Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-29 Thread Jane Lyons
I haven't had it cultured, but she has been on so many antibiotics,  
especially when we first got her, that we
assumed it was a viral infection and tried to treated her with l  
lycine and then thullium met which worked.


She is back on l-lycine. It is so much better than it was when we  
first got her. She has an occasional sneeze
and one of her nostrils is sometimes wet, but the constant sneezing  
and stuffiness in her nose is gone. Her eyes

are clear, and her appetite is great, as is her energy.

I'll check out the bartonella 'henslae' with my vet.
Thanks for your help. I hope you kitty can blow the staff infection.  
It is a shame that you have to do Baytril again.

Hopefully a good probiotic will help him tolerate another round.
Jane

On Jan 29, 2008, at 2:48 AM, catatonya wrote:

I talked to the vet today, and the culture came back as a staff  
infection!?!?


They are putting him on baytril for 14 days this time, and I'm to  
take him back in before the 14 days are over to see if the time  
needs to be extended.


I also found an article when I googled chronic uri's on something  
called bartonella henslae (I think I spelled the second part right)  
that said this was something relatively new.  You might want to  
check that out.


Did your vet do an actual culture on your cat?

t

Jane Lyons [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Tonya, I've been dealing with pretty much the same symptoms for the  
(almost) year that I've had MeMe. I've
been able to get rid of it with l-lycine and DMG liquid  
supplements, but as soon as she is stressed (a trip to the

vet) her one nostril gets runny.
We have also tried antibiotics, without success. We've been able to  
clear it up for months on end, but the latest
trip to the vet brought it back. If you haven't used l-lycine or  
DMG, you might give it a try.


Jane
On Jan 27, 2008, at 7:25 AM, catatonya wrote:


Hi Guys,

I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper  
respiratory problem.  He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds  
of different antibiotics, and had x-rays done to see if there was  
any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal cavities.


We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His  
lungs are clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.


The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if  
there's some kind of weird bacterial thing going on.


I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else  
has this.


Any ideas???

thanks in advance,
tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and  
her gums looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy.  
After Christmas, we went to PetSmart and got her a little red  
tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I expected a bit of a fight,  
but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth brushed every  
night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste  
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in.  
So far: no more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know  
if anyone else had success with this? We also use tartar control  
treats. I don't usually post because I'm a FeLV noob! However,  
I've learned a lot  from this list and thought I'd post this since  
it worked well for Autumn.


~Susan A.








Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-28 Thread catatonya
I talked to the vet today, and the culture came back as a staff infection!?!?
   
  They are putting him on baytril for 14 days this time, and I'm to take him 
back in before the 14 days are over to see if the time needs to be extended.
   
  I also found an article when I googled chronic uri's on something called 
bartonella henslae (I think I spelled the second part right) that said this was 
something relatively new.  You might want to check that out.
   
  Did your vet do an actual culture on your cat?
   
  t

Jane Lyons [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Tonya, I've been dealing with pretty much the same symptoms for the (almost) 
year that I've had MeMe. I've  been able to get rid of it with l-lycine and DMG 
liquid supplements, but as soon as she is stressed (a trip to the
  vet) her one nostril gets runny.
  We have also tried antibiotics, without success. We've been able to clear it 
up for months on end, but the latest
  trip to the vet brought it back. If you haven't used l-lycine or DMG, you 
might give it a try.
  

  Jane
On Jan 27, 2008, at 7:25 AM, catatonya wrote:

Hi Guys,
   
  I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper respiratory problem. 
 He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds of different antibiotics, and had 
x-rays done to see if there was any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal 
cavities.
   
  We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His lungs are 
clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.
   
  The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's some kind 
of weird bacterial thing going on.
   
  I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else has this.
   
  Any ideas???
   
  thanks in advance,
  tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and her gums 
looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After Christmas, we went 
to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I 
expected a bit of a fight, but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth 
brushed every night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste 
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far: no 
more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if anyone else had 
success with this? We also use tartar control treats. I don't usually post 
because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've learned a lot  from this list and 
thought I'd post this since it worked well for Autumn.

~Susan A.







Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-28 Thread catatonya
Feliway, spray or diffuser, and rescue remedy (ear or in water) have never 
helped either with this cat. :(
   
  However since returning home he has been much more sociable after his ordeal 
at the vet's.  I expected the opposite!
   
  tonya

Marylyn [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  I haven't followed this but, to relieve stress, Feliway spray, Rescue Remedy 
and Cat Nap (a spray, not catnip) work for me.  Even, somewhat, at the vets' 
office. 
On Jan 27, 2008, at 4:20 PM, Jane Lyons wrote:

Tonya, I've been dealing with pretty much the same symptoms for the 
(almost) year that I've had MeMe. I've  been able to get rid of it with 
l-lycine and DMG liquid supplements, but as soon as she is stressed (a trip to 
the
  vet) her one nostril gets runny.
  We have also tried antibiotics, without success. We've been able to clear it 
up for months on end, but the latest
  trip to the vet brought it back. If you haven't used l-lycine or DMG, you 
might give it a try.
  

  Jane
On Jan 27, 2008, at 7:25 AM, catatonya wrote:

Hi Guys,
   
  I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper respiratory problem. 
 He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds of different antibiotics, and had 
x-rays done to see if there was any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal 
cavities.
   
  We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His lungs are 
clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.
   
  The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's some kind 
of weird bacterial thing going on.
   
  I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else has this.
   
  Any ideas???
   
  thanks in advance,
  tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and her gums 
looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After Christmas, we went 
to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I 
expected a bit of a fight, but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth 
brushed every night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste 
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far: no 
more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if anyone else had 
success with this? We also use tartar control treats. I don't usually post 
because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've learned a lot  from this list and 
thought I'd post this since it worked well for Autumn.

