  
 stones).  There were antibiotics and steriods I think.  Somehow I  
 think there was meds to deal with the urine PH.  Sorry I can't give  
 more information.  Now I would check with a holistic vet as well as my  
 regular vets.
 On Jul 29, 2011, at 5:31 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
 
 
  What did your vet do for the stones.  Bug has kidney stones and the  
  vet said that there really is not a lot they can do for those.  I  
  tried feeding her the special food but she wouldn't eat it and the  
  vet said if she is eating anything else (very hard to feed  
  individually when you have more than 10 cats) then it was not doing  
  her any good to eat the prescription diet :(
 
 
  From: maima...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 16:42:56 -0500
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  My very sweet little girl, Mi Tu, turned into a problem cat because  
  of
  bladder stones. I took her to the vets several times. They checked
  her, did routine lab tests and everything they could think of. I was
  finally at the end of my rope and they had been doing their research.
  The vets drew urine from the bladder. The stones were there and we
  got her the treatment she needed. She was in a lot of pain but the
  symptoms presented were for a behavioral disorder.
  On Jul 29, 2011, at 12:25 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
 
 
  SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very
  painful and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.
 
  Edna
 
 
  From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's
  related to
  FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing
  painful
  elimination.
 
  Good luck to you,
  Sara
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin
  Potter
  Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  Greetings Everyone,
 
  We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our
  vet, and
  last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling
  noise, i
  thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was
  growling in the
  corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor
  instead of her
  litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and
  Mr. Hyde,
  she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've
  never
  seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was
  more so
  sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst
  days
  ever!
 
  Has anyone else had this happen?
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/
  felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-30 Thread dlgegg
A trip to the vet and try some herbal remidies for stones.
 Edna Taylor taylore...@msn.com wrote: 
 
 SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very painful 
 and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.
 
 Edna
  
 
  From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
  
  I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's related to
  FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing painful
  elimination.
  
  Good luck to you,
  Sara
  
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin Potter
  Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
  
  Greetings Everyone, 
   
  We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our vet, and
  last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling noise, i
  thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was growling in the
  corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor instead of her
  litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and Mr. Hyde,
  she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've never
  seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was more so
  sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst days
  ever!
   
  Has anyone else had this happen? 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-29 Thread Sara Kasteleyn
I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's related to
FeLV.  My first inclination would be to look for something causing painful
elimination.

Good luck to you,
Sara

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin Potter
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

Greetings Everyone, 
 
We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our vet, and
last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling noise, i
thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was growling in the
corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor instead of her
litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and Mr. Hyde,
she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've never
seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was more so
sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst days
ever!
 
Has anyone else had this happen? 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-29 Thread Natalie
The poor cat may have been confused/scared, bullied or thought to have been
bullied by another cat - is that possible?

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin Potter
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 12:55 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

Greetings Everyone, 
 
We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our vet, and
last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling noise, i
thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was growling in the
corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor instead of her
litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and Mr. Hyde,
she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've never
seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was more so
sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst days
ever!
 
Has anyone else had this happen? 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-29 Thread Edna Taylor

SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very painful and 
a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.

Edna
 

 From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
 I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's related to
 FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing painful
 elimination.
 
 Good luck to you,
 Sara
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin Potter
 Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
 
 Greetings Everyone, 
  
 We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our vet, and
 last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling noise, i
 thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was growling in the
 corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor instead of her
 litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and Mr. Hyde,
 she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've never
 seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was more so
 sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst days
 ever!
  
 Has anyone else had this happen? 
 ___
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-29 Thread MaiMaiPG
My very sweet little girl, Mi Tu, turned into a problem cat because of  
bladder stones.  I took her to the vets several times.  They checked  
her, did routine lab tests and everything they could think of.  I was  
finally at the end of my rope and they had been doing their research.   
The vets drew urine from the bladder.  The stones were there and we  
got her the treatment she needed.  She was in a lot of pain but the  
symptoms presented were for a behavioral disorder.

On Jul 29, 2011, at 12:25 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:



SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very  
painful and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.


Edna



From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's  
related to
FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing  
painful

elimination.

Good luck to you,
Sara

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin  
Potter

Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

Greetings Everyone,

We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our  
vet, and
last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling  
noise, i
thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was  
growling in the
corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor  
instead of her
litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and  
Mr. Hyde,
she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've  
never
seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was  
more so
sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst  
days

ever!

Has anyone else had this happen?
___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-29 Thread Edna Taylor

What did your vet do for the stones.  Bug has kidney stones and the vet said 
that there really is not a lot they can do for those.  I tried feeding her the 
special food but she wouldn't eat it and the vet said if she is eating anything 
else (very hard to feed individually when you have more than 10 cats) then it 
was not doing her any good to eat the prescription diet :(
 

 From: maima...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 16:42:56 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
 My very sweet little girl, Mi Tu, turned into a problem cat because of 
 bladder stones. I took her to the vets several times. They checked 
 her, did routine lab tests and everything they could think of. I was 
 finally at the end of my rope and they had been doing their research. 
 The vets drew urine from the bladder. The stones were there and we 
 got her the treatment she needed. She was in a lot of pain but the 
 symptoms presented were for a behavioral disorder.
 On Jul 29, 2011, at 12:25 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:
 
 
  SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very 
  painful and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.
 
  Edna
 
 
  From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's 
  related to
  FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing 
  painful
  elimination.
 
  Good luck to you,
  Sara
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin 
  Potter
  Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question
 
  Greetings Everyone,
 
  We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our 
  vet, and
  last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling 
  noise, i
  thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was 
  growling in the
  corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor 
  instead of her
  litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and 
  Mr. Hyde,
  she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've 
  never
  seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was 
  more so
  sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst 
  days
  ever!
 
  Has anyone else had this happen?
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question

2011-07-29 Thread MaiMaiPG
It has been 15 + years since she left this world (not related to the  
stones).  There were antibiotics and steriods I think.  Somehow I  
think there was meds to deal with the urine PH.  Sorry I can't give  
more information.  Now I would check with a holistic vet as well as my  
regular vets.

On Jul 29, 2011, at 5:31 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:



What did your vet do for the stones.  Bug has kidney stones and the  
vet said that there really is not a lot they can do for those.  I  
tried feeding her the special food but she wouldn't eat it and the  
vet said if she is eating anything else (very hard to feed  
individually when you have more than 10 cats) then it was not doing  
her any good to eat the prescription diet :(




From: maima...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 16:42:56 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

My very sweet little girl, Mi Tu, turned into a problem cat because  
of

bladder stones. I took her to the vets several times. They checked
her, did routine lab tests and everything they could think of. I was
finally at the end of my rope and they had been doing their research.
The vets drew urine from the bladder. The stones were there and we
got her the treatment she needed. She was in a lot of pain but the
symptoms presented were for a behavioral disorder.
On Jul 29, 2011, at 12:25 PM, Edna Taylor wrote:



SOunds like either stones or a bad URI because those are very very
painful and a trip to the vet ASAP is in order.

Edna



From: skastel...@cicresearch.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:15:17 -0700
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question

I'm no expert here, but this doesn't sound to me as though it's
related to
FeLV. My first inclination would be to look for something causing
painful
elimination.

Good luck to you,
Sara

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Joslin
Potter
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 9:55 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question

Greetings Everyone,

We recently took in a kitten someone was going to put down from our
vet, and
last night I was awaken in the middle of the night by a howling
noise, i
thought it was our older cat but it was the kitten, she was
growling in the
corner and for some reason went to the bathroom on the floor
instead of her
litter box, is this common among FeLV cats? It was dr jeckle and
Mr. Hyde,
she was back to her loving self this morning? I'm so confused I've
never
seen an animal behave like that? When my older cat was dx he was
more so
sick we thought he swallowed a bone? talk about one of the worst
days
ever!

Has anyone else had this happen?
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-19 Thread Maureen Olvey

I have been e-mailing with a vet friend and she says most researchers these 
days feel that adult cats are pretty well resistant to the disease, even if not 
vaccinated.  I bet Sugar will be fine.

I've just had 5 of my cats tested that are not vaccinated (think I already told 
you this) but lived with my FeLV + kitty for two years and those 5 are negative.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 09:22:49 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 I always love to hear positive experiences with FeLV+ cats. I still hope 
 that mine will continue to test negative. May 9th can't get here soon enough 
 for me!
 - Original Message - 
 From: POTT, BEVERLY p...@mailbox.sc.edu
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
 I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
  other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
  contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
  also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
  4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.
 
  My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
  never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
  contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.
 
 
  -Original Message-
  From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net]
  Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
  test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
  gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
  even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
  general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
  same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging
  fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.
 
  But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
  living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
  cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
  spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
  nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
  ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.
 
  Has it been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
  she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
  her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
  positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
  who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
  HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
  understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
  fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
  think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
  positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-19 Thread Lynda Wilson
Maureen, this is so comforting! I'm waiting until May 9th (it will be his 
second test since exposure but only within 2 mos - my vet wants me to wait 3 
mos. before she thinks he is safe). I do understand that his chances of 
contracting it are a lot less than if he were a kitten. I'm so glad he is 2 
yrs old. He so misses his companion and longs for another. Another companion 
would keep him more active. He loved to be chased up and down the stairs and 
he no longer gets that exercise (he won't let me chase him, imagine that!). 
I'm still a little worried but not so much like I was.


Thanks for all the support from everyone and let's all still pray for Poppy 
:0)


Have a great week!
Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 1:29 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



I have been e-mailing with a vet friend and she says most researchers these 
days feel that adult cats are pretty well resistant to the disease, even if 
not vaccinated.  I bet Sugar will be fine.


I've just had 5 of my cats tested that are not vaccinated (think I already 
told you this) but lived with my FeLV + kitty for two years and those 5 are 
negative.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain





From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 09:22:49 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I always love to hear positive experiences with FeLV+ cats. I still hope
that mine will continue to test negative. May 9th can't get here soon 
enough

for me!
- Original Message - 
From: POTT, BEVERLY p...@mailbox.sc.edu

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
 other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
 contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
 also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
 4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.

