Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-10-06 Thread catatonya
true. I'm extremely stressed at the doctor's office. lol.

Marylyn [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:  It certainly can't help.  Dixie 
stayed in the dog area of the vet's for a few days when we found out she was 
FeLV+.  She was obviously not happy but other cats could not be exposed to her 
either.  She was very safe but I am sure unhappydogs, strange place, caged. 
 There just wasn't much choice though.  I wonder if the meowing, scents etc of 
other cats aren't upsetting too though
   
  Frankly, anytime I am in a doctor's office, even with someone, I am stressed.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
 from the shelter of compassion 
and pity, you will have men who 
 will deal likewise with their 
fellow man.
  St. Francis
- Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 8:26 AM
  Subject: Re: choosing a vet -OT
  

  I feel like the barking of dogs traumatizes the cats when they're already 
upset about going to the vet anyway. Especially if they have to be left there 
for any length of time with dogs barking I just wondered if any of you felt 
the same about cat only clinics
  t

Kelley Saveika [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  1. No importance.
2. No importance.
3. Very important, I have actually never had a vet that did this, I
was always welcome to be in the room with the cat. My current vet
does temp and weight in the back and that's about it.

On 9/28/07, catatonya wrote:
 How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be

 1- a cat only clinic
 2-doesn't declaw
 3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?

 That is what I had and lost. When Bob got sick last week I took off the
 morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all
 until 2:00. So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she
 seems very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those
 criteria. She is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and
 Saturday and Sunday. That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I
 hate..

 I'm just at a loss as to what to do. I don't know of any other vets in my
 area that don't declaw. The new vet at my old vet's office was required not
 to do it as part of the sale of the practice. But she just does not seem
 good at all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if I
 should put up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very
 knowledgeable or keep looking. And I have been looking and looking. :(
 tonya




-- 
Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

http://www.rescuties.org

Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

Please help George!

http://rescuties.chipin.com/george

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Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread catatonya
I've asked her about 'taking him to the back' to get blood, etc things I'd 
rather have done in the exam. room.  She says she does it with her own cats, 
and that it's a legal thing, and a personal thing.  She says she is not her own 
cats' vet and lets another vet be their vet because they can be more objective 
and that she doesn't even go in with her own cats for procedures.  She says she 
doesn't even let her friends do this either It's just her policy.
   
  The problem is that I DO like this vet.  She seems very concerned, very 
thorough, etc As I said she totally changed the dx from my 'new' vet that I 
got stuck with.  I have much more confidence in her than my previous clinic.
   
  I have a student in my class whose father is a vet.  I'm thinking about 
checking out his clinic as well..
   
  t

Marylyn [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Thoughts:  vets who see more than one type of animal may be more open 
to ideas..well, cats don't normally get this but dogs do and possibly 
this cat picked it up in a 1 in 1000 chance
   
  Declawing is a volatile but personal issue and may not be a black and white 
issue.  Perhaps it is better to have a really good vet do it and a good follow 
up than to have a vet who isn't so good totally screw it up.
   
  I really have an issue with people who won't let me stay with my little 
friend.  Maybe you can explain this to the vet and work something out?
   
  Frankly, if I had bad feelings about a vet and had an option I would take the 
option.  You may hate yourself if you don't.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
 from the shelter of compassion 
and pity, you will have men who 
 will deal likewise with their 
fellow man.
  St. Francis
- Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Friday, September 28, 2007 4:22 AM
  Subject: choosing a vet -OT
  

  How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be
   
  1- a cat only clinic
  2-doesn't declaw
  3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?
   
  That is what I had and lost.  When Bob got sick last week I took off the 
morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all until 
2:00.   So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she seems 
very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those criteria.  She 
is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and Saturday and Sunday.  
That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I hate..
   
