Re: [Felvtalk] more about Kia

2010-05-02 Thread Belinda Sauro

   Are you suer he doesn't mean cancer and not FeLV?



This is when he told me her lymphocytes have dramatically increased just since 
the last workup a couple weeks ago. He is convinced she has circulating 
leukemia/lymphoma.


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Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

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Re: [Felvtalk] more about Kia

2010-05-02 Thread jbero tds.net
Janet,

It sounds like you have been through alot.  It also sounds to me like your
little one has lymphoma although the specifics of the bloodwork would be
more telling.  Did your vet happen to do a feline leukemia virus test?  This
virus can cause lymphomas and leukemias but lymphomas and leukemias can
arise when the virus isn't present.  If it isn't present, you may be able to
treat the lymphoma with different things.

An oncologist/hematologist would be most knowledgable.  I would absolutely
not go on the word of a general practitioner vet as their knowledge is very
limited in this field.  I would get the exact diagnosis - the pathologist
should have done a peripheral blood smear on your cat and there should be a
report with the suspected diagnosis.

I would then ask to be referred to an oncologist/hematologist.  I am telling
you this because some of the lymphomas can be well managed, some not so
well.  Additionally, some of the lymphomas are very slowly progressive and
simply watching them can be sufficient.  I would be very cautious about
using steroids.  Vets today seem to jump to this drug a lot because there is
a temporary improvement of symptoms in almost all illnesses.  The problem is
that long term survival is usually shortened.  Not to say it wouldn't help,
but I would be cautious.

If these things are too expensive, and even if they're not, I would really
consider high dose intravenous Vitamin C in this case.  There is a woman,
Sally, in this group who has done work with Vitamin C (and works for a
company selling it so she has some investment, but she is a very honest
and educated individual who believes in her product).Anyway, she has
seen good luck in the treatment of lymphomas with Vitamin C.  By the way,
the high blood pressure could be helped with this as well.  She could hook
you and your vet up with how to proceed, if you so choose.

I really wish you the best of that luck and I hope that the feline leukemia
test is negative -  that gives you a fighting chance.

Jenny




On Sun, May 2, 2010 at 12:34 AM, kia kia...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Hello again.
 My oldest cat Kia lost weight over a period of time and I just thought
 maybe it was because she was old. She hasn't acted sick at all. Back in
 November my oldest male cat Gabriel got sick and stopped eating. When he
 wouldn't take water I knew it was bad. We rushed him to the vet and the
 bloodwork showed he was in renal failure. The vet said it was too late to do
 anything and we had him put down. Afterwards I starting thinking about Kia
 since she is older and thought I better have her checked out. Due to
 finances I was unable to take her to the vet until a few weeks ago. I told
 the vet she was losing weight and he assumed she had a thyroid problem.
 After the blood work came in he told me her lymphocytes were really high and
 she had an ear infection and a tooth infection. We went through some
 antibiotics and I just took her in last week to check her blood again. This
 is when he told me her lymphocytes have dramatically increased just since
 the last workup
  a couple weeks ago. He is convinced she has circulating leukemia/lymphoma.
 He wants to put her on steroids and an antibiotic. She is also on blood
 pressure meds right now. Those two vet visits have wiped out the budget and
 I am just praying nothing happens to her. I don't understand how she got
 leukemia though. She is an indoor only cat with no contact with cats besides
 our others. When she was a kitten she was tested negative and even got a few
 vaccines for it. Now I am wondering if this is what killed Gabriel. And I
 wonder if the other cats are infected too. I already have a cat with kidney
 disease. All of our pets are over age 11.
 Thank you for your help.
 janet  the gang



 
 

 
 




 
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Re: [Felvtalk] more about Kia

2010-05-02 Thread kia
Hello all,
Thanks for the advice so far. 
My vet did not do a leukemia test that I know of. This last time I think he 
just did a CBC. Because her lymphocyte count had jumped from 25,000 to 38,000 I 
guess he assumes she has leukemia/lymphoma. He did send the blood to a 
university hospital but I don't know where. To my knowledge there are no 
oncologists or hemotologists in my area. Unfortunately I cannot afford a 
specialist any way. I would be willing to look into this vitamin C treatment 
though if it was within our budget. Unfortunately for us all my husband is not 
an animal lover like me and doesn't want to spend any extra money on Kia or the 
others.
You'd think with all the medical advances these days, they would have a cure 
for these common feline killers. 
thanks again,
janet


  
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Re: [Felvtalk] more about Kia

2010-05-02 Thread jbero tds.net
Janet,

One would think there would be treatment, but to be honest, most researchers
aren't that interested in curing cat illnesses.  Usually their discoveries
are a result of trying to find cures in human medicine.

Anyway, a lymphocyte count that high (38,000) is really suggestive of a
lymphoma.  You know it's interesting about vitamin C.  Recently they have
looked into treating people with non Hodgkin's lymphoma with IV Vitamin C
and had some good success.  The research was abandoned in the past because
oral vitamin C was studied and not as effective.

Additionally Vitamin A, Vitamin D3 and Vitamin E have been proposed to
help.  You could get these at a natural food store and add them to the
diet.  I can check into the dosages.  A high quality wet food like Wellness
works well for mixing in supplements.

Although I think a combination chemotherapy and orthomolecular treatment
(high dose vitamin) would work best, I understand how finances can be
limiting.

To give the vitamin C IV, you have to bring your cat to the clinic and have
a slow infusion.  They can put in a catheter so you can do repeat
infusions.  Sally would know more about the specific protocol and doses.
You also need a vet willing to try it as this is not the common approach.
I'll try to contact Sally.

Jenny

On Sun, May 2, 2010 at 2:36 PM, kia kia...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Hello all,
 Thanks for the advice so far.
 My vet did not do a leukemia test that I know of. This last time I think he
 just did a CBC. Because her lymphocyte count had jumped from 25,000 to
 38,000 I guess he assumes she has leukemia/lymphoma. He did send the blood
 to a university hospital but I don't know where. To my knowledge there are
 no oncologists or hemotologists in my area. Unfortunately I cannot afford a
 specialist any way. I would be willing to look into this vitamin C treatment
 though if it was within our budget. Unfortunately for us all my husband is
 not an animal lover like me and doesn't want to spend any extra money on Kia
 or the others.
 You'd think with all the medical advances these days, they would have a
 cure for these common feline killers.
 thanks again,
 janet



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