~Susan A.










upper respiratory???

2008-01-27 Thread catatonya
Hi Guys,
   
  I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper respiratory problem. 
 He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds of different antibiotics, and had 
x-rays done to see if there was any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal 
cavities.
   
  We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His lungs are 
clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.
   
  The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's some kind 
of weird bacterial thing going on.
   
  I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else has this.
   
  Any ideas???
   
  thanks in advance,
  tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and her gums 
looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After Christmas, we went 
to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I 
expected a bit of a fight, but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth 
brushed every night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste 
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far: no 
more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if anyone else had 
success with this? We also use tartar control treats. I don't usually post 
because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've learned a lot  from this list and 
thought I'd post this since it worked well for Autumn.

~Susan A.



Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-27 Thread Pat Kachur
Any chance that it could be asthma or some type of allergy?
  - Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2008 7:25 AM
  Subject: upper respiratory???


  Hi Guys,

  I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper respiratory problem. 
 He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds of different antibiotics, and had 
x-rays done to see if there was any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal 
cavities.

  We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His lungs are 
clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.

  The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's some kind 
of weird bacterial thing going on.

  I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else has this.

  Any ideas???

  thanks in advance,
  tonya

  Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and her gums 
looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After Christmas, we went 
to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I 
expected a bit of a fight, but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth 
brushed every night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste 
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far: no 
more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if anyone else had 
success with this? We also use tartar control treats. I don't usually post 
because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've learned a lot  from this list and 
thought I'd post this since it worked well for Autumn.

~Susan A.




Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-27 Thread Sherry DeHaan
Hi Tonya,maybe he could have allergies?? I know we have a couple cats at the 
sanctuary who have what we call chronic snoogies.But my girl Mystique sounds 
like she has a runny nose quite a bit to but she seems fine.I keep a close eye 
on her to make sure it doesn't turn into something worse,since she is fiv+.
  Good luck I hope Sneaker gets better soon.
  Sherry

catatonya [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Hi Guys,
   
  I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper respiratory problem. 
 He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds of different antibiotics, and had 
x-rays done to see if there was any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal 
cavities.
   
  We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His lungs are 
clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.
   
  The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's some kind 
of weird bacterial thing going on.
   
  I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else has this.
   
  Any ideas???
   
  thanks in advance,
  tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and her gums 
looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After Christmas, we went 
to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I 
expected a bit of a fight, but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth 
brushed every night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste 
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far: no 
more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if anyone else had 
success with this? We also use tartar control treats. I don't usually post 
because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've learned a lot  from this list and 
thought I'd post this since it worked well for Autumn.

~Susan A.



   
-
Never miss a thing.   Make Yahoo your homepage.

Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-27 Thread catatonya
I'm wondering about allergies.

Pat Kachur [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:  Any chance that it could be 
asthma or some type of allergy?
- Original Message - 
  From: catatonya 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2008 7:25 AM
  Subject: upper respiratory???
  

  Hi Guys,
   
  I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper respiratory problem. 
 He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds of different antibiotics, and had 
x-rays done to see if there was any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal 
cavities.
   
  We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His lungs are 
clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.
   
  The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's some kind 
of weird bacterial thing going on.
   
  I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else has this.
   
  Any ideas???
   
  thanks in advance,
  tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and her gums 
looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After Christmas, we went 
to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush and malt flavored paste. I 
expected a bit of a fight, but she loves the flavor and runs to get her teeth 
brushed every night. She doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste 
off the brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far: no 
more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if anyone else had 
success with this? We also use tartar control treats. I don't usually post 
because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've learned a lot  from this list and 
thought I'd post this since it worked well for Autumn.

~Susan A.




Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-27 Thread Jane Lyons
Tonya, I've been dealing with pretty much the same symptoms for the  
(almost) year that I've had MeMe. I've
been able to get rid of it with l-lycine and DMG liquid supplements,  
but as soon as she is stressed (a trip to the

vet) her one nostril gets runny.
We have also tried antibiotics, without success. We've been able to  
clear it up for months on end, but the latest
trip to the vet brought it back. If you haven't used l-lycine or DMG,  
you might give it a try.


Jane
On Jan 27, 2008, at 7:25 AM, catatonya wrote:


Hi Guys,

I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper  
respiratory problem.  He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds  
of different antibiotics, and had x-rays done to see if there was  
any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal cavities.


We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His  
lungs are clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.


The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's  
some kind of weird bacterial thing going on.


I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else  
has this.


Any ideas???

thanks in advance,
tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and  
her gums looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After  
Christmas, we went to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush  
and malt flavored paste. I expected a bit of a fight, but she loves  
the flavor and runs to get her teeth brushed every night. She  
doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste off the  
brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far:  
no more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if  
anyone else had success with this? We also use tartar control  
treats. I don't usually post because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've  
learned a lot  from this list and thought I'd post this since it  
worked well for Autumn.


~Susan A.





Re: upper respiratory???

2008-01-27 Thread Marylyn
I haven't followed this but, to relieve stress, Feliway spray, Rescue  
Remedy and Cat Nap (a spray, not catnip) work for me.  Even, somewhat,  
at the vets' office.

On Jan 27, 2008, at 4:20 PM, Jane Lyons wrote:

Tonya, I've been dealing with pretty much the same symptoms for the  
(almost) year that I've had MeMe. I've
been able to get rid of it with l-lycine and DMG liquid supplements,  
but as soon as she is stressed (a trip to the

vet) her one nostril gets runny.
We have also tried antibiotics, without success. We've been able to  
clear it up for months on end, but the latest
trip to the vet brought it back. If you haven't used l-lycine or  
DMG, you might give it a try.