  I'm just at a loss as to what to do.  I don't know of any other vets in my 
area that don't declaw.  The new vet at my old vet's office was required not to 
do it as part of the sale of the practice.  But she just does not seem good at 
all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if I should put 
up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very knowledgeable or keep 
looking.   And I have been looking and looking.  :(
  tonya





Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread catatonya
My vet that gave up her practice was just so 'perfect' that it's hard to handle 
changing.  I HATE changing vets.
   
  My vet I had years ago told me about declaws that she was running a 
'business' and they did promote the declaws.  It was easy for me to leave there 
when I found out about an all cat clinic that refused to declaw.
   
  I envy you your vet Belinda.
  t

Belinda [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  I would choose the vet I thought was giving the best care to my 
furkids, that would be the most important thing to me. I'm sure you 
could find something you didn't particularly like with just about any 
vet so so for me I'd go with the one I feel most comfortable with and 
feel is giving the best care to my furkids. Of course if you can find a 
vet that fits all your criteria that would be a bonus!!

-- 

Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

Be-Mi-Kitties
http://bemikitties.com

Post Adoptable FeLV/FIV/FIP Cats/Kittens
http://adopt.bemikitties.com

FeLV Candlelight Service
http://bemikitties.com/cls

HostDesign4U.com [affordable hosting  web design]
http://HostDesign4U.com



BMK Designs [non-profit animals websites]
http://bmk.bemikitties.com





Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread catatonya
It's a big decision.  And I always second guess my decisions.  It's hard to 
know what to do.  I think I'm going to stick with this vet (Dr. Roesner) for my 
situation with Bob, and then meet the vet that's a parent in my class as well.  
Dr. Roesner didn't react negatively when I told her Bob had once been positive 
and had lived his life with 2 positive cats.  I suggested we do a retest just 
in case, and she agreed it wouldn't hurt to rule it out.  He was negative, of 
course.  I hate to jinx myself, but I have retested my negatives so many times 
that I really think I'm wasting my money to do it whenever one of them gets 
sick.  
   
  She does seem like a 'good' vet and had a good rapport with Bob and me.  She 
took my concerns about 'taking him to the back' for procedures very seriously, 
and told me she would always do what she could in my presence.  (They brought 
him and a litterbox into the room with me to wait for the enema to 'work' 
although they took him to the back to give the enema, for example.) The front 
office, and all staff were/are very nice and seem informed.  This vet also told 
me not to worry about the money when making my decisions about what to do or 
not to do.  She said that we could work that out, and she didn't even know me.  
So that's a good sign.
   
  t
   
  t

MaryChristine [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  many places don't HAVE cat-only clinics, so it's not even an option i've 
worked with both, can't say that either kind were intrinsically BETTER. the 
chemistry between vet and cat, the openness to new ideas and learning is what's 
paramount to me--i've seen pompous, know-everything, don't-talk-to-me cat-only 
vets, and i've had general practice vets who talked to me as i were another 
professional. if my cats like them, they seem to like my cats, and they work 
with me, that's a major factor. (like when i called my housecall vet and asked 
if he had room to take on a few more cats, cuz i'd started a new job that 
needed a vet he asked how many, and i said, um, well, 500. he was 
silent for a moment, but didn't hang up or say no yep, he's still my vet.) 

i don't know of any local vets that absolutely do not declaw, but i've also 
never ever been to one who pushed it--it'd NEVER bee suggested to me, it's 
never been offered as part of a spay/neuter deal, i don't declaw, tho i have 
some rescues with both front and all-four declaws, but i don't think i would 
have realized from my own experience that so many people just thought it was 
the done thing to do, nor that so many vets and veterinary chains push it so 
aggressively as a money-making item. so it's never occurred to me to even ask. 
i agree with marylyn that i'd MUCH rather have a good, compassionate, aware vet 
doing a declaw if one had to be done--even if the reason is one that many of us 
would NOT consider valid--with the most up-to-date procedures, pain medication 
and follow-up than someone who pushes it on all cats. 

