Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

2013-07-21 Thread dlgegg
I think that one reason not much has been done for treatments for FELV is no 
one thinks there is enough money in it.  

 Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net wrote: 
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Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

2013-06-07 Thread Margo



 Oh, my poor Vet. Thank you so much for that link, I will print it for her toay. I don't use AZT, but I use another anti-viral (famciclovir) with my FeLV cats when they have (what is probably)a herpes outbreak. One of the drugs, gemcitabine was planned for a cat I had with cancer. Sadly, he didn't live long enough to try it, so I can't comment. I will look into the others. I doubt I'd ask to use them, but I still want to know. 

Thanks!

Margo

-Original Message- From: Lance <lini...@fastmail.fm>Sent: Jun 6, 2013 10:14 PM To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms 
I agree. I had no intention of using these drugs. I doubt my vet would even have access to the newer drugs the paper mentions, and AZT is definitely out, unfortunately. It would be a sad irony if an exposed cat was FeLV- (or otherwise threw the virus without the help of AZT) but ended up with non-regenerative anemia after getting slightly too high a dose of AZT.

I have seen references to using AZT right after exposure, but if that were a good idea, I would think people would be trying it regularly.

I did write to the point person for that paper (Dr. Mansky) to ask what he thought could be done to forward research and use of the drugs (other than AZT) that were mentioned. He's not a vet (I think he's a virologist), but he probably has some thoughts on the issue.

It saddens me that there are potential treatments out there, but it seems that no money and little impetus exist to push them along.

Also, Lee, you definitely understood more of the paper than I did. :-)

On Jun 6, 2013, at 9:00 PM, Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:


Ugh! I hate terminology although I do understand some of it from being a medical transcriber in human medical practice. The gist of the paper is that using AZT and other human drugs on a cat can be risky and should not be done except under the control of a veterinary specialist. Your cat could become jaundiced because most of these drugs have bad side effects on liver and kidneys if given in too large a dose and no effect in the disease if given in too small a dose. Why not just wait and see what happens and not subject your cat to something experimental and possibly dangerous?


Spay and Neuter your cats and dogs and your weird relatives and nasty neighbors too!








From: Lance lini...@fastmail.fmTo: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org Sent: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 8:47 PMSubject: Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms
Along those lines, I found this article, "Discovery of drugs that possess activity against feline leukemia virus".http://vir.sgmjournals.org/content/93/Pt_4/900.full.pdfAlmost all of the terminology in the paper is beyond me, but what I do understand makes me think that we could have potential treatment options for FeLV at some point in the near future. These drugs are available now; we just need someone to fund (the sticking point, I'm guessing) trials.This is my last post for tonight. Probably.On Jun 5, 2013, at 8:20 PM, Lance lini...@fastmail.fm wrote: I'm wondering if anyone has ever attempted treatment of a potentially infected cat before the cat showed symptoms or tested positive. Would immune boosters help, or would we be playing with fire and possibly making things worse? It seems like a vet who has done a lot of work with FeLV cats might have done this.  Along those lines, has anyone actually had a cat on Mega-C who then appeared to suppress or eradicate the virus?  I'm kind of thinking out loud here, and hopefully not bugging anyone. It seems to me that the progress of research into FeLV is woefully glacial. ___ Felvtalk mailing list Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org___Felvtalk mailing listFelvtalk@felineleukemia.orghttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org___Felvtalk mailing listFelvtalk@felineleukemia.orghttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

2013-06-06 Thread Margo


Hi Lance,

Well, it couldn't hurt to try an immune booster like DMG. I use it with 
my + cats, but it seems a can't hurt, might help, kind of thing.

http://www.entirelypets.com/vetridmgliquid.html

Not pushing Entirely Pets, it's just where I got it. And I'm sure there 
are other immune boosters you might try. I think I'll see what I can find. 

All the best,

Margo


-Original Message-
From: Lance lini...@fastmail.fm
Sent: Jun 5, 2013 9:20 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

I'm wondering if anyone has ever attempted treatment of a potentially infected 
cat before the cat showed symptoms or tested positive. Would immune boosters 
help, or would  we be playing with fire and possibly making things worse? It 
seems like a vet who has done a lot of work with FeLV cats might have done 
this.

Along those lines, has anyone actually had a cat on Mega-C who then appeared 
to suppress or eradicate the virus?

I'm kind of thinking out loud here, and hopefully not bugging anyone. It seems 
to me that the progress of research into FeLV is woefully glacial.
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Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

2013-06-06 Thread Lee Evans
Ugh! I hate terminology although I do understand some of it from being a 
medical transcriber in human medical practice. The gist of the paper is that 
using AZT and other human drugs on a cat can be risky and should not be done 
except under the control of a veterinary specialist. Your cat could become 
jaundiced because most of these drugs have bad side effects on liver and 
kidneys if given in too large a dose and no effect in the disease if given in 
too small a dose. Why not just wait and see what happens and not subject your 
cat to something experimental and possibly dangerous?


 
Spay and Neuter your cats and dogs and your weird relatives and nasty neighbors 
too!