Jane
On Jan 27, 2008, at 7:25 AM, catatonya wrote:


Hi Guys,

I have a semi-feral cat, Sneaker who has a chronic upper  
respiratory problem.  He has been to the vet, has been on 2 rounds  
of different antibiotics, and had x-rays done to see if there was  
any type of mass (cancer, etc...) in his nasal cavities.


We are finding nothing.  His discharge (if any) is clear.  His  
lungs are clear.  He simply breathes as if he's got a stuffy nose.


The last thing we did was the x-ray and a culture to see if there's  
some kind of weird bacterial thing going on.


I have 5 other cats here, including my positive, and no one else  
has this.


Any ideas???

thanks in advance,
tonya

Susan Ang [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
In December, Autumn developed bad breath. I checked her mouth and  
her gums looked inflamed and a few of her teeth were yellowy. After  
Christmas, we went to PetSmart and got her a little red tooth brush  
and malt flavored paste. I expected a bit of a fight, but she loves  
the flavor and runs to get her teeth brushed every night. She  
doesn't like the brushing so much as licking the paste off the  
brush, but I am able to get some good, light scrubbing in. So far:  
no more bad breath and her gums look healthy. I don't know if  
anyone else had success with this? We also use tartar control  
treats. I don't usually post because I'm a FeLV noob! However, I've  
learned a lot  from this list and thought I'd post this since it  
worked well for Autumn.


~Susan A.







Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread PEC2851



Chandra~
When we have outbreaks of severe URI's at the shelter, we do use 
humidifiers/vaporizers in our Felv rooms. And it does seem to help.
With one of my boys, who was prone to URI's, I would put him in my half 
bath with the steam vaporizer on. It really worked wonders for him, and having 
him in a smaller, confined area seemed to work best. Of course, I would have to 
spend time with him..
But, he did lose the congestion.
My vet also had me use "Little Noses", the pediatric nasal drops. What did 
the vet give you, was it saline drops?
Usually, using the nasal drops helps bring relief relatively quick. 
Just have to administer them about every 4 hours.
Is Buddha still on clavamox? My little Gus responded best to his URIs 
with either doxycycline or Zenequin. Just tossing things out 
here
Also, he was prescribed an antihistamine to help w/ breathing.

It sounds like the Alternative med. vet is understanding and 
compassionate. There should be more of them out there.

I will be praying for Buddha's recovery. Please keep us updated.
And I am sure other members will have some very good information to 
contribute as for addressing Buddha' s Felv status, in regards to supplements 
etc. (Interferon, etc)

And as far as not going to the vets for the 8 years, I have to agree with 
your decision. I am quite leery of over-vaccinating  exposing my companions 
to whatever viruses are lurking at the time. It sounds like you have been 
a very caring guardian for your boy, he is a lucky boy.
I hope that you will have much more time together!

Please, keep us updated. You'll find this is a very caring, 
compassionate  supportive group. Also, very well informed on Felv ~ I 
can't stress that enough.
Give Buddha a hug!
Fondly,
Patti



Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infections

2005-12-15 Thread TenHouseCats
i have never heard of any reason NOT to use a hudifier for a FeLV
cat, nor for one with cancer--i'd think, speaking as a
nonprofessional!, that having unobstructed airways could only be a
benefit in any condition!

what WAS suggested to me by a persian expert was to get a nebulizer
rather than a humidifier to be sure you were getting the correct
effect. i've never used one of those, and if they're employed the same
way with cats as they are with humans, i'd think that'd be more
stressful to a highly compromised cat

sounds like you have a great vet, now!

GLOW for you and for buddha (i hated cats til i was 26, and one of
my shelties became best friends with a beautiful, black, part-persian
girl named buddha.. she became FirstCat, and i haven't had a dog
since--so any kitty named buddha has a special place in my heart)

MC

--
MaryChristine

AIM / YAHOO: TenHouseCats
MSN: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
ICQ: 289856892



Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread Lernermichelle



Immuno-regulin helped two of my cats with URI-- one of them had pneumonia. 
It is an immune booster, you can get it through Revival online, and there are 
articles about it on the felineleukemia.org web page.

Chemo is often very helpful to cats with lymphoma, though they say that 
doing steroids first reduces the effectiveness. There are other steroids besides 
prednisone that tend to work better on lymphoma. A vet who was a friend of a 
friend taught me that giving 1/2 cc dexamethasone and 1/2 cc depomedrol in shot 
form really shrinks the tumor and makes them feel good. At first it is like once 
a month or every few weeks, but as they deteriorate it is more often. 
Stronger than pred and longer lasting, plus no pills. She said she 
oaccasionally had a cat go 6 months with lymphoma on these shots without chemo, 
which is pretty long.

14 years is very inspiring. I hope he has several more.
Michelle


Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread chandra simms
I haven't tried a vaporizer yet.  I did try taking him
into the bathroom and letting it fill up with steam,
but it didn't seem to help much.  
The vet gave me Euphorbium, which I have never heard
of, but it seems to be a homeopathic nasal spray for
humans.  I was told to give him one squirt up each
nostril daily, but it doesn't seem to be doing a thing
for him.  His breathing hasn't improved at all since
Monday, except that he is getting much better at
breathing through his mouth.  I am also giving him
Nose Relief drops in his food and water 3 times a
day, but since he didn't eat for 2 days, we are a
little behind on that med.  He seems to be taking the
liquid food very well again today.  

I wasn't given any type of antihistamine.  Do you
think an antihistamine would help clear up his nose?
and if so, which should I give him.  

I am worried that maybe I am just being over concerned
about his nose being stopped up.  The vet seemed to
think that it would either clear up from the meds he
is taking or not, but that he was breathing ok through
his mouth so it wasn't critical to clear up his nasal
passages.  