i don't really have that much trouble with the vets taking cats in the 
back--but the only time i take cats TO the vet (as opposed to the vet coming 
here to the house, where, clearly, everyone sees almost everything!) is when 
it's for surgeries that my housecall vet can't do. 
having tired of chasing cats throughout my and other folks' house while trying 
to get bloods, ken now takes them out to his new, larger van to do it, but i'm 
welcome to go sit with them if i want to. i usually don't, as i know how ken 
treats them, so i trust him with them. one thing that's been mentioned in a lot 
of places that i'll probably do if i leave town and have to break in a whole 
new set of vets (a thought that absolutely terrifies me), is to make an initial 
appointment to tour the clinic--and if you're not welcome to, take that as a 
warning bell right from the start. 

what vet clients--and human patients--tend to forget is that WE PAY THE BILLS, 
we are the customers, and we don't have to settle for things that make us 
uncomfortable.

see how the FRONT-OFFICE STAFF TREATS YOU, on the phone and in person. we (a 
nationwide rescue group, with vets all over the country we work with) had a 
long-standing relationship with a wonderful vet, with an incredibly 
well-equipped facility--and an office staff that was atrocious. rude, 
inefficient, uncaring--but no one had the guts to say anything to the vet 
guess who was asked to be the one to do so. 

find out IN ADVANCE how the vet will handle emergencies, and emergency PAYMENT. 
as some of you know, i've been disabled for many years, but worked part-time 
til 1991, since then i've been on disability based on part-time work. i 
couldn't afford to rent a litterbox in most large american cities so a 
major surgery, or a catastrophic illness is not something i will EVER be able 
to handle upfront. but i have NEVER found a vet, other than ER ones, who was 
not willing to work with me. but i told them about my circumstances at 

Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread Kelley Saveika
On 9/30/07, catatonya [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 It's a big decision.  And I always second guess my decisions.  It's hard to
 know what to do.  I think I'm going to stick with this vet (Dr. Roesner) for
 my situation with Bob, and then meet the vet that's a parent in my class as
 well.  Dr. Roesner didn't react negatively when I told her Bob had once been
 positive and had lived his life with 2 positive cats.  I suggested we do a
 retest just in case, and she agreed it wouldn't hurt to rule it out.  He was
 negative, of course.  I hate to jinx myself, but I have retested my
 negatives so many times that I really think I'm wasting my money to do it
 whenever one of them gets sick.

I don't think you are wasting your money.  Current AAFP guidelines
indicate cats should be tested when sick regardless of prior test
results.

Cats should be tested for FeLV infection under the following circumstances:
 Whenever they are sick, regardless of age, negative results of
previous FeLV tests, and FeLV vaccination status.

http://www.aafponline.org/resources/guidelines/Felv_FIV_Guidelines.pdf
-- 
Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

http://www.rescuties.org

Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

Please help George!

http://rescuties.chipin.com/george

I GoodSearch for Rescuties.

Raise money for your favorite charity or school just by searching the
Internet with GoodSearch - www.goodsearch.com - powered by Yahoo!



Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread catatonya
I feel like the barking of dogs traumatizes the cats when they're already upset 
about going to the vet anyway. Especially if they have to be left there for any 
length of time with dogs barking I just wondered if any of you felt the 
same about cat only clinics
  t

Kelley Saveika [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  1. No importance.
2. No importance.
3. Very important, I have actually never had a vet that did this, I
was always welcome to be in the room with the cat. My current vet
does temp and weight in the back and that's about it.

On 9/28/07, catatonya wrote:
 How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be

 1- a cat only clinic
 2-doesn't declaw
 3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?

 That is what I had and lost. When Bob got sick last week I took off the
 morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all
 until 2:00. So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she
 seems very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those
 criteria. She is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and
 Saturday and Sunday. That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I
 hate..

 I'm just at a loss as to what to do. I don't know of any other vets in my
 area that don't declaw. The new vet at my old vet's office was required not
 to do it as part of the sale of the practice. But she just does not seem
 good at all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if I
 should put up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very
 knowledgeable or keep looking. And I have been looking and looking. :(
 tonya




-- 
Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

http://www.rescuties.org

Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

Please help George!

http://rescuties.chipin.com/george

I GoodSearch for Rescuties.

