Re: [Fis] The State of the Art - Discussion of Information Science Education

2011-12-07 Thread Pedro C. Marijuan
Thanks a lot, Gordana. It is a very good idea. Unfortunately I could not 
participate in the opening of the session,  well, at least I can say now 
that I had the experience of teaching for Engineering graduate students 
two neatly informational (FIS) disciplines. One of them, 
_Bioinformation: informational analysis of living systems_; and the 
other _Science, Technology and Society: an introduction to the 
informational history of societies_.  Both of them in Spanish. They were 
very successful, particularly the latter. The FIS perspective is ideal 
not only for breaking down on impossible topics (our familiar demons) 
but also for promoting a new, highly original way of analysis --of 
knolweldge recombination processes-- on topics of our time and of the 
most contentious past.


missing a lot the direct involvement in the discussions!

yours,

---Pedro

Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic escribió:


Hi All,

 

One way of looking at the question of curriculum would be from the 
point of view of what already exists


of education in the Foundations of Information.

 


Are there any courses which might be a part of such a curriculum?

 

To start with I can tell about the course I have, which does not cover 
much of Science of information, but there are several connections.


As I work at the computer science department, my perspective is 
computational.


For me computing is information processing and information is that 
which is processed, and that which is a result of processing.


Processing may be done by a machine or by an organism or anything else 
-- the whole of nature computes (processes information) in different ways.


As info-computationalist, I believe that information is unthinkable 
without computation.


So the course is on Computing and Philosophy but addresses Philosophy 
of Information and Science of Information as well and topics on 
evolution of life, intelligence (natural and artificial), 
consciousness, etc.  http://www.idt.mdh.se/kurser/comphil


 

I believe it would be good to have a course on the foundations of 
information science for people in the computing.


Information and computation are completely entangled! And this gives 
also an opportunity to introduce other fields into computing, to 
contribute to building bridges and
facilitating inter-disciplinary/ cross-disciplinary/ 
trans-disciplinary  learning.


 

This is not as ambitious as the original question, but can help 
understanding where we are now and where we want to be.


 


Best wishes,

Gordana

 



http://www.mrtc.mdh.se/~gdc/ http://www.mrtc.mdh.se/%7Egdc/

 

 

*From:* fis-boun...@listas.unizar.es 
[mailto:fis-boun...@listas.unizar.es] *On Behalf Of *Stanley N Salthe

*Sent:* den 5 december 2011 20:53
*To:* fis
*Subject:* Re: [Fis] Discussion of Information Science Education

 


And it could feature in 'Science for Non-Majors' courses as well.

 


STAN

On Mon, Dec 5, 2011 at 12:44 PM, Guy A Hoelzer hoel...@unr.edu 
mailto:hoel...@unr.edu wrote:


Hi All,

I agree with those who are suggesting that Information Science makes sense
as a widely useful way to think about different scientific disciplines
even if we don't have a strong consensus on how to define 'information'.
I think there is enough coherence among views of 'information' to underpin
the unity and universality of the approach.  Perhaps Information Science
is less a discipline of its own and more of a common approach to
understanding that can be applied across disciplines.  While I can imagine
good courses focusing on Information Science, it might be most productive
to include a common framework for information-based models/viewpoints
across the curriculum.

Guy Hoelzer


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--
-
Pedro C. Marijuán
Grupo de Bioinformación / Bioinformation Group
Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud
Avda. Gómez Laguna, 25, Pl. 11ª
50009 Zaragoza, Spain
Telf: 34 976 71 3526 ( 6818) Fax: 34 976 71 5554
pcmarijuan.i...@aragon.es
http://sites.google.com/site/pedrocmarijuan/
-

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Re: [Fis] The State of the Art - Discussion of Information Science Education

2011-12-07 Thread Wolfgang Hofkirchner
dear gordana,

maybe the following is of interest to the topic. first, the description of the 
module i am responsible of in the curriculum of master students of technical 
informatics and media informatics from this year on (see below). and second, a 
link to download a background information from my website referring the field 
i'm teaching in (and taught in salzburg) including a description of my courses 
that i had called years ago foundations of information science 
(http://www.hofkirchner.uti.at/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/forIASCYSchengdu2010.pdf).

