Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-12 Thread Rafael Capurro
Bob maybe you would like to analyze this (metonymical) use of information in Shakespeare's Coriolanus (...) But reason with the fellow, Before you punish him, where he heard this, Lest you shall chance to whip your information, And beat the messenger who bids beware Of what is to be

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-12 Thread Stanley Salthe
John --- you said: 'Data', incidentally, is often treated as a mass term, but it has a singular, 'datum'. So the rules are not hard and fast. Information and data are obviously closely linked, so one could have a grammatical nightmare if one wasn't careful, but idiomatic English speakers have no

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-09 Thread John Collier
At 04:35 PM 12/6/2008, Michel PETITJEAN wrote: Hello FISers. Recently, one of my colleagues attract my attention on the following point. In French, we often use information as a countable quantity, so that we can write informations. In English, it seems that it is unusual, if not incorrect, to do

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-09 Thread Loet Leydesdorff
- From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of John Collier Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2008 10:12 AM To: Michel PETITJEAN; fis@listas.unizar.es Subject: Re: [Fis] information(s) At 04:35 PM 12/6/2008, Michel PETITJEAN wrote: Hello FISers. Recently, one of my colleagues

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-09 Thread Rafael Capurro
John, If I understood you correctly, then information (singular) does not refer (in English) to things but (as in Latin informatio) to the (!) process going on when people get acquainted with something they want/need to know such as in the utterance for your information. In Spanish, however,

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-09 Thread mjs
. But, in this case I don't get it. How can it be useful? Regards, Marcin Original message Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2008 11:11:37 +0200 From: John Collier [EMAIL PROTECTED] Subject: Re: [Fis] information(s) To: Michel PETITJEAN [EMAIL PROTECTED], fis@listas.unizar.es At 04:35 PM 12/6/2008, Michel

[Fis] information(s)

2008-12-06 Thread Michel PETITJEAN
Hello FISers. Recently, one of my colleagues attract my attention on the following point. In French, we often use information as a countable quantity, so that we can write informations. In English, it seems that it is unusual, if not incorrect, to do that. (1) Please can some English native

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-06 Thread Stanley Salthe
Michel -- Of course, a countable quantity certainly inheres in one aspect of information -- the Shannon version. But in English we would not say 'many informations'. Rather 'much information' could be used. 'Many' does have a countable sense of individual pieces, while 'much' is a holistic

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-06 Thread Guy A Hoelzer
Hi Michel, You are correct about the use and concept of information in English. General use of the term information refers to a fuzzy concept that is continuously distributed from none to much, so the plural form informations feels incorrect. Of course, in scientific discourses the term has been

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-06 Thread Joseph Brenner
:35 PM Subject: [Fis] information(s) Hello FISers. Recently, one of my colleagues attract my attention on the following point. In French, we often use information as a countable quantity, so that we can write informations. In English, it seems that it is unusual, if not incorrect, to do that. (1

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-06 Thread Walter Riofrio
Hello Michel, It seems to me the situation with the use of information (in colloquial terms) in Spanish is similar than that in French. Of course, Spanish has many intrinsic details in its uses of words, verbs, expressions, etc; depending of the country we are talking about. In Peru, for

Re: [Fis] information(s)

2008-12-06 Thread Rafael Capurro
Michel this is an interesting question and you can find a plausible answer for if you take a look at the etymology of this word. http://www.capurro.de/infoconcept.html Latin informatio as a noun is used, as far as I know, only in the singular and means giving form to something in a 'material'