Honestly I don't know if anything will work though. 
His nasal discharge was a mixture of blood, and
whatever other fluids were up in his sinuses (the vet
said the tumors were shrinking and could have caused
the increase in discharge).  The thing is, when it
dries, it is almost like rubber cement.  It is thick
and hard, yet almost rubbery.  It is so weird.  I have
never seen anything like it.  It has been almost
impossible to clean it all off his face.  

I suppose that being a Persian might also have
something to do with it as well.  I have heard that
Persians sometimes have chronic trouble with their
noses, but he has never had any sort of problems until
now.  

His lungs are thankfully still clear, so if anyone has
ideas as to what might work to break-up what is in his
nose, please let me know.  

My vet left today to go out of town for 2 weeks on
holiday, so I don't know if I can get any new meds
prescribed until she returns.  She said the vet tech.
would still be available so that we can go in for
fluids or if things go down hill, we can go in for
other options.



--- [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Chandra~
 When we have outbreaks of severe URI's at the
 shelter, we do use  
 humidifiers/vaporizers in our Felv rooms. And it
 does seem to help.
 With one of my boys, who was prone to URI's, I would
 put him in my half  bath 
 with the steam vaporizer on. It really worked
 wonders for him, and having  
 him in a smaller, confined area seemed to work best.
 Of course, I would have to  
 spend time with him..
 But, he did lose the congestion.
 My vet also had me use Little Noses, the pediatric
 nasal drops. What did  
 the vet give you, was it saline drops?
 Usually, using the nasal drops helps bring relief
 relatively quick.   Just 
 have to administer them about every 4 hours.
 Is Buddha still on clavamox?  My little Gus
 responded best to his URIs  with 
 either doxycycline or Zenequin.  Just tossing things
 out  here
 Also, he was prescribed an antihistamine to help w/
 breathing.
  
 It sounds like the Alternative med. vet is
 understanding and  compassionate.  
 There should be more of them out there.
  
 I will be praying for Buddha's recovery. Please keep
 us updated.
 And I am sure other members will have some very good
 information to  
 contribute as for addressing Buddha' s Felv status,
 in regards to supplements  etc. 
 (Interferon, etc)
  
 And as far as not going to the vets for the 8 years,
 I have to agree with  
 your decision. I am quite leery of over-vaccinating
  exposing my companions  to 
 whatever viruses are lurking at the time.  It sounds
 like you have been  a 
 very caring guardian for your boy, he is a lucky
 boy.
 I hope that you will have much more time together!
  
 Please, keep us updated.  You'll find this is a very
 caring,  compassionate  
 supportive group.  Also, very well informed on Felv
 ~ I  can't stress that 
 enough.
 Give Buddha a hug!
 Fondly,
 Patti
 
 



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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread Lernermichelle



Are you sure that it is a cold and not lymphoma in his nasal passage? That 
is one of the places that they get lymphoma. One of my cats who died of lymphoma 
(I think, it was never definitively diagnosed) had a stuffy nose the whole time 
he was sick and nothing helped and I feel pretty sure at this point it was 
cancer and not mucous.
Michelle


Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread chandra simms
It could be.  My husband actually suggested that it
might be caused by the cancer and not an infection,
but I don't think our vet ever said for sure.  Maybe
that is why she said that it would either respond to
the meds or not.  
I was a little out of it when we took him in
yesterday.  Between me getting up to check on him and
him waking me up, I have only been sleeping for an
hour or so at a time since Sunday night. 

We know he had a fairly large tumor behind his right
eye, which was causing it to discharge and droop,
however that particular tumor has shrunk considerably.
 His eye is almost back to normal so it is quite
possible that he does have tumors in his nose, but
shouldn't they be responding to the steroids too?  




--- [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Are you sure that it is a cold and not lymphoma in
 his nasal passage? That  
 is one of the places that they get lymphoma. One of
 my cats who died of 
 lymphoma  (I think, it was never definitively
 diagnosed) had a stuffy nose the whole 
 time  he was sick and nothing helped and I feel
 pretty sure at this point it 
 was  cancer and not mucous.
 Michelle
 


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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread Lernermichelle




I am, unfortunately, very familiar with the feeling of only sleeping an 
hour or so due to checking constantly on a cat with cancer. I am sorry. It is 
horrible.

Yes, I would think it would respond to the steroids too, but the steroids 
kept Buddy going for about 3 months and generally feeling good sometimes, but 
even when feeling good his nose remained stuffy. It could just be that the 
nasal passage is so narrow that even a small amount of tumor, after it has 
shrunk, is still somewhat of an obstruction, whereas other places in the body if 
it gets small enough it does not really interfere with function. Don't know, 
just speculating. You could ask to try the stronger steroids and see if 
they help. One word of caution though on the stronger steroids-- when Buddy had 
been on them for a few months his skin got kind of thin and cut easily and he 
got a big wound on his back where we were giving him shots and fluids. it was 
awful. I do not know if this was from the steroids themselves, as this did not 
happen to my others, but someone else told me once that after a few years on a 
milder steroid the same happened to her cat, so I thought it might have been 
from that. It is a longer-term problem, though, and obviously not as much 
a problem as the cancer.

I would do the humidifier anyway. But in terms of bothering him with meds 
and nasal spray, if they don't work within a few days I think I would stop using 
them as it probably stresses him out somewhat.

Michelle

In a message dated 12/15/2005 12:24:47 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
It could 
  be. My husband actually suggested that itmight be caused by the 
  cancer and not an infection,but I don't think our vet ever said for 
  sure. Maybethat is why she said that it would either respond 
  tothe meds or not. I was a little out of it when we took him 
  inyesterday. Between me getting up to check on him andhim waking 
  me up, I have only been sleeping for anhour or so at a time since Sunday 
  night. We know he had a fairly large tumor behind his righteye, 
  which was causing it to discharge and droop,however that particular tumor 
  has shrunk considerably.His eye is almost back to normal so it is 
  quitepossible that he does have tumors in his nose, butshouldn't they 
  be responding to the steroids too? 




Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread TenHouseCats
with persians, stuffy noses are very often a problem--sometimes it's
nothing more than their anatomy--if there was a tumor by his eyes, i'd
almost expect sinus/nasal impingement that even with the tumor
shrinking might persist. i'd go with the vaporizer, and nasal drops
if, as michelle said, it doesn't stress him out. as long as he's
getting enough air i wouldn't worry too much only because those
smushed-faced ones (who needs a profile, anyway?, my eight ask) can't
be judged by ordinary standards!

MC

--
MaryChristine

AIM / YAHOO: TenHouseCats
MSN: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
ICQ: 289856892



Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infections

2005-12-15 Thread wendy
Hi Chandra,

Thank you for sharing your story about Buddha.  What a
wonderful story.  I hope that Buddha pulls through and
will keep him in my prayers.  I also live in the
Dallas area-Rockwall.  I looked up that clinic and
have added the information to my favorites in case I
need to take one of my kitties.  Thank you for the
recommendation.  I wish I would have known about this
vet two months ago, when my Cricket started getting
sick.  I lost him on November 10th.  I am sorry that I
don't have any advice on URI's, but I do want to
encourage you to continue hoping for the best.  I know
you are probably beside yourself right now worrying
about Buddha, but it sounds as if you have a great
outlook on this situation.  And praise to you for
taking such wonderful care of him for the past 14
years.  

Please keep us posted on Buddha's condition and if you
need anything, just ask.

:)
Wendy

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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread wendy
Chandra,

I have a bottle of ImmunoRegulin that I ordered online
in November.  Cricket only had two doses of it before
he passed and you are welcome to it if you want it. 
Let me know.

:)
Wendy

--- [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Immuno-regulin helped two of my cats with URI-- one
 of them had pneumonia.  
 It is an immune booster, you can get it through
 Revival online, and there are  
 articles about it on the felineleukemia.org web
 page.
  
 
 Chemo is often very helpful to cats with lymphoma,
 though they say that  
 doing steroids first reduces the effectiveness.
 There are other steroids besides  
 prednisone that tend to work better on lymphoma. A
 vet who was a friend of a  
 friend taught me that giving 1/2 cc dexamethasone
 and 1/2 cc depomedrol in 
 shot  form really shrinks the tumor and makes them
 feel good. At first it is like 
 once  a month or every few weeks, but as they
 deteriorate it is more often.   
 Stronger than pred and longer lasting, plus no
 pills.  She said she  
 oaccasionally had a cat go 6 months with lymphoma on
 these shots without chemo,  which 
 is pretty long.
  
 14 years is very inspiring. I hope he has several
 more.
 Michelle
 


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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infections

2005-12-15 Thread PEC2851




In a message dated 12/15/05 9:16:46 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
and if 
  they're employed the sameway with cats as they are with humans, i'd think 
  that'd be morestressful to a highly compromised 
cat

I must agree. Nebulizers can be VERY 
stressful on sick fur-kids.
Also, I must admit, stressful to the human having to administer it!
I think vaporizers are just as effective, although medication is put in 
nebulizer along with waterI just forget what it was we put in.. (senior 
moment)
Patti



Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread chandra simms
Wendy,
Wow, that is so generous of you.  You are so sweet.
You know, I was just telling my husband last night
that if Buddha has any meds left over when he passes,
I would like to see if it is possible to donate them
to someone else who is going through the same thing we
are but who might not be able to afford all the
treatments and meds, and then the very next day you
made the same sweet sweet offer.  That really means a
lot to me.

I have a question though, does ImmunoRegulin need to
be given as a shot, or is it something that can be
given orally?

I am beginning to think that it isn't so much the URI
that is bothering him, but the cancer.  He is not
doing well this afternoon.  He ate some this morning,
but only after much coaxing.  He seems to respond
better to my husband feeding him than when I try,
which seems to be the case with almost everything this
past week.  

He is very, very unhappy with me and I don't know why.
 If I try to pet him, he gets up and walks away, which
given his weak state is no small feat. 
Did you go through anything like that when your cat
was sick?  He has never acted like this before in his
life.  He is usually soo needy.  He has always
acted as if the sole purpose of anyone who comes into
my house is to pet him and love on him.  Until a week
ago, if we were sitting down, he was in one of our
laps or trying to get into one of our laps.  
Now I can't even sit down on the floor next to him
very long before he tries to move away.
It really makes me sad.  Almost everything that was
unique and wonderful about his personality is gone. 
He seems as if he is becoming a sick, tired, shell of
the cat he used to be.  
Julian, my husband, and I have decided that we are not
going to give up hope, but we are also worried that
Buddha might be ready to go, but that we are just not
letting him.  Yet at the same time, it still seems
like he is willing to fight through this.  The part
that I haven't figured out yet is when do you know
when they are tired of fighting and you are just
keeping them alive to make yourself happy?

--- wendy [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Chandra,
 
 I have a bottle of ImmunoRegulin that I ordered
 online
 in November.  Cricket only had two doses of it
 before
 he passed and you are welcome to it if you want it. 
 Let me know.
 