 My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
 never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
 contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.


 -Original Message-
 From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net]
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
 test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
 gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
 even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
 general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
 same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging
 fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.

 But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
 living together, not separate. Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
 cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
 spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
 nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
 ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.

 Has it been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
 she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
 her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
 positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
 who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
 HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
 understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
 fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
 think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
 positive.

 Can anyone help me sort this out?

 Pam



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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-18 Thread POTT, BEVERLY
I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.

My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.


-Original Message-
From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net] 
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.

But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.

Has it been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam



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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-18 Thread Lynda Wilson
I always love to hear positive experiences with FeLV+ cats. I still hope 
that mine will continue to test negative. May 9th can't get here soon enough 
for me!
- Original Message - 
From: POTT, BEVERLY p...@mailbox.sc.edu

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.

My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.


-Original Message-
From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net]
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.

But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.

Has it been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam



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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-18 Thread Lynda Wilson
Hi, Pamgo to this link again, it explains the testing under How is FeLV 
detected



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 9:23 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Great link, thank you, Lynda!

Pam

On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
(meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA 
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person 
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she 
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my 
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of 
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I 
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA 
positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Natalie
Our cats love carriers - when I try to take any cat to the vet, others jump
right in before I have a chance to place the cat into itThey love
carriers as much as they love boxes and paper bags(handles cut apart or
removed).!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 7:47 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

On that note, Copper and Thomas go into their carriers when they want  
to be alone or are pissed off.  They even close (not latch) the  
doors.  They eat on a bench they started eating on as tiny kittens.   
Carriers are wonderful if they are safe places.  My boys traveled from  
the day they came out of the pine thicket and, until they got grown, I  
took them on rides and visited people with them.  Carriers are sources  
of adventure and fun.  I have served the boys for almost 3 years and  
they travel with me to Louisville, to various other places with no  
troubleno fighting to get them in their carriers or searching for  
them for hours.  They have a dog carriage (big baby carriage with  
screens and very big all-terrain wheels) to ride around  
outsidethey love that too.  The crate idea is wonderful.  Same  
principle as crate training a dog.  Bob came crate trainedhe goes  
there to rest from the cats, to eat or tell me it is meal time, when  
he is wet etc.


On Apr 15, 2011, at 6:34 PM, Pam Norman wrote:

 You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't  
 believe it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most  
 of my 10 cats eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the  
 kitchen  each cat knows which one is his  they go into them at  
 meal times.  Otherwise I too would run out of rooms. I have one who  
 also eats in the bathroom  one who eats in my pc room, but the  
 others all eat in their crates in the kitchen. Sometimes they nap or  
 sleep in them too since they have good connotations.

 Pam

 On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
 How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have  
 enough rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each  
 one thinks that he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs  
 so the first few minutes of feeding is spent trading bowls just t  
 make sure I get the best food.


  Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:
 Hello Pam,

 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy- 
 cat was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2  
 years ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had  
 the 2
 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2  
 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor  
 said that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their  
 2nd shot of
 FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be  
 okay for them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other  
 or share
 bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely  
 separate.  My cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat  
 will eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2  
 others cats
 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for  
 quite some
 time now.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam  
 Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when  
 the IFA test
 results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can  
 gather, the
 old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in  
 the same
 house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general  
 sense is that
 it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but  
 should be
 separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with  
 a bite, but
 more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that  
 some of you
 have both positives  negatives really living together, not  
 separate. Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let  
 me cats
 visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses   
 spits?  Would
 that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing  
 around her
 condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some  
 years ago
 the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats  
 vaccinated.  Has it
 been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I  
 guess she
 needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to  
 keep her alone
 until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA  
 positive cause
 then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs  
 it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Natalie
My two boyz are about 5 yrs old now - no health problems at all (hope it
stays that way).  Natalie

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 5:05 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I read that too about the 85% that will live a max of 3.5 years.  Someone in
my feline asthma group said her cat lived until she was 16.  Can you believe
that?  She said the cat lived indoors since a kitten and hadn't mixed with
other cats so she assumes that the cat got the disease as a kitten.  I
thought that was incredible.  11 years is outstanding also.  How fortunate
you are.  Some cats just defy the odds I guess. 

I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:30:51 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Belinda,
 
 What a relief to hear! I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear very 
 many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test positive
on 
 the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs. I'm so glad that you were able to

 enjoy Bailey as long as you did! What meds did you have him on?
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Belinda Sauro ma...@bemikitties.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:29 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 months 
  old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 years,
they 
  slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none of his 
  vaccinated housemates ever became positive. I had them tested 
  intermittently and they were always negative. I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
  his remaining housemates are still negative.
 
  -- 
  Belinda
  happiness is being owned by cats ...
 
  http://BelindaSauro.com
  http://HostDesign4U.com
 
 
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



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Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread dlgegg
My pride doesn't like them.  Maybe if I left them out and open, they would come 
to think of them as bags and boxes.  I have boxes all over the house.  When I 
get a new one, I cannot let it lay for 5 seconds.  If I do, it becomes a bed or 
hiding place for them.
 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 Our cats love carriers - when I try to take any cat to the vet, others jump
 right in before I have a chance to place the cat into itThey love
 carriers as much as they love boxes and paper bags(handles cut apart or
 removed).!
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 7:47 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 On that note, Copper and Thomas go into their carriers when they want  
 to be alone or are pissed off.  They even close (not latch) the  
 doors.  They eat on a bench they started eating on as tiny kittens.   
 Carriers are wonderful if they are safe places.  My boys traveled from  
 the day they came out of the pine thicket and, until they got grown, I  
 took them on rides and visited people with them.  Carriers are sources  
 of adventure and fun.  I have served the boys for almost 3 years and  
 they travel with me to Louisville, to various other places with no  
 troubleno fighting to get them in their carriers or searching for  
 them for hours.  They have a dog carriage (big baby carriage with  
 screens and very big all-terrain wheels) to ride around  
 outsidethey love that too.  The crate idea is wonderful.  Same  
 principle as crate training a dog.  Bob came crate trainedhe goes  
 there to rest from the cats, to eat or tell me it is meal time, when  
 he is wet etc.
 
 
 On Apr 15, 2011, at 6:34 PM, Pam Norman wrote:
 
  You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't  
  believe it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most  
  of my 10 cats eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the  
  kitchen  each cat knows which one is his  they go into them at  
  meal times.  Otherwise I too would run out of rooms. I have one who  
  also eats in the bathroom  one who eats in my pc room, but the  
  others all eat in their crates in the kitchen. Sometimes they nap or  
  sleep in them too since they have good connotations.
 
  Pam
 
  On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
  How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have  
  enough rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each  
  one thinks that he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs  
  so the first few minutes of feeding is spent trading bowls just t  
  make sure I get the best food.
 
 
   Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:
  Hello Pam,
 
  My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy- 
  cat was
  just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2  
  years ago
  when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had  
  the 2
  other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2  
  other
  girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor  
  said that
  they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their  
  2nd shot of
  FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be  
  okay for them
  to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other  
  or share
  bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely  
  separate.  My cats
  never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat  
  will eat
  someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2  
  others cats
  never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for  
  quite some
  time now.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam  
  Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when  
  the IFA test
  results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can  
  gather, the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in  
  the same
  house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general  
  sense is that
  it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but  
  should be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with  
  a bite, but
  more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that  
  some of you
  have both positives  negatives really living together, not  
  separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let  
  me cats
  visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses   
  spits?  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing  
  around her
  condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some  
  years ago
  the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Maureen Olvey

Even though this wasn't directed at me I thought I'd give my input (my husband 
says I do this all the time - LOL).
 
The only way I think this would be possible is if the virus is in transition.  
Like, it has just gotten into the body and it hasn't had time to do what ever 
it does to get into the blood stream.  The ELISA test and an IFA test would be 
negative at this point.  I'm not sure if the cat can pass it at this point 
though since it hasn't really gotten into the saliva or bloodstream.  Not sure 
about that but it seems logical to me.  Then the virus progresses and gets into 
the system/bloodstream or saliva and the ELISA test would be positive but the 
IFA test would be negative.  I'm guessing at this point the cat could spread 
it.  After this if the cat can't extinguish the virus or put it into latentcy 
then it gets into the white blood cells and the IFA test would eventually test 
positive.  The cat could definitely pass it at this point.  I did for sure read 
that if the virus if put into latentcy then it is carried in the bone marrow 
but not in the white blood cells or bloodstream or saliva so it can't pass the 
virus to other cats.
 
That's  my thoughts but I'm not a vet.  I know that if it's in latency they 
can't spread it which I found very interesting.  The cat wouldn't test positive 
at that point either, even on the IFA test.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 16:40:17 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Sharon,
 
 I have read that some cats can be carriers of FeLV and test negative, but 
 can transmit it to other cats. This is a crazy disease that has so many 
 if's that it's confusing. Have you heard of this as well?
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:07 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  Hello Pam,
  Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
  found out that the other one is positive. That is actually the biggest
  mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected. The doctor did say that we
  should test them again every 6 months.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net 
  wrote:
 
  Sharon,
 
  What about grooming? I would assume that those cats, having lived
  together for 10 years, would mutually groom. That's sharing bodily 
  fluids 
  I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.
 