Raise money for your favorite charity or school just by searching the
Internet with GoodSearch - www.goodsearch.com - powered by Yahoo!




Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread Kelley Saveika
I feel a lot more concerned about the quality of the vet than I do
issues such as whether it is a cat only clinic.

There can be bad vets who choose to operate cat only clinics.

My cats do not mind dogs or their barking, but I don't hear
significant amounts of barking at the vet anyway.  Now at the shelter
is a different story.

On 9/30/07, catatonya [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 I feel like the barking of dogs traumatizes the cats when they're already
 upset about going to the vet anyway. Especially if they have to be left
 there for any length of time with dogs barking I just wondered if any of
 you felt the same about cat only clinics
 t

 Kelley Saveika [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 1. No importance.
 2. No importance.
 3. Very important, I have actually never had a vet that did this, I
 was always welcome to be in the room with the cat. My current vet
 does temp and weight in the back and that's about it.

 On 9/28/07, catatonya wrote:
  How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be
 
  1- a cat only clinic
  2-doesn't declaw
  3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?
 
  That is what I had and lost. When Bob got sick last week I took off the
  morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all
  until 2:00. So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she
  seems very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those
  criteria. She is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and
  Saturday and Sunday. That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I
  hate..
 
  I'm just at a loss as to what to do. I don't know of any other vets in my
  area that don't declaw. The new vet at my old vet's office was required
 not
  to do it as part of the sale of the practice. But she just does not seem
  good at all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if
 I
  should put up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very
  knowledgeable or keep looking. And I have been looking and looking. :(
  tonya
 
 


 --
 Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

 http://www.rescuties.org

 Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

 http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

 Please help George!

 http://rescuties.chipin.com/george

 I GoodSearch for Rescuties.

 Raise money for your favorite charity or school just by searching the
 Internet with GoodSearch - www.goodsearch.com - powered by Yahoo!





-- 
Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

http://www.rescuties.org

Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

Please help George!

http://rescuties.chipin.com/george

I GoodSearch for Rescuties.

Raise money for your favorite charity or school just by searching the
Internet with GoodSearch - www.goodsearch.com - powered by Yahoo!



Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread Marylyn
Some vets are afraid that you will faint and injure yourself etc or become 
upset when they draw blood--not necessarily from the sight of blood but from 
the way you hold the cat to do it.  Just lots of things.  I am very lucky and 
my vets let me be there with my critters.  I can understand where they are 
coming from but I really don't like it.  If you feel good with the vet though 
she may be a keeper.  






 If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
 from the shelter of compassion 
and pity, you will have men who 
 will deal likewise with their 
fellow man.
  St. Francis
  - Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 8:00 AM
  Subject: Re: choosing a vet -OT


  It's a big decision.  And I always second guess my decisions.  It's hard to 
know what to do.  I think I'm going to stick with this vet (Dr. Roesner) for my 
situation with Bob, and then meet the vet that's a parent in my class as well.  
Dr. Roesner didn't react negatively when I told her Bob had once been positive 
and had lived his life with 2 positive cats.  I suggested we do a retest just 
in case, and she agreed it wouldn't hurt to rule it out.  He was negative, of 
course.  I hate to jinx myself, but I have retested my negatives so many times 
that I really think I'm wasting my money to do it whenever one of them gets 
sick.  