 :)
 Wendy
 


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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread TenHouseCats
i always ask them if they're ready to go, and try really hard to
listen to THEM, and not my own need to keep trying to help. i tell
them to tell me when it's time; i pay great attention to whether they
accept or fight treatment (fluids, force-feeding) i let them be by
themselves if that's what they need (tho it kills me to do so; when
someone wants to be off on their own, i just make sure they're
comfortable, and keep coming by to check. one other thing that i do is
to tell them, out loud, that they can leave when it's their time, that
i'll be okay, that they don't need to stay for me

the most valuable thing i've ever been told is that it's better to
send them home one day too early than 5 minutes too late

MC

--
MaryChristine

AIM / YAHOO: TenHouseCats
MSN: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
ICQ: 289856892



Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread Nina

Hello Chandra,
As I was reading your post about Buddha's behavior, (responding to your 
husband better), I was thinking that he may be preparing himself for the 
transition, then when you said how uncharacteristic it is of him, and 
how his personality seems to have changed...  My Grace did the same 
thing and even after I figured out that she was disconnecting from 
this plane and spending more time out of her body, it still hurt so 
much to not be able to cuddle and comfort her.  She just didn't want 
it.  I respected her wishes and she rewarded me with one final loving 
connection when we were in the vet's office waiting to help her cross 
over.  It may just be that Buddha is in a great deal of discomfort, but 
it might also be that he feels your energy desperate for him to stay and 
he just isn't able to handle it.  I so feel for you, you've been such a 
good mom and I'm certain that Buddha loves you very much.  It's so hard 
to let go, whenever the time comes, our time together is never long 
enough.  I so very much hope I'm wrong and I'm praying for a long and 
happy remission.

Much love to you,
Nina





Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread Lernermichelle



Chandra, 

 What you and Buddha are going through is very common, 
unfortunately, with cancer. All my babies who had cancer got that way when 
they did not feel well. Sometimes they even hid. They went up and down, 
though. Simon got so he did not want to be touched at all, would not touch 
food or water, and could not even walk. We did those strong steroid 
shots and two days later, when I thought he would pass at any moment, he sat up 
and asked for food and water, then was running around and affectionate the next 
day. He went back to chemo and had another good month. You just don't 
know.

 yes, I-R needs to be given as a shot, as an IV shot usually, 
by a vet. Seriously, given what you are describing, if you do not want to 
try chemo I would really ask for dexamethasone and depomedrol shots (1/2 cc 
each, can be combined) to make him feel better. These steroids are so much 
stronger and longer-lasting than prednisone, and they both increase appetite and 
energy and also make them feel happier. Josephine had lymphoma in her 
kidneys and intestines, and the tumors in her intestines would bulge out when 
the shots were wearing off, and within a few hours of giving her a new round the 
tumors would visibly shrink and she would get up and eat. Dexamethasone works 
very quickly, is very strong, and wears off within a day or so. Depomedrol takes 
a few days to kick in, and lasts for a long time (depending on stage of illness 
from a few days to a few weeks). The combination gives them a strong 
fast-acting steroid that shrinks the tumor and gives them energy fast (the dex) 
and by the time that starts wearing off the depo kicks in. It really does 
work well. It brought Simon back from the precipice, to the surprise even of the 
oncologist who had had to be talked into giving the shots. Ask others on this 
list-- I was giving hourly reports on how Simon was doing and not a soul on this 
list, myself included, thought he would last another day, and then all of a 
sudden he was up and about and hungry and happy and his blood values (liver and 
red blood cell) were so much better he was okayed for more chemo. 

Anyway, that is my suggestion. The steroids do not have any bad side 
effects short-term, are not expensive, and sometimes make them feel so much 
better. If they do not work, then it means they really are very close to the 
end.

Michelle


Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread TenHouseCats
nina, i know what you mean about them disconnecting--i've often felt
that their spirits were gone before their bodies quite let go; i've
also seen them go into what looks like a meditative state, as if they
were making all their own preparations, regardless of their humans or
other companions.  sometimes the cuddling and holding we want to give
is for US, and it's just not what they are needing. they KNOW they are
loved, and they KNOW that leaving this plane is just part of the
cycle in those cases, i make sure that i hug them with white light
and radiated love--chosing to believe that they WILL accept the
vibration

i've also noticed that, often, right before they are leaving behind
their old, used bodies, they perk up and are completely present.
often, i'll see them get playful, almost kittenish--i think that is
their gift to us, reminding us to remember THEM as they were
throughout their lives, not just in their last days or hours.

--
MaryChristine

AIM / YAHOO: TenHouseCats
MSN: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
ICQ: 289856892



Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread wendy
Hey Chandra,

I am sorry that Buddha isn't doing well this
afternoon.  That really stinks.  Yes, the
ImmunoRegulin has to be injected into a vein.  I was
totally opposed to that at first, because Cricket was
what they call fractious, which means he could really
act crazy at the vet.  lol.  But Cricket was feeling
so badly that he didn't fight it at all the first
time, and it was quick.  The doctor didn't charge me
the first time, and then charged me $10 tech time fee
the next.  They injected it into his front paw, on the
side.  They shaved it there first.  I couldn't tell if
it helped Cricket or not as he went downhill so fast,
but he did seem to do better after the first
injection.  He just couldn't kick the anemia.  There
are a lot of people here who really like IR.  They
also like something called Interferon, which you might
ask about.  

Yes, Cricket seemed a little miffed at me sometimes
during the month he was sick.  It made me feel
horrible to be trying to help him, yet I knew he
didn't understand why I was doing these things. 
Giving him meds all the time, force feeding him,
taking him to the vet where they gave him shots or
gave him anesthesia.  It was a LOONG month, and I
was so emotionally drained from all the stress.  It's
hard.  I still have some of Cricket's other meds as
well as the IR, but just have had a hard time dealing
with his loss, so I haven't gotten around to donating
them yet.  I have been meaning to post something on
the Petsmart board.  I also told my vet that it was
available, but they haven't called yet.  I also have
canned A/D, which is what they feed anorexic cats, if
you need some.  Ask your vet.  