  Pam
 
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:
 
  Hello Pam,
 
  My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat 
  was
  just recently diagnosed with FeLV. He may have contracted it 2 years 
  ago
  when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat. We had the 2
  other girl-cats tested and they're both negative. We had the 2 other
  girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated. Doctor said 
  that
  they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd 
  shot
  of
  FeLV vaccination. Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
  them
  to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
  share
  bodily fluids. Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate. My
  cats
  never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will 
  eat
  someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
  never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite 
  some
  time now.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
  wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now when the IFA
  test
  results come in. I've been reading reading from what I can gather,
  the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive negative cats even in the 
  same
  house has been abandoned. From what I have read, the general sense is
  that
  it's fine for positives negatives to be in the same home, but should 
  be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a 
  bite,
  but
  more importantly with mutual grooming. But I know also that some of 
  you
  have both positives negatives really living together, not separate.
  Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom let me 
  cats
  visit, so at least she SEES other cats. What is she hisses spits?
  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
  condo? My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days? I know that some years 
  ago
  the figure was about 30

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Lynda Wilson
Thanks Maureen. You made it sound so logical, thanks! I will add that my vet 
told me that Crash's ELISA test was a faint positive. I read that a faint 
positive means that he does have the virus, but it's not very active in his 
system. Knowing this, I'm sure hoping that he was not shedding the virus and 
be contagious to my other cat.  Scientists have not determined when they 
actually shed the virus but it does make sense that once the virus reaches 
into the bloodstream, I would think they are shedding it.


The other thing that puzzles me is that if it was not very active in his 
system, why was he so lethargic and at death's door?  He was a very sick 
kitten  would have died in my house that day if I did not take him in to my 
vet.


Thanks for your input Maureen! It was very helpful :0)

Have a great weekend and please pray that my other kitty will be fine.

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Saturday, April 16, 2011 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Even though this wasn't directed at me I thought I'd give my input (my 
husband says I do this all the time - LOL).


The only way I think this would be possible is if the virus is in 
transition.  Like, it has just gotten into the body and it hasn't had time 
to do what ever it does to get into the blood stream.  The ELISA test and an 
IFA test would be negative at this point.  I'm not sure if the cat can pass 
it at this point though since it hasn't really gotten into the saliva or 
bloodstream.  Not sure about that but it seems logical to me.  Then the 
virus progresses and gets into the system/bloodstream or saliva and the 
ELISA test would be positive but the IFA test would be negative.  I'm 
guessing at this point the cat could spread it.  After this if the cat can't 
extinguish the virus or put it into latentcy then it gets into the white 
blood cells and the IFA test would eventually test positive.  The cat could 
definitely pass it at this point.  I did for sure read that if the virus if 
put into latentcy then it is carried in the bone marrow but not in the white 
blood cells or bloodstream or saliva so it can't pass the virus to other 
cats.


That's  my thoughts but I'm not a vet.  I know that if it's in latency they 
can't spread it which I found very interesting.  The cat wouldn't test 
positive at that point either, even on the IFA test.



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain





From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 16:40:17 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

Sharon,

I have read that some cats can be carriers of FeLV and test negative, but
can transmit it to other cats. This is a crazy disease that has so many
if's that it's confusing. Have you heard of this as well?

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:07 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


 Hello Pam,
 Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
 found out that the other one is positive. That is actually the biggest
 mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected. The doctor did say that 
 we

 should test them again every 6 months.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
 wrote:

 Sharon,

 What about grooming? I would assume that those cats, having lived
 together for 10 years, would mutually groom. That's sharing bodily
 fluids 
 I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.

 Pam


 On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:

 Hello Pam,

 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat
 was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV. He may have contracted it 2 years
 ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat. We had the 
 2

 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative. We had the 2 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated. Doctor said
 that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd
 shot
 of
 FeLV vaccination. Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
 them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
 share
 bodily fluids. Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate. My
 cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will
 eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others 
 cats

 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite
 some
 time now.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Sharon Catalan
Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
 results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
 old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
 house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
 it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
 separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
 more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
 have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
 visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
 that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
 condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
 the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
 been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
 needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
 until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
 then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
 she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
 with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
 positives if she tests IFA positive.

 Can anyone help me sort this out?

 Pam

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-- 
Sharon F Catalan
Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.  Here 
is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this in case 
she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate information. I think 
it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected to 
socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much attention 
as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus (meaning she is 
not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, then 
adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On March 10, 
2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He was anemic, 
had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing.  He was fine 2 
days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have a bowel movement 
in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just thought his new 
food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get 
him vaccinated against leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So 
far, he has been negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get 
him another companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to 
kitties play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. But I 
will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) effective at 
all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test 
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the 
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same 
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that 
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be 
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, 
but more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of 
you have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. 
Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats 
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits? 
Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around 
her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago 
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has 
it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she 
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her 
alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive 
cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it 
tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. 
Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is 
that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting 
her in with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in 
with the positives if she tests IFA positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman

Sharon,

What about grooming?  I would assume that those cats,  having lived 
together for 10 years, would mutually groom.  That's sharing bodily 
fluids  I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.


Pam

On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:

Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman
Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?


On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.  
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review 
this in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is 
the link:
http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F 



I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats 
infected to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her 
as much attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of 
the virus (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. 
He was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to 
nothing.  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he 
did not have a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for 
diarrhea) and I just thought his new food was working well. Now my 
Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get him vaccinated against 
leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been 
negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get him another 
companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to kitties 
play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. 
But I will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) 
effective at all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get 
her siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the 
IFA test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I 
can gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative 
cats even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have 
read, the general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives 
to be in the same home, but should be separate so there is no chance 
of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with 
mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you have both 
positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were 
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats 
vaccinated.  Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I 
guess she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want 
to keep her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she 
tests IFA positive cause then we know that she is really positive. 
But the person who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests 
on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the 
positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, 
she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with the 
positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the 
positives if she tests IFA positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Belinda Sauro
   My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 
months old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 
years, they slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none 
of his vaccinated housemates ever became positive.  I had them tested 
intermittently and they were always negative.  I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
his remaining housemates are still negative.


--
Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

http://BelindaSauro.com
http://HostDesign4U.com


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Sharon Catalan
Hello Pam,
Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
found out that the other one is positive.  That is actually the biggest
mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected.  The doctor did say that we
should test them again every 6 months.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:

 Sharon,

 What about grooming?  I would assume that those cats,  having lived
 together for 10 years, would mutually groom.  That's sharing bodily fluids 
 I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.

 Pam


 On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:

 Hello Pam,

 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot
 of
 FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
 them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
 share
 bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My
 cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
 time now.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
  wrote:

  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
 test
 results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather,
 the
 old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
 house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is
 that
 it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
 separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite,
 but
 more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
 have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate.
 Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
 visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?
  Would
 that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
 condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
 the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has
 it
 been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
 she
 needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her
 alone
 until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
 then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it
 tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia.
 Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
 she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
 with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
 positives if she tests IFA positive.

 Can anyone help me sort this out?

 Pam

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-- 
Sharon F Catalan
Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey
 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Pam,
 
 I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. Here 
 is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this in case 
 she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate information. I think 
 it will answer many of your questions. Here is the link:
 http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F
 
 I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected to 
 socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much attention 
 as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus (meaning she is 
 not permanently positive for leukemia).
 
 Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, then 
 adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010. On March 10, 
 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He was anemic, 
 had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. He was fine 2 
 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have a bowel movement 
 in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just thought his new 
 food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get 
 him vaccinated against leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So 
 far, he has been negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get 
 him another companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to 
 kitties play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
 have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. But I 
 will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) effective at 
 all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.
 
 I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
 siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.
 
 Good luck! I hope this info helps!!
 
 Lynda
 
 
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

Sounds to me like yet another example of healthy cats being able to fight off 
the virus or put it into latentcy.  

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 13:07:42 -0700
 From: scata...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Hello Pam,
 Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
 found out that the other one is positive. That is actually the biggest
 mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected. The doctor did say that we
 should test them again every 6 months.
 
 Sharon
 
 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:
 
  Sharon,
 
  What about grooming? I would assume that those cats, having lived
  together for 10 years, would mutually groom. That's sharing bodily fluids 
  I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.
 
  Pam
 
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:
 
  Hello Pam,
 
  My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
  just recently diagnosed with FeLV. He may have contracted it 2 years ago
  when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat. We had the 2
  other girl-cats tested and they're both negative. We had the 2 other
  girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated. Doctor said that
  they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot
  of
  FeLV vaccination. Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
  them
  to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
  share
  bodily fluids. Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate. My
  cats
  never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
  someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
  never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
  time now.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
  wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now when the IFA
  test
  results come in. I've been reading reading from what I can gather,
  the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive negative cats even in the same
  house has been abandoned. From what I have read, the general sense is
  that
  it's fine for positives negatives to be in the same home, but should be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite,
  but
  more importantly with mutual grooming. But I know also that some of you
  have both positives negatives really living together, not separate.
  Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom let me cats
  visit, so at least she SEES other cats. What is she hisses spits?
  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
  condo? My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days? I know that some years ago
  the figure was about 30% so I never had any of my cats vaccinated. Has
  it
  been improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
  she
  needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her
  alone
  until then. We have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
  then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it
  tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia.
  Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding is that if
  she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off putting her in
  with the positives is giving up. I think she should only go in with the
  positives if she tests IFA positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
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 -- 
 Sharon F Catalan
 Cell: (408) 398-5647
 Home: (408) 229-2298
 Carpe Diem!
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
He was actually negative. The Humane Society tested him for it prior to me 
having him neutered at 5 1/2 mos in Nov (they wanted to neuter him at 12 
weeks and I would not allow it, so I had to foster him in order to have it 
done later). By March,  he tests positive for Feline Leukemia.  I know that 
he had a weakened immune system because he had coccidia along with his 
siblings when he was born. So I was very surprised. The HS said since Crash 
tested positive then they would have to test his siblings. Now all are 9 mos 
old (same as Crash was obviously) and all tested negative. So they must have 
cleared the virus but his system could not.


I do hope you found my link helpful.  It was helpful to me.  This is a very 
mysterious disease. Some cats can be carriers and test negative but can 
still infect others. It's crazy! I hope they find a cure for it and soon!!



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?