Designing Technosocial Systems
Regelarbeitsaufwand: 6Ects
Bildungsziele:
Fachliche und methodische Kenntnisse: Students acquire, for tayloring their 
methodolo- gies of designing socially embedded systems, theoretical knowledge 
in the fields of
• Information Ethics • Information concepts • Philosophy of Science • 
Science–Technology–Society with special focus on ICTs
Kognitive und praktische Fertigkeiten: Students develop skills • to reflect 
different perspectives of computer science • to get aware of impacts of 
technology design on society • to understand multi-, inter- and 
transdisciplinary needs • to discriminate between mathematical, empirical and 
engineering approaches • to choose and tailor the appropriate methodology
• to better master complexity
Soziale Kompetenzen, Innovationskompetenz und Kreativität: Students are 
capacitated • to feel comfortable with teams going beyond disciplines • to 
respond to the requirement to take social responsibility • to balance formal 
and informal requirements
Inhalt: Theoretical foundations: Philosophy of Information (Computing and 
Philosophy) and Science-Technology–Society with special focus on ICTs 
(Information and Society):
Computing and Philosophy issues: Location of informatics in the classification 
of disci- plines; ways of thinking (reduction, projection, dichotomisation, 
integration); transdisci- plinarity in science and engineering; information 
processing and information generation; system theoretical concepts; computers 
and information ethics. Information and Society issues: Information society 
theory and empirical studies; global challenges; technological systems as 
social systems; the quest for automation and impacts on society (desaster 
analysis); design requirements for socially embedded systems; law aspects: 
liabilities, certification.
20Erwartete Vorkenntisse:
Fachliche und methodische Kenntnisse: Bachelor-level knowledge of computer 
systems and information processing in cyber-physical systems.
Kognitive und praktische Fertigkeiten: Bachelor-level Reading and writing 
skills.
Soziale Kompetenzen, Innovationskompetenz und Kreativität: Interest in inter- 
and transdisciplinary issues in information sciences and technology.
Diese Voraussetzungen werden in folgenden Modulen vermittelt:
Verpflichtende Voraussetzungen: Keine.
Angewandte Lehr- und Lernformen und geeignete Leistungsbeurteilung: Lectures 
with accompanying practicals in which the students make use of the new 
knowledge when applying the different skills and capabilities they have been 
trained in on the Bachelor- level. Working in groups is permitted. The students 
give presentations of the results, author written reports and perform tests.
Lehrveranstaltungen des Moduls: The course on Computing and Philosophy is 
obligatory. Of the other two, one has to be selected.
3.0/2.5 VU Computing and Philosophy 3.0/2.5 VU Information and Society 3.0/2.0 
SE Neue Technologien und sozialer Wandel

cheers,

wolfgang

+43 1 58801 18730 (no box)

http://hofkirchner.uti.at/

Am 06.12.2011 um 16:01 schrieb Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic:

 Hi All,
  
 One way of looking at the question of curriculum would be from the point of 
 view of what already exists
 of education in the Foundations of Information.
  
 Are there any courses which might be a part of such a curriculum?
  