There are some people on this site that use animal
communicators.  I never used one, never even knew what
they were until I came to this site in November. 
Hideyo uses one all the time with her cats.  The
animal communicator is supposed to be able to act as a
channel between you and your cat.  Maybe that might be
an option for you in finding out what is going on in
Buddha's little mind.  She also used the AC to find
out if the animal is ready to pass over the bridge,
which is what we call dying around here.  He probably
feels pretty badly and might not want to be around
anyone much.  Cricket kept climbing under our bedroom
furniture.  I was raised in the country.  I know from
that experience that when one of our animals was
dying, they would wonder away from the home to do it. 
I wonder why animals do this.  I am not saying that's
what Buddha is doing.  I don't know.  But it might
help explain his behavior.  When I am sick, I don't
want anyone touching me.  Maybe it's that type of
thing.

You and your husband will know when it's time to let
Buddha go, if that time is near.  You will just know. 
I know that sounds crazy, but it's not.  I kept
thinking that it was time for Cricket, but he lasted
another two weeks before I took him in to get a
feeding tube inserted because he wasn't eating, and he
passed away that night.  He never quite got over the
anesthesia, and couldn't breathe very well.  You
should know that after a short time of not eating (2
days???), kitties can develop fatty liver disease,
which will kill them.  That's why I went in for the
feeding tube.  But Cricket was ready to go, and now I
regret doing the tube.  I wish I would have helped him
over the bridge that afternoon, instead of inserting
the tube, but I couldn't have known, and given the
same circumstances today, even knowing what happened
with Cricket, I would probably do the same.  It's so
hard to give up on them.  You never know when or if
they will turn the corner.
 
I am so sorry you and Buddha are going through this. 
Just hang in there and take each minute as it comes,
and be really easy on yourself right now.  

:)
Wendy

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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infectio...

2005-12-15 Thread wendy
I so hope it's true that their spirits leave before
their bodies give out.  The thought of that makes me
feel better about Cricket's passing.

--- TenHouseCats [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 nina, i know what you mean about them
 disconnecting--i've often felt
 that their spirits were gone before their bodies
 quite let go; i've
 also seen them go into what looks like a meditative
 state, as if they
 were making all their own preparations, regardless
 of their humans or
 other companions.  sometimes the cuddling and
 holding we want to give
 is for US, and it's just not what they are needing.
 they KNOW they are
 loved, and they KNOW that leaving this plane is just
 part of the
 cycle in those cases, i make sure that i hug
 them with white light
 and radiated love--chosing to believe that they WILL
 accept the
 vibration
 
 i've also noticed that, often, right before they are
 leaving behind
 their old, used bodies, they perk up and are
 completely present.
 often, i'll see them get playful, almost
 kittenish--i think that is
 their gift to us, reminding us to remember THEM as
 they were
 throughout their lives, not just in their last days
 or hours.
 
 --
 MaryChristine
 
 AIM / YAHOO: TenHouseCats
 MSN: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 ICQ: 289856892
 
 


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Re: Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infections

2005-12-15 Thread catatonya
It sounds like Buddha is a real fighter. I had success using a holistic vet to get one of my positives through upper respiratory problems as a young cat. I lost her at about 8 years old.The humidifier will help. Just don't put any kind of eucalyptus smelling stuff in it or anything like that. I'm sure others on the list will have some advice too. I think they have used 'little noses' or something like that. I know the emergency room used some kind of children's nose drops on CC when she was there as well.I hope Buddha turns this around and feels better soon!tonyachandra simms [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:  I have a few questions and hopefully some words ofhope and comfort about sharing your life with an
 FeLVpositive cat. My cat, Buddha, tested positive for FeLV 8 years ago. At the time I had him tested he was not sick orshowing any signs that he might be FeLV positive. Hehad been vaccinated regularly, however one of mymothers cats had recently been diagnosed with FeLV andwas quickly deteriorating. Although Buddha and I hadbeen away at college for 2 years, he had spent timewith the infected cat when we still lived at home so Iwent ahead and had him tested just to be on the safeside. When he tested positive it was like someone hadreached in and ripped out my heart. At the time hewas already 7 years old and I had hoped that he wouldlive to a ripe old age. Our family vet suggested thatI have him tested again in 60-90 days to rule out afalse positive, but he said that he probably wouldn'tlive that long. Since Buddha had never been sick a day in his life,Buddha and I decided then and there that he was
 goingto be one of the rare and lucky few that don't succumbto the disease. Over the next 8 years he lived a veryhappy, healthy and stress free life. He celebrated his 14th birthday on October 13, 2005and it seemed as if he would sail through another yearwithout any problems. However, on November 7th he began sneezing, which thenturned to a runny nose and an irritated, watery lefteye. My husband and I decided he needed to see thevet, but couldn't get an appointment until the 11th. On the morning of November 9th, I woke up to the soundof Buddha having a sneezing and coughing fit. Iquickly noticed that he also had a bloody nose. I hadnever even heard of cats getting bloody noses, so Icalled my vet and told them that it was an emergency. I rushed him to the vet, where after $300 worth oftests, I was given frustrating news. Although all ofBuddha's blood work came back perfect and his organfunction was normal, his
 red and white blood count wasnormal, and even his cholesterol was good, I was givena bottle of Clavimox for his upper respiratoryinfection and was told to take him home and wait forhim to die. Probably within a week. This was exactly the reason I had avoided taking himto the vet for the past 8 years, which some peoplemight see as irresponsible, however he was never sick,never went outdoors, was never exposed to otheranimals and I was concerned about injection sitesarcoma. Also, I had never found a vet who had apositive outlook on FeLV infected cats. For a month he seemed as if he was going to yet againprove the "vet of doom" wrong, however a little over aweek ago I once again awoke to the sound of Buddhacoughing and sneezing, this time much worse. He wasvery lethargic and could barely open his left eye. Hewas so limp and listless, I was worried we wouldn't beable to get him to the vet in time. This
 time my husband and I took him to an vet thatpractices alternative medicine, in addition toconventional veterinary medicine and also specializesin FeLV positive cats. It was as if an angel had come into our lives. (Ifanyone reading this has a cat and lives in the NorthTexas/DFW region, I HIGHLY recommend Dr. Ballard atthe Alternative Veterinary Hospital)She immediately diagnosed him with Lymphatic Cancerand started him on steroid therapy supplemented withhomeopathic Immune System boosters, stress relievingdrops, Nutri-Cal vitamin gel, and more Clavimox. However, she did say that this was only going to be ashort-term solution and that IF he responded to thesteroid treatment and his tumors began to shrink, itwould only buy us a few weeks to months, a year at themost, which we were more than willing to take.By the time we got into the car to come home he wasalmost back to his old self. He was moving
 around,vocal and purring.I took Buddha back for his follow-up exam last Friday.His tumors had been responding very well to thesteroids and he seemed to be getting over his upperrespiratory infection. Which brings us to this week. At about 3am Mondaymorning I woke to the sound of him wheezing andsnorting. Like a person with a really stopped-upnose, who still tries to breath through their nose butcan't. I called the vet and she had me come in andpick up some nasal spray and drops for his water. We noticed Tuesday afternoon that he hadn't eaten allday. By Tuesday night he was breathing almostexclusively t