On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
(meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA 
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person 
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she 
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my 
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of 
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I 
think she should only go in with the positives if she

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson

Belinda,

What a relief to hear!  I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear very 
many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test positive on 
the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs.  I'm so glad that you were able to 
enjoy Bailey as long as you did!  What meds did you have him on?


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Belinda Sauro ma...@bemikitties.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:29 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


   My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 months 
old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 years, they 
slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none of his 
vaccinated housemates ever became positive.  I had them tested 
intermittently and they were always negative.  I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
his remaining housemates are still negative.


--
Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

http://BelindaSauro.com
http://HostDesign4U.com


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
I agree with Maureen. The link I provided you with reiterates what she is 
saying. But I don't know who told you that a neg IFA test still means the 
cat has FeLV. The test has to be a positive for the cat to be persistently 
viremic.


Like I said, there are so many possibilities with this disease as to how it 
affects a cat individually. It's all up to their immune system. Adult cats 
have a greater chance of clearing the virus than a kitten whos immune 
systems has not been established.


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:11 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Pam,

I haven't had a chance to check out this link so it may cover everything I 
say but I wanted to share what I've learned about FeLV just in case it 
didn't cover everything.  I've read a lot of websites, books and talked with 
several vets about all this.  My understanding is very rudimentary but 
here's what I've read:


If a cat test positive on the IFA test then it has FeLV and is shedding the 
virus in the saliva and blood.  This test looks for the virus in the white 
blood cells so once the virus has gotten that far it means the immune system 
wasn't able to extinguish the virus and almost 100 percent chance the cat 
will always be positive and shedding the virus and can infect other cats. 
No need to do any further testing.


At this point, if the IFA test is negative it can mean a couple of different 
things.  1) It can mean the ELISA test done in the vet's office was just 
plain wrong.  It's a sensitive test and can easily produce false positives. 
It should never be solely relied upon as a diagnosis for FeLV.  2) A 
negative IFA test could also mean that the cat really has gotten the virus, 
which means the ELISA test was correct, but the virus hasn't reached the 
white blood cells.  If this is the case, the cat still has a chance for the 
immune system to either extinguish the virus or put it into latentcy.  From 
what I've read about 40% of these cats will extinguish the virus or put it 
into latentcy.  But since all cats don't extinguish the virus if this first 
IFA test shows negative, to be certain the IFA test should be repeated a few 
months later.


If the cat has actually put the virus into latentcy it means the virus is in 
the bone marrow but isn't being shed so it is not infective to other cats. 
However, the virus can be brought out of latentcy even years later if the 
cat becomes ill or has some other major stressors.  But many cats who do 
initially put the virus into latentcy will later on extinguish the virus so 
you just never know.  The vet book I just read said that the only way to 
find out if a cat has the virus in the bone marrow, meaning it's 
dormant/latent, is to do a biopsy of the bone marrow.  That means that there 
really may be lots of cats out there that have contracted FeLV but put it 
into latentcy and the owner never even knows.  The books said only about 10% 
of exposed cats will put it into latentcy though.  So most will either 
extinguish the virus or become carriers (persistently viremic).


So I believe the woman who told you that a negative IFA test still means the 
cat has FeLV is wrong and myself I wouldn't put her in with positive cats 
until you know her true status.  Or, at least get Poppy vaccinated before 
putting her in there with positive cats.


It does take continued and prolonged exposure for a cat to get the FeLV 
virus into it's system.  Cats who eat after each other only on rare 
occasions are not likely to spread the virus.  My thoughts are that if Poppy 
is in a cat condo and occasionally hisses at another cat it's not likely 
that would be enough exposure for the negative cat to get it.  Especially if 
the negative is a healthy adult cat.  That's not a guarantee though so you 
have to decide for yourself about that one.


The vaccination has become much more effective.  Seems like I read somewhere 
that it was 90%.  I have a friend who has had several FeLV positive cats 
living with negatives and even a couple FIV positive cats, for many years. 
She has way more cats than you.  All the FeLV negative cats, including the 
FIV positive cats, get FeLV vaccinations every year and have never gotten 
FeLV.  They all live together, share food and water bowls, etc.  She's not 
the only one with these kinds of results with a house where positive and 
negatives hangout together.


Can't think of anything else right now.  It's very confusing though.  I have 
more cats than you and in March a two year old died and we found out she had 
FeLV even though she tested negative as a kitten.  I'm going through the 
process of re-testing all the other cats right now.  I've only gotten 5 
tested so far but all 5 have been negative, thank the Lord.  Four out of 
those five lived with the FeLV positive cat for one or two years, have never 
been vaccinated and still

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one another 
constantly since day one.  This is why I am so concerned, but I have to 
remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy 
kitten.



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?


On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
(meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA 
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person 
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she 
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my 
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of 
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I 
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA 
positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

I read that too about the 85% that will live a max of 3.5 years.  Someone in my 
feline asthma group said her cat lived until she was 16.  Can you believe that? 
 She said the cat lived indoors since a kitten and hadn't mixed with other cats 
so she assumes that the cat got the disease as a kitten.  I thought that was 
incredible.  11 years is outstanding also.  How fortunate you are.  Some cats 
just defy the odds I guess. 

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:30:51 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Belinda,
 
 What a relief to hear! I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear very 
 many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test positive on 
 the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs. I'm so glad that you were able to 
 enjoy Bailey as long as you did! What meds did you have him on?
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Belinda Sauro ma...@bemikitties.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:29 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 months 
  old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 years, they 
  slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none of his 
  vaccinated housemates ever became positive. I had them tested 
  intermittently and they were always negative. I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
  his remaining housemates are still negative.
 
  -- 
  Belinda
  happiness is being owned by cats ...
 
  http://BelindaSauro.com
  http://HostDesign4U.com
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Beth
Pam -

I would search the archives on mixing. I have always mixed my positives  
negatives, on the advice of my vet. My negatives are vaccinated  they have 
never gotten it in 10 years. I do NOT separate in any way. They share 
everything - food, water, litter, grooming...

Beth
Don't Litter, Fix Your Critter! www.Furkids.org   

--- On Fri, 4/15/11, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:

From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, April 15, 2011, 2:00 PM

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test 
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the old 
dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same house has 
been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that it's fine for 
positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be separate so there 
is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly 
with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you have both positives  
negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats 
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would 
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her condo?  
My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago the 
figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it been  
improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she 
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone 
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause then 
we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells  me that 
regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go 
in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she is IFA 
negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with the 
positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the positives if 
she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

I really hope your Ragdoll will be fine.  Honestly, the odds are higer than 
he'll shake the virus or put it into latentcy.  Please keep us posted as you 
get the final results in.
 
If it turns out he is positive and there is no more doubt about it you could 
consider getting him a positive playmate.  That would be a tough decision 
because then you could possibly have two cats you love that will not live a 
full life instead of just one.  Course you could have two cats you love that 
both have FeLV and live forever.  Hard to know and it would be hard for me to 
make that decision but I just wanted to mention it as an option if you 100% 
positively find out that your ragdoll is positive.

Like I said, odds are higher that you won't even have to make that decision so 
I can't wait to hear good news about the ragdoll being negative.
 

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:45:12 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one another 
 constantly since day one. This is why I am so concerned, but I have to 
 remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy 
 kitten.
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November. Did you 
  mean positive? Or had he been positive prior to this?
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:
  Pam,
 
  I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
  Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
  in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
  information. I think it will answer many of your questions. Here is the 
  link:
  http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F
 
  I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
  to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
  attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
  (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).
 
  Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
  then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010. On 
  March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
  was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
  a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
  thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
  because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
  strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
  on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
  and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
  contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
  disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
  100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
  not being protected at all.
 
  I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
  siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.
 
  Good luck! I hope this info helps!!
 
  Lynda
 
 
 
  - Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
  test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
  gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
  even in the same house has been abandoned. From what I have read, the 
  general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
  same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
  fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
  But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
  living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
  cats visit, so at least she SEES other cats. What is she hisses  
  spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
  around her condo? My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
Thanks, Maureen.  I will gladly keep everyone updated. I was fortunate to be 
a part of this Felv Talk to read and share one another's experiences. 
Certainly it's always nice to hear of stories of kitties living with it for 
many, many years and defy the odds.  No feline deserves this disease (or any 
for that matter!).


You're right, he does have a better chance of clearing the virus. I'm hoping 
he already has. I hate the waiting part. I've read that you can test 28 days 
from last exposure, some say 90 days and then every 6 mos (what do you agree 
with?). It would be nice to find more consistency on the internet but I know 
better than to expect it. My vet said to test him in June, but I could not 
wait 3 mos from last exposure.  I opted to test him every 30 days, then 
after June is passed and he still tests negative, I will feel he is out of 
the woods.


Let's hope that Poppy's outcome is feline negative as well.

Thanks for your input, Maureen! I'm so glad to be part of this chat.

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 4:12 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



I really hope your Ragdoll will be fine.  Honestly, the odds are higer than 
he'll shake the virus or put it into latentcy.  Please keep us posted as you 
get the final results in.


If it turns out he is positive and there is no more doubt about it you could 
consider getting him a positive playmate.  That would be a tough decision 
because then you could possibly have two cats you love that will not live a 
full life instead of just one.  Course you could have two cats you love that 
both have FeLV and live forever.  Hard to know and it would be hard for me 
to make that decision but I just wanted to mention it as an option if you 
100% positively find out that your ragdoll is positive.


Like I said, odds are higher that you won't even have to make that decision 
so I can't wait to hear good news about the ragdoll being negative.



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain





From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:45:12 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one 
another

constantly since day one. This is why I am so concerned, but I have to
remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy
kitten.


- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


 Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November. Did you
 mean positive? Or had he been positive prior to this?

 On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:
 Pam,

 I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.
 Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this
 in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate
 information. I think it will answer many of your questions. Here is the
 link:
 
http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

 I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats 
 infected

 to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much
 attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus
 (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).

 Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered,
 then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010. On
 March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. 
 He

 was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing.
 He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not 
 have
 a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I 
 just

 thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk
 because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is
 strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test 
 again

 on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active
 and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash 
 was

 contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This
 disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not
 100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better 
 than

 not being protected at all.

 I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get 
 her

 siblings tested again to be safe and the mother

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson

Sharon,

I have read that some cats can be carriers of FeLV and test negative, but 
can transmit it to other cats.  This is a crazy disease that has so many 
if's that it's confusing. Have you heard of this as well?


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:07 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Hello Pam,
Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
found out that the other one is positive.  That is actually the biggest
mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected.  The doctor did say that we
should test them again every 6 months.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net 
wrote:



Sharon,

What about grooming?  I would assume that those cats,  having lived
together for 10 years, would mutually groom.  That's sharing bodily 
fluids 

I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.

Pam


On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:


Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat 
was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years 
ago

when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said 
that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd 
shot

of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My
cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will 
eat

someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite 
some

time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
 wrote:

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA

test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather,
the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the 
same

house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is
that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should 
be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a 
bite,

but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of 
you

have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate.
Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats

visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?
 Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has

it
been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her
alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive 
cause

then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it
tells
 me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia.
Period.
 And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that 
if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her 
in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with 
the

positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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--
Sharon F Catalan
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Home: (408) 229-2298
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread dlgegg
I think that the individual cat's health has a lot to do with their getting it 
or not.  The only precaution I took was to keep my kittens seperate from my 
positives and negatives until they had gotten their second shots. For good 
measure, the vet said to wait anoter 2 weeks. They were only 3 month when I got 
them.  Now they are over 1 year and healthy as can be.  Only the kittens mutual 
groom, but they are brother and sister.  We have snarls, slaps and screams, but 
no one has ever bitten anyone .In fact, negatives and positives are all 
healthy.  We do go outside for an hour or two, but most of that time is spent 
on the deck and lately, we have not had any strays around, just a mountain lion 
during deer season, but he moved on.  He has a large territory so he only shows 
up around deer season.  Then I keep every one in to protect them from the lion 
and the hunters.
 Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net wrote: 
 One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one another 
 constantly since day one.  This is why I am so concerned, but I have to 
 remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy 
 kitten.
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
  mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:
  Pam,
 
  I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
  Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
  in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
  information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
  link:
  http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F
 
  I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
  to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
  attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
  (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).
 
  Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
  then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
  March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
  was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
  a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
  thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
  because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
  strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
  on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
  and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
  contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
  disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
  100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
  not being protected at all.
 
  I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
  siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.
 
  Good luck! I hope this info helps!!
 
  Lynda
 
 
 
  - Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
  test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
  gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
  even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
  general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
  same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
  fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
  But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
  living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
  cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
  spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
  around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
  ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
  Has it been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
  she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
  her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread dlgegg
How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have enough rooms 
to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each one thinks that he 
other's food is diffeent and better than theirs so the first few minutes of 
feeding is spent trading bowls just t make sure I get the best food.


 Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com wrote: 
 Hello Pam,
 
 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
 FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
 bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
 time now.
 
 Sharon
 
 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
  results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
  house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
  it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
  more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
  have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
  visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
  condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
  the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
  been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
  needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
  until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
  then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
   me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
   And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
  she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
  with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
  positives if she tests IFA positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
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 -- 
 Sharon F Catalan
 Cell: (408) 398-5647
 Home: (408) 229-2298
 Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Christiane Biagi
First off, if she's neg on IFA I would go with that!  Don't know why you
wouldn't.  Many of us mix pos/neg.  I did that by accident when 1 of my cats
tested pos 4 1/2 years after she tested neg on snap test.  Never been
outside so I assume she always had it.  My other 3 cats were around her
since kittenhood  nobody caught it even though they groomed, ate from same
dishes, used same boxes, had the occasionally tussle, et.  Got the 3 neg
vacc  5 years later, everybody's fine.  

My orig neg on the Elissa got me reading  apparently, just as you can get a
false neg, you can also get a false pos.  I'd go w. IFA which you should get
within a day or so after blood is drawn.  I'd put her in kitty condo  let
her view the sights  sounds of indoor living!  

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Pam Norman
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.   
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  
Has it been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she
is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with
the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman
You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't believe 
it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most of my 10 cats 
eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the kitchen  each cat knows 
which one is his  they go into them at meal times.  Otherwise I too 
would run out of rooms. I have one who also eats in the bathroom  one 
who eats in my pc room, but the others all eat in their crates in the 
kitchen. Sometimes they nap or sleep in them too since they have good 
connotations.


Pam

On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:

How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have enough rooms 
to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each one thinks that he 
other's food is diffeent and better than theirs so the first few minutes of 
feeding is spent trading bowls just t make sure I get the best food.


 Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:

Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread MaiMaiPG
On that note, Copper and Thomas go into their carriers when they want  
to be alone or are pissed off.  They even close (not latch) the  
doors.  They eat on a bench they started eating on as tiny kittens.   
Carriers are wonderful if they are safe places.  My boys traveled from  
the day they came out of the pine thicket and, until they got grown, I  
took them on rides and visited people with them.  Carriers are sources  
of adventure and fun.  I have served the boys for almost 3 years and  
they travel with me to Louisville, to various other places with no  
troubleno fighting to get them in their carriers or searching for  
them for hours.  They have a dog carriage (big baby carriage with  
screens and very big all-terrain wheels) to ride around  
outsidethey love that too.  The crate idea is wonderful.  Same  
principle as crate training a dog.  Bob came crate trainedhe goes  
there to rest from the cats, to eat or tell me it is meal time, when  
he is wet etc.



On Apr 15, 2011, at 6:34 PM, Pam Norman wrote:

You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't  
believe it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most  
of my 10 cats eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the  
kitchen  each cat knows which one is his  they go into them at  
meal times.  Otherwise I too would run out of rooms. I have one who  
also eats in the bathroom  one who eats in my pc room, but the  
others all eat in their crates in the kitchen. Sometimes they nap or  
sleep in them too since they have good connotations.


Pam

On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have  
enough rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each  
one thinks that he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs  
so the first few minutes of feeding is spent trading bowls just t  
make sure I get the best food.



 Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:

Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy- 
cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2  
years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had  
the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2  
other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor  
said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their  
2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be  
okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other  
or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely  
separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat  
will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2  
others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for  
quite some

time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam  
Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when  
the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can  
gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in  
the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general  
sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but  
should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with  
a bite, but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that  
some of you
have both positives  negatives really living together, not  
separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let  
me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses   
spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing  
around her

condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some  
years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats  
vaccinated.  Has it

been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I  
guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to  
keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA  
positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs  
it tells
 me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS  
leukemia. Period.
 And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is  
that if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off   
putting her in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in  
with the

positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Christiane Biagi
I'd love to hear ideas on that one! LOL  I have 6 sep dishes  feed in 2 sep
rooms... but, the other one's dish always seems to be more attractive for
some reason-LOL  There are times that I look over  its as though one said,
everyone more one to the right  they did!  And then there's the dog who
thinks I've put down 6 dishes of treats for him!!!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of
dlg...@windstream.net
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 6:12 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have enough
rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each one thinks that
he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs so the first few minutes
of feeding is spent trading bowls just t make sure I get the best food.


 Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com wrote: 
 Hello Pam,
 
 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat 
 was just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 
 years ago when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  
 We had the 2 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had 
 the 2 other girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  
 Doctor said that they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats 
 receive their 2nd shot of FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our 
 doctor, it should be okay for them to be together again as long as 
 they don't bite/scratch each other or share bodily fluids.  Just keep 
 their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats never fight with 
 each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat someone's 
 leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats never 
 contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some time
now.
 
 Sharon
 
 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the 
  IFA test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I 
  can gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative 
  cats even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have 
  read, the general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives 
  to be in the same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of
exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
  more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of
you
  have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate.
Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
  cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
  spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were 
  nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some 
  years ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats 
  vaccinated.  Has it been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I 
  guess she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want 
  to keep her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she 
  tests IFA positive cause then we know that she is really positive. 
  But the person who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on
the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
   And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is 
  that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  
  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I think she should 
  only go in with the positives if she tests IFA positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
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  rg
 
 
 
 
 --
 Sharon F Catalan
 Cell: (408) 398-5647
 Home: (408) 229-2298
 Carpe Diem!
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Belinda Sauro
Bailey was really very healthy until his last year, he started 
having teeth problems and we had to pull a lot of his teeth, then he was 
fine for about 6 months and then stopped eating and became very anemic 
and lethargic and had constant diarrhea.  We did the bone marrow 
aspirate and they found pre cancer cells so we were pretty sure he was 
developing cancer somewhere but we couldn't find it.  We did 
ultrasounds, bloodwork but nothing was conclusive.  He had a feeding 
tube because he wouldn't eat anything and I could tell he was 
uncomfortable when he got fed, I asked my vet if he could possibly have 
pancreatitis but she said his bloodwork didn't bear that out.  I wish I 
had done the pancreatitis test but I didn't and after he passed 6 months 
later we did a necropsy and he had pancreatic cancer.  If I had done 
that test when I noticed his eating aversion I may have caught it before 
it turned into cancer ...


He never got any special food or meds until he got sick, then I gave him 
things to try and boost his immune system, but Bailey didn't like 
getting meds so I did only the bare minimum because stress is the worst 
thing for positives and getting meds was stressful for him.  With the 
feeding tube it was a lot easier and he got more stuff then.


On 4/15/2011 1:30 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Belinda,

What a relief to hear!  I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear 
very many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test 
positive on the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs.  I'm so glad that 
you were able to enjoy Bailey as long as you did!  What meds did you 
have him on? 



--
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happiness is being owned by cats ...

http://BelindaSauro.com
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman

Great link, thank you, Lynda!