  She does seem like a 'good' vet and had a good rapport with Bob and me.  She 
took my concerns about 'taking him to the back' for procedures very seriously, 
and told me she would always do what she could in my presence.  (They brought 
him and a litterbox into the room with me to wait for the enema to 'work' 
although they took him to the back to give the enema, for example.) The front 
office, and all staff were/are very nice and seem informed.  This vet also told 
me not to worry about the money when making my decisions about what to do or 
not to do.  She said that we could work that out, and she didn't even know me.  
So that's a good sign.

  t

  t

  MaryChristine [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
many places don't HAVE cat-only clinics, so it's not even an option 
i've worked with both, can't say that either kind were intrinsically BETTER. 
the chemistry between vet and cat, the openness to new ideas and learning is 
what's paramount to me--i've seen pompous, know-everything, don't-talk-to-me 
cat-only vets, and i've had general practice vets who talked to me as i were 
another professional. if my cats like them, they seem to like my cats, and they 
work with me, that's a major factor. (like when i called my housecall vet and 
asked if he had room to take on a few more cats, cuz i'd started a new job that 
needed a vet he asked how many, and i said, um, well, 500. he was 
silent for a moment, but didn't hang up or say no yep, he's still my vet.) 

i don't know of any local vets that absolutely do not declaw, but i've also 
never ever been to one who pushed it--it'd NEVER bee suggested to me, it's 
never been offered as part of a spay/neuter deal, i don't declaw, tho i have 
some rescues with both front and all-four declaws, but i don't think i would 
have realized from my own experience that so many people just thought it was 
the done thing to do, nor that so many vets and veterinary chains push it so 
aggressively as a money-making item. so it's never occurred to me to even ask. 
i agree with marylyn that i'd MUCH rather have a good, compassionate, aware vet 
doing a declaw if one had to be done--even if the reason is one that many of us 
would NOT consider valid--with the most up-to-date procedures, pain medication 
and follow-up than someone who pushes it on all cats. 

i don't really have that much trouble with the vets taking cats in the 
back--but the only time i take cats TO the vet (as opposed to the vet coming 
here to the house, where, clearly, everyone sees almost everything!) is when 
it's for surgeries that my housecall vet can't do. 
having tired of chasing cats throughout my and other folks' house while 
trying to get bloods, ken now takes them out to his new, larger van to do it, 
but i'm welcome to go sit with them if i want to. i usually don't, as i know 
how ken treats them, so i trust him with them. one thing that's been mentioned 
in a lot of places that i'll probably do if i leave town and have to break in a 
whole new set of vets (a thought that absolutely terrifies me), is to make an 
initial appointment to tour the clinic--and if you're not welcome to, take that 
as a warning bell right from the start. 

what vet clients--and human patients--tend to forget is that WE PAY THE 
BILLS, we are the customers, and we don't have to settle for things

Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread Marylyn
It certainly can't help.  Dixie stayed in the dog area of the vet's for a few 
days when we found out she was FeLV+.  She was obviously not happy but other 
cats could not be exposed to her either.  She was very safe but I am sure 
unhappydogs, strange place, caged.  There just wasn't much choice though.  
I wonder if the meowing, scents etc of other cats aren't upsetting too 
though

Frankly, anytime I am in a doctor's office, even with someone, I am stressed.






 If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
 from the shelter of compassion 
and pity, you will have men who 
 will deal likewise with their 
fellow man.
  St. Francis
  - Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 8:26 AM
  Subject: Re: choosing a vet -OT


  I feel like the barking of dogs traumatizes the cats when they're already 
upset about going to the vet anyway. Especially if they have to be left there 
for any length of time with dogs barking I just wondered if any of you felt 
the same about cat only clinics
  t

  Kelley Saveika [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
1. No importance.
2. No importance.
3. Very important, I have actually never had a vet that did this, I
was always welcome to be in the room with the cat. My current vet
does temp and weight in the back and that's about it.

On 9/28/07, catatonya wrote:
 How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be

 1- a cat only clinic
 2-doesn't declaw
 3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?

 That is what I had and lost. When Bob got sick last week I took off the
 morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all
 until 2:00. So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she
 seems very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those
 criteria. She is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and
 Saturday and Sunday. That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I
 hate..