Buddha's 14 success story and a Question about Upper Respiratory infections

2005-12-14 Thread chandra simms
I have a few questions and hopefully some words of
hope and comfort about sharing your life with an FeLV
positive cat.  

My cat, Buddha, tested positive for FeLV 8 years ago. 
At the time I had him tested he was not sick or
showing any signs that he might be FeLV positive.  He
had been vaccinated regularly, however one of my
mothers cats had recently been diagnosed with FeLV and
was quickly deteriorating.  Although Buddha and I had
been away at college for 2 years, he had spent time
with the infected cat when we still lived at home so I
went ahead and had him tested just to be on the safe
side.  
When he tested positive it was like someone had
reached in and ripped out my heart.  At the time he
was already 7 years old and I had hoped that he would
live to a ripe old age.  Our family vet suggested that
I have him tested again in 60-90 days to rule out a
false positive, but he said that he probably wouldn't
live that long.  
Since Buddha had never been sick a day in his life,
Buddha and I decided then and there that he was going
to be one of the rare and lucky few that don't succumb
to the disease.  Over the next 8 years he lived a very
happy, healthy and stress free life.  
He celebrated his 14th birthday on October 13, 2005
and it seemed as if he would sail through another year
without any problems.  
However, on November 7th he began sneezing, which then
turned to a runny nose and an irritated, watery left
eye.  My husband and I decided he needed to see the
vet, but couldn't get an appointment until the 11th. 
On the morning of November 9th, I woke up to the sound
of Buddha having a sneezing and coughing fit.  I
quickly noticed that he also had a bloody nose.  I had
never even heard of cats getting bloody noses, so I
called my vet and told them that it was an emergency. 
I rushed him to the vet, where after $300 worth of
tests, I was given frustrating news.  Although all of
Buddha's blood work came back perfect and his organ
function was normal, his red and white blood count was
normal, and even his cholesterol was good, I was given
a bottle of Clavimox for his upper respiratory
infection and was told to take him home and wait for
him to die.  Probably within a week.  

This was exactly the reason I had avoided taking him
to the vet for the past 8 years, which some people
might see as irresponsible, however he was never sick,
never went outdoors, was never exposed to other
animals and I was concerned about injection site
sarcoma.  Also, I had never found a vet who had a
positive outlook on FeLV infected cats.  
For a month he seemed as if he was going to yet again
prove the vet of doom wrong, however a little over a
week ago I once again awoke to the sound of Buddha
coughing and sneezing, this time much worse.  He was
very lethargic and could barely open his left eye.  He
was so limp and listless, I was worried we wouldn't be
able to get him to the vet in time.  

This time my husband and I took him to an vet that
practices alternative medicine, in addition to
conventional veterinary medicine and also specializes
in FeLV positive cats.  

It was as if an angel had come into our lives.  (If
anyone reading this has a cat and lives in the North
Texas/DFW region, I HIGHLY recommend Dr. Ballard at
the Alternative Veterinary Hospital)

She immediately diagnosed him with Lymphatic Cancer
and started him on steroid therapy supplemented with
homeopathic Immune System boosters, stress relieving
drops, Nutri-Cal vitamin gel, and more Clavimox. 
However, she did say that this was only going to be a
short-term solution and that IF he responded to the
steroid treatment and his tumors began to shrink, it
would only buy us a few weeks to months, a year at the
most, which we were more than willing to take.
By the time we got into the car to come home he was
almost back to his old self.  He was moving around,
vocal and purring.
I took Buddha back for his follow-up exam last Friday.
 His tumors had been responding very well to the
steroids and he seemed to be getting over his upper
respiratory infection.  

Which brings us to this week.  At about 3am Monday
morning I woke to the sound of him wheezing and
snorting.  Like a person with a really stopped-up
nose, who still tries to breath through their nose but
can't.  I called the vet and she had me come in and
pick up some nasal spray and drops for his water.  
We noticed Tuesday afternoon that he hadn't eaten all
day.  By Tuesday night he was breathing almost
exclusively through his mouth. I was able to force a
little water down with an eye dropper, but not enough
to be of much use to him.  We took him in to the vet
this afternoon and the vet gave him intravenous fluids
and a booster shot of antibiotics and vitamins.  She
also gave us a can of liquid cat food, which can be
fed with with a syringe if necessary.  We have been
home for several hours and he seems to be feeling
somewhat better.  He not only ate 1/4 of the can of
the liquid cat food, he also had a few bites