Pam

On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.  
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review 
this in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is 
the link:
http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F 



I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats 
infected to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her 
as much attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of 
the virus (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. 
He was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to 
nothing.  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he 
did not have a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for 
diarrhea) and I just thought his new food was working well. Now my 
Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get him vaccinated against 
leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been 
negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get him another 
companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to kitties 
play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. 
But I will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) 
effective at all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get 
her siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the 
IFA test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I 
can gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative 
cats even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have 
read, the general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives 
to be in the same home, but should be separate so there is no chance 
of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with 
mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you have both 
positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were 
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats 
vaccinated.  Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I 
guess she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want 
to keep her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she 
tests IFA positive cause then we know that she is really positive. 
But the person who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests 
on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the 
positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, 
she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with the 
positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the 
positives if she tests IFA positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself

2011-03-30 Thread TANYA NOE
I am not sure how long the Vet Jet has been around, at least a couple of years. 
I am hoping that where we are now in NH I can find a clinic that uses it. My 14 
year old neg still gets the FeLV vaccine even though she is highly unlikely to 
get FeLV from Maggie as it is still possible.
I think it is great that you are thinking about taking in more FeLV babies. It 
is still very tough to find them homes and in most shelters and clinics they 
are still unfairly destroyed. Whatever you decide remember it's the quality of 
the years of their lives and not the quantity. 
Good luck,
Tanya

--- On Wed, 3/30/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Wednesday, March 30, 2011, 1:12 AM
 
 Hadn't heard about the vet jet.  I'll have to ask
 about it.  
  
 Because I didn't know the one cat had the virus until she
 died a few weeks ago most of my cats have lived with her and
 shared food bowls for at least a year and some were with her
 for almost two years.  One vet was kind of saying that
 if they hadn't gotten the virus by now they probably
 wouldn't get it so there wouldn't be a need to vaccinate any
 of my others.  I don't know if he's right or not about
 not vaccinating the negatives.  I've just been tossing
 that idea around.  But then someone was asking me about
 these FeLV + kittens and it got me to thinking about whether
 I should vaccinate if a new member was added.
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces
 results that are profitable to the human race or
 doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon unconsenting
 animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking
 further.” – Mark Twain
 
 
  
  Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2011 13:49:28 -0700
  From: sashacatgodd...@yahoo.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus
 itself
  
  I think that they are immune for life if they get and
 extinguish the virus. I do not believe that it is a mutating
 virus of any sort, at least not so far. The problem is you
 have no way of knowing for sure that you cat did this unless
 it was positive and is now negative. Cats develop some
 natural immunity with age, it is possible to live together
 for years and not contract it even with repeated exposures.
 If you are concerned about vaccine related sarcomas there
 are FeLv vaccines that are given by the vet jet that is
 considered much safer, that is what we were using at the
 last vet hospital I worked at.
  
  Good luck,
  Tanya
  --- On Tue, 3/29/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 wrote:
  
   From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
   Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus
 itself
   To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
   Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 12:30 PM
   
   I've got a question about the FeLV virus
 itself.  Is
   it all the same virus or does it mutate and
 change like the
   herpes virus that causes URI?  What I'm
 wondering is
   that if I've got a cat that has been exposed to
 the virus
   but extinguished it, is he immune for life? 
 Seems like
   I read that.  So if I brought in another
 FeLV + kitty
   and my resident cat has already gotten some
 immunity from
   the virus he had been exposed to in the past,
 does that mean
   being exposed to the virus through another cat
 would be the
   same as the virus that he was first exposed to so
 his
   immunity would work against that virus? 
 Does that make
   sense?  I'm wondering if I brought in
 another FeLV +
   cat would I need to vaccinate my cat that has
 already been
   exposed and extinguished the virus.
   
   Anyone have a clue?  I guess the main
 question is if
   the virus mutates from cat to cat or is it always
 the same
   virus and doesn't change.
   
   “I am not interested to know whether
 vivisection produces
   results that are profitable to the human race or
   doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon
 unconsenting
   animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and
 it is to me
   sufficient justification of the enmity without
 looking
   further.” – Mark Twain
   
      
           
             
     
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself

2011-03-29 Thread TANYA NOE
I think that they are immune for life if they get and extinguish the virus. I 
do not believe that it is a mutating virus of any sort, at least not so far. 
The problem is you have no way of knowing for sure that you cat did this unless 
it was positive and is now negative. Cats develop some natural immunity with 
age, it is possible to live together for years and not contract it even with 
repeated exposures. If you are concerned about vaccine related sarcomas there 
are FeLv vaccines that are given by the vet jet that is considered much 
safer, that is what we were using at the last vet hospital I worked at.

Good luck,
Tanya
--- On Tue, 3/29/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:

 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 12:30 PM
 
 I've got a question about the FeLV virus itself.  Is
 it all the same virus or does it mutate and change like the
 herpes virus that causes URI?  What I'm wondering is
 that if I've got a cat that has been exposed to the virus
 but extinguished it, is he immune for life?  Seems like
 I read that.  So if I brought in another FeLV + kitty
 and my resident cat has already gotten some immunity from
 the virus he had been exposed to in the past, does that mean
 being exposed to the virus through another cat would be the
 same as the virus that he was first exposed to so his
 immunity would work against that virus?  Does that make
 sense?  I'm wondering if I brought in another FeLV +
 cat would I need to vaccinate my cat that has already been
 exposed and extinguished the virus.
  
 Anyone have a clue?  I guess the main question is if
 the virus mutates from cat to cat or is it always the same
 virus and doesn't change.
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces
 results that are profitable to the human race or
 doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon unconsenting
 animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking
 further.” – Mark Twain
 
     
 
       
   
 ___
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 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself

2011-03-29 Thread Sharyl
Maureen, I don't have links to the science to answer your question.  I do know 
there are at least 3 versions of FeLV.  Personally I wouldn't take the chance 
of mixing without 1st vaccinating any negatives in the house.  I have mixed 
negatives and positives but my negatives were always current on their vaccine.
 
Sharyl 

--- On Tue, 3/29/11, Maureen Olive molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 12:30 PM



I've got a question about the FeLV virus itself.  Is it all the same virus or 
does it mutate and change like the herpes virus that causes URI?  What I'm 
wondering is that if I've got a cat that has been exposed to the virus but 
extinguished it, is he immune for life?  Seems like I read that.  So if I 
brought in another FeLV + kitty and my resident cat has already gotten some 
immunity from the virus he had been exposed to in the past, does that mean 
being exposed to the virus through another cat would be the same as the virus 
that he was first exposed to so his immunity would work against that virus?  
Does that make sense?  I'm wondering if I brought in another FeLV + cat would I 
need to vaccinate my cat that has already been exposed and extinguished the 
virus.

Anyone have a clue?  I guess the main question is if the virus mutates from cat 
to cat or is it always the same virus and doesn't change.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain

              
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself

2011-03-29 Thread dlgegg
My vet says I sould keep my negatives up to date on their felv vaccinations.  
It has been over 2 years now since I got my first felv pos baby and all are 
well, especially the felv pos ones.  They are the sleekest, most energetic ones 
in the bunch.  Annie especially has the shiniest fur and the vet marvels at her 
and Nitnoy.  Nit is especially lucky as she had a run in with a raccoon and 
lost most of her tail.  Even with that trauma, she is doing well.


Sharyl cline...@yahoo.com wrote: 
 Maureen, I don't have links to the science to answer your question.  I do 
 know there are at least 3 versions of FeLV.  Personally I wouldn't take the 
 chance of mixing without 1st vaccinating any negatives in the house.  I have 
 mixed negatives and positives but my negatives were always current on their 
 vaccine.
 
Sharyl 

--- On Tue, 3/29/11, Maureen Olive molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:


From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 12:30 PM



I've got a question about the FeLV virus itself.  Is it all the same virus or 
does it mutate and change like the herpes virus that causes URI?  What I'm 
wondering is that if I've got a cat that has been exposed to the virus but 
extinguished it, is he immune for life?  Seems like I read that.  So if I 
brought in another FeLV + kitty and my resident cat has already gotten some 
immunity from the virus he had been exposed to in the past, does that mean 
being exposed to the virus through another cat would be the same as the virus 
that he was first exposed to so his immunity would work against that virus?  
Does that make sense?  I'm wondering if I brought in another FeLV + cat would I 
need to vaccinate my cat that has already been exposed and extinguished the 
virus.

Anyone have a clue?  I guess the main question is if the virus mutates from cat 
to cat or is it always the same virus and doesn't change.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain

              
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself

2011-03-29 Thread Maureen Olvey

Hadn't heard about the vet jet.  I'll have to ask about it.  
 
Because I didn't know the one cat had the virus until she died a few weeks ago 
most of my cats have lived with her and shared food bowls for at least a year 
and some were with her for almost two years.  One vet was kind of saying that 
if they hadn't gotten the virus by now they probably wouldn't get it so there 
wouldn't be a need to vaccinate any of my others.  I don't know if he's right 
or not about not vaccinating the negatives.  I've just been tossing that idea 
around.  But then someone was asking me about these FeLV + kittens and it got 
me to thinking about whether I should vaccinate if a new member was added.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2011 13:49:28 -0700
 From: sashacatgodd...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
 
 I think that they are immune for life if they get and extinguish the virus. I 
 do not believe that it is a mutating virus of any sort, at least not so far. 
 The problem is you have no way of knowing for sure that you cat did this 
 unless it was positive and is now negative. Cats develop some natural 
 immunity with age, it is possible to live together for years and not contract 
 it even with repeated exposures. If you are concerned about vaccine related 
 sarcomas there are FeLv vaccines that are given by the vet jet that is 
 considered much safer, that is what we were using at the last vet hospital I 
 worked at.
 