 To start with I can tell about the course I have, which does not cover much 
 of Science of information, but there are several connections.
 As I work at the computer science department, my perspective is computational.
 For me computing is information processing and information is that which is 
 processed, and that which is a result of processing.
 Processing may be done by a machine or by an organism or anything else – the 
 whole of nature computes (processes information) in different ways.
 As info-computationalist, I believe that information is unthinkable without 
 computation.
 So the course is on Computing and Philosophy but addresses Philosophy of 
 Information and Science of Information as well and topics on evolution of 
 life, intelligence (natural and artificial), consciousness, etc.  
 http://www.idt.mdh.se/kurser/comphil
  
 I believe it would be good to have a course on the foundations of information 
 science for people in the computing.
 Information and computation are completely entangled! And this gives also an 
 opportunity to introduce other fields 

Re: [Fis] The State of the Art - Discussion of Information Science Education

2011-12-07 Thread Karl Javorszky
Dear FIS,



Let me systematise the requirements and conditions raised so far and then
discuss a proposal:



Recapitulation:

(maybe there will be a possibility to attach attachments to the postings.
The following should be an attachment, where I recapitulate the points
previous speakers have raised):



Now, the question is whether we are ready to come out with a syllabus for
such a course acceptable for all of us, those who are involved in the
subject, and those who aren't, but participate in the development of
curricula. Can we overcome differences between our views on the definition
of information, on the relationship of information understood in a general
way to its particular manifestations in other disciplines? Since the course
(or courses) should present an identity of the discipline of Information
Science, it is very important that we are convinced about the authentic
existence of a large enough common ground. Can we develop a map of this
territory? Can we pool resources to establish foundations for a standard,
Information Science curriculum?

(Marcin and Gordana)



Many universities have special schools for library and information science
(LIS).This is different from our discussions at this list about
information theory. Nevertheless, there is a problem with reinventing a
wheel

(Loet)



Thus, the objective should not be a common, monolithic paradigm that
everyone will accept, but commitment to a reasoned, fallible process of
selection and commitment, with the goal of enabling something new to emerge.

(Joseph)



What needs to be applied across all disciplines is Applied Category theory.

(Gavin)



What we have to do is to agree that:

1. The variety is not bad but very stimulating for reasoning, and

2. Independence is absolutely needed for growing our knowledge and
developing the science.

(Krassimir)



If we (FIS = Foundations of Information Science) are something different
from what is called “Information Science” and funded, supported by
40journals etc. we must be able to show definitely the distinction and why
this is important.

(Gordana)

End recapitulation.



Proposal:

Build Information Science (as understood in FIS) from scratch.



Negative Arguments:

· Such has never been done before, we would be outsiders, aside the
mainstream;

· No one has allowed us to do so;

· We do not know how to think and act independently;

· Will it be worth the effort;

· The strict thinking behind accounting is not my taste;

· I do not look for work, I look for fame and importance and
influence.

Positive Arguments:

· I seem to be open-minded, seeing that I am a part of an
open-minded discussion forum;

· I am quite capable of understanding the discussion here, so the
stuff is communicable;

· The audacity of the very thought is somehow fascinating;

· There is a point behind saying that 2+4 is not quite exactly 1+5;

· This FIS goes all about breaking taboos;

· Here we have something easily communicable;

· I could try to say to a friend “We work on a new understanding of
additions and what that all implies. Did you know that additions were
invented very long ago and since then never ever changed?” and see what he
says;

· I could explain that it needs computers to figure out the
accounting behind what distinguishes 3+4 to 2+5, this is why it has not
been done yet by Gauss or Euler or Shannon;

· I could say that I was a part of the group that translated pure
and abstract logic (some deep voodoos of accounting and number theory
together with epistemology) into workday concepts of Physics and Chemistry,
and of course, Psychology.



Next Step

Let us do the test of checking the intended audience for this FIS
production. Whatever we call it, if we do generate (create, dream up,
catalogise, package, edit, etc.) something worth to be taught, then it
needs an audience. Towards whom do we want to direct our efforts of coming
up with something new?

Let us do a field test and see, what the intended (targeted) audience says.
We come up with a good idea and translate it into widgets for the applied
people. (Relative to a number theorist, everyone is an applied one, but
theologians maybe.)



We could call this e.g. Reorder Theory, Rend Theory, Disciplined Thinking
Course, Finding Names For Facts Course or anything glitzy and fizzy.



Looking forward:

Karl
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