 I'm just at a loss as to what to do. I don't know of any other vets in my
 area that don't declaw. The new vet at my old vet's office was required 
not
 to do it as part of the sale of the practice. But she just does not seem
 good at all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if 
I
 should put up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very
 knowledgeable or keep looking. And I have been looking and looking. :(
 tonya




-- 
Rescuties - Saving the world, one cat at a time.

http://www.rescuties.org

Vist the Rescuties store and save a kitty life!

http://astore.amazon.com/rescuties-20

Please help George!

http://rescuties.chipin.com/george

I GoodSearch for Rescuties.

Raise money for your favorite charity or school just by searching the
Internet with GoodSearch - www.goodsearch.com - powered by Yahoo!





Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-30 Thread Marylyn
Some vets are afraid that you will faint and injure yourself etc or become 
upset when they draw blood--not necessarily from the sight of blood but from 
the way you hold the cat to do it.  Just lots of things.  I am very lucky and 
my vets let me be there with my critters.  I can understand where they are 
coming from but I really don't like it.  If you feel good with the vet though 
she may be a keeper.  






 If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
 from the shelter of compassion 
and pity, you will have men who 
 will deal likewise with their 
fellow man.
  St. Francis
  - Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 8:00 AM
  Subject: Re: choosing a vet -OT


  It's a big decision.  And I always second guess my decisions.  It's hard to 
know what to do.  I think I'm going to stick with this vet (Dr. Roesner) for my 
situation with Bob, and then meet the vet that's a parent in my class as well.  
Dr. Roesner didn't react negatively when I told her Bob had once been positive 
and had lived his life with 2 positive cats.  I suggested we do a retest just 
in case, and she agreed it wouldn't hurt to rule it out.  He was negative, of 
course.  I hate to jinx myself, but I have retested my negatives so many times 
that I really think I'm wasting my money to do it whenever one of them gets 
sick.  

  She does seem like a 'good' vet and had a good rapport with Bob and me.  She 
took my concerns about 'taking him to the back' for procedures very seriously, 
and told me she would always do what she could in my presence.  (They brought 
him and a litterbox into the room with me to wait for the enema to 'work' 
although they took him to the back to give the enema, for example.) The front 
office, and all staff were/are very nice and seem informed.  This vet also told 
me not to worry about the money when making my decisions about what to do or 
not to do.  She said that we could work that out, and she didn't even know me.  
So that's a good sign.

  t

  t

  MaryChristine [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
many places don't HAVE cat-only clinics, so it's not even an option 
i've worked with both, can't say that either kind were intrinsically BETTER. 
the chemistry between vet and cat, the openness to new ideas and learning is 
what's paramount to me--i've seen pompous, know-everything, don't-talk-to-me 
cat-only vets, and i've had general practice vets who talked to me as i were 
another professional. if my cats like them, they seem to like my cats, and they 
work with me, that's a major factor. (like when i called my housecall vet and 
asked if he had room to take on a few more cats, cuz i'd started a new job that 
needed a vet he asked how many, and i said, um, well, 500. he was 
silent for a moment, but didn't hang up or say no yep, he's still my vet.) 

i don't know of any local vets that absolutely do not declaw, but i've also 
never ever been to one who pushed it--it'd NEVER bee suggested to me, it's 
never been offered as part of a spay/neuter deal, i don't declaw, tho i have 
some rescues with both front and all-four declaws, but i don't think i would 
have realized from my own experience that so many people just thought it was 
the done thing to do, nor that so many vets and veterinary chains push it so 
aggressively as a money-making item. so it's never occurred to me to even ask. 
i agree with marylyn that i'd MUCH rather have a good, compassionate, aware vet 
doing a declaw if one had to be done--even if the reason is one that many of us 
would NOT consider valid--with the most up-to-date procedures, pain medication 
and follow-up than someone who pushes it on all cats. 

