Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread Donn Miller

So, would having a kernel config utility help us get better
reviews?  I was thinking about something like an explorer-type
thing that was divided into two panes.  On the left would be
LINT.  Here, we would have icons representing the various
devices.  For example, we could ahve an icon representing an
ethernet card, another icon representing a serial port, etc.  On
the right hand side we would have the custom kernel config file. 
You could just drag the icons over to the right hand side to add
devices to your kernel config.  And, of course, you could always
just delete the icons you don't need.

By clicking on the icons, a properties pane would show the
properties for this device.  Of course, there should be some way
to represent options, such as DEVFS or SOFTUPDATES.

Of course, I like using vi better, but I've heard some people
complaining about "how hard it is to configure a FreeBSD
kernel."  I know I didn't fully convey the principles, but you
probably get the general idea.  Of course, when you're down to
using teddy bears and talking parrots, then you know you've made
it too simple. :-]

- Donn


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Re: Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread Bakul Shah

 So, would having a kernel config utility help us get better
 reviews?  I was thinking about something like an explorer-type
 thing that was divided into two panes.  On the left would be
 LINT.  Here, we would have icons representing the various
 devices.  For example, we could ahve an icon representing an
 ethernet card, another icon representing a serial port, etc.  On
 the right hand side we would have the custom kernel config file. 
 You could just drag the icons over to the right hand side to add
 devices to your kernel config.  And, of course, you could always
 just delete the icons you don't need.

You have just described some file system operations!

left pane:  ls LINT
right pane: ls KERNEL
drag an icon:   cp LINT/device/ethernet KERNEL/device

 By clicking on the icons, a properties pane would show the
 properties for this device.  Of course, there should be some way
 to represent options, such as DEVFS or SOFTUPDATES.

property pane:  vi KERNEL/ethernet
options:touch KERNEL/options/DEVFS
echo 2048  KERNEL/options/NMBCLUSTERS

 Of course, I like using vi better, but I've heard some people
 complaining about "how hard it is to configure a FreeBSD
 kernel."

Most of us like the convenience of editing one file but I
think what these `some people' are asking for is explicit
structure.  In a config represented by a plain file the
structure is implicit and the flat structure makes it hard to
group related things so you have to read comments (if any and
hopefully uptodate) to understand what option applies to what
object.  A directory would provide that structure (and allow
for extensions that you wouldn't even try with a flat file).


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Re: Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread Darren Wiebe

Donn Miller wrote:
 
 So, would having a kernel config utility help us get better
 reviews?  I was thinking about something like an explorer-type
 thing that was divided into two panes.  On the left would be
 LINT.  Here, we would have icons representing the various
 devices.  For example, we could ahve an icon representing an
 ethernet card, another icon representing a serial port, etc.  On
 the right hand side we would have the custom kernel config file.
 You could just drag the icons over to the right hand side to add
 devices to your kernel config.  And, of course, you could always
 just delete the icons you don't need.
 

I can definitely see advanatages, not that I would use it myself. :-)  I
also think that if it was written properly, which I'm sure that it would
be, it could also be used to setup ppp etc..

 By clicking on the icons, a properties pane would show the
 properties for this device.  Of course, there should be some way
 to represent options, such as DEVFS or SOFTUPDATES.

Rather like MS registry editor. :-)

 
 Of course, I like using vi better, but I've heard some people
 complaining about "how hard it is to configure a FreeBSD
 kernel."  I know I didn't fully convey the principles, but you
 probably get the general idea.  Of course, when you're down to
 using teddy bears and talking parrots, then you know you've made
 it too simple. :-]
 
 - Donn
 
Darren Wiebe
[EMAIL PROTECTED]


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Re: Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread Jonathan M. Bresler

  
 
 I can definitely see advanatages, not that I would use it myself. :-)  I
 also think that if it was written properly, which I'm sure that it would
 be, it could also be used to setup ppp etc..
 
  By clicking on the icons, a properties pane would show the
  properties for this device.  Of course, there should be some way
  to represent options, such as DEVFS or SOFTUPDATES.
 
 Rather like MS registry editor. :-)

uh...NO! 

must be an ascii file that may be processed into a database
format for use.  we need something that cal be read, diff'ed,
grep'ped, comm'ed, that can be backed up without problmes, that can be
moved from host to host, 

jmb


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Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread Garrett Wollman

On Wed, 15 Dec 1999 07:49:27 -0500, Donn Miller [EMAIL PROTECTED] said:

 thing that was divided into two panes.  On the left would be
 LINT.  Here, we would have icons representing the various
 devices.

This is actually a really cool idea, although it needs a bit of
refinement, and we would need to start providing and maintaining a
database which describes the drivers in more detail.  You don't want
to start with LINT, though; you want to start with GENERIC plus a few
of the more common options.  (Then provide a menu selection of the
form ``Show all available devices and options''.)

Icons are probably not the right user interface.  I'd suggest
something like Windows's ``hardware manager'' (in the System control
panel).

-GAWollman

--
Garrett A. Wollman   | O Siem / We are all family / O Siem / We're all the same
[EMAIL PROTECTED]  | O Siem / The fires of freedom 
Opinions not those of| Dance in the burning flame
MIT, LCS, CRS, or NSA| - Susan Aglukark and Chad Irschick


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Re: Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread Donn Miller

On Wed, 15 Dec 1999, Garrett Wollman wrote:

 Icons are probably not the right user interface.  I'd suggest
 something like Windows's ``hardware manager'' (in the System control
 panel).

Some people were afraid that it would end up like the Windows
registry.  Well, even if it did, I'd argue that it still wouldn't be too
bad.  The Windows registry has so many classes and entries, and I think
the kernel config would be smaller with not as many classes.  You'd have
the device class, and options class.  Then, you'd break devices down into
scsi, ide, etc.  Or, we could break them down into network, disk
controllers, sound, that way.

- Donn



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Re: Kernel config utility

1999-12-15 Thread John LoVerso

 Some people were afraid that it would end up like the Windows registry.

But it wouldn't, because that isn't the right thing.


A kernel config utility should end up functioning like XF86Setup.  When was the
last time most people made an XF86Config file since that program came around?

 and we would need to start providing and maintaining a
 database which describes the drivers in more detail.

Exactly!

John


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