SV: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-11 Thread Jacob Schäffer
. september 2008 21:19 Til: Art Campbell; Inbar, Paul Cc: framers@lists.frameusers.com Emne: RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc. The original problem reported by Paul stems from the Windows phantom phont phenomena! Windows font enumeration, used

Re: SV: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-11 Thread Jim Owens
The Times font also came with Xerox Ventura Publisher. Jacob Schäffer wrote: Dov said: Per Art's response, no, moving to the Adobe Acrobat (Adobe PDF) printer default won't solve the problem since Times is not a native font of the Distiller. I believe that anyone old enough (like me)

RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-11 Thread Dov Isaacs
2008 21:19 Til: Art Campbell; Inbar, Paul Cc: framers@lists.frameusers.com Emne: RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc. The original problem reported by Paul stems from the Windows phantom phont phenomena! Windows font enumeration, used by standard

SV: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-11 Thread Jacob Schäffer
ers.com > Emne: RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing > printers, etc. > > > The original problem reported by Paul stems from the Windows > "phantom phont phenomena!" Windows font enumeration, used by > standard Windows applications (such as Fram

SV: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-11 Thread Jim Owens
The Times font also came with Xerox Ventura Publisher. Jacob Sch?ffer wrote: > Dov said: > > default won't solve the problem since Times is not a native font of the > Distiller.> > > I believe that anyone old enough (like me) to own a license to Distiller 3 > actually have the Base 13 font

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-11 Thread Dov Isaacs
unces at lists.frameusers.com > > [mailto:framers-bounces at lists.frameusers.com] P? vegne af Dov Isaacs > > Sendt: 10. september 2008 21:19 > > Til: Art Campbell; Inbar, Paul > > Cc: framers at lists.frameusers.com > > Emne: RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Inbar, Paul
Hi all, Let me apologize for asking another font question. I have been looking at previous posts and articles on the web, but am still not sure I understand the issues and consequences. Basically, our frame templates use a font called Times for our regular Body paragraph tag. On our Xerox

Re: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Jim Owens
My Windows system has Times (Type 1), Times New Roman (Type 1), and Times New Roman (TrueType). The Times font is listed in the Fonts window under the name Times Roman, but when I view it, it is entitled Times (Type 1). When you view a font selected from the Fonts window, you see the upper

Re: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Art Campbell
The Xerox drive is probably PostScript compliant, the H-P, from your description, is probably not. So far as I know. PS is still and extra item on most H-P systems, which means that they use HPGL as the default page description language. Depending on your final output, many shops and users find

RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Dov Isaacs
The original problem reported by Paul stems from the Windows phantom phont phenomena! Windows font enumeration, used by standard Windows applications (such as FrameMaker), allows printer drivers to insert font information to be passed back to the application even if such fonts are not actually

RE: Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Combs, Richard
Art Campbell wrote: The Xerox drive is probably PostScript compliant, the H-P, from your description, is probably not. So far as I know. PS is still and extra item on most H-P systems, which means that they use HPGL as the default page description language. Actually, HP printers use PCL

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Inbar, Paul
Hi all, Let me apologize for asking another font question. I have been looking at previous posts and articles on the web, but am still not sure I understand the issues and consequences. Basically, our frame templates use a font called Times for our regular Body paragraph tag. On our Xerox

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Jim Owens
My Windows system has Times (Type 1), Times New Roman (Type 1), and Times New Roman (TrueType). The Times font is listed in the Fonts window under the name "Times Roman", but when I view it, it is entitled "Times (Type 1)". When you view a font selected from the Fonts window, you see the

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Art Campbell
The Xerox drive is probably PostScript compliant, the H-P, from your description, is probably not. So far as I know. PS is still and extra item on most H-P systems, which means that they use HPGL as the default page description language. Depending on your final output, many shops and users find

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Dov Isaacs
The original problem reported by Paul stems from the Windows "phantom phont phenomena!" Windows font enumeration, used by standard Windows applications (such as FrameMaker), allows printer drivers to insert font information to be passed back to the application even if such fonts are not actually

Times, Times Roman, Times New Roman, and changing printers, etc.

2008-09-10 Thread Combs, Richard
Art Campbell wrote: > The Xerox drive is probably PostScript compliant, the H-P, from your > description, is probably not. So far as I know. PS is still and extra > item on most H-P systems, which means that they use HPGL as the > default page description language. Actually, HP printers use PCL