i don't really have that much trouble with the vets taking cats in the 
back--but the only time i take cats TO the vet (as opposed to the vet coming 
here to the house, where, clearly, everyone sees almost everything!) is when 
it's for surgeries that my housecall vet can't do. 
having tired of chasing cats throughout my and other folks' house while 
trying to get bloods, ken now takes them out to his new, larger van to do it, 
but i'm welcome to go sit with them if i want to. i usually don't, as i know 
how ken treats them, so i trust him with them. one thing that's been mentioned 
in a lot of places that i'll probably do if i leave town and have to break in a 
whole new set of vets (a thought that absolutely terrifies me), is to make an 
initial appointment to tour the clinic--and if you're not welcome to, take that 
as a warning bell right from the start. 

what vet clients--and human patients--tend to forget is that WE PAY THE 
BILLS, we are the customers, and we don't have to settle for things

Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-28 Thread Kelley Saveika
1.  No importance.
2.  No importance.
3.  Very important, I have actually never had a vet that did this, I
was always welcome to be in the room with the cat.  My current vet
does temp and weight in the back and that's about it.

On 9/28/07, catatonya [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be

 1- a cat only clinic
 2-doesn't declaw
 3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?

 That is what I had and lost.  When Bob got sick last week I took off the
 morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all
 until 2:00.   So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she
 seems very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those
 criteria.  She is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and
 Saturday and Sunday.  That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I
 hate..

 I'm just at a loss as to what to do.  I don't know of any other vets in my
 area that don't declaw.  The new vet at my old vet's office was required not
 to do it as part of the sale of the practice.  But she just does not seem
 good at all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if I
 should put up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very
 knowledgeable or keep looking.   And I have been looking and looking.  :(
 tonya




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Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-28 Thread Marylyn
Thoughts:  vets who see more than one type of animal may be more open to 
ideas..well, cats don't normally get this but dogs do and possibly 
this cat picked it up in a 1 in 1000 chance

Declawing is a volatile but personal issue and may not be a black and white 
issue.  Perhaps it is better to have a really good vet do it and a good follow 
up than to have a vet who isn't so good totally screw it up.

I really have an issue with people who won't let me stay with my little friend. 
 Maybe you can explain this to the vet and work something out?

Frankly, if I had bad feelings about a vet and had an option I would take the 
option.  You may hate yourself if you don't.






 If you have men who will 
exclude any of God's creatures
 from the shelter of compassion 
and pity, you will have men who 
 will deal likewise with their 
fellow man.
  St. Francis
  - Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Friday, September 28, 2007 4:22 AM
  Subject: choosing a vet -OT


  How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be

  1- a cat only clinic
  2-doesn't declaw
  3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?

  That is what I had and lost.  When Bob got sick last week I took off the 
morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all until 
2:00.   So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she seems 
very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of those criteria.  She 
is far away, but they are open until 9:00 every night and Saturday and Sunday.  
That would keep me out of the emergency vets whom I hate..

  I'm just at a loss as to what to do.  I don't know of any other vets in my 
area that don't declaw.  The new vet at my old vet's office was required not to 
do it as part of the sale of the practice.  But she just does not seem good at 
all, she does everything in the back as wellthus wondering if I should put 
up with these things and use this new vet I feel is very knowledgeable or keep 
looking.   And I have been looking and looking.  :(
  tonya




Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-28 Thread Belinda
I would choose the vet I thought was giving the best care to my 
furkids, that would be the most important thing to me.  I'm sure you 
could find something you didn't particularly like with just about any 
vet so so for me I'd go with the one I feel most comfortable with and 
feel is giving the best care to my furkids.  Of course if you can find a 
vet that fits all your criteria that would be a bonus!!