 From: Lance lini...@fastmail.fm
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 8:47 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms
 

Along those lines, I found this article, Discovery of drugs that possess 
activity against feline leukemia virus.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/content/93/Pt_4/900.full.pdf

Almost all of the terminology in the paper is beyond me, but what I do 
understand makes me think that we could have potential treatment options for 
FeLV at some point in the near future. These drugs are available now; we just 
need someone to fund (the sticking point, I'm guessing) trials.

This is my last post for tonight. Probably.

On Jun 5, 2013, at 8:20 PM, Lance lini...@fastmail.fm wrote:

 I'm wondering if anyone has ever attempted treatment of a potentially 
 infected cat before the cat showed symptoms or tested positive. Would immune 
 boosters help, or would  we be playing with fire and possibly making things 
 worse? It seems like a vet who has done a lot of work with FeLV cats might 
 have done this.
 
 Along those lines, has anyone actually had a cat on Mega-C who then appeared 
 to suppress or eradicate the virus?
 
 I'm kind of thinking out loud here, and hopefully not bugging anyone. It 
 seems to me that the progress of research into FeLV is woefully glacial.
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

2013-06-06 Thread Lance
I agree. I had no intention of using these drugs. I doubt my vet would even 
have access to the newer drugs the paper mentions, and AZT is definitely out, 
unfortunately. It would be a sad irony if an exposed cat was FeLV- (or 
otherwise threw the virus without the help of AZT) but ended up with 
non-regenerative anemia after getting slightly too high a dose of AZT.

I have seen references to using AZT right after exposure, but if that were a 
good idea, I would think people would be trying it regularly.

I did write to the point person for that paper (Dr. Mansky) to ask what he 
thought could be done to forward research and use of the drugs (other than AZT) 
that were mentioned. He's not a vet (I think he's a virologist), but he 
probably has some thoughts on the issue. 

It saddens me that there are potential treatments out there, but it seems that 
no money and little impetus exist to push them along.

Also, Lee, you definitely understood more of the paper than I did. :-)

On Jun 6, 2013, at 9:00 PM, Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Ugh! I hate terminology although I do understand some of it from being a 
 medical transcriber in human medical practice. The gist of the paper is that 
 using AZT and other human drugs on a cat can be risky and should not be done 
 except under the control of a veterinary specialist. Your cat could become 
 jaundiced because most of these drugs have bad side effects on liver and 
 kidneys if given in too large a dose and no effect in the disease if given in 
 too small a dose. Why not just wait and see what happens and not subject your 
 cat to something experimental and possibly dangerous?
 
  
 Spay and Neuter your cats and dogs and your weird relatives and nasty 
 neighbors too!
 
 
 From: Lance lini...@fastmail.fm
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Sent: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 8:47 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms
 
 Along those lines, I found this article, Discovery of drugs that possess 
 activity against feline leukemia virus.
 
 http://vir.sgmjournals.org/content/93/Pt_4/900.full.pdf
 
 Almost all of the terminology in the paper is beyond me, but what I do 
 understand makes me think that we could have potential treatment options for 
 FeLV at some point in the near future. These drugs are available now; we just 
 need someone to fund (the sticking point, I'm guessing) trials.
 
 This is my last post for tonight. Probably.
 
 On Jun 5, 2013, at 8:20 PM, Lance lini...@fastmail.fm wrote:
 
  I'm wondering if anyone has ever attempted treatment of a potentially 
  infected cat before the cat showed symptoms or tested positive. Would 
  immune boosters help, or would  we be playing with fire and possibly making 
  things worse? It seems like a vet who has done a lot of work with FeLV cats 
  might have done this.
  
  Along those lines, has anyone actually had a cat on Mega-C who then 
  appeared to suppress or eradicate the virus?
  
  I'm kind of thinking out loud here, and hopefully not bugging anyone. It 
  seems to me that the progress of research into FeLV is woefully glacial.
  ___
  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] treatment before symptoms

2013-06-05 Thread Lance
Along those lines, I found this article, Discovery of drugs that possess 
activity against feline leukemia virus.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/content/93/Pt_4/900.full.pdf

Almost all of the terminology in the paper is beyond me, but what I do 
understand makes me think that we could have potential treatment options for 
FeLV at some point in the near future. These drugs are available now; we just 
need someone to fund (the sticking point, I'm guessing) trials.

This is my last post for tonight. Probably.

On Jun 5, 2013, at 8:20 PM, Lance lini...@fastmail.fm wrote:

 I'm wondering if anyone has ever attempted treatment of a potentially 
 infected cat before the cat showed symptoms or tested positive. Would immune 
 boosters help, or would  we be playing with fire and possibly making things 
 worse? It seems like a vet who has done a lot of work with FeLV cats might 
 have done this.
 
 Along those lines, has anyone actually had a cat on Mega-C who then appeared 
 to suppress or eradicate the virus?
 
 I'm kind of thinking out loud here, and hopefully not bugging anyone. It 
 seems to me that the progress of research into FeLV is woefully glacial.
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


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