 Good luck,
 Tanya
 --- On Tue, 3/29/11, Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
  From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 12:30 PM
  
  I've got a question about the FeLV virus itself.  Is
  it all the same virus or does it mutate and change like the
  herpes virus that causes URI?  What I'm wondering is
  that if I've got a cat that has been exposed to the virus
  but extinguished it, is he immune for life?  Seems like
  I read that.  So if I brought in another FeLV + kitty
  and my resident cat has already gotten some immunity from
  the virus he had been exposed to in the past, does that mean
  being exposed to the virus through another cat would be the
  same as the virus that he was first exposed to so his
  immunity would work against that virus?  Does that make
  sense?  I'm wondering if I brought in another FeLV +
  cat would I need to vaccinate my cat that has already been
  exposed and extinguished the virus.
  
  Anyone have a clue?  I guess the main question is if
  the virus mutates from cat to cat or is it always the same
  virus and doesn't change.
  
  “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces
  results that are profitable to the human race or
  doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon unconsenting
  animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
  sufficient justification of the enmity without looking
  further.” – Mark Twain
  
 
  


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself

2011-03-29 Thread Maureen Olvey

Figures the virus would mutate.  My husband and I were talking and thinking 
that the vaccine probably helps the cat develop antibodies to one general form 
of the virus so even if a different form or mutation of the virus is introduced 
into the system the antibodies created from the general form of the virus 
would be strong enough to combat the mutated form as well.  Make sense?
 
So in theory it would work if the cat got the virus and extinguished it the 
same way as if the cat were vaccinated.
 
However, I think all you guys might be right.  Just vaccinate the negatives 
before introducing another positive just to be safe.  To assume that my cats 
that test negative now have contacted the virus and extinguished it (just 
because they lived with the FeLV + kitty for two years) might be taking a big 
risk.  Even though the cats were together two years maybe for some reason they 
never got enough of the virus into their system for their bodies immune system 
to have to respond.  So then they really don't have immunity in their system.
 
I guess it's not worth taking the risk.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2011 14:00:31 -0700
 From: cline...@yahoo.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
 
 Maureen, I don't have links to the science to answer your question.  I do 
 know there are at least 3 versions of FeLV.  Personally I wouldn't take the 
 chance of mixing without 1st vaccinating any negatives in the house.  I have 
 mixed negatives and positives but my negatives were always current on their 
 vaccine.
  
 Sharyl 
 
 --- On Tue, 3/29/11, Maureen Olive molvey...@hotmail.com wrote:
 
 
 From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question about the virus itself
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 12:30 PM
 
 
 
 I've got a question about the FeLV virus itself.  Is it all the same virus or 
 does it mutate and change like the herpes virus that causes URI?  What I'm 
 wondering is that if I've got a cat that has been exposed to the virus but 
 extinguished it, is he immune for life?  Seems like I read that.  So if I 
 brought in another FeLV + kitty and my resident cat has already gotten some 
 immunity from the virus he had been exposed to in the past, does that mean 
 being exposed to the virus through another cat would be the same as the virus 
 that he was first exposed to so his immunity would work against that virus?  
 Does that make sense?  I'm wondering if I brought in another FeLV + cat would 
 I need to vaccinate my cat that has already been exposed and extinguished the 
 virus.
 
 Anyone have a clue?  I guess the main question is if the virus mutates from 
 cat to cat or is it always the same virus and doesn't change.
 
 “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
 profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
 unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
 sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain
 
   
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

2011-03-26 Thread MaiMaiPG
Don't know about garlic but onions can cause an irreversible anemia in  
cats and dogs.
On Mar 25, 2011, at 10:04 PM, dlg...@windstream.net dlg...@windstream.net 
 wrote:


I had always been told that yeast along with garlic and onions were  
not good for cats.

 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

www.swansonvitamins.com - great source for great prices
Brewer's Yeast tablets:
http://www.swansonvitamins.com/Search?keyword=Brewers+Yeast+tabletsdoSearch
=truentt=n=0ntk=Level1x=44y=12
Nutritional yeast flakes are very nutritious - great in cooking and
flavoring!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Bonnie  
Hogue

Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 9:30 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

MMPG
I used to sprinkle brewer's yeast onto the dog and cat food years  
ago.  I
think it helped with fleas.  But lately (new cats) it isn't  
accepted as

well.
When we have movie night we make popcorn, put an olive oil/butter  
combo on


it (trying to reduce the butterfat) then put the brewer's yeast  
on.  Very
tasty.  This is for us humans, mind you.  The cats always try to  
lick out
the bowls, which I discourage because of the fat content.  So, if  
we can

find out who makes the tablet form, it might work better.
~Bonnie
- Original Message -
From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:14 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle


Please:  More information on Brewer's yeast on popcorn.  This is a  
new
one...type and amount?  Brewer's yeast worked wonders for Mai Mai  
and
Allie's (dogs) coats and I know it would be great for Copper and   
Thomas

Cougar and Bob the Dog.  Just figuring out how to present it is  the
issue.  I think it would be great for the ferals too.
On Mar 24, 2011, at 4:58 PM, Bonnie Hogue wrote:


Natalie
What kind of yeast tablets do you get?
My cats always try to lick the popcorn bowl when we're done...we  
put

brewer's yeast on our popcorn.
Thanks.
~Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 2:48 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle


Yes, get some vitamin C crystals, and start with a small amount  
and

build up
so Amber doesn't get diarrhea.  Does she like yogurt?  If not,  
also  get



some
acidophilus/probiotic capsules, and mix powder into food. There  
are

also
some chewable vitamins for cats (ours aren't too keen on them)  
-  they

do,
however, love to chew on yeast tablets as treats!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of  
Jannes  Taylor

Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 5:28 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

I will ask about that when I take her back to the vet. In the   
meantime,



are

there any supplements you recommend that I can purchase? Thanks!
Jannes





From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 4:22:22 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

Vitamin C, B12 - my vet gives injections that we call the
cocktailworks wonders!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of  
Jannes  Taylor

Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 4:37 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

What vitamin supplement do you guys recommend?
Jannes





From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 2:56:44 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

There are blood tests that can be run tooexpensive though.  
I  took

Dixie

Louise Doodle Katt to be spayed. She had no scar. Apparently  
scars  are

becoming harder to see with self-absorbing stitches etc. I was
convinced
that
she had been spayed.not sure why but an angel sat on my   
shoulder

and
yelled
in my ear. My wonderful vets ran the blood test even though  
they  were

very
sure
I was wasting my money. A couple of weeks later, one called with  
the

results.
Either Dixie had been spayed or she was a male. My little  
darling  was

all
girl. Dixie was apparently a throw-away who came into my life  
by  was of



the

same pine thicket that brought most of the cats in my life. She  
was

FeLV+
which
led me to this wonderful group.

All of this is to say, follow your instincts and knowledge of cats
before
you
have her spayed. FYI: I like colostrum (health food stores or  
the  local

farm
store--cheaper) for those I know are going to have any surgery  
and  try

to
give
it for a good while before. Most of the cats in my life are  
feral  and

they
have
their own thoughts about what

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

2011-03-26 Thread Bonnie Hogue
Yes, I've heard that onions and garlic are not good for the cat.  Yeast has 
been advised to reduce fleas.  Guess the fleas don't like the vit. B or 
smell of the yeast.  I've never had a cat try to eat onions/garlic, but I've 
had them try to eat the yeast.  And the popcorn, which I doubt is good for 
them.

~B.
- Original Message - 
From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, March 25, 2011 11:06 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle


Don't know about garlic but onions can cause an irreversible anemia in 
cats and dogs.
On Mar 25, 2011, at 10:04 PM, dlg...@windstream.net 
dlg...@windstream.net

 wrote:

I had always been told that yeast along with garlic and onions were  not 
good for cats.

 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote:

www.swansonvitamins.com - great source for great prices
Brewer's Yeast tablets:
http://www.swansonvitamins.com/Search?keyword=Brewers+Yeast+tabletsdoSearch
=truentt=n=0ntk=Level1x=44y=12
Nutritional yeast flakes are very nutritious - great in cooking and
flavoring!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Bonnie  Hogue
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 9:30 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

MMPG
I used to sprinkle brewer's yeast onto the dog and cat food years  ago. 
I

think it helped with fleas.  But lately (new cats) it isn't  accepted as
well.
When we have movie night we make popcorn, put an olive oil/butter 
combo on


it (trying to reduce the butterfat) then put the brewer's yeast  on. 
Very
tasty.  This is for us humans, mind you.  The cats always try to  lick 
out
the bowls, which I discourage because of the fat content.  So, if  we 
can

find out who makes the tablet form, it might work better.
~Bonnie
- Original Message -
From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:14 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle



Please:  More information on Brewer's yeast on popcorn.  This is a  new
one...type and amount?  Brewer's yeast worked wonders for Mai Mai  and
Allie's (dogs) coats and I know it would be great for Copper and 
Thomas

Cougar and Bob the Dog.  Just figuring out how to present it is  the
issue.  I think it would be great for the ferals too.
On Mar 24, 2011, at 4:58 PM, Bonnie Hogue wrote:


Natalie
What kind of yeast tablets do you get?
My cats always try to lick the popcorn bowl when we're done...we  put
brewer's yeast on our popcorn.
Thanks.
~Bonnie
- Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 2:48 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle



Yes, get some vitamin C crystals, and start with a small amount  and
build up
so Amber doesn't get diarrhea.  Does she like yogurt?  If not,  also 
get



some
acidophilus/probiotic capsules, and mix powder into food. There  are
also
some chewable vitamins for cats (ours aren't too keen on them)  - 
they

do,
however, love to chew on yeast tablets as treats!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of  Jannes 
Taylor

Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 5:28 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

I will ask about that when I take her back to the vet. In the 
meantime,



are

there any supplements you recommend that I can purchase? Thanks!
Jannes





From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 4:22:22 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

Vitamin C, B12 - my vet gives injections that we call the
cocktailworks wonders!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of  Jannes 
Taylor

Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 4:37 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

What vitamin supplement do you guys recommend?
Jannes





From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 2:56:44 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

There are blood tests that can be run tooexpensive though.  I 
took

Dixie

Louise Doodle Katt to be spayed. She had no scar. Apparently  scars 
are

becoming harder to see with self-absorbing stitches etc. I was
convinced
that
she had been spayed.not sure why but an angel sat on my 
shoulder

and
yelled
in my ear. My wonderful vets ran the blood test even though  they 
were

very
sure
I was wasting my money. A couple of weeks later, one called with  the
results.
Either Dixie had been spayed or she was a male. My little  darling 
was

all
girl. Dixie was apparently a throw-away who came into my life  by 
was of



the

same pine thicket

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

2011-03-25 Thread dlgegg
I had always been told that yeast along with garlic and onions were not good 
for cats.
 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 www.swansonvitamins.com - great source for great prices
 Brewer's Yeast tablets:
 http://www.swansonvitamins.com/Search?keyword=Brewers+Yeast+tabletsdoSearch
 =truentt=n=0ntk=Level1x=44y=12 
 Nutritional yeast flakes are very nutritious - great in cooking and
 flavoring!  
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Bonnie Hogue
 Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 9:30 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
 MMPG
 I used to sprinkle brewer's yeast onto the dog and cat food years ago.  I 
 think it helped with fleas.  But lately (new cats) it isn't accepted as 
 well.
 When we have movie night we make popcorn, put an olive oil/butter combo on
 
 it (trying to reduce the butterfat) then put the brewer's yeast on.  Very 
 tasty.  This is for us humans, mind you.  The cats always try to lick out 
 the bowls, which I discourage because of the fat content.  So, if we can 
 find out who makes the tablet form, it might work better.
 ~Bonnie
 - Original Message - 
 From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:14 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
 
  Please:  More information on Brewer's yeast on popcorn.  This is a new 
  one...type and amount?  Brewer's yeast worked wonders for Mai Mai and 
  Allie's (dogs) coats and I know it would be great for Copper and  Thomas 
  Cougar and Bob the Dog.  Just figuring out how to present it is  the 
  issue.  I think it would be great for the ferals too.
  On Mar 24, 2011, at 4:58 PM, Bonnie Hogue wrote:
 
  Natalie
  What kind of yeast tablets do you get?
  My cats always try to lick the popcorn bowl when we're done...we put 
  brewer's yeast on our popcorn.
  Thanks.
  ~Bonnie
  - Original Message - From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 2:48 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
 
  Yes, get some vitamin C crystals, and start with a small amount and 
  build up
  so Amber doesn't get diarrhea.  Does she like yogurt?  If not, also  get
 
  some
  acidophilus/probiotic capsules, and mix powder into food. There are 
  also
  some chewable vitamins for cats (ours aren't too keen on them) -  they 
  do,
  however, love to chew on yeast tablets as treats!
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes  Taylor
  Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 5:28 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
  I will ask about that when I take her back to the vet. In the  meantime,
 
  are
 
  there any supplements you recommend that I can purchase? Thanks!
  Jannes
 
 
 
 
  
  From: Natalie at...@optonline.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 4:22:22 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
  Vitamin C, B12 - my vet gives injections that we call the
  cocktailworks wonders!
 
  -Original Message-
  From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
  [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes  Taylor
  Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 4:37 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
  What vitamin supplement do you guys recommend?
  Jannes
 
 
 
 
  
  From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 2:56:44 PM
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
  There are blood tests that can be run tooexpensive though. I  took 
  Dixie
 
  Louise Doodle Katt to be spayed. She had no scar. Apparently scars  are
  becoming harder to see with self-absorbing stitches etc. I was 
  convinced
  that
  she had been spayed.not sure why but an angel sat on my  shoulder 
  and
  yelled
  in my ear. My wonderful vets ran the blood test even though they  were 
  very
  sure
  I was wasting my money. A couple of weeks later, one called with the
  results.
  Either Dixie had been spayed or she was a male. My little darling  was 
  all
  girl. Dixie was apparently a throw-away who came into my life by  was of
 
  the
 
  same pine thicket that brought most of the cats in my life. She was 
  FeLV+
  which
  led me to this wonderful group.
 
  All of this is to say, follow your instincts and knowledge of cats 
  before
  you
  have her spayed. FYI: I like colostrum (health food stores or the  local
  farm
  store--cheaper) for those I know are going to have any surgery and  try 
  to
  give
  it for a good while before. Most of the cats in my life are feral  and 
  they
  have
  their own thoughts about what

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

2011-03-24 Thread Natalie
A veterinarian can probably be able to tell by palpating her stomach...I've
had cats that were never very obvious, but when spayed, it was noticeable
that they were in heat.
Because Amber is FeLV+, build up her immune system with some good vitamin
supplements before she is spayed.  BTW, when she's shaved, a vet can also
see if there's a scar!  I got a cat off death row in NYC, and we don't know
whether she has been spayed. Since I have no intact males, there's no danger
of pregnancy - we will just wait and see if she goes into heat, otherwise,
we can shave and check at any timeI wouldn't worry too much - also check
for nipple size

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:12 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

This Sunday will be one month since I rescued Amber. I have no idea if she
has 
ever been spayed or not. I am guessing not...
If she hasn't, should she not be coming in heat soon? I just hope and pray
she 
is not pregnant. 

If she does come in heat, I will get her spayed afterwards. Just waiting to
see. 

As always, thank you everyone for your advice!
 Jannes 


  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

2011-03-24 Thread MaiMaiPG
There are blood tests that can be run tooexpensive though.  I took  
Dixie Louise Doodle Katt to be spayed.  She had no scar.  Apparently  
scars are becoming harder to see with self-absorbing stitches etc.  I  
was convinced that she had been spayed.not sure why but an angel  
sat on my shoulder and yelled in my ear.  My wonderful vets ran the  
blood test even though they were very sure I was wasting my money.  A  
couple of weeks later, one called with the results.  Either Dixie had  
been spayed or she was a male.  My little darling was all girl.  Dixie  
was apparently a throw-away who came into my life by was of the same  
pine thicket that brought most of the cats in my life.  She was FeLV+  
which led me to this wonderful group.


All of this is to say, follow your instincts and knowledge of cats  
before you have her spayed.  FYI:  I like colostrum (health food  
stores or the local farm store--cheaper) for those I know are going to  
have any surgery and try to give it for a good while before.  Most of  
the cats in my life are feral and they have their own thoughts about  
what they will and will not consume.  Arnica helps healing...I use  
it frequently myself and swear by it.



On Mar 24, 2011, at 2:19 PM, Natalie wrote:

A veterinarian can probably be able to tell by palpating her  
stomach...I've
had cats that were never very obvious, but when spayed, it was  
noticeable

that they were in heat.
Because Amber is FeLV+, build up her immune system with some good  
vitamin
supplements before she is spayed.  BTW, when she's shaved, a vet can  
also
see if there's a scar!  I got a cat off death row in NYC, and we  
don't know
whether she has been spayed. Since I have no intact males, there's  
no danger
of pregnancy - we will just wait and see if she goes into heat,  
otherwise,
we can shave and check at any timeI wouldn't worry too much -  
also check

for nipple size

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes  
Taylor

Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:12 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

This Sunday will be one month since I rescued Amber. I have no idea  
if she

has
ever been spayed or not. I am guessing not...
If she hasn't, should she not be coming in heat soon? I just hope  
and pray

she
is not pregnant.

If she does come in heat, I will get her spayed afterwards. Just  
waiting to

see.

As always, thank you everyone for your advice!
 Jannes



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

2011-03-24 Thread Jannes Taylor
What vitamin supplement do you guys recommend?
 Jannes 





From: MaiMaiPG maima...@gmail.com
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Thu, March 24, 2011 2:56:44 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle

There are blood tests that can be run tooexpensive though.  I took Dixie 
Louise Doodle Katt to be spayed.  She had no scar.  Apparently scars are 
becoming harder to see with self-absorbing stitches etc.  I was convinced that 
she had been spayed.not sure why but an angel sat on my shoulder and yelled 
in my ear.  My wonderful vets ran the blood test even though they were very 
sure 
I was wasting my money.  A couple of weeks later, one called with the results.  
Either Dixie had been spayed or she was a male.  My little darling was all 
girl.  Dixie was apparently a throw-away who came into my life by was of the 
same pine thicket that brought most of the cats in my life.  She was FeLV+ 
which 
led me to this wonderful group.

All of this is to say, follow your instincts and knowledge of cats before you 
have her spayed.  FYI:  I like colostrum (health food stores or the local farm 
store--cheaper) for those I know are going to have any surgery and try to give 
it for a good while before.  Most of the cats in my life are feral and they 
have 
their own thoughts about what they will and will not consume.  Arnica helps 
healing...I use it frequently myself and swear by it.


On Mar 24, 2011, at 2:19 PM, Natalie wrote:

 A veterinarian can probably be able to tell by palpating her stomach...I've
 had cats that were never very obvious, but when spayed, it was noticeable
 that they were in heat.
 Because Amber is FeLV+, build up her immune system with some good vitamin
 supplements before she is spayed.  BTW, when she's shaved, a vet can also
 see if there's a scar!  I got a cat off death row in NYC, and we don't know
 whether she has been spayed. Since I have no intact males, there's no danger
 of pregnancy - we will just wait and see if she goes into heat, otherwise,
 we can shave and check at any timeI wouldn't worry too much - also check
 for nipple size
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Jannes Taylor
 Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:12 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re heat cycle
 
 This Sunday will be one month since I rescued Amber. I have no idea if she
 has
 ever been spayed or not. I am guessing not...
 If she hasn't, should she not be coming in heat soon? I just hope and pray
 she
 is not pregnant.
 
 If she does come in heat, I will get her spayed afterwards. Just waiting to
 see.
 
 As always, thank you everyone for your advice!
  Jannes
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org



  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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