--

Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

Be-Mi-Kitties
http://bemikitties.com

Post Adoptable FeLV/FIV/FIP Cats/Kittens
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FeLV Candlelight Service
http://bemikitties.com/cls

HostDesign4U.com [affordable hosting  web design]
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Re: choosing a vet -OT

2007-09-28 Thread MaryChristine
many places don't HAVE cat-only clinics, so it's not even an option i've
worked with both, can't say that either kind were intrinsically BETTER. the
chemistry between vet and cat, the openness to new ideas and learning is
what's paramount to me--i've seen pompous, know-everything, don't-talk-to-me
cat-only vets, and i've had general practice vets who talked to me as i were
another professional. if my cats like them, they seem to like my cats, and
they work with me, that's a major factor. (like when i called my housecall
vet and asked if he had room to take on a few more cats, cuz i'd started a
new job that needed a vet he asked how many, and i said, um, well,
500. he was silent for a moment, but didn't hang up or say no yep,
he's still my vet.)

i don't know of any local vets that absolutely do not declaw, but i've also
never ever been to one who pushed it--it'd NEVER bee suggested to me, it's
never been offered as part of a spay/neuter deal, i don't declaw, tho i have
some rescues with both front and all-four declaws, but i don't think i would
have realized from my own experience that so many people just thought it was
the done thing to do, nor that so many vets and veterinary chains push it so
aggressively as a money-making item. so it's never occurred to me to even
ask. i agree with marylyn that i'd MUCH rather have a good, compassionate,
aware vet doing a declaw if one had to be done--even if the reason is one
that many of us would NOT consider valid--with the most up-to-date
procedures, pain medication and follow-up than someone who pushes it on all
cats.

i don't really have that much trouble with the vets taking cats in the
back--but the only time i take cats TO the vet (as opposed to the vet coming
here to the house, where, clearly, everyone sees almost everything!) is when
it's for surgeries that my housecall vet can't do.
having tired of chasing cats throughout my and other folks' house while
trying to get bloods, ken now takes them out to his new, larger van to do
it, but i'm welcome to go sit with them if i want to. i usually don't, as i
know how ken treats them, so i trust him with them. one thing that's been
mentioned in a lot of places that i'll probably do if i leave town and have
to break in a whole new set of vets (a thought that absolutely terrifies
me), is to make an initial appointment to tour the clinic--and if you're not
welcome to, take that as a warning bell right from the start.

what vet clients--and human patients--tend to forget is that WE PAY THE
BILLS, we are the customers, and we don't have to settle for things that
make us uncomfortable.

see how the FRONT-OFFICE STAFF TREATS YOU, on the phone and in person. we (a
nationwide rescue group, with vets all over the country we work with) had a
long-standing relationship with a wonderful vet, with an incredibly
well-equipped facility--and an office staff that was atrocious. rude,
inefficient, uncaring--but no one had the guts to say anything to the
vet guess who was asked to be the one to do so.

find out IN ADVANCE how the vet will handle emergencies, and emergency
PAYMENT. as some of you know, i've been disabled for many years, but worked
part-time til 1991, since then i've been on disability based on part-time
work. i couldn't afford to rent a litterbox in most large american
cities so a major surgery, or a catastrophic illness is not something i
will EVER be able to handle upfront. but i have NEVER found a vet, other
than ER ones, who was not willing to work with me. but i told them about my
circumstances at the very beginning, and always made every payment, so that
when the times came when a big bill needed to be stretched out, i already
had a history with them. places that will NOT make arrangements for payment
are, to my mind, not the people i want caring for my animals--yes, it's a
business, and yes they need to pay their bills and i understand that--but if
they're passionate about the human/animal bond, they are not going to make
people choose pain and death for their animals due to an immediate shortage
of cash.

this is a good discussion to have; maybe input from lots of us could be
edited into a separate page on the site for folks on, what to look for in a
vet, or, interviewing your next vet? we used to hold periodic chats on
this with vets, to see what the best client for THEM is--it's possible i
could get one to come to the list and talk about that, if there's interest
(she's a cat-only vet)




On 9/28/07, catatonya [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 How important is it to you when looking for a vet that it be

 1- a cat only clinic
 2-doesn't declaw
 3 doesn't take your cat 'to the back' to do everything?

 That is what I had and lost.  When Bob got sick last week I took off the
 morning to call and get him in and there was no doctor coming in at all
 until 2:00.   So I tried this highly recommended new vet I'm seeing and she
 seems very knowledgeable and thorough, but doesn't meet any of